Spirits of the Road: The Cult of Animitas

The traveler who exits the Estación Central in Santiago, Chile and walks down San Francisco de Borja street, after less than twenty meters will stumble upon a sort of votive wall, right on the side of the train station on his left, a space choke-full of little engravings, offerings, perpetually lit candles, photographs and holy pictures. A simple sign says: “Romualdito”, the same name present on every thankful ex voto.

If our hypothetical traveler then takes a cab and heads down the Autopista del Sol towards the suburb of Maipù, he will see by the side of the opposite lane an altar quite similar to the first one, dedicated to a young girl called Astrid whose portrait is almost buried under dozens of toys and plush bears.

Should he cross the entirety of Chile’s narrow strip of land, encased between the mountains and the ocean, maybe crossing from time to time the border to the Argentinian pampas, he would notice that the landscape (both urban and rural) is studded with numerous of these strange little temples: places of devotion where veneration is not directed towards canonical saints, but to the spirits of people whose life ended in tragedy. This is the cult of the animitas.

An expression of popular piety, the animitas are votive boxes that are often built by the side of the road (animita de carretera) to remember some victims of the “mala muerte”, an awful death: even if the remains of these persons are buried at the cemetery, they cannot really rest in peace on the account of the violent circumstances of their demise. Their souls still haunt the places where life was taken from them.

 

The Romualdito at the train station, for instance, was a little boy who suffered from tubercolosis, assaulted and killed by some thugs who wanted to steal his poncho and the 15 pesos he had on him. But his story, dating back to the 1930s, is told in countless versions, more or less legendary, and it’s impossible to ascertain exactly what happened: one thing is sure, the popular faith in Romualdito is so widespread in Santiago that when it was time to renew and rebuild the station, his wall was left untouched.

Young Astrid, the girl with the plush toys altar, died in 1998 in a motorcycle accident, when she was just 19-years-old. She is now known as the Niña Hermosa.

But these funeral altars can be found by the hundreds, mostly installed by the roadside, shaped like little houses or small churches with crosses sicking out of their tiny roofs.

At first they are built as an act of mercy and remembrance on the exact spot of the fatal accident (or, in the case of fishermen lost at sea, in specific sectors of the coast); but they become the center of a real cult whenevert the soul of the deceased proves to be miraculous (animita muy milagrosa). When, that is, the spirit starts answering to prayers and offerings with particular favors, by interceding bewteen the believer and the Holy Virgin or Christ himself.

 The cult of the animitas is an original mixture of the indigenous, pre-Hispanic cult of the dead (where the ancestor turned into a benign presence offering protection to his offspring) and the cult of the souls of Purgatory which arrived here with Catholicism.
For this reason it shows surprising analogies with another form of folk religiosity developed in Naples, at the Fontanelle Cemetery, a place to which I devoted my book
De profundis.
The two cults, not officially recognized by the Roman Church, have some fundamental aspects in common.

Animitas, built with recycled material, are folk art objects that closely resemble the carabattoli found in the Fontanelle Cemetery; not only for their shape but also for their function of making a dialectic, a dialogue with the Netherworld possible.
Secondly, the system of intercessions and favors, the offerings and the ex voto, are essentially the same in both cases.

But the crucial element is that the objects of veneration are not religious heroes, those saints who accomplished miraculous feats while they were alive, but rather victims of destiny. This allows for the identification between the believer and the invoked soul, the acknowledging of their reciprocal condition, a sharing of human misery – a feeling which is almost impossible when faced with “supernatural” figures like saints. Who of course have themselves an apotropaic function, but always maintain a higher position in respect to common mortals.
On the other hand the
animitas, just like the anime pezzentelle in Naples, are “democratic” symbols, offering a much easier relationship: they share with the believers the same social milieu, they know firsthand all the daily hardship and difficulties of survival. They are protective spirits which can be bothered even for more modest, trivial miracles, because they once were ordinary people, and they understand.

But while in Italy the cult developed exclusively in one town, in Chile it is quite ubiquitous. To have an idea of the tenacity and pervasiveness of this faith, there is one last, amazing example.
Ghost bikes (white-painted bicycles remembering a cyclist who was run over by a car) can be seen all around the world, and they are meant as a warning against accidents. When these installations began to appear in Chile, they immediately intertwined with popular devotion giving birth to hybrids called
bicianimitas. Boxes for the ritual offerings began to appear beside the white bicycles, and the funeral memorials turned into a bridge for communication between the living and the dead.
Those living and dead that, the
animitas seem to remind us, are never really separated but coexist on the city streets or along the side of dusty highways stretching out into the desert.

The blog Animitas Chilenas intends to create an archive of all animitas, recording for each one the name of the soul, her history and GPS coordinates.
Besides the links in the article, I highly recommend the essay by Lautaro Ojeda,
Animitas – Una expresión informal y democrática de derecho a la ciudad (in ARQ Santiago n. 81 agosto 2012) and the in-depth post El culto urbano de la muerte: el origen y la trascendencia de las animitas en Chile, by Criss Salazar.
Photographer Patricio Valenzuela Hohmann put up a
wonderful animitas photo gallery.
Lastly, you should check out the
Difunta Correa, Argentina’s most famous animita, dedicated to the legendary figure of a woman who died of thirst and fatigue in the Nineteenth Century while following her husband – who had been forced to enroll in the army; her body was found under a tree, still holding her newborn baby to her breast. The cult of the Difunta Correa is so widespread that it led to the construction of a real sanctuary in Vallecito, visited by one million pilgrims every year.

Ghost Marriages

China, Shanxi province, on the nothern part of the Republic.
At the beginningof 2016, the Hongtong County police chief gave the warning: during the three previous years, at least a dozen thefts of corpses were recorded each year. All the exhumed and smuggled bodies were of young women, and the trend is incresing so fast that many families now prefer to bury their female relatives near their homes, rather than in secluded areas. Others resort to concrete graves, install surveillance cameras, hire security guards or plant gratings around the burial site, just like in body snatchers England. It looks like in some parts of the province, the body of a young dead girl is never safe enough.
What’s behind this unsettling trend?

These episodes of body theft are connected to a very ancient tradition which was thought to be long abandoned: the custom of “netherworld marriages”.
The death of a young unmarried male is considered bad lack for the entire family: the boy’s soul cannot find rest, without a mate.
For this reasons his relatives, in the effort of finding a spouse for the deceased man, turn to matchmakers who can put them in contact with other families having recently suffered the lost of a daughter. A marriage is therefore arranged for the two dead young persons, following a specific ritual, until they are finally buried together, much to the relief of both families.
This kind of marriages seem to date back to the Qin dinasty (221-206 a.C.) even if the main sources attest a more widespread existence of the practice starting from the Han dinasty (206 a.C.-220 d.C.).

The problem is that as the traffic becomes more and more profitable, some of these matchmakers have no qualms about exhuming the precious corpses in secret: to sell the bodies, they sometimes pretend to be relatives of the dead girl, but in other cases they simply find grieving families who are ready to pay in order to find a bride for their departed loved one, and willing to turn a blind eye on the cadaver’s provenance.

Until some years ago, “ghost marriages” were performed by using symbolic bamboo figurines, dressed in traditional clothes; today weath is increasing, and as much as 100,000 yan (around $15,000) can be spent on the fresh body of a young girl. Even older human remains, put back together with wire, can be worth up to $800. The village elders, after all, are the ones who warn new generations: to cast away bad luck nothing beats an authentic corpse.
Although the practice has been outlawed in 2006, the business is so lucrative that the number of arrests keep increasing, and at least two cases of murder have been reported in the news where the victim was killed in order to sell her body.

If at first glance this tradition may seem macabre or senseless, let us consider its possible motivations.
In the province where these episodes are more frequent, a large number of young men work in coal mines, where fatal accidents are sadly common. The majority of these boys are the sole children of their parents, because of the Chinese one-child policy, effective until 2013.
So, apart from reasons dictated by superstition, there is also an important psychological element: imagine the relief if, in the process of elaborating grief, you could still do something to make your dearly departed happy. Here’s how a “ghost wedding” acts as a compensation for the loss of a loved boy, who maybe died while working to support his family.

Marriages between two deceased persons, or between a living person and a dead one, are not even unique to China, for that matter. In France posthumous marriages (which usually take place when a woman prematurely loses her fiancé) are regularly requested to the President of the Republic, who has the power of issuing the authorization. The purpose is to acknowledge children who were conceived before the premature death, but there may also been purely emotional motivations. In fact there’s a relatively long list of countries that allowed for marriages in which one or both the newlywed were no longer alive.

In closing, here is a little curiosity.
In the well-known Tim Burton film Corpse Bride (2005), inspired by a centuries-old folk tale (the short story Die Todtenbraut by F. A. Schulze, found within the Fantasmagoriana anthology, is a Romantic take on that tale), the main character puts a ring on a small branch, unaware that this light-hearted move is actually sanctioning his netherworld engagement.
Quite similar to that harmless-looking twig is a “trick” used in Taiwan when a young girl dies unmarried: her relatives leave out on the streets a small red package containing Hell money, a lock of hair or some nails from the dead woman. The first man to pick up the package has to marry the deceased girl, if he wants to avoid misfortune. He will be allowed to marry again, but he shall forever revere the “ghost” bride as his first, real spouse.

These rituals become necessary when an individual enters the afterlife prematurely, without undergoing a fundamental rite of passage like marriage (therefore without completing the “correct” course of his life). As is often the case with funeral customs, the practice has a beneficial and apotropaic function both for the social group of the living and for the deceased himself.
On one hand all the bad luck that could harm the relatives of the dead is turned away; a bond is formed between two different families, which could not have existed without a proper marriage; and, at the same time, everybody can rest assured that the soul will leave this world at peace, and will not depart for the last voyage bearing the mark of an unfortunate loneliness.

Afterlife

What will we feel in the moment of death?
What will come after the initial, inevitable fear?
Shall we sense a strange familiarity with the extreme, simultaneous relaxation of every muscle?
Will the ultimate abandonment remind us of the ancient, primitive annihilation we experience during an orgasm?

Following Epicurus’ famous reasoning (which is, by the way, philosophically and ethically debatable), we should not even worry about such things because when death is present, we are not, and viceversa.
Unknowability of death: as is often said, “no one ever came back” to tell us what lies on the other side. Despite this idea, religious traditions have often described in detail the various phases the soul is bound to go through, once it has stepped over the invisible threshold.

Through the centuries, this has led to the writing of actual handbooks explaining the best way to day.
Western Ars moriendi focused on the moments right before death, while in the East the stress was more on what came after it. But eventually most spiritual philosophies share the fear that the passage might entail some concrete dangers for the spirit of the dying person: demons and visions will try to divert the soul’s attention from the correct path.
In death, one can get lost.

One of the intuitions I find most interesting can be found in Part II of the Bardo Thodol:

O nobly-born, when thy body and mind were separating, thou must have experienced a glimpse of the Pure Truth, subtle, sparkling, bright, dazzling, glorious, and radiantly awesome, in appearance like a mirage moving across a landscape in spring-time in one continuous stream of vibrations. Be not
daunted thereby, nor terrified, nor awed. That is the radiance of thine own true nature. Recognize it.
From the midst of that radiance, the natural sound of Reality, reverberating like a thousand thunders simultaneously sounding, will come. That is the natural sound of thine own real self. Be not daunted thereby, nor terrified, nor awed. […] Since thou hast not a material body of flesh and blood, whatever may come — sounds, lights, or rays — are, all three, unable to harm thee: thou art incapable of dying. It is quite sufficient for thee to know that these apparitions are thine own thought-forms.

It seems to me that this idea, although described in the book in a figurative way, might in a sense resist even to a skeptical, seular gaze. If stripped of its buddhist symbolic-shamanic apparatus, it looks almost like an “objective” observation: death is essentially that natural state from which we took shape and to which we will return. Whatever we shall experience after death — if we are going to experience anything, be it little or much — is ultimately all there is to understand. In poetic terms, it is our own true face, the bottom of things, our intimate reality.

In 1978 Indian animator Ishu Patel, fascinated by these questions, decided to put into images his personal view of what lies beyond. His award-winning short movie Afterlife still offers one of the most suggestive allegorical representations of death as a voyage: a psychedelic trip, first and foremost, but also a moment of essential clarity. The consciousness, upon leaving the body, is confronted with archetypical, shape-shifting figures, and enters a non-place of the mind where nothing is certain and yet everything speaks an instantly recognizable language.

Patel’s artistic and fantastic representation depicts death as a moment when one’s whole life is reviewed, when we will be given a glimpse of the mystery of existence. A beautiful idea, albeit a bit too comforting.
Patel declared to have taken inspiration from Eastern mythologies and from near-death experience accounts (NDE), and this latter detail poses a further question: even supposing that in the moment of death we could witness similar visions, wouldn’t they actually be a mere illusion?

Of course, science tells us that NDE are perfectly coherent with the degenerative neurological processes the brain undergoes when it’s dying. Just like we are now aware of the psychophysical causes of mystic ecstasy, of auto-hypnotic states induced by repeating mantras or prayers, of visions aroused by prolonged fasting or by ingestion of psychoactive substances which are used in many shamanic rituals, etc.
But the physiological explanation of these alteration in consciousness does not undermine their symbolic force.
The sublime beauty of hallucinations lies in the fact that it does not really matter if they’re true or not; what is relevant is the meaning we bestow upon them.

Maybe, after all, only one thing can be really asserted: death still remains a white canvas. It’s up to us what we project on its blank screen.
Afterlife does just that, with the enigmatic lightness of a dance; it is a touching, awe-inspiring ride to the center of all things.

Afterlife, Ishu Patel, National Film Board of Canada

Lanterns of the Dead

lanterne-des-morts-antigny

In several medieval cemeteries of west-central France stand some strange masonry buildings, of varying height, resembling small towers. The inside, bare and hollow, was sufficiently large for a man to climb to the top of the structure and light a lantern there, at sundawn.
But what purpose did these bizarre lighthouses serve? Why signal the presence of a graveyard to wayfarers in the middle of the night?

The “lanterns of the dead”, built between the XII and XIII Century, represent a still not fully explained historical enigma.

Lanterne-Ciron-1

Lanterne-des-morts-moutiers-en-retz-0004

Saint-Goussaud_(Creuse,_fr)_lanterne_des_morts

Part of the problem comes from the fact that in medieval literature there seems to be no allusion to these lamps: the only coeval source is a passage in the De miraculis by Peter the Venerable (1092-1156). In one of his accounts of miraculous events, the famous abbot of Cluny mentions the Charlieu lantern, which he had certainly seen during his voyages in Aquitaine:

There is, at the center of the cemetery, a stone structure, on top of which is a place that can house a lamp, its light brightening this sacred place every night  as a sign of respect for the the faithful who are resting here. There also are some small steps leading to a platform which can be sufficient for two or three men, standing or seated.

This bare description is the only one dating back to the XII Century, the exact period when most of these lanterns are supposed to have been built. This passage doesn’t seem to say much in itself, at least at first sight; but we will return to it, and to the surprises it hides.
As one might expect, given the literary silence surrounding these buildings, a whole array of implausible conjectures have been proposed, multiplying the alleged “mysteries” rather than explaining them — everything from studies of the towers’ geographical disposition, supposed to reveal hidden, exoteric geometries, to the decyphering of numerological correlations, for instance between the 11 pillars on Fenioux lantern’s shaft and the 13 small columns on its pinnacle… and so on. (Incidentally, these full gallop speculations call to mind the classic escalation brilliantly exemplified by Mariano Tomatis in his short documentary A neglected shadow).

lanterne

A more serious debate among historians, beginning in the second half of XIX Century, was intially dominated by two theories, both of which appear fragile to a more modern analysis: on one hand the idea that these towers had a celtic origin (proposed by Viollet-Le-Duc who tried to link them back to menhirs) and, on the other, the hypothesis of an oriental influence on the buildings. But historians have already discarded the thesis that a memory of the minarets or of the torch allegedly burning on Saladin‘s grave, seen during the Crusades, might have anything to do with the lanterns of the dead.

Without resorting to exotic or esoteric readings, is it then possible to interpret the lanterns’ meaning and purpose by placing them in the medieval culture of which they are an expression?
To this end, historian Cécile Treffort has analysed the polysemy of the light in the Christian tradition, and its correlations with Candlemas — or Easter — candles, and with the lantern (Les lanternes des morts: une lumière protectrice?, Cahiers de recherches médiévales, n.8, 2001).

Since the very first verses of Genesis, the divine light (lux divina) counterposes darkness, and it is presented as a symbol of wisdom leading to God: believers must shun obscurity and follow the light of the Lord which, not by chance, is awaiting them even beyond death, in a bright afterworld permeated by lux perpetua, a heavenly kingdom where prophecies claim the sun will never set. Even Christ, furthermore, affirms “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” (Jn 8:12).
The absence of light, on the contrary, ratifies the dominion of demons, temptations, evil spirits — it is the kingdom of the one who once carried the flame, but was discharged (Lucifer).

In the Middle Ages, tales of demonic apparitions and dangerous revenants taking place inside cemeteries were quite widespread, and probably the act of lighting a lantern had first and foremost the function of protecting the place from the clutches of infernal beings.

Lanterne_des_morts-Saint-Pierre-d'Oléron

Cherveix-Cubas_lanterne_des_morts_(10)

But the lantern symbology is not limited to its apotropaic function, because it also refers to the Parable of the Ten Virgins found in Matthew’s gospel: here, to keep the flame burning while waiting for the bridegroom is a metaphor for being vigilant and ready for the Redeemer’s arrival. At the time of his coming, we shall see who maintained their lamps lit — and their souls pure — and who foolishly let them go out.

The Benedictine rule prescribed that a candle had to be kept always lit in the convent’s dorms, because the “sons of light” needed to stay clear of darkness even on a bodily level.
If we keep in mind that the word cemetery etymologically means “dormitory”, lighting up a lantern inside a graveyard might have fulfilled several purposes. It was meant to bring light in the intermediary place par excellence, situated between the church and the secular land, between liturgy and temptation, between life and death, a permeable boundary through which souls could still come back or be lost to demons; it was believed to protect the dead, both physically and spiritually; and, furthermore, to symbolically depict the escatological expectation, the constant watch for the Redeemer.

Lanterne_des_Morts_Sarlat

One last question is left, to which the answer can be quite surprising.
The theological meaning of the lanterns of the dead, as we have seen, is rich and multi-faceted. Why then did Peter the Venerable only mention them so briefly and in an almost disinterested way?

This problem opens a window on a little known aspect of ecclesiastical history: the graveyard as a political battleground.
Starting from the X Century, the Church began to “appropriate” burial grounds ever more jealously, laying claim to their management. This movement (anticipating and preparing for the introduction of Purgatory, of which I have written in my De Profundis) had the effect of making the ecclesiastical authority an undisputed judge of memory — deciding who had, or had not, the right to be buried under the aegis of the Holy Church. Excommunication, which already was a terrible weapon against heretics who were still alive, gained the power of cursing them even after their death. And we should not forget that the cemetery, besides this political control, also offered a juridical refuge as a place of inviolable asylum.

Peter the Venerable found himself in the middle of a schism, initiated by Antipope Anacletus, and his voyages in Aquitaine had the purpose of trying to solve the difficult relationship with insurgent Benedictine monasteries. The lanterns of the dead were used in this very region of France, and upon seeing them Peter must have been fascinated by their symbolic depth. But they posed a problem: they could be seen as an alternative to the cemetery consecration, a practice the Cluny Abbey was promoting in those years to create an inviolable space under the exclusive administration of the Church.
Therefore, in his tale, he decided to place the lantern tower in Charlieu — a priorate loyal to his Abbey — without even remotely suggesting that the authorship of the building’s concept actually came from the rival Aquitaine.

43815703

Cellefrouin, lanterne des morts

This copyright war, long before the term was invented, reminds us that the cemetery, far from being a simple burial ground, was indeed a politically strategic liminal territory. Because holding the symbolic dominion over death and the afterworld historically proved to be often more relevant than any temporal power.

Although these quarrels have long been returned to dust, many towers still exist in French cemeteries. Upright against the tombs and the horizontal remains waiting to be roused from sleep, devoid of their lanterns for centuries now, they stand as silent witnesses of a time when the flame from a lamp could offer protection and hope both to the dead and the living.

(Thanks, Marco!)

I soldi dei morti

Per i cinesi, ogni uomo è composto da diversi spiriti: fra tutti, i due più importanti sono quello materiale, chiamato po, con sede nel fegato e nutrito dal cibo, che al momento della morte rimane nella tomba; e l’anima spirituale, chiamata hun, con sede nei polmoni e nutrita dal respiro, che al trapasso si stacca invece dal corpo e va incontro al suo destino.
Un destino che è ovviamente conseguenza delle azioni terrene, della virtù e delle qualità del morto. Così, nell’oltretomba, esiste una gamma di possibili mutamenti che attendono lo hun del defunto: il più difficile e prestigioso è ovviamente divenire uno xiandao, un Immortale taoista – oppure raggiungere Jing-tu, la Terra Pura, se si è buddhisti. Ma, qualora in vita le azioni del morto non siano state per nulla virtuose, l’anima può finire per incrementare le fila degli egui, “spiriti affamati” che arrecano danni e problemi ai viventi a causa della fame e della sete insaziabili che li divorano.
Tutti coloro che stanno nel mezzo – né spiriti eccelsi, né peccatori senza speranza – vengono destinati alla “Via dell’Uomo” (rendao), vale a dire a reincarnarsi fino a che non saranno finalmente degni di lasciare questo mondo. Queste anime, però, prima di potersi reincarnare dovranno passare per una sorta di regno di mezzo chiamato diyu, assimilabile al nostro purgatorio.

Il diyu non è altro che una terribile “prigione sotterranea” che in qualche modo riflette specularmente la burocrazia del nostro mondo. Qui le anime vengono imputate in un vero e proprio processo in dieci differenti stadi, i Dieci Tribunali dell’Inferno: alla fine del lungo dibattimento giudiziario, il defunto viene assegnato ad un supplizio specifico a seconda delle sue colpe e mancanze. Si tratta di pene e torture dantesche sia nella crudeltà che nel contrappasso, che l’anima patisce provando dolori atroci, proprio come se avesse ancora un corpo. Fra lame che mozzano la lingua ai bugiardi, seghe che tagliano in due gli uomini d’affari scorretti, stupratori e ladri gettati in calderoni d’olio bollente o cotti al vapore, gente macinata e ridotta in polvere con mole di pietra, il diyu è una fiera degli orrori senza fine. Le anime, una volta subìto il supplizio, vengono ricomposte e la pena ricomincia.

Una volta scontato il periodo di “carcere duro” previsto dai giudici, all’anima è somministrata una pozione che le fa dimenticare quanto ha visto, e infine viene rispedita sulla terra… spesso con un bel calcio nel sedere (il che spiega le voglie violacee all’altezza delle natiche che a volte mostrano i neonati).

Dicevamo però che il diyu è una sorta di versione ribaltata del nostro mondo. Non crediate quindi che le delibere del Tribunale dell’Inferno siano infallibili: proprio come accade nei Palazzi di Giustizia terreni, nell’oltretomba cinese possono verificarsi degli errori giudiziari; c’è una mole impressionante di pratiche burocratiche da sbrigare, e anche fra i demoni esistono corruzione e nepotismo.
Ecco perché i cinesi hanno sviluppato uno dei rituali sacrificali più particolari e bizzarri: quello delle qian zhi, le “banconote di carta”.

Si tratta di imitazioni di banconote su cui è impresso il volto del sovrano dell’Aldilà, simili ai soldi finti dei giochi in scatola, stampate su carta di riso ed emesse dalla Banca degli Inferi, Yantong Yinhang. I tagli variano (anche a seconda dell’inflazione!) da diecimila a centinaia di miliardi di yuan – anche se ovviamente il prezzo d’acquisto è infinitamente inferiore a quello nominale. Si possono comprare in svariati empori e negozi.

400685506_fe1e803396_z

Le banconote vengono bruciate in falò rituali accesi vicino alle tombe, così che il fuoco le “trasporti” oltre il confine fra vivi e morti, recapitandole al caro estinto. L’anima del defunto potrà quindi usare i soldi inviatigli dalla famiglia per acquistare beni di consumo, per “comprare” i favori delle guardie, oppure per guadagnarsi rispetto e status sociale, o magari addirittura per corrompere un giudice e ottenere così uno sconto di pena.

Vi sono regole strette e tabù collegati al modo in cui le banconote vanno bruciate, così come ad esempio regalarne una ad una persona ancora in vita è altamente offensivo: insomma, i soldi dei morti sono un affare serio per molti cinesi.
Il defunto è in definitiva considerato come un parente vivo e vegeto, che si trova in un luogo lontano e sta attraversando un periodo di difficoltà. Quale famiglia amorevole non gli manderebbe un po’ di soldi?

Se questo approccio, tipico della pratica e concreta mentalità cinese, ci sembra strano ad un primo sguardo, si tratta in realtà di una pratica non molto distante dal nostro atteggiamento verso i cari estinti: compriamo una bella lapide, raccomandiamo a Dio la loro anima, in modo da ottenere la loro benevolenza; in cambio, li preghiamo per avere intercessioni, protezione e favori.
Il culto degli antenati è pressoché universale, e la versione cinese delle qian zhi non fa che rendere evidente il meccanismo che lo sottende.
L’appartenenza alla società è di norma sancita dallo scambio (economico, di lavoro, di sostegno e di aiuto) fra i membri della società stessa: la barriera della morte, che in teoria dovrebbe interrompere questo commercio, non è affatto insormontabile, perché in tutte le culture lo scambio fra vivi e morti non viene mai meno, diventa semplicemente simbolico.

La peculiarità non sta quindi nel tentativo di regalare qualcosa ai morti, poiché è proprio questo il nocciolo del culto dei defunti, in ogni epoca e latitudine: vogliamo continuare a proteggere i nostri cari, e a dimostrare attraverso il dono sacrificale quanto forte sia ancora l’affetto che ci lega a loro. Il vero aspetto singolare di questa tradizione sta nella somiglianza quasi comica dell’Aldilà cinese con il nostro mondo.


Con il passare del tempo e con l’evolversi della tecnologia, ormai anche all’Inferno le semplici mazzette non bastano più. Forse i diavoli sono diventati più esigenti, o forse nell’Aldilà – dove comunque è indispensabile darsi un tono – le stesse anime dei defunti si fanno influenzare dalle mode consumistiche; fatto sta che nei negozi, accanto alle banconote, sono oggi esposte delle raffigurazioni cartacee di bottiglie di champagne (conquistare la simpatia del carceriere con un goccetto funziona sempre), prodotti di bellezza, completi in gessato, ciabatte contraffatte di Louis Vuitton con cui pavoneggiarsi, carte di credito, addirittura ville in miniatura, macchine di lusso, televisori al plasma, laptop, cellulari, iPhone e iPad taroccati con tanto di custodia. Tutto in carta, pronto da bruciare, in vendita per pochi euro.

Un oltretomba fin troppo familiare, che rispecchia vizi e problemi per i quali nemmeno la morte sembra essere un rimedio sicuro: non c’è da stupirsi quindi che, fra i vari gadget che si possono inviare nell’oltretomba, vi siano anche le repliche delle scatole di Viagra.

La maggior parte delle informazioni sono tratte dall’illuminante e consigliatissimo Tre uomini fanno una tigre. Viaggio nella cultura e nella lingua cinese (2014) di Nazzarena Fazzari.

Dia de los Natitas

Tutte le tradizioni culturali del mondo hanno elaborato complessi rituali per negare la completa dissoluzione del defunto, ma anzi reintegrarlo nella vita quotidiana in un sistema ammissibile; in questo modo i morti divengono delle “guide” simboliche e vengono inseriti in un quadro di continuità che è un antidoto all’assenza di senso della morte. Perfino nella nostra società, incentrata sul corpo e sul materialismo, diamo nomi di defunti alle strade, parliamo di “immortalità attraverso le opere”, e teniamo scrupolosi resoconti storici relativi ai nostri antenati.
In alcune società questo rapporto che lega i vivi e i morti risulta ancora molto concreto.

In diverse parti dell’America del Sud il cristianesimo si è sviluppato in maniera sincretica con le religioni precedenti; i missionari cioè, piuttosto che combattere le antiche credenze del luogo, hanno cercato di trasfigurare alcuni degli dèi delle popolazioni Quechua e Aymara per farli aderire alle figure tipiche della tradizione cattolica. Alcuni rituali pre-colombiani sono pertanto giunti fino a noi e sono tuttora tollerati dalla Chiesa locale.
Uno di questi antichissimi riti è quello relativo al Dia de los Natitas, ovvero il Giorno dei Teschi.

La Paz, Bolivia, 8 novembre.
In questo giorno centinaia di persone si radunano al cimitero centrale portando con sé i teschi dei propri antenati o dei cari estinti. Il cranio del parente defunto è spesso esposto in elaborate teche di vetro, legno o cartone.

I teschi vengono puliti, purificati, e decorati con addobbi di vario tipo: berretti di lana intessuti a mano, occhiali da sole, ghirlande di fiori coloratissimi. Talvolta le cavità ossee vengono protette otturandole con del cotone.

Una volta ottenuta la benedizione, la gente “coccola” questi resti umani, offrendo loro sigarette, alcol, foglie di coca, cibo e profumi. Una banda tradizionale suona per loro, quasi ad offrire ai morti una particolare serenata.

Come fanno gli abitanti ad essere in possesso di questi teschi, e che significato ha il rituale? La tradizione, come abbiamo detto, è molto antica e precedente all’avvento del cristianesimo. Nella concezione pre-colombiana diffusa in Bolivia ogni uomo è composto da sette anime, di tipo e pesantezza diversi. Quando un parente muore, viene seppellito per un periodo sufficientemente lungo affinché tutte e sei le anime “eteree” possano lasciare il cadavere. L’ultima anima è quella che rimane all’interno dello scheletro, e del cranio in particolare.

Quando si è sicuri che le sei anime se ne siano andate, si dissotterra il cadavere e il teschio viene affidato alla famiglia, che avrà cura di mantenerlo in casa con amore e dedizione, su un altare dedicato. Questi resti, infatti, hanno proprietà magiche e, se trattati con il giusto rispetto, sono in grado di esaudire le preghiere dei parenti. Se, invece, vengono trascurati possono portare sciagure e sfortuna.

Il Dia de los Natitas serve proprio a celebrare questi defunti, a ringraziarli con una grande festa per la buona sorte portata durante l’anno appena trascorso, e ingraziarsi i loro favori per l’anno a venire.

Jhator

Siamo abituati a considerare la salma di un caro estinto con estremo rispetto: nonostante la convinzione che si tratti in definitiva di un involucro vuoto, le esequie occidentali si iscrivono nella tradizione cristiana della conservazione del cadavere, in attesa della resurrezione della carne. Anche esulando dall’ambito strettamente religioso, il rispetto per la salma non cambia: addirittura la cremazione, pur disfacendo il corpo, viene principalmente intesa da noi come metodo per “salvare” il corpo dalla naturale putrefazione, o per dissolvere metaforicamente l’anima del defunto nel mondo.

In Tibet, invece, le esequie tradizionali hanno assunto dei connotati decisamente distanti dalla nostra sensibilità, ma non per questo meno stimolanti o affascinanti. La cerimonia funebre del jhator, o “funerale del cielo”, si è sviluppata a causa della mancanza, alle grandi altitudini himalayane, della vegetazione necessaria alla cremazione e dell’estrema durezza del suolo che impedisce la sepoltura vera e propria. Jhator significa letteralmente “elemosina agli uccelli”, ed infatti sono proprio questi ultimi i protagonisti della cerimonia.

Dopo alcuni giorni di canti e preghiere, il corpo del defunto viene portato all’alba nel luogo sacro destinato al funerale, sul fianco di una montagna che guarda ad est.  Il punto esatto delle esequie può essere in prossimità di templi (stupa), marcato da altari oppure da semplici lastre di pietra. Qui il corpo viene liberato dal sudario, e al sorgere del sole alcuni uomini (chiamati rogyapa, “distruttori di corpi”) cominciano a tagliare la salma secondo le indicazioni di un lama, seguendo un preciso ordine di dissezione rituale.

I primi pezzi di carne, strappati dalle ossa, vengono gettati a qualche metro di distanza, per attirare gli avvoltoi. Se questi non si avvicinano, viene eseguita una danza propiziatoria, il cui canto intriso di versi e suoni gutturali serve da richiamo per gli animali. In breve tempo alcune dozzine di uccelli sono allineati in fremente attesa. Dopo aver proceduto a rimuovere gli organi interni e a tagliare il corpo in pezzi sempre più piccoli, i rogyapa, con dei grossi martelli o con delle pietre, frantumano le ossa per mischiarle alla polpa.

Ogni brandello di carne viene dato in offerta agli avvoltoi, e niente va conservato: una volta sazi, questi enormi uccelli lasciano i rimasugli ai falchi e ai corvi più piccoli, che hanno pazientemente aspettato a debita distanza. Talvolta le carni vengono mischiate alla farina, per sottolineare come questo “pasto” sia davvero un’offerta.

Questo rito funebre, che può apparire barbaro agli occhi di un occidentale, è in realtà intriso di un profondo sentimento: quello dell’impermanenza, una delle grandi verità buddiste. Siamo soltanto di passaggio, appariamo e subito svaniamo nel nulla, in un continuo cambiamento di forma; l’accettazione di questa realtà rende la salma niente più che un guscio, utile a nutrire altri esseri viventi. Così il jhator è innanzitutto un atto rituale di generosità, ma dona anche la sensazione che il morto non sia mai veramente uscito dal ciclo naturale della vita.

In poco meno di un’ora del corpo non rimane più nulla, e i parenti si allontanano dal sacro luogo per far ritorno, più a valle, alle loro gioie e alle loro difficoltà quotidiane. Forse, per ricordare chi se ne è andato, è sufficiente lanciare uno sguardo alle vette dell’Himalaya, che brillano, immense, nel sole.

Ecco la pagina di Wikipedia (in inglese) sul jhator.

Il Tempio delle Torture

Wat Phai Rong Wua.

Se visitate la Thailandia, ricordatevi questo nome. Si tratta di un luogo sacro, unico e assolutamente weird, almeno agli occhi di un occidentale. Tempio buddista, mèta annuale di migliaia di famiglie, è celebre per ospitare la più grande scultura metallica del Buddha. Ma non è questo che ci interessa. È famoso anche per il suo Palazzo delle Cento Spire, ma nemmeno questo ci interessa. Quello che segnaliamo qui sono le dozzine di figure e complessi statuari che descrivono torture e sevizie riservate dai demoni dell’inferno alle anime in pena.

Infilzate in faccia, o intrappolate nelle fauci di orrendi mostri, con le interiora esposte, trafitte da spade e lance, queste sculture lasciano ben poco all’immaginazione: se non diciamo le preghierine alla sera, non ce la passeremo tanto bene nell’aldilà. Questo macabro e violentissimo “parco di attrazioni” ha per i fedeli un valore educativo. È una visualizzazione grafica e figurativa della sofferenza e dell’inferno.

Certo, c’è da dire che il rapporto dei thailandesi con la morte è meno travagliato del nostro; eppure, per quanto a prima vista il giardino delle torture di Wat Phai Rong Wua possa sembrare una soluzione estrema per colpire la fantasia dell’uomo illetterato, ricordiamoci che anche le nostre chiese abbondano di dipinti e allegorie non meno violente o macabre. Ormai abituati all’arte del Novecento, che si è man mano astratta dal bisogno di veicolare o avere un significato, ci dimentichiamo facilmente del ruolo avuto anche nella nostra storia dell’arte figurativa: quella di educare le masse, di proporsi come libro illustrato, e di servire quindi alla formazione di un immaginario anche per quanto riguarda i mondi a venire.

Scoperto via Oddity Central.

Dolore sacro

Come è noto, nella maggior parte delle tradizioni religiose il sacrificio corporale è parte integrante di specifici rituali o pratiche di ascesi o espiazione. Nelle culture più marcatamente sciamaniche o tribali il dolore sacro va spesso di pari passo con l’estasi e la trance mistica, come accade durante alcune festività in cui le ferite vengono praticate o autoinflitte dai devoti come segno di una raggiunta “immunità” alle sofferenze, garantita dalla comunione con la divinità.

tv7

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWpNPP6Lvi4]

In Oriente, l’intera esistenza era vista come una serie ininterrotta di sofferenze. Questo tipo di visione pessimistica era comune nell’area indocinese, e le due soluzioni a cui si era pensato prima dell’avvento del Buddha erano le più logiche. Per sconfiggere il dolore si doveva: 1) massimizzare il piacere – da cui la tradizione tantrista, che peraltro ha diversi elementi di derivazione sciamanica ed è radicalmente differente dalla versione edulcorata che ne hanno dato in Occidente le varie trasposizioni New-Age; oppure 2) abituare l’anima alla sofferenza, in modo talmente estremo da non poterla più percepire – da cui tutte le tecniche di meditazione ascetiche induiste. La rivoluzione operata dal Buddha fu proprio quella di proporre una via di mezzo, che non indulgesse nell’attaccamento alle cose ma che non mortificasse il corpo.

Eppure, anche la visione buddhista deve fare i conti con la sofferenza: quando il Buddha Siddhārtha Gautama annunciò le Quattro Nobili Verità, che ruotano tutte attorno al concetto di dolore (Dukkha), la prima di queste recitava: “[…] la nascita è dolore, la vecchiaia è dolore, la malattia è dolore, la morte è dolore; il dispiacere, le lamentazioni, la sofferenza, il tormento e la disperazione sono dolore; l’unirsi con ciò che è spiacevole è dolore; il separarsi da ciò che è piacevole è dolore”.

Chiaro quindi come, all’interno di una concezione simile dell’esistenza, il sottoporsi a stress fisici notevoli assuma un significato di accettazione e di “allenamento” alla vita, fino all’auspicato distacco da questa realtà fatta di illusione e dolore.

yogi_himalaya3

Per quanto riguarda il cattolicesimo, il sacrificio più comune è quello di derivazione ebraica, vale a dire la vera e propria rinuncia a un beneficio o a una ricchezza come forma di contraccambio per una grazia o un favore richiesto alla divinità.

Nella tradizione cattolica, però, il corpo umano ha storicamente avuto un posto subordinato rispetto al concetto di anima. Nonostante la nuova catechesi abbia cercato di rettificare l’attitudine religiosa verso il corpo, ancora oggi per molti fedeli esiste una marcata dicotomia fra fisicità e spirito, come se la purezza dell’anima fosse minacciata costantemente dalle pulsioni animali e peccaminose del suo involucro materiale.

In questo senso nel mondo cattolico il sacrificio (da sacer+facere, rendere sacro) tenta spesso di ridare dignità al corpo disonorato; l’accanimento per il controllo degli istinti, considerati impuri, fa in questi casi sfumare i contorni dell’atto sacrificale, rendendo difficile capire se si tratti effettivamente di un atto di rinunzia al benessere fisico in nome del sacro, oppure di una vera e propria punizione.

A San Pedro Cutud, nelle Filippine, durante le celebrazioni della Settimana Santa, i credenti inscenano la Passione del Cristo in maniera fedele e realistica: il devoto che “interpreta” Gesù, in questa sorta di rappresentazione sacra, viene flagellato, coronato di spine e infine crocifisso realmente (anche se con accorgimenti che rendono il martirio non letale). Pare che Ruben Enaje, un fedele locale, sia stato crocifisso ben 21 volte fino al 2007. Rolando Del Campo, un altro devoto, ha fatto voto di essere crocifisso per 15 volte se Dio avesse voluto far superare a sua moglie una gravidanza difficoltosa.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VI19pLL9VKM]

Chiaramente, come in tutto ciò che riguarda l’ambìto religioso, ognuno è libero di credere ciò che vuole; e di leggere, in queste manifestazioni di fede assoluta, una miopia intellettuale oppure uno strapotere della casta sacerdotale, una ricerca della spettacolarità che sconfina nel divismo, oppure al contrario una commovente espressione di modestia e di umanità. Quello che resta come dato di fatto è che il dolore trova sempre posto nella contemplazione del sacro, in quanto è, assieme alla morte, uno dei misteri essenziali a cui l’uomo ha da sempre cercato una risposta.