Special: Innocenzo Manzetti

We like to think scientific progress as something evolving in a clear way, relying exclusively on research and method, and that the authority of a scholar is assessed on the basis of his results. But, as it goes for all human things, many unpredictable factors may intervene in the success of a theory or discovery — human factors, as well as social, political, commercial factors: which, in a word, have nothing to do with science.

There are good possibilities you never heard about Innocenzo Manzetti, even if he was one of the most fertile and dynamic italian geniuses. And if things had turned out differently for him, less than a month ago, on the 29th of June, we would have celebrated the 150th anniversary of his major invention, which had a profound impact on history and our own lives: the telephone.

But, on the account of a streak of unlucky events you’ll read about in a moment, the paternity of the first device for long-distance transmission of sound was attributed to others. This story takes place in a time of fertile change, in the midst of an international rush for technological innovation, a no-holds-barred struggle to the ultimate patent: in this kind of conflict, among inventors in good faith, spies, legal litigations and strategic moves, inevitably someone gets cut out. Maybe because he lives in a particularly secluded region, or because he is not wealthy like his opposers. Or simply because he, a hopeless idealist, is less interested in disputing than in research.

Innocenzo Manzetti’s figure belongs to the heterogeneous family of innovators, scientists and thinkers who, for these or other reasons, were confined to an undeserved oblivion, never to show up in history books. Yet his creativity and ingenuity were far from ordinary.

cache_1434810

Born in Aosta on March 17th 1826, Innocenzo was the fourth of eight siblings. Interested, since he was a kid, in physics ad mechanics, he got his diploma in surveying in Turin, and then settled back in his home town for good. Manzetti divided himself between his job at the civil engineering department, and his real passion: physics experiments on one hand, and on the other, designing and building mechanical devices.

The range of his interests was all-encompassing, and his fervid mind knew no repose. In 1849 he presented to the public his “flute player”: an iron and steel automaton, covered in suede, complete with porcelain eyes. The mechanical man was able to move his arms, take off his hat, talk, and perform up to twelve different melodies on his instrument. An astonishing result, which thanks to a municipal grant Manzetti was able to showcase at the London World’s Fair in 1851; but ultimately destined, like many of his inventions, to never achieve the hoped-for resonance.

cache_17300897

cache_17300898

His love for mechanical gear pushed him to build a flying automated parakeet, and a music box featuring an animated puppet. But beyond these brilliant inventions, which were meant to amaze the audience and show off his exceptional mechanical expertise, Manzetti also devised very useful, practical solutions: he developed a new hydrated lime, built a water pump which was used to drain the floodings in the Ollomont mines, but also a machine for making pasta, a filtering system for public drinking water, a pantograph with which he was able to etch a medallion with the image of Pope Pious IX on a grain of rice.

Excerpt from Manzetti’s pasta machine patent.

cache_1789372

3D reconstruction of the pasta amchine.

cache_1880520

3D reconstruction of the 3-seat velocipede.

cache_6123713

3D reconstruction of the steam-powered automobile.

Over the years, his fellow citizens learned to be amazed by the inventions of this eccentric character.
But it wasn’t until 1865 that Manzetti presented the two prototypes which could have granted him, on paper at least, fame and fortune: an automobile with an internal-combustion engine, the first steam-powered car with a functional steering system; and above all the “vocal telegraph”, true precursor of the telephone – six years before Antonio Meucci registered his idea in 1871, and eleven years ahead of Alexander Graham Bell‘s patent (1876).

If the legal battle over the paternity of the telephone between these last two inventors is well known, then why is Manzetti’s name so very seldom mentioned? Why didn’t this forerunner gain a prominent status in the history of telecommunications? And just how reliable are the rumors depicting him as a victim of a complex case of international espionnage?

There may be various causes condemning a scientist, albeit brilliant, to oblivion.
We decided to talk about it with one of the major experts in Manzetti’s life and work, Mauro Caniggia Nicolotti, who authored together with Luca Poggianti a series of biographies on the inventor from the Aosta Valley. Following is a transcription of the interesting conversation we had with Mauro.

Between the ‘800 and the ‘900, a series of extraordinary technological innovations took place, which in turn produced spectacular patent litigations – featuring many hits below the belt – to secure the rights of these revolutionary inventions: from radio to cinema, from the automobile to the telephone.
In fact, several scientists, physicists, engineers and inventors in different parts of the globe came to similar conclusions at the same time, and what proved most successful in the long run was not the novelty of the project itself, but rather a small improvement in respect to the versions proposed by the adversaries.
What was the atmosphere like in those times of great change? How was this turmoil perceived in Italy? Did the economic and cultural conditions of the Aosta Valley at the time play a part in Manzetti’s marginalization and bad luck?

I think what you said is true for every context in which an “invention” occurs. It is as if there were a thousand ideas floating in the sky, and somebody turns out to be the only one capable of grabbing the right ones.
Aosta Valley was very isolated. Just consider that major roads were built barely a century ago. Aosta at the time was known as a cul-de-sac, a dead end. Manzetti operated in this out-of-the-way context, which was quite rich culturally but not very technologically advanced. The first local newspapers were arising right then, and they were re-publishing news appearing on international papers; Manzetti absorbed every details about the inventions he read about in the news. He was like some sort of Gyro Gearloose, you know… in a word, a genius. In every field, not just plain science: he was a fine engraver, he was requested as a callygrapher in Switzerland, his interests were wide.
In his “workshop of wonders” he tried first of all to solve the problems of his own town, as for instance public lighting, or water supplying from the Buthier creek, which was particularly muddy, so he built filters for that… he tried to refine some solutions he learned from the papers, or he came up with original ideas. He absorbed, perfected, created.
So even in this limited context, Manzetti was an explosion of creativity. The local papers kept saying that he should have been living elsewhere for his genius to shine through, and the muncipal administration paid for his trip to the Exposition in London, so really, his talent was acknowledged, but for his entire life he was forced to operate with the poorest means.

Manzetti had undoubtedly a prolific mind: would his career have been different, had he cultivated a more entrepreneurial attitude? Was he well-integrated in the social fabric of his time? What did his fellow citizens think of him?

Certainly Manzetti was no entrepreneur. I think he really was a dreamer: although poor, he never went for the money. Instead he preferred to help out, so much so that he was elected to a post that today we would call “Commissioner of public works”. So yes, in a sense he was socially integrated.
Recently I discovered a vintage article (we weren’t able to include it in our new book) in which a traveller, describing the inhabitants of the Aosta Valley, used a derogatory term: he called them “hillbillies”, and wrote that they were ignorant and badly dressed. In this very article the author pointed out that, apart from the bishop who came from Ivrea (as the episcopal seat was vacant) and must have looked like an alien, the only other elegantly dressed citizen was Manzetti. So the feeling is that he was seen, maybe not really as a foreign body, but nevertheless as a person well above the average.

cache_1780662

cache_1783774

cache_1783773

In 1865 Innocenzo Manzetti presented his “vocal telegraph”, after envisioning it at the end of 1843 and having spent more than fifteen years in experiments and development. Some years before (1860-62) Johann Philipp Reis had demonstrated the use of his experimental phone, probably based on Charles Bourseul‘s research: this device however was meant as a prototype, useful for further studies, and was not entirely functional. How was Manzetti’s version different? I read that his telegraph had some flaws, especially in the output of consonants: is that true?

It’s true, in Manzetti’s first experiments of sound transmission the voice was not clear. You have to keep in mind that carbon filters were not available, along with every improvement that came along later on. His first attempt was done with makeshift gears, or at least with low-quality materials. Actually even inside his much celebrated automaton there were some low-quality pieces, so much so that it stopped working now and then.
The true problem is that the man who experimented the vocal telegraph with Manzetti was his friend, the canon Édouard Bérard: and Bérard was a perfectionist, even a bit fastidious.
That’s why he didn’t report just the news of sound transmission but, instead of giving in to the excitement of having been the first human being to hear a long-distance call, he felt the need to specify that the sound performance was “not clear”. Looking at it today, it sounds a little bit like complaining that the first plane ever built was able to fly “only” for some hundred meters.

Why didn’t Manzetti patent his invention?

He didn’t patent it for a number of reasons. Firstly, patents were extremely expensive and Manzetti couldn’t afford it. The only things he patented were the ones that could hopefully bring in a little money: the pasta machine, which is still under his patent today, and the hydrated lime which looked promising.
His telephone was immediately torn to shreds.
Between July and August 1864 Minister Matteucci visited Aosta Valley, and saw Manzetti’s telephone: so there must have been an unofficial presentation, a year before the public one. The Minister however openly confronted Manzetti, and his disapproval was expressed along these lines: “Are you crazy? We just united Italy, we faced revolutionary movements… the telegraph operator today is able to send a message, but at the same time to check its contents. A telephone call between two persons, without any mediator, without any control, could be dangerous for the government”. Even some newspapers in Florence skeptically asked who in the world could find such an invention to be useful: maybe young mushy lovers wishing one another goodnight? There was widespread criticism about him and his device, which would be of absolutely no use whatsoever.

Then again we have to remember that Manzetti himself had not a clear idea of all the developments his invention could entail: he thought of it simply as a way to make his automaton talk. So much so, that the first newspapers called the device “the Mouth”, because it was designed to fit into the automaton’s face. I don’t think he immediately understood what he had invented. His friends slowly made him realize that his device could be useful in a number of other ways.

cache_1781348

Letter by Innocenzo’s brother, describing the first experiments in 1843.

cache_1786758

cache_1786759

Alexander Graham Bell officially patented the telephone on February the 14th 1876. A year later, on March the 15th, Manzetti died in Aosta, forgotten and in poverty. And here the waters begin to get muddy, because the dispute between Bell and Meucci kicked off: did they both know Manzetti? According to your research, what are the elements suggesting a case of international espionnage? How reliable are they?

The battle over the paternity of the telephone consisted of two phases. The first one is all-Italian, in that Manzetti presented his “vocal telegraph” in 1865 (after his friends finally convinced him); the news travelled around the world, and in August it showed up in New York’s Italian-American newspaper L’eco d’Italia. Meucci was in NYC at the time, and he read the news. He replied with a series of articles in which he stated he invented something similar himself, and he described his device – which however was limited in respect to Manzetti’s, because instead of the handset it featured a conductor foil one had to keep between his teeth in order to transmit the words through vibrations. The articles ended with Meucci inviting Manzetti to collaborate. We don’t know whether Manzetti ever read this series of articles, so the question seemed closed until 1871, when Meucci deposited a caveat for his rudimental invention, which was not yet a proper telephone.

In a following moment, there was the litigation between Meucci and Bell. Bell frequented the same company with which Meucci deposited his invention, and strangely enough he patented his telephone in 1876, in the exact moment Meucci’s caveat expired. Then in the 1880’s a whole series of lawsuits followed, because precursors and inventors, real or alleged, sprang up like mushrooms. Once the dust settled, only Bell and Meucci were left to stand.

And then there was the issue of the “American intrigue”. The Aosta newspaper reported in 1865 that some English “mechanics” (i.e., scientists) came to Aosta to attend Manzetti’s presentation of his telegraph, maybe to figure out his secrets: according to some sources, among them was a young Bell, not yet renowned at the time, and Manzetti himself later said he still had Bell’s business card.
I would like to stress that we are not 100% sure that it really was Bell who travelled to Aosta in ’65, but the unpublished documents seem to confirm this hypothesis (and being private notes, there would have been no reason to lie about that).

But the real “scandal” happened later. On December the 19th 1879, a certain Horace H. Eldred, director of the telegraph society in NYC, met up with Bell: he was nominated President of Missouri Bell Telephone Company, and immediately took off to Europe. He arrived in Aosta on February the 6th, went to a notary together with Manzetti’s widow, and he acquired all the rights to the vocal telegraph: the deal was that he would appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States to recognize Manzetti as the true inventor of the telephone. He obviously did not tell the  grieving woman that he was one of Bell’s emissaries.
Perhaps Bell calculated that by buying exclusive rights from Manzetti, who was already thought to be the first inventor, he could keep in check all the others who were battling him.

Eldred took all the projects and everything with him.
But at some point I believe Eldred realized what he had just bought. He understood he held in his hands an improvement of the telephone, and thus he immediately came back to America, on April the 14th. In spite of Bell, he patented the device under his own name. A predictable litigation ensued, between him and Bell: Eldred won, opened a nice big factory on Front Street, New York, ran ads about his product, became vice-president of Telephones in the US and delegate in Europe. Eventually, he parted with Bell but went on to have a stunning career.

cache_17715870

manzetti_placca_1886

In your opinion, is Innocenzo Manzetti destined to remain in that crowded gallery of characters who showed prodigius talent – but were defeated right on the verge of glory – or will there be a late acknowledgement and a revival of his figure? Do you have some events planned for the anniversary?

We launched the “150th Forgotten Anniversary” with a small conference – but everyone here was busy with another recurrence, the first ascent on the Matterhorn (which was even celebrated with military aerobatics shows). Regarding Manzetti, there is no acknowledgement whatsoever; I intend to repeat the conference in July and August, but I already know the results will be even worse. Nobody cares, nor does the Administration. We had to fight for years just to have a tiny museum room, 6.5 by 7.5 meters wide, inside the sacristy of a church, where the automaton is on display along with some digital panels… nobody intends to believe in this.

Nemo propheta in patria, “nobody’s a prophet in his own country”: in the Aosta Valley, as long as there’s just me and Luca working on this, we will always be seen as visionaries. Maybe if some interest for Manzetti arose from the outside, then things could change — because when a voice comes from “outside the valley”, it is always taken more seriously. If only some English-speaking literature began to appear on the subject… but it takes time.
As far as I’m concerned, I count on being still present for the bicentenary, even if I will be almost a hundred years old. I will be a senile man, but I’ll be there!

cache_17300900

cache_17300903

cache_17300901

cache_17300905

cache_17300904

To further explore Manzetti’s life and inventions, and learn more details about the fascinating case of “American espionnage”, you can find a whole load of information at Manzetti’s Online Virtual Museum, curated by Mauro Caniggia Nicolotti e Luca Poggianti.

We also thank our reader Elena.

L’automa misterioso

Henri_Maillardet_automaton,_London,_England,_c._1810_-_Franklin_Institute_-_DSC06656

Una mattina di novembre del 1928, un camion si fermò di fronte al prestigioso museo scientifico della città di Philadelphia, il Franklin Institute; la cassa che i fattorini fecero scendere dall’autocarro conteneva un complesso rompicapo.
La facoltosa famiglia Brock, infatti, aveva deciso di donare alla collezione del museo una serie di parti meccaniche che originariamente componevano una macchina in ottone. Si trattava di un vecchio automa ereditato dal loro antenato John Penn Brock o, meglio, di quello che ne rimaneva: il burattino meccanico era sopravvissuto a un incendio, riportando però gravi danni.

Il lavoro di restauro si preannunciava laborioso e complicato, anche perché non c’era nessuno schema o progetto originale su cui basarsi per comprendere come assemblare i pezzi; mentre Charles Roberts, talentuoso tecnico del Franklin Institute, si metteva pazientemente all’opera, in parallelo si cominciò a investigare la storia dell’automa. A quanto si sapeva, il burattino era stato costruito da Johann Maelzel, inventore tedesco vissuto a cavallo fra ‘700 e ‘800. Quest’uomo, seppur sprovvisto di una formale educazione, possedeva una geniale mente ingegneristica: certo, spesso prendeva “ispirazione” da idee altrui in maniera un po’ troppo disinvolta, ma sapeva perfezionarle talmente bene da sorpassare sempre l’originale. Realizzò strumenti musicali che imitavano il suono di intere bande militari, cronometri, metronomi, burattini automatici, e tutta una serie di stupefacenti meccanismi. La sua amicizia turbolenta con Ludwig van Beethoven gli aprì le porte del successo, e per molti anni Maelzel girò il mondo, esibendo i suoi automi (fra cui anche una ricostruzione del famigerato “Turco” di cui abbiamo parlato in questo articolo) dall’Europa alla Russia, dalle Americhe alle Indie.
John Penn Brock, a quanto dicevano gli eredi, aveva acquistato questo meccanismo da Maelzel in persona, durante un viaggio in Francia. In effetti quando arrivò al Franklin Institute il burattino indossava un’uniforme, ormai a brandelli, che lo faceva assomigliare vagamente a un soldato francese.

Durante il restauro, i tecnici del museo cominciarono pian piano a comprendere quale incredibile tesoro avessero ricevuto in dono. Rispetto agli altri automi, notarono infatti una grossa differenza: se normalmente gli ingranaggi contenenti la memoria di movimento si trovavano all’interno del corpo del manichino stesso, in questo caso essi erano talmente voluminosi che era stato necessario nasconderli nella base dell’automa. Era la più grande memoria meccanica di questo tipo mai vista, perlomeno in un pezzo d’epoca. Questo significava che la macchina doveva essere in grado di compiere delle azioni di una complessità senza precedenti.

La memoria dell’automa era contenuta in grandi dischi in ottone (camme), dentellati in maniera irregolare. Il motore li faceva girare, e tre lunghe dita d’acciaio ne seguivano i contorni, “traducendo” la forma dei bordi nelle tre dimensioni spaziali e veicolando, tramite un intricato sistema di leve e ingranaggi, il movimento alla mano del burattino.

1227-sci-AUTOMATON-web

Quando i lavori furono ultimati, l’automa aveva ripreso quasi del tutto la sua forma originaria. Gli mancavano ancora le gambe, distrutte nell’incendio, e probabilmente alcuni ingranaggi che avrebbero permesso un movimento più fluido e “umano” della sua testa. Anche la penna che aveva in mano era andata perduta, e venne sostituita da una stilografica. Ma l’essenziale era stato ricostruito.

Non appena fu data carica ai motori, l’automa tornò in vita dopo decenni di inattività. Abbassò la testa, appoggiò delicatamente la punta della penna sul foglio. Quello che stava per succedere andava oltre ogni aspettativa.

Maillardet's_automaton_drawing_6

Maillardet's_automaton_drawing_4

Maillardet's_automaton_drawing_7

Maillardet's_automaton_drawing_5

Il burattino cominciò a delineare alcuni fra i più elaborati disegni mai riprodotti da un automa. Dopo aver creato quattro diverse illustrazioni, venne il momento delle poesie: l’automa scriveva i suoi versi con un’arzigogolata e leziosa calligrafia, dimostrando di non aver perso per nulla la “mano”. Ma la sorpresa più grande doveva ancora venire.

    Maillardet's_automaton_drawing_3

Maillardet's_automaton_drawing_2

Dopo aver scritto il terzo e ultimo poema, l’automa sembrò fermarsi per un attimo, quasi fosse indeciso se svelare o meno il suo segreto; infine aggiunse, sul bordo, una frase. Ecrit par l’Automate de Maillardet, “scritto dall’Automa di Maillardet”.
L’inventore della macchina non era quindi Maelzel!

Maillardet's_automaton_drawing_1

Dalla profondità degli ingranaggi dell’automa stesso era emersa la sua vera storia, e l’identità del suo creatore.
Henri Maillardet (1745-1830) era un orologiaio svizzero che aveva lavorato a Londra, prima di morire in Belgio. Egli aveva costruito diversi automi, fra cui uno in grado di scrivere in cinese che fu regalato da Re Giorgio III all’Imperatore della Cina. Ma il suo lavoro più ambizioso e straordinario aveva rischiato di rimanere attribuito all’inventore sbagliato, se Maillardet non avesse deciso di lasciare nella memoria di quel burattino meccanico la traccia del suo nome.

The_Automaton_Exhibition_1826_at_Gothic_Hall_in_Haymarket_London

L’automa di Maillardet, sulla destra, a Londra nel 1826.

L’automa di Maillardet, costruito probabilmente nella prima decade del XIX secolo, aveva viaggiato da Londra in tutta l’Europa, spingendosi fino a San Pietroburgo. Dal 1821 al 1833 era stato in possesso di un certo signor Schmidt, che l’aveva esibito nuovamente a Londra. Nel 1835 l’automa faceva effettivamente parte della collezione di Maelzel, che lo portò con sé nel suo tour degli Stati Uniti nel 1835 e lo mise in mostra insieme alle sue creazioni a Boston, Philadelphia, Washington D.C. e New York. Dopodiché l’automa scomparve, anche se alcuni ritengono possibile che P. T. Barnum, che conosceva Maelzel, l’avesse acquistato per esporlo in uno dei suoi due musei (situati a Philadelphia e New York). L’ipotesi è plausibile anche perché sappiamo che l’automa aveva subìto i danni di un incendio, e in effetti entrambi i musei di Barnum finirono distrutti dal fuoco.

27JPAUTO3-popup

27AUTO-articleLarge

automaton2011_3

Gli ingranaggi di Maillardet sono considerati precursori storici, in epoca pre-elettronica, della cosiddetta memoria ROM (Read-Only-Memory), cioè di un sistema per immagazzinare dati recuperabili in seguito. L’automa ha inoltre ispirato il pupazzo meccanico che compare in Hugo Cabret (2011) di Martin Scorsese e nel romanzo di Brian Selznick da cui è stato tratto il film.

hugo-cabret-3

Per un approfondimento sugli automi, ecco un nostro vecchio post.

Il Messia Meccanico

Le mie idee religiose si limitano a questa assurda convinzione:
che Dio abbia creato l’uomo, e viceversa.
(André Glucksmann)

1W-MA-LY-1881

Massachussetts, 1853. High Rock era una collinetta rocciosa alta 52 metri da cui si poteva godere di un bel panorama: ai suoi piedi si stendeva l’industriosa cittadina di Lynn, Massachussetts, piuttosto famosa all’epoca per la produzione di calzature e come tranquillo luogo di villeggiatura. Proprio qui, all’inizio di ottobre, un gruppo di uomini si riunì per dare inizio ad  un progetto, lungo e particolarmente delicato, che avrebbe rivoluzionato il mondo. Lo scopo della loro missione era di portare un Nuovo Messia sulla Terra. Ma non l’avrebbero pregato né invocato: l’avrebbero costruito.

SpearCombo

La loro guida nell’incredibile impresa era John Murray Spear, un uomo gentile, anticonvenzionale ed eccentrico. Un tempo ministro della Chiesa Universalista (che predicava la salvezza finale di tutti gli uomini, senza esclusione), si era già fatto notare per alcune prese di posizione poco ortodosse: nei suoi sermoni, infatti, parlava di diritti delle donne, di liberazione degli schiavi, di uguaglianza fra razze, di abolizione della pena di morte. Tutte opinioni poco condivise dalla folla, che nel 1844 a Portland, Maine, lo pestò a sangue a causa di un suo discorso contro lo schiavismo. Dalle prigioni, in cui portava conforto ai detenuti, alle iniziative clandestine per far passare in Canada gli schiavi fuggitivi, la vita di Spear era tutta dedicata a combattere quelle che avvertiva come ingiustizie.

Ma, nella sua battaglia contro i pregiudizi del tempo, anche Spear sentiva di aver bisogno di certezze. Fu così che egli si lasciò affascinare dalla nuova moda che stava esplodendo proprio in quel periodo: lo spiritismo. Nel 1851 lasciò la Chiesa Universalista, e divenne un medium.
Il suo scopo non era mutato. Cercava ancora di aiutare gli indifesi, e portare sollievo ai sofferenti, però questa volta non era solo: gli spiriti lo guidavano durante le sessioni di trance, ed egli viaggiava di villaggio in villaggio, “curando” gli ammalati secondo le prescrizioni che gli arrivavano dall’aldilà. I defunti che lo consigliavano non erano certo i primi venuti: si trattava nientemeno che di Emanuel Swedenborg, e soprattutto Benjamin Franklin. Spear dava pubbliche dimostrazioni dei suoi poteri medianici entrando in trance e lasciando che gli spiriti parlassero, attraverso la sua bocca, di temi che (guarda caso) lo avevano sempre interessato – politica, salute, uguaglianza. I suoi nuovi sermoni, nonostante fossero ora ammantati della veste spiritista, poco sorprendentemente ricevettero la stessa accoglienza dei primi. Il pubblico era convinto che fosse Spear a parlare, e non le anime dei famosi defunti, e la carriera del medium faticava a decollare.

In effetti, a una prima occhiata Spear potrebbe sembrare il classico ciarlatano; ma tutti coloro che lo conobbero non misero mai in dubbio la sua fede sincera nella scrittura automatica, nella trance medianica e nelle voci autorevoli che guidavano le sue azioni. Fatto sta che nel 1853 a Rochester, New York, le cose cambiarono. Spear cominciò a ricevere da un gruppo di spiriti, come al solito capitanati dal buon vecchio Ben Franklin, una serie di comunicazioni che gli svelarono quale fosse la sua vera missione.

Tramite la scrittura automatica, gli spiriti lo proclamarono rappresentante terrestre della “Banda degli Elettrizzatori”, una cerchia di anime di ampie vedute scientifiche. Nell’aldilà, infatti, esisteva un’Associazione di Beneficienza che contava nelle sue file – oltre agli Elettrizzatori – anche i Salutizzatori, gli Educatizzatori, gli Agricolturizzatori, gli Elementizzatori, i Governatizzatori; ogni gruppo avrebbe scelto il suo rappresentante nel mondo dei vivi, per far progredire e rendere finalmente divina e perfetta la società umana.

Gli Elettrizzatori cominciarono a rivelare al medium i loro piani per il futuro dell’umanità.  La commissione di fantasmi gli indicò come lanciare messaggi al mondo degli spiriti tramite una sorta di armatura ricoperta di batterie di rame e zinco: grazie a questo strumento di avanzatissima tecnologia, Spear riceveva consigli che spaziavano dalla progettazione urbanistica di vaste città circolari alla costruzione di macchine da cucire perfezionate, dai metodi per eliminare il terribile sintomo dei “peli che si rizzano sul collo” (molto nocivo, a detta degli spiriti, per la memoria) al brevetto di una barca elettrica, fino al fantascientifico programma per stabilire una rete telepatica intercontinentale.

Ma il primo, e il più importante compito, che gli Elettrizzatori affidarono al fervente spiritista era la costruzione di un Nuovo Messia, “l’ultimo dono del Cielo agli uomini”, che avrebbe infuso nuova vitalità in tutte le creature, animate e inanimate, della Terra.

HighRock
Fu così che, nell’ottobre del 1853 ad High Rock, in un capanno per gli attrezzi presso il cottage della famiglia Hutchinson (anch’essi appassionati di spiritismo), cominciò la fabbricazione dell’automa messianico. Oltre a Spear e ad alcuni suoi fedelissimi, il gruppo di costruttori includeva anche due editori di testate spiritiste e una misteriosa donna chiamata “la Maria della Nuova Legge Divina”, che secondo alcune versioni sarebbe stata, più prosaicamente, la signora Spear.

Gli Elettrizzatori inviavano a Spear ogni giorno una nuova parte di precise e dettagliate istruzioni sui materiali da usare, sulla forma che i diversi ingranaggi avrebbero dovuto avere, e su come montarli. Il gruppo lavorava alla cieca, perché non c’era un piano completo: si procedeva pezzo per pezzo alla costruzione e all’assemblaggio, “come si decora un albero di Natale”. Il fatto che Spear non avesse la benché minima preparazione scientifica o tecnica era la garanzia che i progetti degli Elettrizzatori non sarebbero stati alterati da interpretazioni fallaci – o dalla logica.

Dopo una gestazione di nove mesi, la Nuova Forza Motrice era completata e pronta per essere “vivificata”. Putroppo nessuna immagine di questo Messia elettrico è giunta fino a noi, ma si trattava certamente di una macchina impressionante, seppure bislacca:

Dal centro del tavolo si alzavano due pali metallici collegati in alto da una sbarra rotante in acciaio. La sbarra sosteneva un braccio trasversale alle cui estremità erano sospese due grosse sfere d’acciaio con dei magneti al loro interno. Sotto alle sfere appariva […] una curiosa costruzione, una specie di piattaforma ovale formata da una combinazione peculiare di magneti e metalli. Direttamente sopra a questo erano sospese alternativamente un certo numero di placche di zinco e rame, che fungevano come riserva elettrica per il cervello. Erano equipaggiate con conduttori metallici, o attrattori, che dovevano raggiungere un alto strato dell’atmosfera per ricavarne direttamente l’energia. In combinazione con queste parti principali erano assemblate varie sbarre di metallo, placche, cavi, magneti, sostanze isolanti, strani composti chimici, ecc. In alcuni punti lungo la circonferenza di queste strutture, e connesse con il centro, erano appese piccole palle d’acciaio che racchiudevano magneti. Due connessioni metalliche finivano dentro il terreno, una positiva e una negativa, corrispondenti agli arti inferiori, destro e sinistro, del corpo.

La Nuova Maria, dopo aver annunciato di essere incinta, giacque accanto alla macchina per due ore in preda alle doglie, mentre Spear, rinchiuso in un elaborato pastrano rigido costellato di gemme grezze e strisce metalliche, entrava in stato di trance profonda e creava un legame psichico “ombelicale” con l’automa. Quando il “parto” giunse al termine, Maria si alzò, impose le mani sull’automa, e il Nuovo Messia… si mosse!

cienciareal41_01
O, perlomeno, questo fu quello che vide Spear. Gli altri astanti, a dir la verità, rimasero un po’ meno impressionati: ci fu chi disse di aver notato soltanto un leggerissimo movimento nelle sfere sospese; chi raccontò di non aver visto proprio un bel nulla.
Spear annunciò alla stampa con toni entusiastici “la Nuova Forza Motrice, il Salvatore Fisico, l’Ultimo Dono del Cielo all’Uomo, la Nuova Creazione, la Grande Rivelazione Spirituale dell’Era, la Pietra Filosofale, Arte di ogni Arte, Scienza di ogni Scienza, il Nuovo Messia” – e riuscì a fare in modo che qualche testata titolasse “LA COSA SI MUOVE!”.
Peccato però che già le prime lettere ai giornali facessero notare che questo straordinario Messia non era in grado nemmeno di girare un macinino per il caffè.
Un giornalista analizzò attentamente l’intero progetto e, concedendo il beneficio del dubbio al simpatico Spear, che certamente aveva operato in buona fede, concluse che forse gli spiriti si erano presi gioco di lui. Anche se non si muoveva, concluse, il Nuovo Messia era comunque un’opera di eccellente e ammirevole artigianato.

Gli Elettrizzatori, vista la mala parata, consigliarono a Spear che forse un cambio d’aria avrebbe giovato al Messia. L’automa venne spostato a Randolph, New York, dove sarebbe riuscito a nutrirsi grazie a una “posizione elettrica migliore”. Ancora una volta, un consiglio poco preveggente: una volta a Randolph, il Messia venne alloggiato temporaneamente in un fienile; ma, nella migliore tradizione frankensteiniana, una folla inferocita fece irruzione nel rifugio e distrusse completamente il macchinario, spargendo ovunque i suoi pezzi. Alla violenta aggressione non sopravvisse nemmeno un ingranaggio.

Questa è la versione narrata dallo stesso Spear al Lynn News del 27 ottobre 1854: in realtà gli storici che hanno indagato sul caso non hanno trovato alcuna fonte che corrobori la sua dichiarazione – nessun articolo che parli della distruzione di un automa, di un’orda furibonda, nessun accenno all’accaduto nemmeno nelle lettere o nei diari privati dell’epoca. Il Messia, dunque, potrebbe essere stato – molto meno romanticamente – smontato e gettato via dopo il clamoroso insuccesso.

john_modern
Sia che abbia assistito impotente alla Passione del suo meccanismo divino, sia che abbia inventato di sana pianta l’intera leggenda della folla vendicativa, Spear comunque abbandonò ogni progetto di ingegneria redentrice. Tornò a predicare le riforme sociali che gli stavano a cuore, a combattere per i diritti delle donne, continuando contemporaneamente a tenere sedute spiritiche. Fino a quando, nel 1887, non passò egli stesso dall’altra parte dell’invisibile soglia che ci separa dal mondo ultraterreno.

Il Turco

Nel 1770, alla corte di Maria Teresa d’Austria, fece la sua prima sconcertante apparizione il Turco.

Vestito come uno stregone mediorientale, con tanto di vistoso turbante, il Turco sedeva ad un grosso tavolo di fronte a una scacchiera, e fumava una lunghissima pipa tradizionale; da sopra la barba nerissima, i suoi occhi grigi, ancorché vuoti e privi d’espressione, sembravano osservare tutto e tutti.  Il Turco era in attesa del coraggioso giocatore che avrebbe osato sfidarlo a scacchi.

Turk-engraving5

Tuerkischer_schachspieler_windisch4

Ciò che davvero impressionò tutti i presenti era che il Turco non era un uomo in carne ed ossa: era un automa. Il suo inventore, Wolfgang von Kempelen, lo aveva creato proprio per compiacere la Regina, con la quale si era vantato l’anno prima di essere in grado di costruire la macchina più spettacolare del mondo. Prima che cominciasse la partita a scacchi, Kempelen aprì le ante dell’enorme scatola sulla quale poggiava la scacchiera, e gli spettatori poterono vedere una intricatissima serie di meccanismi, ruote dentate e strane strutture ad orologeria – non c’era nessun trucco, si poteva vedere da una parte all’altra della struttura, quando Kempelen apriva anche le porte sul retro. Un’altra sezione della macchina era invece quasi vuota, a parte una serie di tubi d’ottone. Quando il Turco era messo in moto, si sentiva chiaramente il ritmico sferragliare dei suoi ingranaggi interni, simile al ticchettio che avrebbe prodotto un enorme orologio.

Il primo volontario si fece avanti e Kempelen lo informò che il Turco doveva avere sempre le pedine bianche, e muovere invariabilmente per primo. A parte questa “concessione”, si scoprì ben presto che il Turco non soltanto era un ottimo giocatore di scacchi, ma aveva anche un certo caratterino. Se un avversario tentava una mossa non valida, il Turco scuoteva la testa, rimetteva la pedina al suo posto e si arrogava il diritto di muovere; se il giocatore ci riprovava una seconda volta, l’automa gettava via la pedina.

arab1
Alla sua presentazione ufficiale a corte, il Turco sbaragliò facilmente qualsiasi avversario. Per Kempelen sarebbe anche potuta finire lì, con il bel successo del suo spettacolo. Ma il suo automa divenne di colpo l’argomento di conversazione preferito in tutta Europa: intellettuali, nobili e curiosi volevano confrontarsi con questa incredibile macchina in grado di pensare, altri sospettavano un trucco, e alcuni temevano si trattasse di magia nera (pochi per la verità, era pur sempre l’epoca dei Lumi). Nonostante volesse dedicarsi a nuove invenzioni, di fronte all’ordine dell’Imperatore Giuseppe II, Kempelen fu costretto controvoglia a rimontare il suo automa e ad esibirsi nuovamente a corte; il successo fu ancora più clamoroso, e all’inventore venne suggerito (o, per meglio dire, imposto) di iniziare un tour europeo.

Kempelen-charcoal

Nel 1783 il Turco viaggiò fra spettacoli pubblici e privati, presso le principali corti europee e nei saloni nobiliari, perdendo alcune partite ma vincendone la maggior parte. A Parigi il più grande scacchista del tempo, François-André Danican Philidor, vinse contro il Turco ma confessò che quella era stata la partita più faticosa della sua carriera. Dopo Parigi vennero Londra, Leipzig, Dresda, Amsterdam, Vienna. A poco a poco si spense il clamore della novità, e il Turco rimase smantellato per una ventina d’anni: nessuno aveva ancora scoperto il suo segreto. Quando Kempelen morì nel 1804, suo figlio decise di vendere il macchinario a Johann Nepomuk Mälzel, un appassionato collezionista di automi. Mälzel decise che avrebbe dato nuova vita al Turco, perfezionandolo e rendendolo ancora più spettacolare. Aggiunse alcune parti, modificò alcuni dettagli, e infine installò una scatola parlante che permetteva alla macchina di pronunciare la parola “échec!” quando metteva sotto scacco l’avversario.

1-0.The_Turk.Granger_Collection_0059574_H.L02645400
Perfino Napoleone Bonaparte volle giocare contro il Turco. Si racconta che l’Imperatore provò una mossa illecita per ben tre volte; le prime due volte l’automa scosse il capo e rimise la pedina al suo posto, ma la terza volta perse le staffe e con un braccio – evidentemente incurante di chi aveva di fronte! – il Turco spazzò via tutti pezzi dalla scacchiera. Napoleone rimase estremamente divertito dal gesto insolente, e giocò in seguito alcune partite più “serie”.

Malzels-exhibition-ad
Nel 1826 Mälzel portò il Turco in America, dove la sua popolarità non smise di crescere su tutta la costa orientale degli States, da New York a Boston a Philadelphia; Edgar Allan Poe scrisse un famoso trattato sull’automa (anche se non azzeccò affatto il suo segreto), e numerosi “cloni” ed imitazioni del Turco cominciarono ad apparire – ma nessuno ebbe il successo dell’originale.

Ma ogni cosa fa il suo tempo. Nel 1838 Mälzel morì, e il Turco, inizialmente messo all’asta, finì relegato in un angolo del Peale Museum di Baltimora. Nel 1854 un incendio raggiunse il Museo, e ci fu chi giurò di aver sentito il Turco, avvolto dalle fiamme, che gridava “Scacco! Scacco!“, mentre la sua voce diveniva sempre più flebile. Dell’incredibile automa si salvò soltanto la scacchiera, che era conservata in un luogo separato.

Nel 1857 Silas Mitchell, figlio dell’ultimo proprietario del Turco, decise che non c’era più motivo di nascondere il vero funzionamento della macchina, visto che era andata ormai distrutta. Così, su una prestigiosa rivista di scacchi, pubblicò infine il “segreto meglio mantenuto di sempre”. Si scoprì che, fra le ipotesi degli scettici e le teorie di chi aveva tentato di risolvere l’enigma, alcune parti dell’ingegnosa opera erano state indovinate, ma mai interamente.

turk-hidden-1-4
Dentro al macchinario del Turco si nascondeva un maestro di scacchi in carne ed ossa. Quando il presentatore apriva i diversi scomparti per mostrarli al pubblico, l’operatore segreto si spostava su un sedile mobile, secondo uno schema preciso, facendo così scivolare in posizione alcune parti semoventi del macchinario. In questo modo, poiché non tutte le ante venivano aperte contemporaneamente, lo scacchista rimaneva sempre al riparo dagli occhi degli spettatori. Ma come poteva sapere in che modo giocare la sua partita?

Sotto ogni pezzo degli scacchi era impiantato un forte magnete, e l’operatore nascosto poteva seguire le mosse dell’avversario perché la calamita attirava a sé altrettanti magneti attaccati con un filo all’interno del coperchio superiore della scatola. L’operatore, per vedere nel buio del mobile in legno, usava una candela i cui fumi uscivano discretamente da un condotto di aerazione nascosto nel turbante del Turco; i numerosi candelabri che illuminavano la scena aiutavano a mascherare la fuoriuscita del fumo. Una complessa serie di leve simili a quelle di un pantografo permettevano al maestro di scacchi di fare la sua mossa, muovendo il braccio dell’automa. C’era perfino un quadrante in ottone con una serie di numeri, che poteva essere visto anche dall’esterno: questo permetteva la comunicazione in codice fra l’operatore all’interno della scatola e il presentatore all’esterno.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

1041323440_a377ac2955
Nel 1989 John Gaughan presentò a una conferenza sulla magia una perfetta ricostruzione del Turco, che gli era costata quattro anni di lavoro. Questa volta, però, non c’era più bisogno di un operatore umano all’interno del macchinario: a dirigere le mosse dell’automa era un programma computerizzato. Meno di dieci anni dopo Deep Blue sarebbe stato il primo computer a battere a scacchi il campione mondiale in carica, Garry Kasparov.

Oggi la tecnologia è arrivata ben oltre le più assurde fantasie di chi rimaneva sconcertato di fronte al Turco; eppure alcune delle domande che ci sono tanto familiari (potranno mai le macchine soppiantare gli uomini? È possibile costruire dei sistemi meccanici capaci di pensiero?) non sono poi così moderne come potremmo credere: nacquero per la prima volta proprio attorno a questa misteriosa e ironica figura dall’esotico turbante.

turk-chess-automaton-01-x640
(Grazie, Giulia!)

Le strabilianti macchine di Mr. Ganson

Arthur Ganson, classe 1955, ha  sempre avuto un debole per i meccanismi. Fin da quando, bambino introverso e timido, decise di superare la solitudine raccogliendo materiali di recupero e costruendo macchine incredibili, “mettendo le mie idee e passioni dentro agli oggetti, e imparando a parlare attraverso le mie mani”. Anche oggi, dopo che i suoi lavori sono stati esposti in sedi prestigiose attraverso tutto il mondo, e che alcune sue opere sono raccolte permanentemente in diversi musei scientifici, Ganson mantiene intatti l’entusiasmo e la meraviglia infantili di fronte a un qualsiasi complesso congegno meccanico.

Ma le sue “macchine cinetiche”, o sculture, o come vogliate chiamarle, sono molto più che semplici macchinari – sembrano avere un’anima. Ganson descrive il suo lavoro come l’incontro fra ingegneria e coreografia: automi che danzano, dunque. Eppure per spiegare la spiazzante bellezza di queste macchine occorre afferrare il nodo centrale dell’opera di Ganson – l’inutilità.

Tutte le macchine create dall’uomo assolvono a uno scopo specifico, sono progettate per compiere un lavoro, e la loro struttura è strettamente collegata con la loro funzione. Quelle di Arthur Ganson, invece, non hanno un fine preciso e, per quanto complessa ed elaborata sia la progettazione, per quanto minuzioso e difficoltoso l’assemblaggio, tutta questa fatica di lavoro e di intelletto è diretta alla costruzione di un oggetto senza scopo; tutto questo affollarsi d’ingranaggi, molle e meccanismi ad orologeria si risolve nella chiara, semplice, bellezza del movimento. Ed è in questo momento, quando realizziamo che la macchina non è più nostra schiava, non serve a qualcosa, che essa comincia a parlare.

Ognuna delle decine e decine di opere ha la sua voce distinta. Molto spesso la macchina si muove per il puro piacere di farlo, magari assumendo di volta in volta forme casuali che probabilmente non si ripeteranno mai più.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tcw7IvGJG9s]

In altri casi sembra quasi che la macchina diventi addirittura simbolo della condizione umana: guardate questa Macchina con Petalo di Carciofo, con la foglia rinsecchita destinata a camminare, camminare senza sosta e senza meta, come un moderno Sisifo “on the road”.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skeI3FXz9_4]

Altri marchingegni si oliano da soli, altri ancora introducono l’elemento del tempo. In Machine with Concrete, nonostante la macchina continui instancabilmente a muoversi, la riduzione di ghiera in ghiera è talmente estrema che l’ultima rotellina ha potuto essere incastonata nel cemento: si muove così lentamente che compierà una rivoluzione completa soltanto fra 2.3 trilioni di anni.

“Tutti questi pezzi cominciano nella mia mente, nel mio cuore, e io faccio del mio meglio per trovare il modo di esprimerli, ed è sempre approssimativo, è sempre una battaglia, ma alla fine riesco a concretizzare questo pensiero in un oggetto, e allora eccolo lì. Non significa nulla. L’oggetto in sé non vuol dire niente. Ma una volta che viene percepito, e qualcuno lo trasferisce nella sua mente, ecco che allora il ciclo si è completato”.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9K6XaqT_VoQ]

Le macchine di Arthur Ganson ci parlano della nostra stessa fragilità – sono, come noi, macchinari perfetti ma senza uno scopo definito. E forse è proprio l’assenza di una ragione, di un motivo d’essere, che ne rende poetica l’esistenza. Se la vita avesse un senso, sembrano suggerire questi meravigliosi automi, non saremmo altro che macchine programmate e senz’anima. Che miracolo, che liberazione, potere danzare per il solo gusto di farlo!

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Arthur Ganson.

(Grazie, Yoana!)

Automi & Androidi

La storia degli automi meccanici si perde nella notte dei tempi, e non è nostra intenzione affrontarla in maniera sistematica o esaustiva. È interessante però notare che nella Grecia classica, così come nella Cina antica, l’ingegneria meccanica era forse più avanzata di quanto non sostenga la storia ufficiale. Gli archeologi sono sempre più aperti alla nozione di scienza perduta – vale a dire una conoscenza già raggiunta in tempi antichi e poi, per cause diverse, persa e “riscoperta” in tempi più recenti. Meccanismi come quello celebre di Anticitera sono “sorprese” archeologiche che fanno soppesare daccapo l’avanzamento tecnologico di alcuni nostri antenati così come è stato supposto fino ad ora (senza peraltro arrivare alle fantasiose ipotesi extraterrestri o a ingenue rivisitazioni esoteriche o new-age delle epoche passate).

Nonostante quindi ci sia pervenuta voce di automi meccanici complessi e realistici da epoche e regioni non sospette, i primi veri robot storicamente documentati risalgono ai primi del 1200 in Medioriente, e sono attribuiti al genio ingegneristico dello scienziato, artista e inventore Al-Jazari. Per intrattenere gli ospiti alle feste, si dice avesse creato una piccola nave con quattro automi musicisti che suonavano e si muovevano realisticamente; un altro suo automa aveva un meccanismo simile alle nostre moderne toilette: ci si lavava le mani in una bacinella e, tirata una leva, l’acqua veniva scaricata e il meccanismo dalle avvenenti forme di ancella riempiva nuovamente la vaschetta. (E le meraviglie inventate da questo genio non si fermavano qui).

Tra i molti inventori che misero a punto automi meccanici, fra Cina, Medioriente e Occidente, spicca anche il nostro Leonardo da Vinci, che aveva progettato un cavaliere in armatura semovente, destinato forse al divertimento per i nobili invitati ai simposi.

Nel Rinascimento, ogni wunderkammer che si rispettasse ospitava qualche automa pneumatico, idraulico o meccanico: nobiluomini di latta che fumavano, dame metalliche che cantavano, cigni e pavoni meccanici che si muovevano e drizzavano il piumaggio. Jacques de Vaucanson (inventore del telaio automatico, così come di molti altri meccanismi tutt’oggi adoperati negli utensili domestici) costruì un’anitra di metallo che ad oggi resta un automa insuperato per complessità. L’anatra poteva bere acqua con il becco, mangiare semi di grano e replicare il processo di digestione in una camera speciale, visibile agli spettatori; ognuna delle sue ali conteneva quattrocento parti in movimento, che potevano simulare alla perfezione tutte le movenze di un’anatra vera.

Nel ‘700 gli automi erano una moda e un’ossessione per molti inventori. Il loro successo non accennò mai a declinare anche nel secolo successivo. Ma da semplici curiosità o giocattoli automatizzati sarebbero divenuti molto più intriganti con l’avvento, nella seconda metà del XX secolo, delle nuove tecnologie, dell’informatica e del concetto di robot  portato avanti dalla fantascienza.

Con l’affermarsi della cibernetica e della robotica, gli automi meccanici fecero il grande passo. Autori di science-fiction quali Asimov, Bradbury, e poi Dick, Gibson e tutta la stirpe degli scrittori cyberpunk ne celebrarono il potenziale destabilizzante. Abbiamo già parlato del concetto di Uncanny Valley, ovvero quel punto esatto in cui l’automa diviene un po’ troppo simile all’essere umano, e suscita un sentimento di paura e repulsione. Gli autori di fantascienza del ‘900, trovatisi per primi a confrontarsi con i prototipi di computer in grado di tener testa a un esperto giocatore di scacchi, o alle primissime generazioni di robot capaci di azioni complesse, non potevano che descrivere un’umanità minacciata da una “presa di controllo” da parte delle macchine. Una visione piuttosto ingenua e “antica”, forse, vista alla luce della nostra realtà in cui i computer ci aiutano, ci connettono e ci sostengono in modo così pervasivo. Eppure…

…eppure. Ecco le domande interessanti. A che punto siamo oggi con gli androidi (così vengono chiamati i moderni automi)? A che livello sono giunti gli scienziati? Quali sono le novità che gli ingegneri sfoggiano alle mostre e alle convention? Ci fanno ancora paura questi esseri automatizzati che simulano le espressioni e i movimenti umani? Il fascino degli automi, e le domande che ci pongono, divengono sempre più concreti. Se fra qualche anno vi trovaste a chiedere informazioni a una signorina seduta dietro a un bancone della reception, e scopriste dopo poco che vi trovate davanti a un perfetto automa, la cosa vi darebbe fastidio? Donare un’identità sempre più definita a una macchina, confondere l’organico e il meccanico, è davvero uno scandalo, come preconizzavano gli autori di fantascienza del secolo scorso? Può davvero un automa troppo umano far vacillare la nostra sicurezza, perché toglie qualcosa alla nostra stessa unicità? Potete decidere voi stessi, dando un’occhiata a questi recenti video.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFVlzUAZkHY]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtuioXKssyA]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MY8-sJS0W1I]