Inanimus, Monsters & Chimeras of the Present

I look above me, towards the movable hooks once used to hang the meat, and I visualize the blood and pain that these walls had to contain – sustain – for many long years. Death and pain are the instruments life has to proceed, I tell myself.

I’m standing inside Padua’s former slaughterhouse: a space specifically devised for massacre, where now animals are living a second, bizarre life thanks to Alberto Michelon’s artworks.
When I meet him, he immediately infects me with the feverish enthusiasm of someone who is lucky (and brave) enough to be following his own vocation. What comes out of his mouth must clearly be a fifth of what goes through his mind. As John Waters put it, “without obsession, life is nothing“.
Animals and taxidermy are Alberto’s obsession.

Taxidermy is traditionally employed in two main fields: hunting trophies, and didactical museum installations.
In both context, the demand for taxidermic preparations is declining. On one hand we are witnessing a drop in hunting activities, which find less and less space in European culture as opposed to ecological preoccupations and the evolution of the ethical sensitiviy towards animals. On the other hand, even great Natural History Museums already have their well-established collections and seldom acquire new specimens: often a taxidermist is only called when restoration is required on already prepared animals.

This is why – Alberto explains – I mainly work for private customers who want to preserve their domestic pets. It is more difficult, because you have to faithfully recreate the cat or dog’s expressiveness based on their photographs; preparing a much-loved and familiar pet requires the greatest care. But I get a huge satisfaction when the job turns out well. Customers often burst into tears, they talk to the animal – when I present them with the finished work, I always step aside and leave them a bit of intimacy. It’s something that helps them coming to terms with their loss.”

What he says doesn’t surprise me: in a post on wunderkammern I associated taxidermy’s second youth (after a time in which it looked like this art had become obsolete) to the social need of reconfiguring our relationship with death.
But the reason I came here is Alberto is not just an ordinary taxidermist: he is Italy’s only real exponent of artistic taxiermy.

Until November 5, here at the ex-slaughterhouse, you can visit his exhibition Inanimus – A Contemporary Bestiary, a collection of his main works.
To a casual observer, artistic non-naturalist taxidermy could seem not fully respectful towards the animal. In realuty, most artists who use animal organic material as a medium do so just to reflect on our own relationship with other species, creating their works from ethical sources (animals who died of natural causes, collected in the wild, etc.).

Alberto too follows such professional ethics, as he began his experiment using leftovers from his workshop. “I was sorry to have to throw away pieces of skin, or specimens that wouldn’t find an arrangement“, he tells me. “It began almost like a diversion, in a very impulsive way, following a deep urge“.
He candidly confesses that he doesn’t know much about the American Rogue Taxidermy scene, nor about modern art galleries. And it’s clear that Alberto is somewhat alien to the contemporary art universe, so often haughty and pretentious: he keeps talking about instinct, about playing, but must of all – oh, the horror! – he takes the liberty of doing what no “serious” artist would ever dream of doing: he explains the message of his own works, one by one.

His installations really have much to say: rather than carrying messages, though, they are food for thought, a continuous and many-sided elaboration of the modernity, an attempt to use these animal remains as a mirror to investigate our own face.
Some of his works immediately strike me for the openness with which they take on current events: from the tragedy of migrants to GMOs, from euthanasia to the present-day fear of terrorist attacks.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen any other artist using taxidermy to confront the present in such a direct way.
A roe deer head covered in snake skin, wearing an orange uniform reminiscent of Islamic extremists’ prisoners, is chained to the wall. The reference is obvious: the heads of decapitated infidels are assimilated to hunting trophies.
To be honest, I find this explicit allusion to current events imagery (which, like it or not, has gained a “pop” quality) pretty unsettling, and I’m not even sure that I like it – but if something pulls the rug out from under my feet, I bless it anyways. This is what the best art is supposed to do.

Other installations are meant to illustrate Western contradictions, halfway through satire and open criticism to a capitalistic system ever harder to sustain.
A tortoise, represented as an old bejeweled lady with saggy breasts, is the emblem of a conservative society based on economic privilege: a “prehistoric” concept that, just like the reptile, has refused to evolve in any way.

A conqueror horse, fierce and rampant, exhibits a luxurious checked fur composed from several equines.
A social climber horse: to be where he stands, he must have done away with many other horses“, Alberto tells me with a smile.

An installation shows the internal organs of a tiger, preserved in jars that are arranged following the animal’s anatomy: the eyes, tomgue and brain are placed at the extremity where the head should be, and so on. Some chimeras seem to be in the middle of a bondage session: an allusion to poaching for aphrodisiac elixirs such as the rhino horn, and to the fil rouge linking us to those massacres.

A boar, sitting on a toilet, is busy reading a magazine and searching for a pair of glass eyes to fill his empty eye sockets.
The importance of freedom of choice regarding the end of life is incarnated by two minks who hanged themselves – rather than ending up in a fur coat.
The skulls of three livestock animals are hanged like trophies, and plastic flowers come out of the hole bored by the slaughterhouse firearm (“I picked up the flowers from the graves at the cemetery, replacing them with new flowers“, Michelon tells me).

As you might have understood by now, the most interesting aspect of the Inanimus works is the neverending formal experimentation.
Every installation is extremely different from the other, and Alberto Michelon always finds new and surprising ways of using the animal matter: there are abstract paintings whose canvas is made of snake or fish skin; entomological compositions; anthropomorphic taxidermies; a crucifix entirely built by patiently gluing together bone fragments; tribal masks, phallic snakes mocking branded underwear, skeletal chandeliers, Braille texts etracted from lizard skin.

Ma gli altri tassidermisti, diciamo i “puristi”, non storcono il naso?
Certamente alcuni non la ritengono vera tassidermia, forse pensano che io mi sia montato la testa. Non mi importa. Cosa vuoi farci? Questo progetto sta prendendo sempre più importanza, mi diverte e mi entusiasma.

On closer inspection, there’s not a huge difference between classic and artistic taxidermy. The stuffed animals we find in natural science museums, as well as Alberto’s, are but representations, interpretations, simulachra.
Every taxidermist uses the skin, and shape, of the animal to convey a specific vision of the world; and the museum narrative (although so conventional as to be “invisible” to our eyes) is maybe no more legit than a personal perspective.

Although Alberto keeps repeating that he feels he’s a novice, still unripe artist, the Inanimus works show a very precise artistic direction. As I approach the exit, I feel I have witnessed something unique, at least in the Italian panorama. I cannot therefore back away from the ritual prosaic last question: future projects?
I want to keep on getting better, learning, experimenting new things“, Alberto replies as his gaze wanders all around, lost in the crowd of his transfigured animals.

Inanimus – un bestiario contemporaneo
Padova, Cattedrale Ex-macello, Via Cornaro 1
Until October 17, 2017 [Extended to November 5, 2017]

Kate MacDowell

L’artista statuinitense Kate MacDowell realizza delle sculture in porcellana assolutamente originali. Si interroga sul posto dell’essere umano all’interno dell’ecosistema, e più in particolare sul suo rapporto con gli animali. Le sue creazioni mostrano una strana e inquietante ibridazione fra la struttura organica umana e quella degli animali rappresentati, come se esistesse una sostanziale identità – e, insieme, un conflitto insanabile. Noi siamo parte del mondo animale, e allo stesso tempo ne siamo i carnefici.

Le sue sculture mostrano creature morte e sezionate che spesso nascondono al loro interno strutture ossee umane, o nuove simboliche mescolanze di forme. “Nel mio lavoro – afferma l’artista – questo ideale romantico di unione con la natura emerge in conflitto con il nostro impatto moderno sull’ambiente. Questi pezzi […] prendono anche in prestito dal mito, dalla storia dell’arte, dai luoghi comuni linguistici, e da altre pietre miliari culturali.  In alcune opere gli aspetti della figura umana ci rappresentano, e causano inquietanti, talvolta umoristiche mutazioni che illustrano il nostro odierno rapporto con il mondo naturale. […] In ogni modo, l’unione fra uomo e natura è mostrato come causa di attrito e disagio, con la difficile implicazione che siamo vulnerabili riguardo alle nostre stesse pratiche distruttrici”.

La scelta del mezzo non è casuale: “Ho scelto la porcellana per le sue qualità luminose e fantasmatiche, così come per la sua forza e capacità di mostrare i dettagli scultorei. Sottolinea l’impermanenza e la fragilità delle forme naturali in un ecosistema che muore, mentre, paradossalmente, essendo un materiale che può durare migliaia di anni, è associato con uno status nobile e con un valore elevato”.

“Vedo ogni opera come un esemplare catturato e preservato, un minuzioso registro di forme di vita naturali in pericolo, e uno sguardo sulla nostra stessa colpa”.

Le fragili e precarie forme impresse nella porcellana ci interrogano sulla nostra identità, che amiamo distinguere dal mondo naturale, ma che vi è inevitabilmente collegata.

Il sito ufficiale di Kate MacDowell.

Sculture tassidermiche – II

Continuiamo la nostra panoramica (iniziata con questo articolo) sugli artisti contemporanei che utilizzano in modo creativo e non naturalistico le tecniche tassidermiche.

Jane Howarth, artista britannica, ha finora lavorato principalmente con uccelli imbalsamati. Avida collezionista di animali impagliati, sotto formalina e di altre bizzarrie, le sue esposizioni mostrano esemplari tassidermici adornati di perle, collane, tessuti pregiati e altre stoffe. Jane è particolarmente interessata a tutti quegli animali poveri e “sporchi” che la gente non degna di uno sguardo sulle aste online o per strada: la sua missione è manipolare questi resti “indesiderati” per trasformarli in strane e particolari opere da museo, che giocano sul binomio seduzione-repulsione. Si tratta di un’arte delicata, che tende a voler abbellire e rendere preziosi i piccoli cadaveri di animali. La Howarth ci rende sensibili alla splendida fragilità di questi corpi rinsecchiti, alla loro eleganza, e con impercepibili, discreti accorgimenti trasforma la materia morta in un’esibizione di raffinata bellezza. Bastano qualche piccolo lembo di stoffa, o qualche filo di perla, per riuscire a mostrarci la nobiltà di questi animali, anche nella morte.

Pascal Bernier è un artista poliedrico, che si è interessato alla tassidermia soltanto per alcune sue collezioni. In particolare troviamo interessante la sua Accidents de chasse (1994-2000, “Incidenti di caccia”), una serie di sculture in cui animali selvaggi (volpi, elefanti, tigri, caprioli) sono montati in posizioni naturali ma esibiscono bendaggi medici che ci fanno riflettere sul valore della caccia. Normalmente i trofei di caccia mostrano le prede in maniera naturalistica, in modo da occultare il dolore e la violenza che hanno dovuto subire. Bernier ci mette di fronte alla triste realtà: dietro all’esibizione di un semplice trofeo, c’è una vita spezzata, c’è dolore, morte. I suoi animali “handicappati”, zoppi, medicati, sono assolutamente surreali; poiché sappiamo che nella realtà, nessuno di questi animali è mai stato medicato o curato. Quelle bende suonano “false”, perché quando guardiamo un esemplare tassidermico, stiamo guardando qualcosa di già morto. Per questo i suoi animali, nonostante l’apparente serenità,  sembrano fissarci con sguardo accusatorio.

Lisa Black, neozelandese ma nata in Australia nel 1982, lavora invece sulla commistione di organico e meccanico. “Modificando” ed “adattando” i corpi degli animali secondo le regole di una tecnologia piuttosto steampunk, Lisa Black si pone il difficile obiettivo di farci ragionare sulla bellezza naturale confusa con la bellezza artificiale. Crea cioè dei pezzi unici, totalmente innaturali, ma innegabilmente affascinanti, che ci interrogano su quello che definiamo “bello”. Una tartaruga, un cerbiatto, un coccodrillo: di qualsiasi animale si tratti, ci viene istintivo trovarli armoniosi, esteticamente bilanciati e perfetti. La Black aggiunge a questi animali dei meccanismi a orologeria, degli ingranaggi, quasi si trattasse di macchine fuse con la carne, o di prototipi di animali meccanici del futuro. E la cosa sorprendente è che la parte meccanica nulla toglie alla bellezza dell’animale. Creando questi esemplari esteticamente raffinati, l’artista vuole porre il problema di questa falsa dicotomia: è davvero così scontata la “sacrosanta” bellezza del naturale rispetto alla “volgarità” dell’artificiale?

Restate sintonizzati: a breve la terza parte del nostro viaggio nel mondo della tassidermia artistica!

Arte pericolosa

La performance art, nata all’inizio degli anni ’70 e viva e vegeta ancora oggi, è una delle più recenti espressioni artistiche, pur ispirandosi anche a forme classiche di spettacolo. Nonostante si sia naturalmente inflazionata con il passare dei decenni, a volte è ancora capace di stupire e porre quesiti interessanti attraverso la ricerca di un rapporto più profondo fra l’artista e il suo pubblico. Se infatti l’artista classico aveva una relazione superficiale con chi ammirava le sue opere in una galleria, basare il proprio lavoro su una performance significa inserirla in un adesso e ora che implica l’apporto diretto degli spettatori all’opera stessa. Così l’obiettivo di questo tipo di arte non è più la creazione del “bello” che possa durare nel tempo, quanto piuttosto organizzare un happening che tocchi radicalmente coloro che vi assistono, portandoli dentro al gioco creativo e talvolta facendo del pubblico il vero protagonista.

Dagli anni ’70 ad oggi il valore shock di alcune di queste provocazioni ha perso molti punti. Le performance sono divenute sempre più cruente per riflettere sui limiti del corpo, generando però un’assuefazione generale che è una vera e propria sconfitta per quegli artisti che vorrebbero suscitare emozioni forti. Ancora oggi ci si può imbattere però in qualche idea davvero coinvolgente ed intrigante. Fanno infatti eccezione alcuni progetti che pongono davvero gli spettatori al centro dell’attenzione, permettendo loro di operare scelte anche estreme.

È il 1974 quando Marina Abramović, la “nonna” della performance art, mette in scena il suo “spettacolo” più celebre, intitolato Rhythm 0. L’artista è completamente passiva, e se ne sta in piedi ferma e immobile. 72 oggetti sono posti su un tavolo, un cartello rende noto al pubblico che quegli oggetti possono essere usati su di lei in qualsiasi modo venga scelto dagli spettatori. Alcuni di questi oggetti possono provocare piacere, ma altri sono pensati per infliggere dolore. Fruste, forbici, coltelli e una pistola con un singolo proiettile. Quello che Marina vuole testare è il rapporto fra l’artista e il pubblico: consegnandosi inerme, sta rischiando addirittura la sua vita. Starà agli spettatori decidere quale uso fare degli oggetti posti sul tavolo.

All’inizio, tutti i visitatori sono piuttosto cauti e inibiti. Man mano che passa il tempo, però, una certa aggressività comincia a farsi palpabile. C’è chi taglia i suoi vestiti con le forbici, denudandola. Qualcun altro le infila le spine di una rosa sul petto. Addirittura uno spettatore le punta la pistola carica alla testa, fino a quando un altro non gliela toglie di mano. “Ciò che ho imparato è che se lasci la decisione al pubblico, puoi finire uccisa… mi sentii davvero violentata… dopo esattamente 6 ore, come avevo progettato, mi “rianimai” e cominciai a camminare verso il pubblico. Tutti scapparono, per evitare un vero confronto”.

1999. Elena Kovylina sta in piedi su uno sgabello, con un cappio attorno al collo. Indossa un cartello in cui è disegnato un piede che calcia lo sgabello. Per due ore rimarrà così, e starà al pubblico decidere se assestare una pedata allo sgabello, e vederla morire impiccata, oppure se lasciarla vivere. Sareste forse pronti a scommettere che nessuno avrà il coraggio di provare a calciare lo sgabello. Sbagliato. Un uomo si avvicina, e toglie l’appoggio da sotto i piedi di Elena. Fortunatamente, la corda si rompe e l’artista sopravvive.

L’artista iracheno Wafaa Bilal, colpito profondamente dalle sempre più pressanti dichiarazioni di odio xenofobo verso la sua cultura, definita “terrorista” e “animalesca”, decide nel 2005 di sfruttare internet per un progetto d’arte che riceve ampia risonanza. Per un mese Wafaa vive in una stanzetta simile a quella di una prigione, collegato al mondo esterno unicamente tramite il suo sito. Una pistola da paintball è collegata con il sito, e chiunque accedendovi può direzionare l’arma e sparare dei pallini di inchiostro verso l’artista. Un mese sotto il continuo fuoco di qualsiasi internauta annoiato. Il titolo del progetto è “Spara a un iracheno”, e vuole misurare l’odio razziale su una base spettacolare. Le discussioni in chat che l’artista conduce aiutano il pubblico a chiarire motivazioni e moventi delle più recenti “sparatorie”, con il risultato che molti utenti dichiarano che quel progetto ha “cambiato loro la vita”, oltre a fruttare numerosi premi all’artista mediorientale.


Eccoci arrivati ai giorni nostri. L’artista russo Oleg Mavromatti è già assurto agli onori della cronaca per un film indipendente in cui si fa crocifiggere realmente. La crocifissione non è una prerogativa esclusiva di Gesù Cristo, rifletteva l’artista, e infatti sul suo corpo, durante il supplizio, era scritto a chiare lettere “Io non sono il vostro Dio”. Ma non è bastato e, condannato sulla base di una legge russa che tutela la religione dalle offese alla cristianità, Oleg ha dovuto autoesiliarsi in Bulgaria.

Ha iniziato da poco un nuovo progetto intitolato Ally/Foe (Alleato/Nemico): il suo corpo, attaccato a cavi elettrici, è sottoposto a scariche sempre maggiori, come su una vera e propria sedia elettrica da esecuzione. Unica variabile: saranno gli utenti che, tramite internet, decideranno con diverse votazioni quante e quali scosse dovrà subire. Quello che l’artista vuole veicolare è una domanda: quando la gente ha la piena libertà di azione, come la utilizza? Se aveste l’opportunità di decidere della vita di un’altra persona, come sfruttereste questo potere?

Oleg è sicuro che questo tipo di libertà verrà utilizzata dagli internauti per farlo sopravvivere – ma è pronto a subire seri danni o addirittura a morire se il suo sacrificio dovesse dimostrare una verità sociologica tristemente diversa.