Myrtle The Four-Legged Girl

Mrs. Josephine M. Bicknell died only one week before her sixtieth birthday; she was buried in Cleburne, Texas, at the beginning of May, 1928.

Once the coffin was lowered into the ground,her husband James C. Bicknell stood watching as the grave was filled with a thick layer of cement; he waited for an hour, maybe two, until the cement dried completely. Eventually James and the other relatives could head back home, relieved: nobody would be able to steal Mrs. Bicknell’s body – not the doctors, nor the other collectors who had tried to obtain it.

It is strange to think that a lifeless body could be tempting for so many people.
But the lady who was resting under the cement had been famous across the United States, many years before, under her maiden name: Josephine Myrtle Corbin, the Four-Legged Girl from Texas.

Myrtle was born in 1868 in Lincoln County, Tennessee, with a rare fetal anomaly called dipygus: her body was perfectly formed from her head down to her navel, below which it divided into two pelvises, and four lower limbs.

Her two inner legs, although capable of movement, were rudimentary, and at birth they were found laying flat on the belly. They resembled those of a parasitic twin, but in reality there was no twin: during fetal development, her pervis had split along the median axis (in each pair of legs, one was atrophic).

 Medical reports of the time stated that

between each pair of legs there is a complete, distinct set of genital organs, both external and internal, each supported by a pubic arch. Each set acts independently of the other, except at the menstrual period. There are apparently two sets of bowels, and two ani; both are perfectly independent,– diarrhoea may be present on one side, constipation on the other.

Myrtle joined Barnum Circus at the age of 13. When she appeared on stage, nothing gave away her unusual condition: apart from the particularly large hips and a clubbed right foot, Myrtle was an attractive girl and had an altogether normal figure. But when she lifted her gown, the public was left breathless.

She married James Clinton Bicknell when she was 19 years old, and the following year she went to Dr. Lewis Whaley on the account of a pain in her left side coupled with other worrying symptoms. When the doctor announced that she was pregnant in her left uterus, Myrtle reacted with surprise:

“I think you are mistaken; if it had been on my right side I would come nearer believing it”; and after further questioning he found, from the patient’s observation, that her right genitals were almost invariably used for coitus.

That first pregnancy sadly ended with an abortion, but later on Myrtle, who had retired from show business, gave birth to four children, all perfectly healthy.

Given the enormous success of her show, other circuses tried to replicate the lucky formula – but charming ladies with supernumerary legs were nowhere to be found.
With typical sideshow creativity, the problem was solved by resorting to some ruse.
The two following diagrams show the trick used to simulate a three-legged and a four-legged woman, as reported in the 1902 book The New Magic (source: Weird Historian).

If you search for Myrtle Corbin’s pictures on the net, you can stumble upon some photographs of Ashley Braistle, the most recent example of a woman with four legs.
The pictures below were taken at her wedding, in July 1994, when she married a plumber from Houston named Wayne: their love had begun after Ashley appeared in a newspaper interview, declaring that she was looking for a “easygoing and sensitive guy“.

Unfortunately on May 11, 1996, Ashley’s life ended in tragedy when she made an attempt at skiing and struck a tree.

Did you guess it?
Ashley’s touching story is actually a trick, just like the ones used by circus people at the turn of the century.
This photographic hoax comes from another bizarre “sideshow”, namely the Weekly World News, a supermarket tabloid known for publishing openly fake news with funny and inventive titles (“Mini-mermaid found in tuna sandwich!” “Hillary Clinton adopts a baby alien!”, “Abraham Lincoln was a woman!”, and so on).

The “news” of Ashley’s demise on the July 4, 1996 issue.

 

Another example of a Weekly World News cover story.

To end on a more serious note, here’s the good news: nowadays caudal duplications can, in some instances, be surgically corrected after birth (it happened for example in 1968, in 1973 and in 2014).

And luckily, pouring cement is no longer needed in order to prevent jackals from stealing an extraordinary body like the one of Josephine Myrtle Corbin Bicknell.

The Homunculus Inside

Paracelsushomunculus, the result of complicated alchemic recipes, is an allegorical figure that fascinated the collective uncoscious for centuries. Its fortune soon surpassed the field of alchemy, and the homunculus was borrowed by literature (Goethe, to quote but one example), psychology (Jung wrote about it), cinema (take the wonderful, ironic Pretorius scene from The Bride of Frankenstein, 1935), and the world of illustration (I’m thinking in particular of Stefano Bessoni). Even today the homunculus hasn’t lost its appeal: the mysterious videos posted by a Russian youtuber, purportedly showing some strange creatures developed through unlikely procedures, scored tens of millions of views.

Yet I will not focus here on the classic, more or less metaphorical homunculus, but rather on the way the word is used in pathology.
Yes beacuse, unbeknownst to you, a rough human figure could be hiding inside your own body.
Welcome to a territory where the grotesque bursts into anatomy.

Let’s take a step back to how life starts.
In the beginning, the fertilized cell (zygote) is but one cell; it immediately starts dividing, generating new cells, which in turn proliferate, transform, migrate. After roughly two weeks, the different cellular populations organize into three main areas (germ layers), each one with its given purpose — every layer is in charge of the formation of a specific kind of structure. These three specialized layers gradually create the various anatomical shapes, building the skin, nerves, bones, organs, apparatuses, and so on. This metamorphosis, this progressive “surfacing” of order ends when the fetus is completely developed.

Sometimes it might happen that this very process, for some reason, gets activated again in adulthood.
It is as if some cells, falling for an unfathomable hallucination, believed they still are at an embryonic stage: therefore they begin weaving new structures, abnormal growths called teratomas, which closely resemble the outcome of the first germ differentiations.

These mad cells start producing hair, bones, teeth, nails, sometimes cerebral or tyroid matter, even whole eyes. Hystologically these tumors, benign in most cases, can appear solid, wrapped inside cystes, or both.

In very rare cases, a teratoma can be so highly differentiated as to take on an antropomorphic shape, albeit rudimentary. These are the so-called fetiform teratomas (homunculus).

Clinical reports of this anomaly really have an uncanny, David Cronenberg quality: one homunculus found in 2003 inside an ovarian teratoma in a 25-year-old virginal woman, showed the presence of brain, spinal chord, ears, teeth, tyroid gland, bone, intestines, trachea, phallic tissue and one eye in the middle of the forehead.
In 2005 another fetiform mass had hairs and arm buds, with fingers and nails. In 2006 a reported homunculus displayed one upper limb and two lower limbs complete with feet and toes. In 2010 another mass presented a foot with fused toes, hair, bones and marrow. In 2015 a 13-year-old patient was found to carry a fetiform teratoma exhibiting hair, vestigial limbs, a rudimentary digestive tube and a cranial formation containing meninxes and neural tissue.

What causes these cells to try and create a new, impossible life? And are we sure that the minuscule, incomplete fetus wasn’t really there from the beginning?
Among the many proposed hypothesis, in fact, there is also the idea that homunculi (difficult to study because of their scarcity in scientific literature) may not be actual tumors, but actually the remnants of a parasitic twin, incapsulated within his sibling’s body during the embryonic phase. If this was the case, they would not qualify as teratomas, falling into the fetus in fetu category.

But the two phenomenons are mainly regarded as separate.
To distinguish one from the other, pathologists rely on the existence of a spinal column (which is present in the fetus in fetu but not in teratomas), on their localization (teratomas are chiefly found near the reproductive area, the fetus in fetu within the retroperitoneal space) and on zygosity (teratomas are often differentiated from the surrounding tissues, as if they were “fraternal twins” in regard to their host, while the fetus in fetu is homozygote).

The study of these anomalous formations might provide valuable information for the understanding of human development and parthenogenesis (essential for the research on stem cells).
But the intriguing aspect is exactly their problematic nature. As I said, each time doctors encounter a homunculus, the issue is always how to categorize it: is it a teratoma or a parasitic twin? A structure that “emerged” later, or a shape which was there from the start?

It is interesting to note that this very uncertainty also has existed in regard to normal embryos for the over 23 centuries. The debate focused on a similar question: do fetuses arise from scratch, or are they preexistent?
This is the ancient dispute between the supporters of epigenesis and preformationism, between those who claimed that embryonic structures formed out of indistinct matter, and those who thought that they were already included in the egg.
Aristotle, while studying chicken embryos, had already speculated that the unborn child’s physical structures acquire solidity little by little, guided by the soul; in the XVIII Century this theory was disputed by preformationism. According to the enthusiasts of this hypothesis (endorsed by high-profile scholars such as Leibniz, Spallanzani and Diderot), the embryo was already perfectly formed inside the egg, ab ovo, only too small to be visible to the naked eye; during development, it would just have to grow in size, as a baby does after birth.
Where did this idea come from? An important part was surely played by a well-known etching by Nicolaas Hartsoeker, who was among the first scientists to observe seminal fluid under the microscope, as well as being a staunch supporter of the existence of minuscule, completely formed fetuses hiding inside the heads of sperm cells.
And Hartsoeker, in turn, had taken inspiration precisely from the famous alchemical depictions of the homunculus.

In a sense, the homunculus appearing in an ancient alchemist’s vial and the ones studied by pathologists nowadays are not that different. They can both be seen as symbols of the enigma of development, of the fundamental mystery surrounding birth and life. Miniature images of the ontological dilemma which has been forever puzzling humanity: do we appear from indistinct chaos, or did our heart and soul exist somewhere, somehow, before we were born?


Little addendum of anatomical pathology (and a bit of genetics)
by Claudia Manini, MD

Teratomas are germ cell tumors composed of an array of tissues derived from two or three embryonic layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, endoderm) in any combination.
The great majority of teratomas are benign cystic tumors mainly located in ovary, containing mature (adult-type) tissues; rarely they contains embryonal tissues (“immature teratomas”) and, if so, they have a higher malignant potential.
The origin of teratomas has been a matter of interest, speculation, and dispute for centuries because of their exotic composition.
The partenogenic theory, which suggests an origin from the primordial germ cell, is now the most widely accepted. The other two theories, one suggesting an origin from blastomeres segregated at an early stage of embryonic development and the second suggesting an origin from embryonal rests have few adherents currently. Support for the germ cell theory has come from anatomic distribution of the tumors, which occurs along the body midline of migration of the primordial germ cell, from the fact that the tumors occur most commonly during the reproductive age (epidemiologic-observational but also experimental data) and from cytogenetic analysis which has demonstrated genotypic differences between omozygous teratomatous tissue and heterozygous host tissue.
The primordial germ cells are the common origins of gametes (spermatozoa and oocyte, that are mature germ cells) which contain a single set of 23 chromosomas (haploid cells). During fertilization two gametes fuse together and originate a new cell which have a dyploid and heterozygous genetic pool (a double set of 23 chromosomas from two different organism).
On the other hand, the cells composing a teratoma show an identical genetic pool between the two sets of chromosomes.
Thus teratomas, even when they unexpectedly give rise to fetiform structures, are a different phenomenon from the fetus in fetu, and they fall within the scope of tumoral and not-malformative pathology.
All this does not lessen the impact of the observation, and a certain awe in considering the differentiation potential of one single germ cell.

References
Kurman JR et al., Blaustein’s pathology of the female genital tract, Springer 2011
Prat J., Pathology of the ovary, Saunders 2004

Una coppia (quasi) perfetta

Juan Baptista Dos Santos nacque attorno al 1843 a Faro, in Portogallo, figlio di una coppia che aveva avuto già due gemelli. Anche questo secondo parto, in realtà, sarebbe dovuto essere gemellare: e invece nacque solo Juan, che portava nel suo corpo le vestigia del fratello mai nato.

Perfettamente formato dalla vita in su, e addirittura di bella presenza, Juan aveva però due peni, due ani (di cui uno non funzionante) e un arto in sovrannumero che pendeva dal suo addome. Ad essere precisi, questa “terza gamba” era il risultato della fusione delle due gambe del gemello parassita. Avendo un rudimentale ginocchio dotato di patella, l’arto si poteva piegare ma non aveva motilità volontaria: Juan quindi prese l’abitudine di legarlo alla coscia destra, in modo da essere più libero nei movimenti e potersi dedicare alla sua passione, l’equitazione.

Esaminato regolarmente dai dottori fin dall’età di sei mesi, Juan si trasferì a Parigi dove sarebbe diventato un caso clinico celebre, assiduo frequentatore di università e invitato a prestigiosi convegni medici come oggetto di studio. Certo, per buona parte della sua vita si esibì nei circhi; ma nel 1865 rifiutò un ingaggio da 200.000 franchi in un freakshow, deciso a concedersi esclusivamente alla ricerca scientifica. Quando, di tanto in tanto, riprendeva a vagabondare con gli spettacoli itineranti, era sempre uno dei nomi di punta del cartellone.

Più passava il tempo, però, e più i dottori si rendevano conto che la particolarità più sensazionale di Juan Baptista erano i suoi due peni. L’urinazione avveniva da entrambi, così come entrambi erano perfettamente funzionanti per capacità erettili e riproduttive, fatto questo più unico che raro. Un rapporto fisiologico del 1865 stilato all’Havana descrive Juan, all’età di 22 anni, come “posseduto da passione animale”, avido di sesso e conosciuto per il suo comportamento promiscuo: utilizzava entrambi i suoi peni nell’atto sessuale, e quando aveva “finito” con uno, continuava con il secondo.

Se esisteva al mondo qualcuno che potesse avere un’affinità elettiva con un uomo particolare come Juan Baptista Dos Santos, era sicuramente Blanche Dumas (o Dumont). Purtroppo della sua vita ci sono arrivati meno dettagli, ma pare che sia nata attorno al 1860 in Martinica, da padre francese e madre meticcia. A quanto riportato nel famoso trattato Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine (1896), Blanche aveva un addome molto largo, che conteneva, nell’ordine: le sue due gambe, malformate; una terza gamba attaccata al coccige; due seni in sovrannumero all’altezza del pube, rudimentali ma completi di capezzoli (ma questo dato è probabilmente falso, alcune foto d’epoca sono in tutta evidenza truccate); e, soprattutto, due vagine con vulve perfettamente formate e dalla sviluppata sensibilità.

Proprio come per Juan Baptista, anche l’appetito sessuale di Blanche era straordinario; si dice che avesse decine di ammiratori e che talvolta si intrattenesse con due uomini alla volta, utilizzando contemporaneamente le sue due vagine. Tanto che ad un certo punto, conscia del successo delle sue particolari “abilità”, Blanche decise di trasferirsi a Parigi dove divenne una prostituta d’alto bordo.

Aveva sentito spesso parlare di Juan Baptista Dos Santos, celebre per i suoi genitali doppi quanto per la sua sfrenata libido; quando seppe della sua presenza a Parigi in occasione di un tour circense europeo, Blanche, incuriosita, decise che era venuto il momento che l’uomo con due peni e la donna con due vagine si incontrassero. Dopotutto, quante possibilità c’erano, nell’intero cosmo, che due esseri talmente straordinari nascessero nello stesso secolo, a distanza di pochi anni, e si ritrovassero nella stessa città? Così, confidando in questo segno del destino, Blanche organizzò l’incontro.

Ma il detto popolare Dio li fa e poi li accoppia non è infallibile. La scintilla della passione, purtroppo, non si accese, e dopo una breve (e molto chiacchierata) relazione i due ritornarono alle loro vite: Juan a girare il mondo con il circo, e Blanche nella sua casa di appuntamenti… e nessuno può dire se vissero felici, o contenti.

Il Povero Edward

Edward Mordake (o Mordrake) è uno dei più celebri freaks di sempre, e questo anche se la sua effettiva esistenza non è mai stata provata.

La sua vicenda, infatti, si colloca in pieno ‘800, agli albori della storia clinica, ed è stata tramandata attraverso racconti popolari e folkloristici, ma mai documentata nei testi medici. Ancora oggi la sua triste vita ispira artisti e cantautori, perché ci parla del corpo come prigione, come inferno personale.

Edward, racconta la leggenda, nacque ereditiero di una delle più nobili stirpi inglesi. Era un giovane sereno, solare e grazioso, eccellente studioso e musicista delicato. Ma Edward aveva un pesante fardello da portare: sul retro della sua testa, sulla nuca, aveva una seconda faccia.

Questo suo gemello non completamente formato poteva ridere e piangere, e seguiva con lo sguardo le persone che entravano nella stanza. Le sue labbra continuavano incessantemente a muoversi, come se la faccia bisbigliasse qualcosa, anche se nessuno udiva la sua voce.

Ma pochi sapevano quale fosse la terribile verità: quando calava la notte, e tutti se ne andavano, Edward rimaneva da solo con il suo “fratello”, e cominciavano i tormenti. La seconda faccia era infatti crudele e malvagia, come un gemello demoniaco. Di notte, si dice, sussurrava ad Edward parole “che stanno soltanto all’Inferno”. Rideva quando Edward singhiozzava per la disperazione.

La storia si conclude invariabilmente in modo drammatico: a 23 anni, Edward si uccide, reso folle dall’incessante e sadico bisbigliare della sua seconda faccia. Alcuni dicono che si avvelenò, altri che si impiccò, altri ancora che si sparò in testa (dritto fra gli occhi del malefico “gemello”). Alcune varianti della storia specificano che lasciò scritto come desiderio che la seconda faccia venisse distrutta prima della sua inumazione, “perché non continui i suoi osceni bisbigli anche nella mia tomba”.

La versione più popolare della storia è raccontata nel testo del 1896, Anomalies and Curiosities of Medecine, ed è per molto tempo stata considerata inattendibile, per via dell’arricchimento dovuto ai decenni di passaparola. Alcune versioni della storia sostengono addirittura che la seconda faccia di Edward fosse quella di una bellissima e maligna ragazza – cosa ovviamente impossibile perché tutti i gemelli parassiti sono dello stesso sesso. Quindi Edward Mordake è davvero soltanto una leggenda?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWwSXpyyDMQ]

Questo è Chang Tzu Ping. Scoperto tra la fine degli anni ’70 e l’inizio degli ’80 da un gruppo di militari americani; aveva una seconda faccia consistente di una bocca, una lingua rudimentale, qualche dente, un pezzo di scalpo, e le vestigia di occhi, naso e orecchie. Fu portato negli Stati Uniti dove la sua seconda faccia venne asportata chirurgicamente. Una volta ritornato al suo paese natale, in Cina, “Chang dalle due facce” finalmente potè vivere serenamente con gli altri abitanti del villaggio, non più terrorizzati, e non si seppe più nulla di lui.

Casi come questi ci fanno dedurre che forse un briciolo di realtà, esagerata poi dalla sensibilità popolare, fosse presente anche nella storia del Povero Edward.

Concludiamo con la ballata dedicata a Mordake dal nostro beniamino, Tom Waits.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xrbddZuN_8Q]