Un’intervista a Bizzarro Bazar

sdangher

Se c’è qualcosa di folle, assurdo o malato noi ne parliamo o ne abbiamo già parlato o di sicuro ne parleremo.

Così si presenta il sito Sdangher (pron.: Sdengher), fanzine online senza peli sulla lingua, dedicata alla weird music e all’heavy metal, con frequenti digressioni nei territori della cronaca nera, dei film porno, dei clisteri (!), dei b-movies e in generale da ogni tipo di notizia bizzarra dal mondo. Il tutto con tono scanzonato, divertito e divertente, che nasconde però una seria preparazione culturale.

Francesco Ceccamea, uno dei curatori di Sdangher, mi ha rivolto una lunga serie di domande particolarmente gustose, e l’intervista è stata pubblicata oggi. Abbiamo chiacchierato soprattutto di cosa significhi gestire un blog, ma anche di libri, arte, cinema, musica… e ovviamente del gusto del macabro e del meraviglioso. Ecco un estratto:

La tua passione per il bizzarro ti ha condotto materialmente in posti insoliti, quali ti hanno lasciato un’impressione maggiore?

L’Italia, quanto a luoghi insoliti, non si batte. La nostra penisola è una vera e propria wunderkammer traboccante di meraviglie poco conosciute. È ciò che mi propongo di documentare con la collana di libri. Prendi ad esempio Roma: ad ogni angolo c’è una chiesa, e basta infilarsi in una a caso per scoprire capolavori spesso macabri. Scene di martirio, reliquie, cadaveri di santi esposti nelle teche, cripte decorate con autentici teschi… questi tesori nascosti mi danno un senso di continuità […].

Più che i posti in sé, però, sono le esperienze che contano, e la mia passione mi ha portato a viverne di indimenticabili. Ho passato giorni e notti fra centinaia di mummie a Palermo. In un Museo di Anatomia Patologica, ho tenuto in mano la testa disseccata di un bambino, e imparato come far cambiare posizione a un feto deforme dentro un barattolo di formalina senza aprirlo. Sono salito in treno con una placenta nella borsa termica, dono di una cara amica che aveva appena partorito… Anche se forse l’esperienza più vera, essenziale e a suo modo sacra è stata assistere a un’autopsia.

Qui trovate l’intervista integrale.

Death 2.0

Considerations about death in the age of social media

Chart

Take a look at the above Top Chart.
Blackbird is a Beatles song originally published in the 1968 White Album.
Although Paul McCartney wrote it 46 years ago, last week the song topped the iTunes charts in the Rock genre. Why?
The answer is below:

Italian articles about “daddy Blackbird”.

Chris Picco lives in California: he lost his wife Ashley, who died prematurely giving birth to litle Lennon. On November 12 a video appeared on YouTube showing Chris singing Blackbird before the incubator where his son was struggling for life; the child died just four days after birth.
The video went immediately viral, soon reaching 15 million views, bouncing from social neworks to newspapers and viceversa, with great pariticipation and a flood of sad emoticons and moving comments. This is just the last episode in a new, yet already well-established tendency of public exhibitions of suffering and mourning.

Brittany Maynard (1984-2014), terminally ill, activist for assisted suicide rights.

A recent article by Kelly Conaboy, adressing the phenomenon of tragic videos and stories going viral, uses the expression grief porn: these videos may well be a heart-felt, sincere display to begin with, but they soon become pure entertainment, giving the spectator an immediate and quick adrenaline rush; once the “emotional masturbation” is over, once our little tear has been shed, once we’ve commented and shared, we feel better. We close the browser, and go on with our lives.
If the tabloid genre of grief porn, Conaboy stresses out, is as old as sexual scandals, until now it was only limited to particularly tragic, violent, extraordinary death accounts; the internet, on the other hand, makes it possible to expose common people’s private lives. These videos could be part of a widespread exhibitionism/vouyeurism dynamics, in which the will to show off one’s pain is matched by the users’ desire to watch it — and to press the “Like” button in order to prove their sensitivity.

During the Twentieth Century we witnessed a collective removal of death. So much has been written about this removal process, there is no need to dwell on it. The real question is: is something changing? What do these new phenomenons tell us about our own relationship with death? How is it evolving?

Skull-in-Fashion1

If death as a real, first-hand experience still remains a sorrowful mystery, a forbidden territory encompassing both the reality of the dead body (the true “scandal”) and the elaboration of grief (not so strictly coded as it once was), on the other hand we are witnessing an unprecedented pervasiveness of the representation of death.
Beyond the issues of commercialization and banalization, we have to face an ever more unhibited presence of death images in today’s society: from skulls decorating bags, pins, Tshirts as well as showing up in modern art Museums, to death becoming a communication/marketing/propaganda tool (terrorist beheadings, drug cartels execution videos, immense websites archiving raw footage of accidents, homicides and suicides). All of this is not death, it must be stressed, it’s just its image, its simulacrum — which doesn’t even require a narrative.
Referring to it as “death pornography” does make sense, given that these representations rely on what is in fact the most exciting element of classic pornography: it is what Baudrillard called hyper-reality, an image so realistic that it surpasses, or takes over, reality. (In porn videos, think of viewpoints which would be “impossibile” during the actual intercourse, think of HD resolution bringing out every detail of the actors’ skin, of 3D porn, etc. — this is also what happens with death in simulacrum.)

Damien Hirst poses with his famous For the love of God.

We can now die a million times, on the tip of a cursor, with every click starting a video or loading a picture. This omnipresence of representations of death, on the other hand, might not be a sign of an obscenity-bound, degenerated society, but rather a natural reaction and metabolization of last century’s removal. The mystery of death still untouched, its obscenity is coming apart (the obscene being brought back “on scene”) until it becomes an everyday image. To continue the parallelism with pornography, director Davide Ferrario (in his investigative book Guardami. Storie dal porno) wrote that witnessing a sexual intercourse, as a guest on an adult movie set, was not in the least exciting for him; but as soon as he looked into the camera viewfinder, everything changed and the scene became more real. Even some war photographers report that explosions do not seem real until they observe them through the camera lens. It is the dominion of the image taking over concrete objects, and if in Baudrillard’s writings this historic shift was described in somewhat apocalyptic colors, today we understand that this state of things — the imaginary overcoming reality — might not be the end of our society, but rather a new beginning.

Little by little our society is heading towards a global and globalized mythology. Intelligence — at least the classic idea of a “genius”, an individual achieving extraordinary deeds on his own — is becoming an outdated myth, giving way to the super-conscience of the web-organism, able to work more and more effectively than the single individual. There will be less and less monuments to epic characters, if this tendency proves durable, less and less heroes. More and more innovations and discoveries will be ascribable to virtual communities (but is there a virtuality opposing reality any more?), and the merit of great achievements will be distributed among a net of individuals.

In much the same way, death is changing in weight and significance.
Preservation and devotion to human remains, although both well-established traditions, are already being challenged by a new and widespread recycling sensitivity, and the idea of ecological reuse basically means taking back decomposition — abhorred for centuries by Western societies, and denied through the use of caskets preventing the body from touching the dirt. The Resurrection of the flesh, the main theological motivation behind an “intact” burial, is giving way to the idea of composting, which is a noble concept in its own right. Within this new perspective, respect for the bodies is not exclusively expressed through devotion, fear towards the bones or the inviolability of the corpse; it gives importance to the body’s usefulness, whether through organ transplant, donation to science, or reduction of its pollution impact. Destroying the body is no longer considered a taboo, but rather an act of generosity towards the environment.

At the same time, this new approach to death is slowly getting rid of the old mysterious, serious and dark overtones. Macabre fashion, black tourism or the many death-related entertainment and cultural events, trying to raise awareness about these topics (for example the London Month of the Dead, or the seminal Death Salon), are ways of dealing once and for all with the removal. Even humor and kitsch, as offensive as they might seem, are necessary steps in this transformation.

Human ashes pressed into a vinyl.

Human ashes turned into a diamond.

And so the internet is daily suggesting a kind of death which is no longer censored or denied, but openly faced, up to the point of turning it into a show.
In respect to the dizzying success of images of suffering and death, the word voyeurism is often used. But can we call it voyeurism when the stranger’s gaze is desired and requested by the “victims” themselves, for instance by terminally ill people trying to raise awareness about their condition, to leave a testimony or simply to give a voice to their pain?

Jennifer Johnson, madre di due bambini e malata terminale, nell'ultimo video prima della morte.

Jennifer Johnson, mother of two children, in her last video before she died (2012).

The exhibition of difficult personal experiences is a part of our society’s new expedient to deal with death and suffering: these are no longer taboos to be hidden and elaborated in the private sphere, but feelings worth sharing with the entire world. If at the time of big extended families, in the first decades of ‘900, grief was “spread” over the whole community, and in the second half of the century it fell back on the individual, who was lacking the instruments to elaborate it, now online community is offering a new way of allocation of suffering. Condoleances and affectionate messages can be received by perfect strangers, in a new paradigm of “superficial” but industrious solidarity.
Chris Picco, “daddy Blackbird”, certainly does not complain about the attention the video brought to him, because the users generosity made it possible for him to raise the $ 200.000 needed to cover medical expenses.

I could never articulate how much your support and your strength and your prayers and your emails and your Facebook messages and your text messages—I don’t know how any of you got my number, but there’s been a lot of me just, ‘Uh, okay, thank you, um.’ I didn’t bother going into the whole, ‘I don’t know who you are, but thank you.’ I just—it has meant so much to me, and so when I say ‘thank you’ I know exactly what you mean.

On the other end of the PC screen is the secret curiosity of those who watch images of death. Those who share these videos, more or less openly enjoying them. Is it really just “emotional masturbation”? Is this some obscene and morbid curiosity?
I personally don’t think there is such a thing as a morbid — that is, pathological — curiosity. Curiosity is an evolutionary tool which enables us to elaborate strategies for the future, and therefore it is always sane and healthy. If we examine voyeurism under this light, it turns out to be a real resource. When cars slow down at the sight of an accident, it’s not always in hope of seeing blood and guts: our brain is urging us to slow down because it needs time to investigate the situation, to elaborate what has happened, to understand what went on there. That’s exactly what the brain is wired to do — inferring data which might prove useful in the future, should we find ourselves in a similar situation.road-accidents

Accordingly, the history of theater, literature and cinema is full to the brim with tragedy, violence, disasters: the interest lies in finding out how the characters will react to the difficulties they come about. We still need the Hero’s Journey, we still need to discover how he’s going to overcome the tests he finds along the way, and to see how he will solve his problems. As kids, we carefully studied our parents to learn the appropriate response to every situation, and as adults our mind keeps amassing as much detail as possible, to try and control future obstacles.

By identifying with the father playing a sweet song to his dying son, we are confronting ourselves. “What is this man feeling? What would I do in such a predicament? Would I be able to overcome terror in this same way? Would this strategy work for me?”
The construction of our online persona comes only at a later time, when the video is over. Then it becomes important to prove to our contacts and followers that we are humane and sympathetic, that we were deeply moved, and so begins the second phase, with all the expressions of grief, the (real or fake) tears, the participation. This new paradigma, this modern kind of mourning, requires little time and resources, but it could work better than we think (again, see the success of Mr. Picco’s fund-raising campaing). And this sharing of grief is only possible on the account of the initial curiosity that made us click on that video.

And what about those people who dig even deeper into the dark side of the web, with its endless supply of images of death, and watch extremly gruesome videos?
The fundamental stimulus behind watching a video of a man who gets, let’s say, eaten alive by a crocodile, is probably the very same. At a basic lavel, we are always trying to acquire useful data to respond to the unknown, and curiosity is our weapon of defense and adaptation against an uncertain future; a future in which, almost certainly, we won’t have to fight off an alligator, but we’ll certainly need to face suffering, death and the unexpected.
The most shocking videos sometimes lure us with the promise of showing what is normally forbidden or censored: how does the human body react to a fall from a ten story building? Watching the video, it’s as if we too are falling by proxy; just like, by proxy but in a more acceptable context, we can indentify with the tragic reaction of a father watching his child die.

A weightlifter is lifting a barbell. Suddenly his knee snaps and collapses. We scream, jump off the seat, feel a stab of pain. We divert our eyes, then look again, and each time we go over the scene in our mind it’s like we are feeling a little bit of the athlete’s pain (a famous neurologic study on empathy proved that, in part, this is exactly what is going on). This is not masochism, nor a strange need to be upset: anticipation of pain is considered one of the common psychological strategies to prepare for it, and watching a video is a cheap and harmless solution.

In my opinion, the curiosity of those who watch images of suffering and death should not be stigmatized as “sick”, as it is a completely natural instinct. And this very curiosity is behind the ever growing offer of such images, as it is also what allows suffering people to stage their own condition.

The real innovations of these last few years have been the legitimization of death as a public representation, and the collectivization of the experience of grief and mourning — according to the spirit of open confrontation and sharing, typical of social media. These features will probably get more and more evident on Facebook, Twitter and similar platforms: even today, many people suffering from an illness are choosing to post real-time updates on their therapy, in fact opening the curtain over a reality (disease and hospital care) which has been concealed for a long time.

There’ll be the breaking of the ancient Western Code / Your private life will suddenly explode, sang Leonard Cohen in The Future. The great poet’s views expressed in the song are pessimistic, if not apocalyptc, as you would expect from a Twentieth century exponent. Yet it looks like this voluntary (and partial) sacrifice of the private sphere is proving to be an effective way to fix the general lack of grief elaboration codes. We talk ever more frequently about death and disease, and until now it seems that the benefits of this dialogue are exceeding the possible stress from over-exposure (see this article).

What prompted me to write this post is the feeling, albeit vague and uncertain, that a transition is taking place, before our eyes, even if it’s still all too cloudy to be clearly outlined; and of course, such a transformation cannot be immune to excesses, which inevitably affect any crisis. We shall see if these unprecedented, still partly unconscious strategies prove to be an adequate solution in dealing with our ultimate fate, or if they are bound to take other, different forms.
But something is definitely changing.

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – III

Eccoci al nostro terzo ed ultimo appuntamento con la Parigi più insolita e curiosa.

Quando ci troviamo nel cuore di una metropoli, tutto ci aspetteremmo tranne che poter osservare… gli animali selvaggi nel proprio habitat. Eppure, nel centralissimo quartiere di Les Halles a pochi passi del Centre Pompidou, esiste un luogo davvero unico: il Museo della Caccia e della Natura.

Prima di approfondire le implicazioni filosofiche ed artistiche di questa stupefacente istituzione, lasciatevi raccontare quello che attende il visitatore che decida di varcare la soglia del Museo.
Mentre ci si avventura nella luce soffusa della prima stanza, gli arazzi alle pareti, le ricercate poltrone antiche e i raffinati mobili d’ebano intarsiati di splendide fantasie in avorio danno l’impressione di essere appena entrati in un’abitazione privata di un ricco collezionista dell’800. Eppure, a sorpresa, ecco un cinghiale proprio nel bel mezzo di questo nobile salotto – l’animale ci fissa, la sua enorme massa scura è minacciosa ed imponente. Chiaramente si tratta di un esemplare tassidermico, ma il contrasto con l’ambiente circostante è spiazzante.
Lì vicino si può notare un armadio diverso dagli altri: è il pannello dedicato proprio al cinghiale. I cassetti e le ante di questo particolare mobiletto si possono aprire liberamente: facendo scivolare un largo e basso cassetto, ecco una ricostruzione del terreno del sottobosco – in cui all’inizio si stenta a scorgere alcunché se non del fango e delle foglie secche, ma ecco, guardando meglio si possono distinguere le impronte lasciate dal passaggio degli zoccoli del cinghiale. E’ la pista che dovremmo saper riconoscere e seguire se volessimo dare la caccia a questa difficile preda. In un altro cassettino, ecco una riproduzione degli escrementi della bestia.

chasse 8

chasse 5

chasse 4

chasse 3

chasse 2

chasse 1

Vi è anche una specie di binocolo integrato all’interno del legno dell’armadio. Accostando gli occhi, vediamo un paesaggio naturale in tre dimensioni. Sembra tutto piuttosto statico, i rami ondeggiano un poco e le acque di un lago si increspano, finché, con un po’ di pazienza, scorgiamo qualcosa che si muove in lontananza, fra le foglie… che sia proprio un cinghiale?

chasse 14

Lasciata la stanza del cinghiale, si entra in quella del cervo, e lo strano senso di spaesamento si rinnova.
A parte le due bellissime plancie esplicative ai lati del mobile, marchiate a fuoco nel legno, che raccontano le abitudini e le caratteristiche dell’animale, non vi è traccia delle classiche e pedisseque targhette da museo. Alcune sottili associazioni sono liberamente lasciate alla sensibilità del visitatore, come ad esempio quando a due passi dal teschio del cervo s’incontra una statua che rappresenta un satiro: molti passeranno oltre, senza accorgersi che le corna della statua antica sono perfettamente somiglianti a quelle del cervo… ma quando nella mente dell’osservatore prende forma questa analogia, ecco che senza bisogno di tante parole quella stanza svela l’importanza fondamentale dell’animale (il cervo, in questo caso) nell’immaginario umano. E mano a mano che ci si aggira per le sale, risulta sempre più evidente che, più che un Museo della Caccia, questo luogo è un tributo al complesso e stratificato rapporto fra esseri umani ed animali, e a come esso sia mutato nel corso dei millenni.

chasse 18

chasse 7

chasse 12

chasse 9

chasse 11

chasse 15

chasse 16

chasse 17

Nelle altre stanze si possono trovare opere d’arte e installazioni moderne proposte di fianco a carabine d’epoca, saloni che esplorano la tradizione venatoria del trofeo (rappresentazione ed esposizione della gloria del massacro, inquietante ed infantile al tempo stesso), teche piene di maschere di carnevale dalle fattezze animalesche che dimostrano come, a livello simbolico, la bestia sia radicata nel nostro inconscio – tanto da spingerci a dare vita anche ad animali e chimere di fantasia, di cui facciamo la conoscenza nello splendido gabinetto dell’unicorno.

chasse 38

chasse 37

chasse 40

chasse 34

chasse 35

chasse 45

chasse 46

chasse 50

chasse 49

chasse 47

chasse 25

chasse 19

chasse 20

chasse 21

chasse 23

Ma qual è la storia dietro a questo eccentrico museo? La fondazione si deve a François Sommer e a sua moglie Jacqueline: ricco collezionista e appassionato cacciatore, Sommer fu tra i primi a sostenere attivamente la necessità di una caccia etica, rispettosa dell’equilibrio naturale. Il cinghiale e il cervo, in via di estinzione, ritornarono a popolare le foreste francesi proprio grazie a Sommer e alle sue tenute, in cui voleva che gli animali selvaggi potessero moltiplicarsi al riparo dalla venagione indiscriminata.

chasse 32

chasse 33

chasse 56

chasse 53

chasse 57

chasse 58

chasse 59

chasse 60

Eppure, per quanto rispettoso e appassionato naturalista, egli era pur sempre un amante della caccia: da qui l’idea di un museo che mostrasse quanto questa attività avesse contribuito alla civilizzazione, e che allo stesso tempo esplorasse la nostra percezione degli animali e come si è radicalmente evoluta dalla preistoria ai giorni nostri.

chasse 61

chasse 62

chasse 67

chasse 68

chasse 69

chasse 70

Oggi che è venuto a mancare il suo fine sostentativo, rifiutiamo la caccia come superflua e crudele (affidandoci per l’approvvigionamento di carne ad altri metodi, bisogna vedere se meno crudeli), e consideriamo gli animali come vittime: ma un tempo il cinghiale, ad esempio, era un fiero e pericolosissimo avversario, capace di sbudellare il cacciatore con le sue zanne in pochi minuti. Esisteva dunque un naturale rispetto per l’animale che si è venuto a modificare.
Nel nostro Occidente ipertecnologico ed industrializzato, la caccia sta progressivamente perdendo ogni motivo di esistere; questo non cancella però il peso fondamentale che questa attività ha rivestito nei secoli. La storia della caccia, in fondo, è la storia del faticoso tentativo dell’uomo di prevalere nella gerarchia naturale, ma anche la storia delle nostre paure più ancestrali, dei nostri sogni, dei nostri miti.

chasse 72

chasse 73

Per approfondire e completare questa riflessione sui rapporti fra esseri umani e animali, ci rechiamo nuovamente nella banlieue, questa volta a nord-ovest di Parigi sulla rive gauche, ad Asnières-sur-Seine. Qui si trova il Cimitero dei Cani che, nonostante il nome, ospita anche molte altre specie di animali da compagnia.

chiens 1

Ufficialmente aperto alla fine dell’estate del 1899, il cimitero rispecchia il trasformarsi della funzione dell’animale (da utilitario ad animale di compagnia) avvenuta nel corso del XIX° Secolo. Se in quegli ultimi decenni le condizioni di vita degli “amici a quattro zampe” erano infatti migliorate, si avvertiva l’esigenza di una sistemazione più consona anche per le spoglie degli animali deceduti, e che fino a quel momento venivano squartati, o abbandonati nell’immondizia, o gettati nella Senna.

chiens 23

chiens 54

Nonostante alcune croniche difficoltà che continueranno, nel corso del secolo successivo, ad affliggerlo, il Cimitero dei Cani conoscerà un successo crescente, popolandosi di monumenti e sepolture sempre più prestigiose. Nel 1900 ad esempio viene eretto all’entrata del cimitero un monumento alla memoria di Barry, un San Bernardo che all’inizio del secolo precedente aveva “salvato la vita a 40 persone, restando ucciso dalla 41ma!”; a quanto pare, cioè, il coraggioso cane morì stremato da quest’ultimo sforzo. Alla sua morte, il suo corpo venne imbalsamato e conservato presso il Museo di storia naturale di Berna.
Un’altra tomba commemora un cane randagio che il 15 maggio del 1958 venne a morire proprio alle porte del cimitero: casualità straordinaria, si trattava del quarantamillesimo animale ad essere seppellito lì.

chiens 2

chiens 5

chiens 56

Ma qui, tutte le tombe raccontano delle storie di affetto e di amore fra persone ed animali, legami forti che apparentemente nulla hanno da invidiare a quelli fra esseri umani. Alcune iscrizioni sono davvero toccanti: “Figlia mia / Amore della mia vita / Ti amo / Tua mamma“, recita la tomba di Caramel. Sulla lapide della scimmietta Kiki è iscritto il verso “Dormi mia cara / fosti la gioia della mia vita“. Il proprietario del barboncino Youpi, morto nel 2001, scrive: “Il tuo immenso affetto ha illuminato la mia vita, sono talmente triste senza di te e il tuo meraviglioso sguardo“. E ancora: “In memoria della mia cara Emma, dal 12 Aprile 1889 al 2 Agosto 1900 fedele compagna e sola amica della mia vita errante e desolata“.

chiens 10

chiens 17

chiens 51

chiens 29

chiens 6

chiens 8

chiens 9

chiens 11

chiens 12

chiens 13

chiens 16

chiens 49

chiens 53

chiens 50

Iscrizioni commoventi, dicevamo: in certi casi l’incontro fra uomo e animale può rivelarsi una bellissima amicizia, tanto che ogni barriera specifica viene a cadere di fronte all’affetto creatosi fra due esseri viventi.
Eppure, bisogna ammetterlo, il Cimitero dei Cani fa anche un po’ sorridere. I mausolei sfarzosi e riccamente ornati, le grosse lapidi erette per un pesciolino rosso o per un criceto, i monumenti fatti scolpire appositamente per tartarughe, cavalli, topolini, uccelli, conigli e perfino gazzelle, fennec e lemuri ci possono sembrare in alcuni casi francamente esagerati.

chiens 55

chiens 48

chiens 45

chiens 44

chiens 40

chiens 35

chiens 36

chiens 38

chiens 37

chiens 19

chiens 27

chiens 22

chiens 31

chiens 30

chiens 21

chiens 20

chiens 18

Ma si tratta sempre, a ben vedere, dello stesso antico bisogno (forse, sì, patetico, ma incrollabile e a suo modo eroico) che sta alla base di qualsiasi necropoli: la necessità, tutta umana, di dare valore alle cose e alla vita, cercando di impedire che il passaggio sulla terra di coloro che amiamo termini senza lasciare traccia alcuna. Una battaglia destinata a fallire, in ultima istanza, ma che offre conforto a chi si trova ad elaborare un lutto.

chiens 15

chiens 14

chiens 46

chiens 39

chiens 34

Abbandoniamo il Cimitero dei Cani, non prima di aver visitato un’ultima, umile tomba: quella di una celebre star del cinema…

chiens 47

Terminiamo quindi il nostro viaggio con una visita a quello che è probabilmente il luogo più magico dell’intera capitale: il Musée des Arts Forains.
Si tratta di un’enorme collezione/installazione dedicata alle  fêtes foraines, cioè quelle giostre itineranti che da noi presero il nome di luna park (dal primo parco di attrazioni della storia, a Coney Island). Un tempo le giostre non erano nemmeno itineranti, ma trovavano posto all’interno delle città; poi, in seguito alle lamentele per il rumore, vennero spostate lontano dai centri abitati, e con il nomadismo iniziò anche il loro declino.

artsforains 1

artsforains 4

artsforains 5

artsforains 10

artsforains 11

artsforains 12

artsforains 13

Il Museo è collocato all’interno dei pittoreschi Pavillons Bercy, antichi depositi di vino, e magazzini di scalo per le merci in attesa d’essere caricate sui battelli fluviali. La visita guidata (che va prenotata in anticipo, visto che i gruppi hanno un numero limitato di partecipanti) si articola in tre diversi spazi: il Teatro del Meraviglioso, il Musée des Art Forains vero e proprio, e il Salone Veneziano.

artsforains 2

Il Teatro del Meraviglioso accoglie il visitatore con un’esplosione di luci colorate e di strane scenografie, in una sorta di ritorno all’atmosfera delle esposizioni universali di inizio secolo. C’è da restare a bocca aperta. Un elefante, appeso ad una mongolfiera, porta sulla schiena un incredibile e fragilissimo diorama creato interamente in mollica di pane; fra le foglie e gli intricati tronchi naturali, appositamente selezionati per la loro forma curiosa e artistica, fanno la ruota i pavoni meccanici; statue di sirene montano la guardia agli antenati dei flipper; tutto intorno, macchinari e giocattoli fantastici mentre, in fondo al salone, una corsa di cavalli con le biglie impegna i visitatori in una gara all’ultimo lancio. Sì, perché tutte le giostre che si trovano nel museo, originali di fine ‘800 e inizio ‘900, sono ancora funionanti e il tour include l’esperienza di provarne alcune in prima persona.

artsforains 17

artsforains 19

artsforains 18

artsforains 16

artsforains 20

artsforains 21

artsforains 23

artsforains 24

artsforains 25

artsforains 26

artsforains 27

artsforains 28

artsforains 29

artsforains 30

Nel salone a fianco, è la musica a farla da padrone. Un unicorno se ne sta ritto vicino ad un pianoforte i cui tasti si muovono da soli, mentre la guida turistica (per metà Virgilio, per metà imbonitore) dà inizio alle danze, facendo vibrare le pareti al suono di un antico organo e un carillon di tubi che si diramano lungo su tutte le pareti. Assieme ai visitatori che si cimentano in un valzer improvvisato, si muovono a tempo di musica sui loro baldacchini e parapetti anche gli automi con le fattezze di alcuni personaggi famosi degli anni d’oro di Parigi.

artsforains 31

artsforains 32

artsforains 33

artsforains 34

Questo spazio, evocativo e misterioso, viene utilizzato per serate ed eventi ed è anche dotato, per queste occasioni speciali, di 12 video proiettori che sono in grado di trasformare i muri nelle pareti interne del Nautilus, il celebre sottomarino del Capitano Nemo.

artsforains 7

Ci si sposta poi in un diverso padiglione, dove è ospitato il Musée des Arts Forains, dedicato al luna park vero e proprio. Come prima cosa, si prova sui propri timpani la potenza sonora dell’Organetto di Barberia: quando il mantice soffiava nelle canne, questo strumento a rullo spandeva l’allegra musica per chilometri sottovento, annunciando con le sue note l’arrivo delle giostre in città.

artsforains 41

artsforains 35

artsforains 38

artsforains 39

Poi, ecco comparire l’emblema e il simbolo di qualsiasi luna park: la giostra con i cavalli. Ad una popolaione divenuta urbana a seguito della rivoluzione industriale, questa attrazione ricordava le proprie origini rurali; e, al tempo stesso, prometteva alla gente comune il sogno di sentirsi nobili cavalieri per lo spazio di qualche giro di giostra.
Uno dei dettagli interessanti è il fatto che solitamente i cavalli hanno un solo lato perfettamente decorato e dipinto, quello che dà verso l’esterno. Il loro fianco interno, invece, è pitturato molto più grossolanamente – con il tipico cinismo dei circensi, i costruttori sapevano che l’importante era attirare chi sulla giostra non era ancora salito!

artsforains 42

I visitatori montano sulle loro selle, chiudono gli occhi, e sulle note di Mon manège à moi di Édith Piaf i cavalli di legno si mettono in moto… da quando fu creata, nel 1890, più di due milioni di persone hanno riscoperto la loro anima di bambini su questa giostra di origine tedesca.

artsforains 45

artsforains 48

artsforains 47

artsforains 51

artsforains 52

artsforains 53

artsforains 54

artsforains 59

Dopo aver passato in rassegna innumerevoli altri tipi di attrazioni, si sale sulla giostra probabilmente più bizzarra dell’intera collezione: un manège vélocipédique del 1897. Qui sono i visitatori stessi che con le loro pedalate mettono in moto la giostra, raggiungendo velocità da capogiro.

artsforains 55

artsforains 56

artsforains 57

artsforains 58

Infine, ecco che ci si sposta nel terzo padiglione, dedicato a Venezia, per una “corsa” molto più rilassante e serena su una giostra di gondole, mentre si ammira l’insolita ricostruzione dei canali e dei palazzi che adorna le pareti.

artsforains 62

artsforains 61

La visita termina con uno spettacolo di musica lirica interpretata dagli automi di Casanova, del Doge, di Arlecchino, Pantalone, eccetera.

artsforains 63

artsforains 64

Ritornati fuori, alla luce del sole, ci si accorge con sorpresa che senza l’aiuto di un orologio sarebbe impossibile dire quanto sia durata la visita. Un’ora e mezza, due ore, o ancora di più? Per qualche ragione, all’interno di questo spazio, per il quale l’aggettivo “meraviglioso” non è affatto fuori luogo, ogni cognizione del tempo è rimasta alterata.
Ci si guarda l’un l’altro, ed ecco che – ultima magia – negli occhi di tutti brilla quell’antico senso di incanto che sembrava ormai perduto.

artsforains 49

MUSEE DE LA CHASSE ET DE LA NATURE
62, rue des Archives
Apertura: Tutti i giorni tranne il lunedì.
Orari: Mar-Dom 11-18, Mer 11-21.30
Sito Web

CEMETIERE DES CHIENS
4, pont de Clichy
Asnières-sur-Seine
Apertura: tutti i giorni tranne il lunedì.
Orari: dal 16 marzo al 15 ottobre 10-18, dal 16 ottobre al 15 marzo 10-16.30

MUSEE DES ARTS FORAINS
53, Av des Terroirs de France
Apertura e orari: consultare il calendario per le prenotazioni sul sito.
Sito Web

(Questo articolo è l’ultimo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. I primi due capitoli sono qui e qui.)