The Unexpected Ascent

(This article originally appeared on #ILLUSTRATI n. 44, Che ci faccio qui)

It’s September 7, 2013. At the 0B pavilion of the Wallops Flight Facility, on the east coast of Virginia, NASA is getting ready to launch a rocket towards the Moon.
The LADEE probe was designed to study the atmosphere and the exosphere of our satellite, and to gather information about moon dust. For this purpose, the probe is equipped with two technologically advanced mass spectrometers, and a sensor which is capable of detecting the collisions of the minuscule dust particles that rise up from the lunar ground due to the electrostatic effect.

As the countdown begins, dozens of specialists supervise the data flow coming from the various sectors of the rocket, checking the advancing launch phases on their monitors. Vibrations, balancing, condition of the ogive: everything seems to be going according to plan, but mental tension and concentration are palpable. It is a 280 million dollar mission, after all.

Yet at the 0B pavilion of the Wallops Flight Facility, on the east coast of Virginia, there is also someone who is happily ignoring the frantic atmosphere.
She knows nothing about electrostatics, mass spectrometers, solid rocket fuels or space agencies. Furthermore, she does not even know what a dollar is.
The peaceful creature just knows that she is very satisfied, having just gulped down as many as three flies within two minutes (although she ignores what a minute is).
From the edge of her body of water she looks at the moon, yes, like every night, but without trying to reach it. And like every night, she croaks, pleased with her simple life.

A life that had always been without mysteries, ever since she was just a tadpole. A comfortably predictable life.
But now, all of a sudden – here come the thunderous roar, the flames, the smoke. Absurdity breaks into the reality of our poor frog. From the pool, she rises in the air, sucked up by the rocket’s contrail. Flung up in the sky, in an unexpected flight, in a definitive and shining rapture.

NASA Wallops Flight Facility © Chris Perry

She sees her entire existence passing before her eyes, like in a movie – although she doesn’t know what a movie is. The endless stakeouts waiting for a tiny little insect, the cool nights spent soaking in the water, the eggs she has never managed to lay, the brief moments of fulfilment… but now, because of this cruel and unnatural joke, it all seems to be meaningless!
“There is no criterion for such an end” reflects the amphibious philosopher in the fraction of a second in which the incredible trajectory pushes her towards the rocket’s furnace “but maybe it is better this way. Who would really want to be weighed down by a reason? Every moment I have lived, good or bad, has contributed to bring me here, in a vertiginous ascent towards the flash of light in which I am about to dissolve. If this world is a meaningless dance, it is a dance after all. So let’s dance!”
And with this last thought, the fatal blaze.

One must imagine that frog happy.

The Carney Landis Experiment

Suppose you’re making your way through a jungle, and in pulling aside a bush you find yourself before a huge snake, ready to attack you. All of a sudden adrenaline rushes through your body, your eyes open wide, and you instantly begin to sweat as your heartbeat skyrockets: in a word, you feel afraid.
But is your fear triggering all these physical reactions, or is it the other way around?
To make a less disquieting example, let’s say you fall in love at first sight with someone. Are the endorphines to be accounted for your excitation, or is your excitation causing their discharge through your body?
What comes first, physiological change or emotion? Which is the cause and which is the effect?

This dilemma was a main concern in the first studies on emotion (and it still is, in the field of affective neurosciences). Among the first and most influential hypothesis was the James-Lange theory, which maintained the primacy of physiological changes over feelings: the brain detects a modification in the stimuli coming from the nervous system, and it “interprets” them by giving birth to an emotion.

One of the problems with this theory was the impossibility of obtaining clear evidence. The skeptics argued that if every emotion arises mechanically within the body, then there should be a gland or an organ which, when conveniently stimulated, will invariably trigger the same emotion in every person. Today we know a little bit more of how emotions work, in regard to the amygdala and the different areas of cerebral cortex, but at the beginning of the Twentieth Century the objection against the James-Lange theory was basically this — “come on, find me the muscle of sadness!

In 1924, Carney Landis, a Minnesota University graduate student, set out to understand experimentally whether these physiological changes are the same for everybody. He focused on those modifications that are the most evident and easy to study: the movement of facial muscles when emotion arises. His study was meant to find repetitive patterns in facial expressions.

To understand if all subjects reacted in the same way to emotions, Landis recruited a good number of his fellow graduate students, and began by painting their faces with standard marks, in order to highlight their grimaces and the related movement of facial muscles.
The experiment consisted in subjecting them to different stimuli, while taking pictures of their faces.

At first volunteers were asked to complete some rather harmless tasks: they had to listen to jazz music, smell ammonia, read a passage from the Bible, tell a lie. But the results were quite discouraging, so Landis decided it was time to raise the stakes.

He began to show his subjects pornographic images. Then some medical photos of people with horrendous skin conditions. Then he tried firing a gunshot to capture on film the exact moment of their fright. Still, Landis was having a hard time getting the expressions he wanted, and in all probability he began to feel frustrated. And here his experiment took a dark turn.

He invited his subjects to stick their hand in a bucket, without looking. The bucket was full of live frogs. Click, went his camera.
Landis encouraged them to search around the bottom of the mysterious bucket. Overcoming their revulsion, the unfortunate volunteers had to rummage through the slimy frogs until they found the real surprise: electrical wires, ready to deliver a good shock. Click. Click.
But the worst was yet to come.

The experiment reached its climax when Landis put a live mouse in the subject’s left hand, and a knife in the other. He flatly ordered to decapitate the mouse.
Most of his incredulous and stunned subjects asked Landis if he was joking. He wasn’t, they actually had to cut off the little animal’s head, or he himself would do it in front of their eyes.
At this point, as Landis had hoped, the reactions really became obvious — but unfortunately they also turned out to be more complex than he expected. Confronted with this high-stress situation, some persons started crying, others hysterically laughed; some completely froze, others burst out into swearing.

Two thirds of the paricipants ended up complying with the researcher’s order, and carried out the macabre execution. In any case, the remaining third had to witness the beheading, performed by Landis himself.
As we said, the subjects were mainly other students, but one notable exception was a 13 years-old boy who happened to be at the department as a patient, on the account of psychological issues and high blood pressure. His reaction was documented by Landis’ ruthless snapshots.

Perhaps the most embarassing aspect of the whole story was that the final results for this cruel test — which no ethical board would today authorize — were not even particularly noteworthy.
Landis, in his Studies of Emotional Reactions, II., General Behavior and Facial Expression (published on the Journal of Comparative Psychology, 4 [5], 447-509) came to these conclusions:

1) there is no typical facial expression accompanying any emotion aroused in the experiment;
2) emotions are not characterized by a typical expression or recurring pattern of muscular behavior;
3) smiling was the most common reaction, even during unpleasant experiences;
4) asymmetrical bodily reactions almost never occurred;
5) men were more expressive than women.

Hardly anything that could justify a mouse massacre, and the trauma inflicted upon the paritcipants.

After obtaining his degree, Carney Landis devoted himself to sexual psychopatology. He went on to have a brillant carreer at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. And he never harmed a rodent again, despite the fact that he is now mostly remembered for this ill-considered juvenile experiment rather than for his subsequent fourty years of honorable research.

There is, however, one last detail worth mentioning.
Alex Boese in his Elephants On Acid, underlines how the most interesting figure of all this bizarre experiment went unnoticed: the fact that two thirds of the subjects, although protesting and suffering, obeyed the terrible order.
And this percentage is in fact similar to the one recorded during the infamous Milgram experiment, in which a scientist commanded the subjects to inflict an electric shock to a third individual (in reality, an actor who pretended to receive the painful discharge). In that case as well, despite the ethical conflict, the simple fact that the order came from an authority figure was enough to push the subjects into carrying out an action they perceived as aberrant.

The Milgram experiment took place in 1961, almost forty years after the Landis experiment. “It is often this way with experiments — says Boese — A scientis sets out to prove one thing, but stumbles upon something completely different, something far more intriguing. For this reason, good researchers know they should always pay close attention to strange events that occur during their experiments. A great discovery might be lurking right beneath their eyes – or beneath te blade of their knife.

On facial expressions related to emotions, see also my former post on Guillaume Duchenne (sorry, Italian language only).

Four-legged Espionage

The cat does not offer services. The cat offers itself.
(William S. Burroughs, The Cat Inside, 1986)

Today, after Wikileaks and Snowden, we are used to think of espionage as cyberwarfare: communication hacking, trojans and metadata tracking, attacks to foreign routers, surveillance drones, advanced software, and so on.
In the Sixties, in the middle of the Cold War, the only way to intercept enemy conversations was to physically bug their headquarters.

The problem, of course, was that all factions listend, and knew they were listened to. No agent would talk top secret matters inside a state building hall. The safest method was still the one we’ve seen in many films — if you wanted to discuss in all tranquillity, you had to go outside.
It was therefore essential, for all intelligence systems, to find an appropriate countermeasure: but how could they eavesdrop a conversation out in the open, without arousing suspicion?

In 1961 someone at CIA Directorate of Science and Technology had a flash of inspiration.
There was only one thing the enemy spies would not pay attention to, in the midst of a classified conversation: a cat passing by.
In the hope of achieving the spying breakthrough of the century, CIA launched a secret program called “Acoustic Kitty”. Goal of the project: to build cybercats equipped with surveillance systems, train them to spy, and to infiltrate them inside the Kremlin.

After all, as Terry Pratchett put it, “it is well known that a vital ingredient of success is not knowing that what you’re attempting can’t be done“.

After the first years of theoretical studies, researchers proceeded to test them in vivo.
They implanted a microphone inside a cat’s earing canal, a transmitter with power supply, and an antenna extending towards the animal’s tail. According to the testimony of former CIA official Victor Marchetti, “they slit the cat open, put batteries in him, wired him up. They made a monstrosity“. A monstrosity which nonetheless could allow them to record everything the kitty was hearing.

But there was another, not-so-secondary issue to deal with. The furry incognito agent would have to reach the sensible target without getting distracted along its way — not even by an untimely, proverbial little mouse. And everybody knows training a cat is a tough endeavour.

Some experiments were conducted in order to guide the cat from a distance, basicially to operate it by remote control through electrical impulses (remember José Delgado?). This proved to be harder than expected, and tests followed one antoher with no substantial results. The felines could be “trained to move short distances“; hardly an extraordinary success, even if researchers tried to make it look like a “remarkable scientific achievement“.
Eventually, having lost their patience, or maybe hoping for some unexpected miracle, the agents decided to run some empirical field test. They sent the cat on its first true mission.

On a bright morning in 1966, two Soviet officials were sitting on a park bench on Wisconsin Avenue, right outside the Washington Embassy of Russia, unaware of being targeted for one of the most absurd espionage operations ever.
In a nearby street, history’s first 007 cat was released from an anonymous van.
Now imagine several CIA agents, inside the vehicle, all wearing headphone and receivers, anxiously waiting. After years of laboratory studies, the moment of truth had come at last: would it work? Would they succeed in piloting the cat towards the target? Would the kitty obediently eavesdrop the conversation between the two men?

Their excitement, alas, was short lived.

After less than 10 feet, the Acoustic Kitty was run over by a taxi.
RIP Acoustic Kitty.

With this inglorious accident, after six years of pioneering research which cost 20 million dollars, project Acoustic Kitten was declared a total failure and abandoned.
One March 1967 report, declassified in 2001, stated that “the environmental and security factors in using this technique in a real foreign situation force us to conclude that […] it would not be practical“.

One last note: the story of the cat being hit by a taxi was told by the already mentioned Victor Marchetti; in 2013 Robert Wallace, former director of the Office of Technical Service, disputed the story, asserting that the animal simply did not do what the researchers wanted. “The equipment was taken out of the cat; the cat was re-sewn for a second time, and lived a long and happy life afterwards“.

You can choose your favorite ending.

Tassidermia e vegetarianismo

SideTour_Taxidermy

La tassidermia sembra conoscere, in questi ultimi anni, una sorta di nuova vita. Alimentata dall’interesse per l’epoca vittoriana e dal diffondersi dell’iconografia e l’estetica della sottocultura goth, l’antica arte tassidermica sta velocemente diventando addirittura una moda: innumerevoli sono gli artisti che hanno cominciato ad integrare parti autentiche di animali nei loro gioielli e accessori, come vi confermerà un giro su Etsy, la più grande piattaforma di e-commerce per prodotti artigianali.

taxidermy kitten mouse necklace-f50586

tumblr_lovkxjtwur1qbkjd0o1_400

il_570xN.311750603

il_570xN.530781784_rwry
A Londra e a New York conoscono un crescente successo i workshop che insegnano, nel giro di una giornata o due, i rudimenti del mestiere. Un tassidermista esperto guida i partecipanti passo passo nella preparazione del loro primo esemplare, normalmente un topolino acquistato in un negozio di animali e destinato all’alimentazione dei rettili; molti alunni portano addirittura con sé dei minuscoli abiti, per vestire il proprio topolino alla maniera di Walter Potter.

article-2107482-11F22C86000005DC-726_634x460
Su Bizzarro Bazar abbiamo regolarmente parlato di tassidermia, e sappiamo per esperienza che l’argomento è sensibile: alcuni dei nostri articoli (rimbalzati senza controllo da un social all’altro) hanno scatenato le ire di animalisti e vegetariani, dando vita ad appassionati flame. Ci sembra quindi particolarmente interessante un articolo apparso da poco sull’Huffington Post a cura di Margot Magpie, sui rapporti fra tassidermia e vegetarianesimo.

Margot Magpie è istruttrice tassidermica proprio a Londra, e sostiene che una gran parte dei suoi alunni sia costituita da vegetariani o vegani. Ma come si concilia questa scelta di rispetto per gli animali con l’arte di impagliarli?

article-2107482-11F22FDE000005DC-919_634x408

article-2107482-11F22D3C000005DC-29_634x460

article-2107482-11F22EC7000005DC-410_634x523
Ovviamente, tagliare e preparare il corpo di un animale non implica certo mangiarne la carne. E una gran parte degli artisti, vegetariani e non, che operano oggi nel settore ci tengono a precisare che i loro esemplari non vengono uccisi con lo scopo di creare l’opera tassidermica, ma sono già morti di cause naturali oppure – come nel caso dei topolini – allevati per un motivo più accettabile. (Certo, anche sul commercio dei rettili come animali da compagnia si potrebbe discutere, ma questo esula dal nostro tema). Si tratta in definitiva di materiale biologico che andrebbe sprecato e distrutto, quindi perché non usarlo?

article-2107482-11DCE7C2000005DC-704_634x505

article-2107482-11F230BC000005DC-859_634x449

article-2107482-11F231D9000005DC-824_634x483
Ma preparare un animale comporta comunque il superamento di un fattore di disgusto che sembrerebbe incompatibile con il vegetarianismo: significa entrare in contatto diretto con la carne e il sangue, sventrare, spellare, raschiare e via dicendo. A quanto dice Margot, però, i suoi allievi vegetariani colgono una differenza fondamentale fra l’allevamento degli animali a fini alimentari – con tutti i problemi etici che l’industrializzazione del mercato della carne porta con sé – e la tassidermia, che è vista invece come un rispettoso atto d’amore per l’animale stesso. “La tassidermia per me significa essere stupiti dall’anatomia e dalla biologia delle creature, e aiutarle a continuare a vivere anche dopo la morte, in modo che noi possiamo vederle ed apprezzarle”, dice un suo studente.

La passione per la tecnica tassidermica proviene spesso dall’interesse per la storia naturale. Visitare un museo e ammirare splendidi animali esotici (che normalmente non potremmo vedere) perfettamente conservati, può far nascere la curiosità sui processi utilizzati per prepararli. E questo amore per gli animali, dice Margot, è una costante riconoscibile in tutti i suoi alunni.

article-2107482-11F22AA9000005DC-736_634x455
“Combatto con questo dilemma da un po’. – racconta un’altra artista vegetariana – La gente mi dice che ‘non dovrebbe piacermi’, ma ci sono piccole cose nella vita che ci danno gioia, e non possiamo farne a meno. Mi sembra che sia come donare all’animale una vita interamente nuova, permettergli di vivere per sempre in un nuovo mondo d’amore, per essere attentamente rimesso in sesto, posizionato e decorato, ed è un’impresa premurosa e amorevole”.

article-2107482-11F235DE000005DC-79_634x454
L’altro problema è che non tutti i lavori tassidermici sono “naturalistici”, cioè mirati a riprodurre esattamente l’animale nelle pose e negli atteggiamenti che aveva in vita. Non a caso facevamo l’esempio della tassidermia antropomorfica, in cui l’animale viene vestito e fissato in pose umane, talvolta inserito in contesti e diorami di fantasia, oppure integrato come parte di un accessorio di vestiario, un pendaglio, un anello. Si tratta di una tassidermia più personale, che riflette il gusto creativo dell’artista. Per alcuni questa pratica è irrispettosa dell’animale, ma non tutti la pensano così: secondo Margot e alcuni dei suoi studenti la cosa non crea alcun conflitto, fintanto che il corpo proviene da ambiti controllati.

article-2107482-11F233AB000005DC-674_634x453

“Credo che utilizzare animali provenienti da fonti etiche per la tassidermia sia positivo e, per questo motivo, posso continuare felicemente con il vegetarianismo e con il mio interesse di lunga data per la tassidermia. Sento di molti tassidermisti moderni che usano esclusivamente animali morti per cause naturali o in incidenti, quindi credo che ci troviamo in una nuova era di tassidermia etica. Sono felice di farne parte”.

C’è chi invece il problema l’ha aggirato del tutto. L’artista americana Aimée Baldwin ha creato quella che chiama “tassidermia vegana”: i suoi uccelli sono in realtà sculture costruite con carta crespa. Il lavoro certosino e la conoscenza del materiale, con cui sperimenta da anni, le permettono di ottenere un risultato incredibilmente realistico.

Vegan Taxidermy  An Intersection of Art, Science, and Conservation

Raven-360x240

Kingfisher432

HeronCity432

AmericanAvocet-288x432

Ecco il link all’articolo di Margot Magpie. Gran parte delle fotografie nell’articolo provengono da questo articolo su un workshop tassidermico newyorkese. Ecco infine il sito ufficiale di Aimée Baldwin.

Ivanov e lo Scimpanzuomo

616296853

Nell’Isola del Dr. Moreau, di H.G. Wells, il folle scienziato che dà il titolo al romanzo insegue il progetto di abbattere le barriere fra gli esseri umani e gli animali; con gli strumenti della vivisezione e dei trapianti, vuole sconfiggere gli istinti bestiali e trasformare tutte le belve feroci in innocui servitori dell’umanità. Certo, detto così il piano a lungo termine sembra piuttosto nebuloso, e capiamo che in realtà è la vertigine della ricerca a muovere e motivare l’allucinato Dottore:

Io mi ponevo una domanda, studiavo i metodi per ottenere una risposta e trovavo invece una nuova domanda. Era mai possibile? Voi non potete immaginare quanto ciò sia di sprone ad un ricercatore della verità e quale passione intellettuale nasca in lui. Voi non potete immaginare gli strani e indescrivibili diletti di tali smanie intellettuali.
La cosa che sta qui davanti a voi non è più un animale, una creatura, ma un problema. […] Quello che io volevo, la sola cosa che io volessi, era trovare il limite estremo della plasticità delle forme viventi.

Gli esperimenti di Moreau non hanno, nel romanzo, un lieto fine. Ma sarebbe possibile, almeno in via teorica, l’ibridazione fra l’uomo e le altre specie animali?

Fino a poco tempo fa, si credeva che i rapporti sessuali interspecifici fossero poco diffusi in natura: alcune recenti ricerche, però, sembrerebbero indicare nell’ibridazione un fattore più significativo di quanto sospettato per l’evoluzione delle specie.
Questo accade fra piccoli insetti, quando ad esempio nasce una “nuova” farfalla, risultato dell’incrocio di specie differenti, che mostra colorazioni impercettibilmente modificate rispetto ai genitori; ma ovviamente, per animali di stazza maggiore le cose sono più complicate. Se escludiamo i rari episodi di “stupro” dei rinoceronti da parte degli elefanti, o gli incroci fra grizzly e orsi polari, nei mammiferi gli accoppiamenti fra specie diverse sono stati osservati quasi esclusivamente in cattività (anche se questo non significa che non esistano in natura comportamenti sessualmente opportunistici). E in cattività, infatti, hanno visto la luce tutti quegli ibridi dai nomi bislacchi e un po’ ridicoli, che ricordano un fantasioso libro per bambini: il ligre, il tigone, il leopone, il zebrallo, e via dicendo (al riguardo, Wiki ospita una breve lista).

Zebroid

Questi animali ibridi, creati o meno dall’uomo, sterili o fertili, esistono soltanto in virtù della vicinanza e compatibilità di codice genetico fra i genitori. Il mulo nasce perché cavalla e asino hanno un patrimonio cromosomico similare fra di loro, e la cosa interessante è che la differenza nel numero dei cromosomi non sembra costituire una barriera, una volta che i geni si “assomigliano” abbastanza.

Se ci guardassimo attorno con l’occhio famelico del Dr. Moreau, alla ricerca del candidato ideale da ibridare con l’essere umano, gli animali su cui il nostro sguardo si poserebbe immediatamente sarebbero i cugini primati. Gli scimpanzé, per esempio, condividono con noi il 99,4% del patrimonio genetico, tanto che c’è chi discute sull’opportunità o meno di farli rientrare nella categoria tassonomica dell’Homo. Quindi, se proprio volessimo cominciare gli esperimenti, sarebbe necessario partire dalle scimmie.

ivanov

Alla stessa conclusione, anche se a quel tempo ancora non si parlava di DNA o cromosomi, era arrivato il dottor Il’ja Ivanovič Ivanov. Biologo, ricercatore, professore ordinario dell’Università di Kharkov, Ivanov era un’autorità nel campo dell’inseminazione artificiale. All’inizio degli anni ’20 aveva dimostrato come si poteva far accoppiare un singolo stallone con 500 cavalle, portando la tecnica della riproduzione “assistita” a livelli stupefacenti per l’epoca.

Ivanov conduceva contemporaneamente altri tipi di sperimentazioni: era interessato all’idea dell’ibridazione, e fu tra i primi ad incrociare con successo ratti e topi, cavie e conigli, zebre ed asini, bisonti e mucche, e molti altri animali. La genetica muoveva allora i suoi primi passi, ma già prometteva bene, tanto che anche i vertici del PCUS si erano mostrati interessati alla creazione di nuove specie domestiche. A quanto ci racconta lo storico Kirill O. Rossianov, però, Ivanov voleva spingere i suoi esperimenti ancora oltre – desiderava essere il primo scienziato della Storia a creare, mediante inseminazione artificiale, un ibrido uomo-scimmia.

Muovendosi con circospezione, un po’ per conoscenze private e un po’ attraverso richieste ufficiali, Ivanov era riuscito a farsi accordare dall’Istituto Pasteur di Parigi il permesso di utilizzare per i suoi esperimenti la stazione primatologica di Kindia, nella Guinea Francese. Dopo circa un anno di corteggiamento dei vari burocrati del governo sovietico, nel 1925 finalmente lo scienziato riuscì a far stanziare un finanziamento alla sua ricerca da parte dell’Accademia delle Scienze dell’URSS per l’equivalente di 10.000$. Così, a marzo dell’anno successivo, Ivanov partì speranzoso per la Guinea.

Ma le cose andarono male fin dall’inizio: appena arrivato, comprese subito che il laboratorio di primatologia non ospitava alcuno scimpanzé sessualmente maturo. Non fu prima del febbraio dell’anno successivo che Ivanov riuscì a procedere con i primi tentativi di inseminazione artificiale: assistito da suo figlio, Ivanov inserì dello sperma umano nell’utero di due esemplari di scimpanzé e nel giugno del 1927 inoculò lo sperma in una terza femmina della colonia. Di chi fosse il seme umano non è dato sapere, l’unica cosa certa è che non era né di Ivanov né di suo figlio. Nessuno dei tre tentativi di inseminazione andò a buon fine, e Ivanov ripartì, probabilmente amareggiato, portandosi a Parigi tutte le scimmie che poteva (tredici esemplari).

Mentre era in Guinea, Ivanov aveva anche cercato di trovare delle volontarie umane disposte a farsi inseminare da sperma di scimmia – anche qui, stranamente, senza alcuna fortuna.
Tornato in Russia, però, non si diede per vinto e nel 1929, sempre spalleggiato dall’Accademia, ricominciò a pianificare i suoi esperimenti, riuscendo addirittura a costituire una commissione apposita con il sostegno della Società dei Biologi Materialisti. Avrebbe avuto bisogno di cinque volontarie donne: fece in tempo a reclutarne soltanto una, disposta – nel caso l’esperimento fosse andato a buon fine – a concepire un figlio metà uomo e metà scimmia. Proprio in quel momento arrivò da Parigi una terribile notizia: l’ultimo esemplare maschio fra quelli riportati in Europa dalla Guinea, un orango, era morto. Prima di poter mettere le mani su un nuovo gruppo di scimmie, avrebbe dovuto aspettare almeno un altro anno.

the-family-yeti

Nel frattempo, però, il vento era cambiato all’interno dell’Accademia: i finanziamenti vennero revocati, Ivanov fu criticato per il suo operato e in men che non si dica, nel 1930, venne epurato dal regime stalinista. Esiliato in Kazakistan, vi morì dopo due anni.

Come dimostra la storia di Ivanov, meno di un secolo fa la barriera per questo tipo di ricerche era l’acerbo sviluppo della tecnologia; oggi, ovviamente, il principale ostacolo sarebbe di stampo etico. E così  per il momento lo “scimpanzuomo“, com’è stato battezzato, rimane ancora un’ipotesi fantascientifica.

Su Battileddu

Il Carnevale, si sa, è la versione cattolica dei saturnalia romani e delle più antiche festività greche in onore di Dioniso. Si trattava di un momento in cui le leggi normali del pudore, delle gerarchie e dell’ordine sociale venivano completamente rovesciate, sbeffeggiate e messe a soqquadro. Questo era possibile proprio perché accadeva all’interno di un preciso periodo, ben delimitato e codificato: e, nonostante i millenni trascorsi e la secolarizzazione di questa festa, il Carnevale mantiene ancora in parte questo senso di liberatoria follia.

Ma a Lula, in Sardegna, ogni anno si celebra un Carnevale del tutto particolare, molto distante dalle colorate (e commerciali) mascherate cittadine. Si tratta di un rituale allegorico antichissimo, giunto inalterato fino ai giorni nostri grazie alla tenacia degli abitanti di questo paesino nel salvaguardare le proprie tradizioni. È un Carnevale che non rinnega i lati più oscuri ed apertamente pagani che stanno all’origine di questa festa, incentrato com’è sul sacrificio e sulla crudeltà.

battileddu3
Il protagonista del Carnevale lulese è chiamato su Battileddu (o Batiledhu), la “vittima”, che incarna forse proprio Dioniso stesso – dio della natura selvaggia, forza vitale primordiale e incontrollabile. L’uomo che lo interpreta è acconciato in maniera terribile: vestito di pelli di montone, ha il volto coperto di nera fuliggine e il muso sporco di sangue. Sulla sua testa, coperta da un fazzoletto nero da donna, è fissato un mostruoso copricapo cornuto, ulteriormente adornato da uno stomaco di capra.

007

su_battileddu_2011_20110302_1137676125

def07268-fb02-495d-9ec8-83f9636e2b92_590_590_0
Le pelli, le corna e il viso imbrattato di cenere e sangue sarebbero già abbastanza spaventosi: come non bastasse, su Battileddu porta al collo dei rumorosi campanacci (marrazzos) mentre sotto di essi, sulla pancia, penzola un grosso stomaco di bue che è stato riempito di sangue ed acqua.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

6775177204_f6fb9a5fd9_z

url

battileddu2

Per quanto possa incutere timore, su Battileddu è una vittima sacrificale, e la rappresentazione “teatrale” che segue lo mostra molto chiaramente. Il dio folle della natura è stato catturato, e viene trascinato per le strade del villaggio. Il rovesciamento carnascialesco è evidente nei cosiddetti Battileddos Gattias, uomini travestiti da vedove che però indossano dei gambali da maschio: si aggirano intonando lamenti funebri per la vittima, porgendo bambole di pezza alle donne tra la folla affinché le allattino. Ad un certo punto della sfilata, le finte vedove si siedono in cerchio e cominciano a passarsi un pizzicotto l’una con l’altra (spesso dopo aver costretto qualcuno fra il pubblico ad unirsi a loro); la prima a cui sfuggirà una risata sarà costretta a pagare pegno, che normalmente consiste nel versare da bere.

8459873022_377977706a_o

6915217689_59ecb0b44d

09-su-battileddu-viene-percosso
In questo chiassoso e sregolato corteo funebre, intanto, su Battileddu continua ad essere pungolato, battuto e strattonato dalle funi di cuoio con cui l’hanno legato i Battileddos Massajos, i custodi del bestiame, uomini vestiti da contadini. È uno spettacolo cruento, al quale nemmeno il pubblico si sottrae: tutti cercano di colpire e di bucare lo stomaco di bue che il dio porta sulla pancia, in modo che il sangue ne sgorghi, fecondando la terra. Quando questo accade, gli spettatori se ne imbrattano il volto.

carnevale_lula_100213_2053

reportage_267_15
Alla fine, lo stomaco di su Battileddu viene squarciato del tutto, e il dio si accascia nel sangue, sventrato. Si alza un grido: l’an mortu, Deus meu, l’an irgangatu! (“l’hanno ucciso, Dio mio, lo hanno sgozzato!”). Ecco che le vedove intonano nuovi lamenti e mettono in scena un corteo funebre, ma le parole e i gesti delle “pie donne” sono in realtà osceni e scurrili.

battileddu4

8467947728_da57f3fbf2_o

su-batiledhu1
Nel frattempo un altro capovolgimento ha avuto luogo: due dei “custodi” sono diventati bestie da soma e, aggiogati ad un carro come buoi, l’hanno tirato per le strade durante la rappresentazione. È su questo carro che viene issato il corpo esanime della vittima, per essere esibito alla piazza in alcuni giri trionfali. Ma la finzione viene presto svelata: un bicchiere di vino riporta in vita su Battileddu, e la festa vera e propria può finalmente avere inizio.

carnevale_lula_100213_033

carnevale_lula_100213_016

Su-Battileddu-Issocatore
Questa messa in scena della passione e del cruento sacrificio di su Battileddu si ricollega certamente agli antichi riti agricoli di fecondazione della terra; la cosa davvero curiosa è che la tradizione sarebbe potuta scomparire quando, nella prima metà del ‘900, venne abbandonata. È ricomparsa soltanto nel 2001, a causa dell’interesse antropologico cresciuto attorno a questa caratteristica figura, nell’ambito dello studio e valorizzazione delle maschere sarde. Ora, il dio impazzito che diviene montone sacrificale è di nuovo tra di noi.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNGkd056N9Q]

(Grazie, freya76!)

Pinar Yolaçan

Pinar Yolaçan è un’artista turca, nata nel 1981 e residente a New York.

Le sue serie di fotografie, Perishables (2005-2007), Maria (2008-2010) e Mother Goddess (2011-2012) sono complesse indagini sulla figura della donna, straordinarie per più di un motivo.

In Perishables, Pinar Yolaçan fotografa alcune matrone inglesi su sfondo bianco. I loro volti severi, arcigni e orgogliosi sono diretti discendenti del colonialismo, della grandezza dell’Impero. Ma, in contrasto con queste facce talvolta dure e altezzose, ecco che l’artista opera un’inversione scioccante: le anziane signore sono infatti vestite di carne animale.

Viscere, budella, nervi, trippe, organi interni sono stati aperti, ripuliti e cuciti in fogge sontuose, abbinati ai velluti e alle sete, per ricreare nella commistione di organico e tessile lo stile barocco della moda femminile coloniale.

In questo modo si opera l’inversione di cui parlavamo: così come gli antropologi dell’800 scattavano fotografie ai “primitivi” delle colonie, ecco che ora sono proprio queste anziane e nobili signore, reliquie di un Impero in rovina, ad essere sottomesse al freddo occhio della macchina fotografica; così esposte, grazie alla carne che le ricopre, sembrano al tempo stesso vestite e nude, e tutta la loro affettata finezza scompare nella brutale realtà del corpo e del cibo. Qualsiasi sia la cultura che prendiamo ad alibi, pare dire Yolaçan, siamo e restiamo primitivi, e le vesti dietro cui nascondiamo la nostra nudità sono destinate a deperire, marcire, passare (da cui il titolo della serie).

Nella serie Maria, Yolaçan continua questo discorso, mostrando però l’altra faccia della medaglia: ancora una volta rivestite di interiora animali, le sue modelle sono ora donne afro-brasiliane che vivono nell’isola di Itaparica, uno dei porti tristemente famosi per il commercio di schiavi in epoca coloniale.

Yolaçan crea gli abiti su misura, prestando particolare attenzione alla fisionomia della sua modella, e integrando in maniera talvolta quasi impercettibile i tessuti del vestito con la placenta e gli altri organi animali acquistati al mercato.

Questa serie, a marcare la specularità e complementarietà con la precedente, mostra i soggetti su sfondo nero: ancora una volta, negli occhi delle donne ritratte, traspaiono tutta la forza e l’orgoglio di un’appartenenza culturale.

Quello che è davvero sensazionale è il modo in cui i vestiti di carne di Pinar Yolaçan sembrano smascherare la finzione in un verso e nell’altro: in Perishables riuscivano a far crollare la maschera della “cultura”; in Maria è il contrario – la cultura emerge attraverso gli strati di polpa cruda. Le fotografie ci mostrano l’umanità di un popolo storicamente sfruttato e mercificato, trattato quindi come carne da mercato.

Nella sua ultima serie di fotografie, intitolata Mother Goddess, Yolaçan è tornata nella sua Anatolia, culla di una moltitudine di civiltà, per cercare le radici della figura femminile. Così, battendo la campagna turca, ha trovato e scritturato come modelle diverse contadine dalle forme giunoniche.

Confezionando dei fantasiosi abiti per i soggetti delle sue fotografie (ma questa volta senza carne cruda!), o anche tramite un elaborato body paint, Yolaçan esplora in questa serie le forme voluttuose delle dèe ancestrali immortalate nelle sculture neolitiche della Mesopotamia.

In virtù dell’assenza di volti, qui sempre coperti o lasciati fuori campo, le foto assumono un tono sospeso, mitico, stemperato però dai colori pop e sgargianti degli sfondi.

Un’estetica che sembra a prima vista molto distante dalla quotidiana proposta di corpi asettici o anoressici oppure ricostruiti dal bisturi: eppure le fotografie di Mother Goddess racchiudono e rielaborano l’archetipo della femminilità, e incantano l’occhio per le pose statuarie che rimandano direttamente alle sculture e ai feticci di fertilità che sono fra le più antiche opere d’arte mai create dall’uomo.

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Pinar Yolaçan.

Nim Chimpsky

È possibile insegnare alle scimmie a comunicare con noi attraverso il linguaggio dei segni? È quello che voleva scoprire il dottor Herbert Terrace della Columbia University di New York quando, all’inizio degli anni ’70, diede avvio al suo rivoluzionario”progetto Nim”.

Nim Chimpsky era uno scimpanzé di due settimane, chiamato così per parodiare il nome di Noam Chomsky, linguista e intellettuale fra i più influenti del XX Secolo (chimp in inglese significa appunto scimpanzé).
Nato in cattività presso l’Institute of Primate Studies di Norman (Oklahoma), nel dicembre del 1973 Nim venne sottratto alle cure di sua madre, e affidato da Terrace a una famiglia umana: quella di Stephanie LaFarge, sua ex-allieva. L’intento era quello di crescere il cucciolo in tutto e per tutto come un essere umano, vestirlo come un bambino, trattarlo come un bambino, insegnargli le buone maniere, ma soprattutto cercare di fargli apprendere il linguaggio dei sordomuti.

L’idea di Terrace potrà sembrare un po’ folle e temeraria, ma va inserita in un contesto scientifico peculiare: la linguistica era agli albori, e da poco veniva associata all’etologia per comprendere se si potesse parlare di linguaggio vero e proprio anche nel caso degli animali. Lo stesso Chomsky faceva parte di quella fazione che sosteneva che il linguaggio fosse una caratteristica specifica e assolutamente unica dell’essere umano; secondo questa tesi, gli animali certamente comunicano fra di loro – e si fanno capire bene anche da noi! – ma non possono utilizzare una vera e propria sintassi, che sarebbe prerogativa della nostra struttura neurologica.
Se Nim fosse riuscito ad imparare il linguaggio dei segni, sarebbe stato un vero e proprio terremoto per la comunità scientifica.

Il professor Terrace però commise da subito un grave errore.
La famiglia a cui aveva affidato Nim non era effettivamente la più adatta per l’esperimento: nessuno dei figli della LaFarge era fluente nel linguaggio dei segni, e quindi nella prima fase della sua vita, quella più delicata per l’apprendimento, Nim non imparò granché; inoltre, la madre adottiva era un’ex-hippie con un’idea piuttosto liberale nell’educare i figli.
Nim finì per essere lasciato libero di scorrazzare per il parco, di mettere la casa sottosopra, e addirittura di fumarsi qualche spinello assieme ai “genitori”.
Quando Terrace si rese conto che non stava arrivando alcun questionario compilato, che certificasse i progressi del suo scimpanzé, comprese che l’esperimento era seriamente a rischio. Il clima indisciplinato e caotico di casa LaFarge metteva in pericolo l’intero studio.


Terrace decise quindi di incaricare una studentessa ventenne, Laura-Ann Petitto, dell’educazione di Nim.
Strappato per una seconda volta alla figura materna, lo scimpanzé venne trasferito in una residenza di proprietà della Columbia University, dove la Petitto cominciò un più rigido e intensivo programma di addestramento.
In poco tempo Nim imparò oltre 120 segni, e i suoi progressi cominciarono a fare scalpore. Conversava con i suoi maestri in maniera che sembrava prodigiosa, e in generale faceva mostra di un’intelligenza acuta, tanto da arrivare addirittura a mentire.

Ma ormai Nim non era già più un cucciolo, e con la giovane età cominciò a crescere di mole e soprattutto di forza. I suoi muscoli erano potenti come quelli di due maschi umani messi assieme, e spesso Nim non era in grado di misurare la violenza di un suo gesto: gli stessi giochi che qualche mese prima erano spensierati, diventavano per gli addestratori sempre più pericolosi perché lo scimpanzé non si rendeva conto della sua forza.
Con lo sviluppo sessuale e la maturazione verso l’età adulta, inoltre, crebbe anche la sua aggressività: la Petitto venne attaccata diverse volte, due delle quali in maniera molto grave. I morsi di Nim in un’occasione le lacerarono la faccia, costringendola a 37 punti di sutura, e in un’altra le recisero un tendine.

La tensione psicologica era insopportabile, e la Petitto decise di lasciare l’esperimento… e di lasciare Terrace, con il quale aveva cominciato una relazione sentimentale.
Joyce Butler, una studentessa di vent’anni, entrò a sostituire la Petitto come terza madre adottiva di Nim. Anche lei fu più volte attaccata dalla scimmia, e la difficoltà di reperire fondi fece infine decidere a Terrace di dichiarare concluso l’esperimento, e smantellare il progetto dopo solo quattro anni.

Qui cominciò un vero e proprio calvario per il povero Nim. Egli non aveva infatto mai avuto contatti con altri primati, essendo sempre vissuto con gli umani: quando gli scienziati lo riportarono all’Institute of Primate Studies, Nim era completamente terrorizzato dai suoi simili e ci vollero diversi uomini per staccarlo da Joyce Butler, alla quale si era avvinghiato, per essere rinchiuso nella gabbia.
Per “lo scimpanzé che sapeva parlare”, abituato a mangiare a tavola in compagnia degli esseri umani e a correre libero nel parco, la prigionia fu uno shock terribile. Ma le cose erano destinate a peggiorare, perché l’istituto decise di trasferirlo in un centro di ricerca scientifico in cui si faceva sperimentazione sugli animali.

Rinchiuso in una gabbia ancora più angusta, di fianco a decine di altre scimmie terrorizzate in attesa di essere inoculate con virus e antibiotici, il futuro di Nim era tutt’altro che roseo. Terrace non muoveva un dito per salvarlo da quel destino, e così ci pensarono alcuni degli assistenti che avevano preso parte al progetto: organizzarono un battage mediatico denunciando le condizioni inumane in cui Nim era tenuto, diedero avvio a un’azione legale e infine riuscirono a farlo trasferire in un ranch di recupero per animali selvatici, liberando anche le altre scimmie destinate agli esperimenti.

Nonostante fosse al sicuro in questa riserva naturale, Nim era ormai provato, abbattuto e depresso; restava immobile e senza mangiare anche per giorni. Quando dopo anni la sua prima madre adottiva, Stephanie LaFarge, gli fece visita e volle entrare nella gabbia, Nim la riconobbe immediatamente e, come se la ritenesse responsabile per averlo abbandonato, la attaccò quando lei provò ad entrare nella gabbia.

Eppure arrivò per Nim almeno un’ultima, insperata, dolce sorpresa: dopo un lungo periodo di solitudine, un altro scimpanzé, femmina, venne introdotto nella sua gabbia e per la prima volta Nim riuscì a socializzare con la nuova arrivata.
Potè così passare gli ultimi anni della sua vita in compagnia di una nuova amica, forse più sincera e fidata di quanto non fossero stati gli uomini. Nim morì nel 2000 per un attacco di cuore.

Il professor Terrace, dopo aver cercato e ottenuto la fama grazie a questo ambizioso progetto, tornò sui suoi passi e dichiarò che il progetto era stato fallimentare; dichiarò che Nim non aveva mai veramente imparato a formulare delle frasi di senso compiuto, ma che era soltanto divenuto abile ad associare certi segni alla ricompensa, e aveva capito quali sequenze usare per ottenere del cibo. La voglia dei ricercatori di vedere in un animale un’intelligenza simile alla nostra aveva insomma viziato i risultati, che andavano grandemente ridimensionati.
Ancora oggi però c’è chi è convinto del contrario: gli assistenti e i collaboratori che hanno conosciuto Nim e si sono presi cura di lui continuano anche oggi a sostenere che Nim sapesse davvero parlare in maniera chiara e precisa, e che se Terrace si fosse degnato di stare un po’ di più con lo scimpanzé, invece di relazionarsi con lui soltanto al momento di farsi bello davanti ai fotografi, l’avrebbe certamente capito.

La ricerca, per la metodologia confusionaria con cui venne condotta, ha effettivamente un valore scientifico relativo, e i dati raccolti si prestano a interpretazioni troppo volubili.
D’altronde un esperimento come il progetto Nim è figlio del suo tempo, e sarebbe impensabile replicarlo oggi; lo strano destino di Nim, questo essere speciale che ha vissuto due vite in una, la prima come “umano” e la seconda come animale da laboratorio, continua però a sollevare altre questioni, forse ancora più fondamentali. Ci interroga sui confini (reali? inventati?) che separano l’uomo dalla bestia, e soprattutto sui limiti etici della ricerca.

Nel 2010 James Marsh (già regista di Man On Wire) ha diretto uno splendido documentario, Project Nim, costituito in larga parte di materiale d’archivio inedito, che ripercorre in maniera commovente e appassionante l’intera vicenda.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – I

New York, Novembre 2011. È notte. Il vento gelido frusta le guance, s’intrufola fra i grattacieli e scende sulle strade in complicati vortici, senza che si possa prevedere da che parte arriverà la prossima sferzata. Anche le correnti d’aria sono folli ed esagerate, qui a Times Square, dove il tramonto non esiste, perché i maxischermi e le insegne brillanti degli spettacoli on-Broadway non lasciano posto alle ombre. Le basse temperature e il forte vento non fermano però il vostro esploratore del bizzarro, che con la scusa di una settimana nella Grande Mela, ha deciso di accompagnarvi alla scoperta di alcuni dei negozi e dei musei più stravaganti di New York.

Partiamo proprio da qui, da Times Square, dove un’insegna luminosa attira lo sguardo del curioso, promettendo meraviglie: si tratta del museo Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not!, una delle più celebri istituzioni mondiali del weird, che conta decine di sedi in tutto il mondo. Proudly freakin’ out families for 90 years! (“Spaventiamo le famiglie, orgogliosamente, da 90 anni”), declama uno dei cartelloni animati.

L’idea di base del Ripley’s sta proprio in quel “credici, oppure no”: si tratta di un museo interamente dedicato allo strano, al deviante, al macabro e all’incredibile. Ad ogni nuovo pezzo in esposizione sembra quasi che il museo ci sfidi a comprendere se sia tutto vero o se si tratti una bufala. Se volete sapere la risposta, beh, la maggior parte delle sorprendenti e incredibili storie raccontate durante la visita sono assolutamente vere. Scopriamo quindi le reali dimensioni dei nani e dei giganti più celebri, vediamo vitelli siamesi e giraffe albine impagliate, fotografie e storie di freak celebri.

Ma il tono ironico e fieramente “exploitation” di questa prima parte di museo lascia ben presto il posto ad una serie di reperti ben più seri e spettacolari; le sezioni antropologiche diventano via via più impressionanti, alternando vetrine con armi arcaiche a pezzi decisamente più macabri, come quelli che adornano le sale dedicate alle shrunken heads (le teste umane rimpicciolite dai cacciatori tribali del Sud America), o ai meravigliosi kapala tibetani.

Tutto ciò che può suscitare stupore trova posto nelle vetrine del museo: dalla maschera funeraria di Napoleone Bonaparte, alla pistola minuscola ma letale che si indossa come un anello, alle microsculture sulle punte di spillo.

Talvolta è la commistione di buffoneria carnevalesca e di inaspettata serietà a colpire lo spettatore. Ad esempio, in una pacchiana sala medievaleggiante, che propone alcuni strumenti di tortura in “azione” su ridicoli manichini, troviamo però una sedia elettrica d’epoca (vera? ricostruita?) e perfino una testa umana sezionata (questa indiscutibilmente vera). Il tutto per il giubilo dei bambini, che al Ripley’s accorrono a frotte, e per la perplessità dei genitori che, interdetti, non sanno più se hanno fatto davvero bene a portarsi dietro la prole.

Insomma, quello che resta maggiormente impresso del Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not è proprio questa furba commistione di ciarlataneria e scrupolo museale, che mira a confondere e strabiliare lo spettatore, lasciandolo frastornato e meravigliato.

Per tornare unpo’ con i piedi per terra, eccoci quindi a un museo più “serio” e “ufficiale”, ma di certo non più sobrio. Si tratta del celeberrimo American Museum of Natural History, uno dei musei di storia naturale più grandi del mondo – quello, per intenderci, in cui passava una notte movimentata Ben Stiller in una delle sue commedie di maggior successo.

Una giornata intera basta appena per visitare tutte le sale e per soffermarsi velocemente sulle varie sezioni scientifiche che meriterebbero ben più attenzione.

Oltre alle molte sale dedicate all’antropologia paleoamericana (ricostruzioni accurate degli utensili e dei costumi dei nativi, ecc.), il museo offre mostre stagionali in continuo rinnovo, una sala IMAX per la proiezione di filmati di interesse scientifico, un’impressionante sezione astronomica, diverse sale dedicate alla paleontologia e all’evoluzione dell’uomo, e infine la celebre sezione dedicata ai dinosauri (una delle più complete al mondo, amata alla follia dai bambini).

Ma forse i veri gioielli del museo sono due in particolare: il primo è costituito dall’ampio uso di splendidi diorami, in cui gli animali impagliati vengono inseriti all’interno di microambienti ricreati ad arte. Che si tratti di mammiferi africani, asiatici o americani, oppure ancora di animali marini, questi tableaux sono accurati fin nel minimo dettaglio per dare un’idea di spontanea vitalità, e da una vetrina all’altra ci si immerge in luoghi distanti, come se fossimo all’interno di un attimo raggelato, di fronte ad alcuni degli esemplari tassidermici più belli del mondo per precisione e naturalezza.

L’altra sezione davvero mozzafiato è quella dei minerali. Strano a dirsi, perché pensiamo ai minerali come materia fissa, inerte, e che poche emozioni può regalare – fatte salve le pietre preziose, che tanto piacciono alle signore e ai ladri cinematografici. Eppure, appena entriamo nelle immense sale dedicate alle pietre, si spalanca di fronte a noi un mondo pieno di forme e colori alieni. Non soltanto siamo stati testimoni, nel resto del museo, della spettacolare biodiversità delle diverse specie animali, o dei misteri del cosmo e delle galassie: ecco, qui, addirittura le pietre nascoste nelle pieghe della terra che calpestiamo sembrano fatte apposta per lasciarci a bocca aperta.

Teniamo a sottolineare che nessuna foto può rendere giustizia ai colori, ai riflessi e alle mille forme incredibili dei minerali esposti e catalogati nelle vetrine di questa sezione.

Alla fine della visita è normale sentirsi leggermente spossati: il Museo nel suo complesso non è certo una passeggiata rilassante, anzi, è una continua ginnastica della meraviglia, che richiede curiosità e attenzione per i dettagli. Eppure la sensazione che si ha, una volta usciti, è di aver soltanto graffiato la superficie: ogni aspetto di questo mondo nasconde, ora ne siamo certi, infinite sorprese.

(continua…)

Gopher Hole Museum

(Articolo a cura della nostra guestblogger Marialuisa)

Nel caso a qualcuno venisse voglia di farsi un tour del Canada e passasse per caso da Tourrington, ad Alberta, non si dimentichi di visitare il motivo per cui la piccola cittadina ha iniziato a godere di fama internazionale, il Gopher Hole Museum.

Aperto nel 1995 nel tentativo di aumentare il turismo locale, il Gopher Hole Museum è un’esposizione stabile di ben 47 diorama rappresentanti scene di umana quotidianità… interpretate però da graziosi scoiattoli impagliati. Come per tutto ciò che riguarda la tassidermia, sta a chi guarda decidere se tutto questo è affascinante, divertente o raccapricciante.

Gli scoiattoli sono agghindati e vestiti di tutto punto, a tema con il loro “buco” (gopher hole si riferisce infatti alle tane scavate nel terreno da questi particolari roditori), arredato con minuzia di particolari, dove ci vengono mostrati perfino i loro pensieri e dialoghi attraverso dei fumetti attaccati agli scoiattoli stessi o disegnati sullo sfondo.


Il museo, alla sua apertura, era passato del tutto inosservato; paradossalmente, infatti, la gloria internazionale è arrivata dall’involontaria pubblicità gratuita generata dall’entrata in gioco del PETA, movimento per il trattamento etico degli animali.
L’apertura del museo, con i suoi allegri animaletti impagliati, ha generato malcontento e suscitato forti critiche dal movimento. La contestazione principale è quella che si sarebbe potuto creare lo stesso museo utilizzando riproduzioni piuttosto che veri scoiattoli. Si può discutere su come l’utilizzo di riproduzioni piuttosto che animali veri avrebbe modificato l’effetto visivo dei diorami; tuttavia è interessante conoscere la risposta di una dei curatori del museo.

La risposta di Angie Falk alle critiche animaliste è che questi scoiattoli di terra, con le gallerie che scavano, sono un grosso problema per gli agricoltori di Tourrington; essendo in sovrannumero vengono comunque soppressi e abbattuti, a prescindere dal Museo. Quindi perché non riutilizzarli per motivi artistici ed economici?

Di arte si può in effetti parlare, osservando come le scene raffigurate nel Museo siano in realtà uno specchio della vita ad Alberta: piccole attività artigiane, allevatori, negozi e persino scene religiose, tutti rappresentanti un piccolo spaccato di società; l’aspetto artistico popolare dell’operazione è evidente. La capacità e il talento necessari per dare vita e naturalezza a questi quadretti di vita quotidiana non sono affatto scontati, e per questo tutte le installazioni sono curate dalla migliore artista tassidermica locale, di nome Shelley Haase.

Certo, la bellezza è sempre soggettiva; ma senz’altro il Gopher Hole Museum è un modo quantomeno originale di “riciclare”.

A questo link potete trovare una raccolta di immagini dei diorami.