Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 4

In the fourth episode of the Bizzarro Bazar Web Series we talk about the most incredible automatons in history, about the buttocks of a girl named Fanny, and about a rather unique parasite. [Be sure to turn on English captions.]

If you like this episode please consider subscribing to the channel, and most of all spread the word. Enjoy!

Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

Living Machines: Automata Between Nature and Artifice

Article by Laura Tradii
University of Oxford,
MSc History of Science, Medicine and Technology

In a rather unknown operetta morale, the great Leopardi imagines an award competition organised by the fictitious Academy of Syllographers. Being the 19th Century the “Age of Machines”, and despairing of the possibility of improving mankind, the Academy will reward the inventors of three automata, described in a paroxysm of bitter irony: the first will have to be a machine able to act like a trusted friend, ready to assist his acquaintances in the moment of need, and refraining from speaking behind their back; the second machine will be a “steam-powered artificial man” programmed to accomplish virtuous deeds, while the third will be a faithful woman. Considering the great variety of automata built in his century, Leopardi points out, such achievements should not be considered impossible.

In the eighteenth and nineteenth century, automata (from the Greek, “self moving” or “acting of itself”) had become a real craze in Europe, above all in aristocratic circles. Already a few centuries earlier, hydraulic automata had often been installed in the gardens of palaces to amuse the visitors. Jessica Riskin, author of several works on automata and their history, describes thus the machines which could be found, in the fourteenth and fifteenth century, in the French castle of Hesdin:

“3 personnages that spout water and wet people at will”; a “machine for wetting ladies when they step on it”; an “engien [sic] which, when its knobs are touched, strikes in the face those who are underneath and covers them with black or white [flour or coal dust]”.1

26768908656_4aa6fd60f9_o

26768900716_9e86ee1ded_o

In the fifteenth century, always according to Riskin, Boxley Abbey in Kent displayed a mechanical Jesus which could be moved by pulling some strings. The Jesus muttered, blinked, moved his hands and feet, nodded, and he could smile and frown. In this period, the fact that automata required a human to operate them, instead of moving of their own accord as suggested by the etymology, was not seen as cheating, but rather as a necessity.2

In the eighteenth century, instead, mechanics and engineers attempted to create automata which could move of their own accord once loaded, and this change could be contextualised in a time in which mechanistic theories of nature had been put forward. According to such theories, nature could be understood in fundamentally mechanical terms, like a great clockwork whose dynamics and processes were not much different from the ones of a machine. According to Descartes, for example, a single mechanical philosophy could explain the actions of both living beings and natural phenomena.3
Inventors attempted therefore to understand and artificially recreate the movements of animals and human beings, and the mechanical duck built by Vaucanson is a perfect example of such attempts.

With this automaton, Vaucanson purposed to replicate the physical process of digestion: the duck would eat seeds, digest them, and defecate. In truth, the automaton simply simulated these processes, and the faeces were prepared in advance. The silver swan built by John Joseph Merlin (1735-1803), instead, imitated with an astonishing realism the movements of the animal, which moved (and still moves) his neck with surprising flexibility. Through thin glass tubes, Merlin even managed to recreate the reflection of the water on which the swan seemed to float.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT05uNFb6hY

Vaucanson’s Flute Player, instead, played a real flute, blowing air into the instruments thanks to mechanical lungs, and moving his fingers. On a similar vein, at the beginning of the nineteenth century, a little model of Napoleon was displayed in the United Kingdom: the puppet breathed, and it was covered in a material which imitated the texture of skin.  The advertisement for its exhibition at the Dublin’s Royal Arcade described it as a ‘splendid Work of Art’, ‘produc[ing] a striking imitation of human nature, in its Form, Color, and Texture, animated with the act of Respiration, Flexibility of the Limbs, and Elasticity of Flesh, as to induce a belief that this pleasing and really wonderful Figure is a living subject, ready to get up and speak’.4

The attempt to artificially recreate natural processes included other functions beyond movement. In 1779, the Academy of Sciences of Saint Petersburg opened a competition to mechanise the most human of all faculties, language, rewarding who would have succeeded in building a machine capable of pronouncing vowels. A decade later, Kempelen, the inventor of the famous Chess-Playing Turk, built a machine which could pronounce 19 consonants (at least according to Kempelen himself).5

In virtue of their uncanny nature, automata embody the tension between artifice and nature which for centuries has animated Western thought. The quest not only for the manipulation, but for the perfecting of the natural order, typical of the Wunderkammer or the alchemical laboratory, finds expression in the automaton, and it is this presumption that Leopardi comments with sarcasm. For Leopardi, like for some of his contemporaries, the idea that human beings could enhance what Nature already created perfect is a pernicious misconception. The traditional narrative of progress, according to which the lives of humans can be improved through technology, which separates mankind from the cruel state of nature, is challenged by Leopardi through his satire of automata. With his proverbial optimism, the author believes that all that distances humans from Nature can only be the cause of suffering, and that no improvement in the human condition shall be achieved through mechanisation and modernisation.

This criticism is substantiated by the fear that humans may become victims of their own creation, a discourse which was widespread during the Industrial Revolution. Romantic writer Jean Paul (1763-1825), for example, uses automata to satirise the society of the late eighteenth century, imagining a dystopic world in which machines are used to control the citizens and to carry out even the most trivial tasks: to chew food, to play music, and even to pray.6

The mechanical metaphors which were often used in the seventeenth century to describe the functioning of the State, conceptualised as a machine formed of different cogs or institutions, acquire here a dystopic connotation, becoming the manifestation of a bureaucratic, mechanical, and therefore dehumanising order. It is interesting to see how observations of this kind recur today in debates over Artificial Intelligence, and how, quoting Leopardi, a future is envisioned in which “the uses of machines [will come to] include not only material things, but also spiritual ones”.

A closer future than we may think, since technology modifies in entirely new directions our way of life, our understanding of ourselves, and our position in the natural order.

____________

[1]  Jessica Riskin, Frolicsome Engines: The Long Prehistory of Artificial Intelligence.
[2]  Grafton, The Devil as Automaton: Giovanni Fontana and the Meanings of a Fifteenth-Century Machine, p.56.
[3]  Grafton, p.58.
[4]  Jennifer Walls, Captivating Respiration: the “Breathing Napoleon”.
[5]  John P. Cater, Electronically Speaking: Computer Speech Generation, Howard M. Sams & Co., 1983, pp. 72-74.
[6]  Jean Paul, 1789. Discusso in Sublime Dreams of Living Machines: the Automaton in the European Imagination di Minsoo Kang.

Il Turco

Nel 1770, alla corte di Maria Teresa d’Austria, fece la sua prima sconcertante apparizione il Turco.

Vestito come uno stregone mediorientale, con tanto di vistoso turbante, il Turco sedeva ad un grosso tavolo di fronte a una scacchiera, e fumava una lunghissima pipa tradizionale; da sopra la barba nerissima, i suoi occhi grigi, ancorché vuoti e privi d’espressione, sembravano osservare tutto e tutti.  Il Turco era in attesa del coraggioso giocatore che avrebbe osato sfidarlo a scacchi.

Turk-engraving5

Tuerkischer_schachspieler_windisch4

Ciò che davvero impressionò tutti i presenti era che il Turco non era un uomo in carne ed ossa: era un automa. Il suo inventore, Wolfgang von Kempelen, lo aveva creato proprio per compiacere la Regina, con la quale si era vantato l’anno prima di essere in grado di costruire la macchina più spettacolare del mondo. Prima che cominciasse la partita a scacchi, Kempelen aprì le ante dell’enorme scatola sulla quale poggiava la scacchiera, e gli spettatori poterono vedere una intricatissima serie di meccanismi, ruote dentate e strane strutture ad orologeria – non c’era nessun trucco, si poteva vedere da una parte all’altra della struttura, quando Kempelen apriva anche le porte sul retro. Un’altra sezione della macchina era invece quasi vuota, a parte una serie di tubi d’ottone. Quando il Turco era messo in moto, si sentiva chiaramente il ritmico sferragliare dei suoi ingranaggi interni, simile al ticchettio che avrebbe prodotto un enorme orologio.

Il primo volontario si fece avanti e Kempelen lo informò che il Turco doveva avere sempre le pedine bianche, e muovere invariabilmente per primo. A parte questa “concessione”, si scoprì ben presto che il Turco non soltanto era un ottimo giocatore di scacchi, ma aveva anche un certo caratterino. Se un avversario tentava una mossa non valida, il Turco scuoteva la testa, rimetteva la pedina al suo posto e si arrogava il diritto di muovere; se il giocatore ci riprovava una seconda volta, l’automa gettava via la pedina.

arab1
Alla sua presentazione ufficiale a corte, il Turco sbaragliò facilmente qualsiasi avversario. Per Kempelen sarebbe anche potuta finire lì, con il bel successo del suo spettacolo. Ma il suo automa divenne di colpo l’argomento di conversazione preferito in tutta Europa: intellettuali, nobili e curiosi volevano confrontarsi con questa incredibile macchina in grado di pensare, altri sospettavano un trucco, e alcuni temevano si trattasse di magia nera (pochi per la verità, era pur sempre l’epoca dei Lumi). Nonostante volesse dedicarsi a nuove invenzioni, di fronte all’ordine dell’Imperatore Giuseppe II, Kempelen fu costretto controvoglia a rimontare il suo automa e ad esibirsi nuovamente a corte; il successo fu ancora più clamoroso, e all’inventore venne suggerito (o, per meglio dire, imposto) di iniziare un tour europeo.

Kempelen-charcoal

Nel 1783 il Turco viaggiò fra spettacoli pubblici e privati, presso le principali corti europee e nei saloni nobiliari, perdendo alcune partite ma vincendone la maggior parte. A Parigi il più grande scacchista del tempo, François-André Danican Philidor, vinse contro il Turco ma confessò che quella era stata la partita più faticosa della sua carriera. Dopo Parigi vennero Londra, Leipzig, Dresda, Amsterdam, Vienna. A poco a poco si spense il clamore della novità, e il Turco rimase smantellato per una ventina d’anni: nessuno aveva ancora scoperto il suo segreto. Quando Kempelen morì nel 1804, suo figlio decise di vendere il macchinario a Johann Nepomuk Mälzel, un appassionato collezionista di automi. Mälzel decise che avrebbe dato nuova vita al Turco, perfezionandolo e rendendolo ancora più spettacolare. Aggiunse alcune parti, modificò alcuni dettagli, e infine installò una scatola parlante che permetteva alla macchina di pronunciare la parola “échec!” quando metteva sotto scacco l’avversario.

1-0.The_Turk.Granger_Collection_0059574_H.L02645400
Perfino Napoleone Bonaparte volle giocare contro il Turco. Si racconta che l’Imperatore provò una mossa illecita per ben tre volte; le prime due volte l’automa scosse il capo e rimise la pedina al suo posto, ma la terza volta perse le staffe e con un braccio – evidentemente incurante di chi aveva di fronte! – il Turco spazzò via tutti pezzi dalla scacchiera. Napoleone rimase estremamente divertito dal gesto insolente, e giocò in seguito alcune partite più “serie”.

Malzels-exhibition-ad
Nel 1826 Mälzel portò il Turco in America, dove la sua popolarità non smise di crescere su tutta la costa orientale degli States, da New York a Boston a Philadelphia; Edgar Allan Poe scrisse un famoso trattato sull’automa (anche se non azzeccò affatto il suo segreto), e numerosi “cloni” ed imitazioni del Turco cominciarono ad apparire – ma nessuno ebbe il successo dell’originale.

Ma ogni cosa fa il suo tempo. Nel 1838 Mälzel morì, e il Turco, inizialmente messo all’asta, finì relegato in un angolo del Peale Museum di Baltimora. Nel 1854 un incendio raggiunse il Museo, e ci fu chi giurò di aver sentito il Turco, avvolto dalle fiamme, che gridava “Scacco! Scacco!“, mentre la sua voce diveniva sempre più flebile. Dell’incredibile automa si salvò soltanto la scacchiera, che era conservata in un luogo separato.

Nel 1857 Silas Mitchell, figlio dell’ultimo proprietario del Turco, decise che non c’era più motivo di nascondere il vero funzionamento della macchina, visto che era andata ormai distrutta. Così, su una prestigiosa rivista di scacchi, pubblicò infine il “segreto meglio mantenuto di sempre”. Si scoprì che, fra le ipotesi degli scettici e le teorie di chi aveva tentato di risolvere l’enigma, alcune parti dell’ingegnosa opera erano state indovinate, ma mai interamente.

turk-hidden-1-4
Dentro al macchinario del Turco si nascondeva un maestro di scacchi in carne ed ossa. Quando il presentatore apriva i diversi scomparti per mostrarli al pubblico, l’operatore segreto si spostava su un sedile mobile, secondo uno schema preciso, facendo così scivolare in posizione alcune parti semoventi del macchinario. In questo modo, poiché non tutte le ante venivano aperte contemporaneamente, lo scacchista rimaneva sempre al riparo dagli occhi degli spettatori. Ma come poteva sapere in che modo giocare la sua partita?

Sotto ogni pezzo degli scacchi era impiantato un forte magnete, e l’operatore nascosto poteva seguire le mosse dell’avversario perché la calamita attirava a sé altrettanti magneti attaccati con un filo all’interno del coperchio superiore della scatola. L’operatore, per vedere nel buio del mobile in legno, usava una candela i cui fumi uscivano discretamente da un condotto di aerazione nascosto nel turbante del Turco; i numerosi candelabri che illuminavano la scena aiutavano a mascherare la fuoriuscita del fumo. Una complessa serie di leve simili a quelle di un pantografo permettevano al maestro di scacchi di fare la sua mossa, muovendo il braccio dell’automa. C’era perfino un quadrante in ottone con una serie di numeri, che poteva essere visto anche dall’esterno: questo permetteva la comunicazione in codice fra l’operatore all’interno della scatola e il presentatore all’esterno.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

1041323440_a377ac2955
Nel 1989 John Gaughan presentò a una conferenza sulla magia una perfetta ricostruzione del Turco, che gli era costata quattro anni di lavoro. Questa volta, però, non c’era più bisogno di un operatore umano all’interno del macchinario: a dirigere le mosse dell’automa era un programma computerizzato. Meno di dieci anni dopo Deep Blue sarebbe stato il primo computer a battere a scacchi il campione mondiale in carica, Garry Kasparov.

Oggi la tecnologia è arrivata ben oltre le più assurde fantasie di chi rimaneva sconcertato di fronte al Turco; eppure alcune delle domande che ci sono tanto familiari (potranno mai le macchine soppiantare gli uomini? È possibile costruire dei sistemi meccanici capaci di pensiero?) non sono poi così moderne come potremmo credere: nacquero per la prima volta proprio attorno a questa misteriosa e ironica figura dall’esotico turbante.

turk-chess-automaton-01-x640
(Grazie, Giulia!)

Automi & Androidi

La storia degli automi meccanici si perde nella notte dei tempi, e non è nostra intenzione affrontarla in maniera sistematica o esaustiva. È interessante però notare che nella Grecia classica, così come nella Cina antica, l’ingegneria meccanica era forse più avanzata di quanto non sostenga la storia ufficiale. Gli archeologi sono sempre più aperti alla nozione di scienza perduta – vale a dire una conoscenza già raggiunta in tempi antichi e poi, per cause diverse, persa e “riscoperta” in tempi più recenti. Meccanismi come quello celebre di Anticitera sono “sorprese” archeologiche che fanno soppesare daccapo l’avanzamento tecnologico di alcuni nostri antenati così come è stato supposto fino ad ora (senza peraltro arrivare alle fantasiose ipotesi extraterrestri o a ingenue rivisitazioni esoteriche o new-age delle epoche passate).

Nonostante quindi ci sia pervenuta voce di automi meccanici complessi e realistici da epoche e regioni non sospette, i primi veri robot storicamente documentati risalgono ai primi del 1200 in Medioriente, e sono attribuiti al genio ingegneristico dello scienziato, artista e inventore Al-Jazari. Per intrattenere gli ospiti alle feste, si dice avesse creato una piccola nave con quattro automi musicisti che suonavano e si muovevano realisticamente; un altro suo automa aveva un meccanismo simile alle nostre moderne toilette: ci si lavava le mani in una bacinella e, tirata una leva, l’acqua veniva scaricata e il meccanismo dalle avvenenti forme di ancella riempiva nuovamente la vaschetta. (E le meraviglie inventate da questo genio non si fermavano qui).

Tra i molti inventori che misero a punto automi meccanici, fra Cina, Medioriente e Occidente, spicca anche il nostro Leonardo da Vinci, che aveva progettato un cavaliere in armatura semovente, destinato forse al divertimento per i nobili invitati ai simposi.

Nel Rinascimento, ogni wunderkammer che si rispettasse ospitava qualche automa pneumatico, idraulico o meccanico: nobiluomini di latta che fumavano, dame metalliche che cantavano, cigni e pavoni meccanici che si muovevano e drizzavano il piumaggio. Jacques de Vaucanson (inventore del telaio automatico, così come di molti altri meccanismi tutt’oggi adoperati negli utensili domestici) costruì un’anitra di metallo che ad oggi resta un automa insuperato per complessità. L’anatra poteva bere acqua con il becco, mangiare semi di grano e replicare il processo di digestione in una camera speciale, visibile agli spettatori; ognuna delle sue ali conteneva quattrocento parti in movimento, che potevano simulare alla perfezione tutte le movenze di un’anatra vera.

Nel ‘700 gli automi erano una moda e un’ossessione per molti inventori. Il loro successo non accennò mai a declinare anche nel secolo successivo. Ma da semplici curiosità o giocattoli automatizzati sarebbero divenuti molto più intriganti con l’avvento, nella seconda metà del XX secolo, delle nuove tecnologie, dell’informatica e del concetto di robot  portato avanti dalla fantascienza.

Con l’affermarsi della cibernetica e della robotica, gli automi meccanici fecero il grande passo. Autori di science-fiction quali Asimov, Bradbury, e poi Dick, Gibson e tutta la stirpe degli scrittori cyberpunk ne celebrarono il potenziale destabilizzante. Abbiamo già parlato del concetto di Uncanny Valley, ovvero quel punto esatto in cui l’automa diviene un po’ troppo simile all’essere umano, e suscita un sentimento di paura e repulsione. Gli autori di fantascienza del ‘900, trovatisi per primi a confrontarsi con i prototipi di computer in grado di tener testa a un esperto giocatore di scacchi, o alle primissime generazioni di robot capaci di azioni complesse, non potevano che descrivere un’umanità minacciata da una “presa di controllo” da parte delle macchine. Una visione piuttosto ingenua e “antica”, forse, vista alla luce della nostra realtà in cui i computer ci aiutano, ci connettono e ci sostengono in modo così pervasivo. Eppure…

…eppure. Ecco le domande interessanti. A che punto siamo oggi con gli androidi (così vengono chiamati i moderni automi)? A che livello sono giunti gli scienziati? Quali sono le novità che gli ingegneri sfoggiano alle mostre e alle convention? Ci fanno ancora paura questi esseri automatizzati che simulano le espressioni e i movimenti umani? Il fascino degli automi, e le domande che ci pongono, divengono sempre più concreti. Se fra qualche anno vi trovaste a chiedere informazioni a una signorina seduta dietro a un bancone della reception, e scopriste dopo poco che vi trovate davanti a un perfetto automa, la cosa vi darebbe fastidio? Donare un’identità sempre più definita a una macchina, confondere l’organico e il meccanico, è davvero uno scandalo, come preconizzavano gli autori di fantascienza del secolo scorso? Può davvero un automa troppo umano far vacillare la nostra sicurezza, perché toglie qualcosa alla nostra stessa unicità? Potete decidere voi stessi, dando un’occhiata a questi recenti video.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFVlzUAZkHY]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtuioXKssyA]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MY8-sJS0W1I]