An elephant on the gallows

The billboards for Sparks World Famous Shows, which appeared in small Southern American towns a couple of days before the circus’ arrival, seem quite anomalous to anyone who has a familiarity with this kind of poster design from the beginning of the Twentieth Century.
Where one could expect to see emphatic titles and hyperbolic advertising claims, Sparks circus — in a much too unpretentious way — was defined as a “moral, entertaining and instructive” spectacle; instead of boasting unprecedented marvels, the only claim was that the show “never broke a promise” and publicized its “25 years of honest dealing with the public“.

The reason why owner Charlie Sparks limited himself to stress his show’s transparency and decency, was that he didn’t have much else to count on, in order to lure the crowd.
Despite Sparks’ excellent reputation (he was among the most respected impresarios in the business), his was ultimately a second-category circus. It consisted of a dozen cars, against the 42 cars of his main rival in the South, John Robinson’s Circus. Sparks had five elephants, Robinson had twelve. And both of them could never hope to compete with Barnum & Bailey’s number one circus, with its impressive 84-car railroad caravan.
Therefore Sparks World Famous Shows kept clear of big cities and made a living by serving those smaller towns, ignored by more famous circuses, where the residents would find his attractions worth paying for.

Although Sparks circus was “not spectacularly but slowly and surely” growing, in those years it didn’t offer much yet: some trained seals, some clowns, riders and gymnasts, the not-so-memorable “Man Who Walks on His Head“, and some living statues like the ones standing today on public squares, waiting for a coin.
The only real resource for Charlie Sparks, his pride and joy widely displayed on the banners, was Mary.

Advertides as being “3 inches taller than Jumbo” (Barnum’s famous elephant), Mary was a 5-ton indian pachyderm capable of playing different melodies by blowing horns, and of throwing a baseball as a pitcher in one of her most beloved routines. Mary represented the main source of income for Charlie Sparks, who loved her not just for economical but also for sentimental reasons: she was the only real superior element of his circus, and his excuse for dreaming of entering the history of entertainment.
And in a sense it is because of Mary if Sparks is still remembered today, even if not for the reason he might have suspected or wanted.

On September 11, 1916, Sparks pitched his Big Top in St. Paul, a mining town in Clinch River Valley, Virginia. On that very day Walter “Red” Eldridge, a janitor in a local hotel, decided that he had enough of sweeping floors, and joined the circus.
Altough Red was a former hobo, and clearly knew nothing about elephants, he was entrusted with leading the pachyderms during the parade Sparks ran through the city streets every afternoon before the show.
The next day the circus moved to Kingsport, Tennessee, where Mary paraded quietly along the main street, until the elephants were brought over to a ditch to be watered. And here the accounts begin to vary: what we know for sure is that Red hit Mary with a stick, infuriating the beast.
The rogue elephant grabbed the inexperienced handler with its trunk, and threw him in the air. When the body fell back on the ground, Mary began to trample him and eventually crushed his head under her foot. “And blood and brains and stuff just squirted all over the street“, as one witness put it.

Charlie Sparks immediately found himself in the middle of the worst nightmare.
Aside from his employee’s death on a public street — not really a “moral” and “instructive” spectacle — the real problem was that the whole tour was now in jeopardy: what town would allow an out-of-control elephant near its limits?
The crowd demanded the animal to be suppressed and Sparks unwillingly understood that if he wanted to save what was left of his enterprise, Mary had to be sacrified and, with her, his personal dreams of grandeur.
But killing an elephant is no easy task.

The first, obvious attempt was to fire five 32-20 rounds at Mary. There’s a good reason however if elephants are called pachyderms: the thick skin barrier did not let the bullets go deep in the flesh and, despite the pain, Mary didn’t fall down. (When in 1994 Tyke, a 3.6-ton elephant, killed his handler running amok on the streets of Honolulu, it took 86 shots to stop him. Tyke became a symbol for the fights against animal cruelty in circuses, also because of the heartbreaking footage of his demise.)
Someone then suggested to try and eliminate Mary by electrocution, a method used more than a decade before in the killing of Topsy in Coney Island. But there was no nearby way of producing the electricity needed to carry out the execution.
Therefore it was decided that Mary would be hung.

The only gallows that could bear such a weight was to be found in the railyards in Erwin, where there was a derrick capable of lifting railcars to place them on the tracks.
Charlie Sparks, knowing he was about to lose an animal worth $20.000, was determined to make the most out of the desperate situation. In the brief time that took for Mary to be moved from Kingsport to Erwin, he had already turned his elephant’s execution into a public event.

On September 13, on a rainy and foggy afternoon, more than 2.500 people gathered at the railyards. Children stood in the front line to witness the extraordinary endeavour.
Mary was brought to the makeshift gallows, and her foot was chained to the tracks while men struggled to pass a chain around her neck. They then tied the chain to the derric, started the winch, and the hanging began.
In theory, the weight of her body would have had to quickly break her neck. But Mary’s agony was to be far from swift and painless; in the heat of the moment, someone forgot to untie the animal’s foot, which was still bound to the rails.

When they began to lift her up — a witness recalled — I heard the bones and ligaments cracking in her foot“; the men hastily released the foot, but right then the chain around Mary’s neck broke with a metallic crack.

The elephant fell on the ground and sat there upright, unable to move because in falling she had broken her hip.

The crowd, unaware that Mary at this point was wounded and paralyzed, panicked upon seeing the “murderous” elephant free from any restraint. As everyone ran for cover, one of the roustabouts climbed on the animal’s back and applaied a heavier chain to her neck.
The derrick once more began to lift the elephant, and this time the chain held the weight.
After she was dead, Mary was left to hang for half an hour. Her huge body was then buried in a large grave which had been excavated further up the tracks.

Mary’s execution, and the photograph of her hanging, were widely reported in the press. But to search for an article where this strange story was recounted with special emotion or participation would be useless. Back then, Mary’s incident was little more than quintessential, small-town oddity piece of news.
After all, people were used to much worse. In Erwin, in those very years, a black man was burned alive on a pile of crosstiles.

Today the residents of this serene Tennessee town are understandably tired of being associated with a bizarre and sad page of the city history — a century-old one, at that.
And yet still today some passing foreigner asks the proverbial, unpleasand question.
Didn’t they hang an elephant here?

A well-researched book on Mary’s story is The Day They Hung the Elephant by Charles E. Price. On Youtube you can find a short documentary entitled Hanging Over Erwin: The Execution of Big Mary.

Le sorelle Sutherland

1882. Sotto la luce delle lampade a gas, nel sideshow del Barnum & Bailey Circus, si esibirono per la prima volta le Sorelle Sutherland. Erano sette, vestite di bianco, e cantavano in armonia accompagnate al pianoforte, accennando brevi passi di danza di fronte alla folla assiepata sotto il tendone. Per quanto belle fossero le loro voci, nessuno si aspettava il gran finale che le sette donne avevano in serbo: alla conclusione dell’ultimo numero, ecco che si girarono all’unisono, dando le spalle alla platea, e lasciarono cadere le loro chiome. Fino alle spalle… fino alle ginocchia… fino ai piedi… e ancora più giù, nella fossa d’orchestra. Le sette fluenti chiome, in totale, misuravano quasi 12 metri – la più lunga da sola superava i 2 metri e mezzo.
Per un secondo la folla rimase a bocca spalancata, prima di esplodere in un fragoroso applauso.

SutherlandSistersBarnum

SutherlandSisters

Le sorelle Sutherland erano figlie di un vagabondo del Vermont, Fletcher Sutherland, e di sua moglie Mary. Si chiamavano Sarah (nata nel 1851), Victoria (1853), Isabella (1855), Grace (1859), Naomi (1861), Dora (1863), e Mary (1865). Dalla madre Mary, appassionata di musica, le figlie appresero l’arte della melodia; nel 1867 però ella morì, e le ragazzine rimasero a carico del padre. Cresciute in drammatica povertà, evitate dagli abitanti di Cambria, NY, cittadina in cui risiedevano, le sorelle oltre ai rudimenti di bel canto avevano come unica particolarità i loro lunghi e nerissimi capelli. Nel tentativo di sfuggire alla fame, al padre venne l’idea di sfruttare le capigliature delle figlie per farle assumere nel circo più celebre dell’epoca.

tumblr_m0p2dbJWsV1rnseozo1_1280

tgod7s2

Una volta scritturate, la vita delle sorelle cominciò finalmente ad apparire più rosea. Il loro show era molto apprezzato, ma il vero colpo di genio doveva ancora arrivare.
Nel 1885 Naomi sposò Henry Bailey, il nipote del coproprietario del circo. Seguendo il tipico modo di ragionare, cinico e concreto, di tutti gli impresari, Henry capì che le sorelle nascondevano un potenziale economico straordinario: certo, la musica e il canto andavano bene, ma fra il pubblico c’erano più uomini calvi che melomani.
Così Henry Bailey divenne il manager delle Sutherland e cominciò, alla fine di ogni spettacolo, a pubblicizzare una lozione per capelli. Secondo quanto raccontava, la ricetta segretissima era stata inventata dalla defunta madre delle sorelle, Mary, e stava alla base della miracolosa crescita delle loro chiome: le cascate di capelli delle sette artiste erano la prova vivente dell’efficacia del prodotto. La soluzione, venduta a 50 centesimi la bottiglia, era  composta da 56 per cento di acqua amamelide, 44 per cento acqua di colonia Bay Rum, un pizzico di sale, magnesio, e acido cloridrico.

SUTHERL_MFC

La lozione The Seven Sutherland Sisters’ Hair Grower, brevettata nel 1890, si rivelò da subito un clamoroso successo, tanto che la gamma dei prodotti per capelli delle sorelle Sutherland si ampliò fino ad includere detergenti per il cuoio capelluto, pozioni antiforfora e tinture, tutti pubblicizzati da estenuanti tour che annunciavano, con la consueta fantasia, The Niagara of Curls, “il Niagara di ricci”.

Sutherland-Sisters-B1

SUTHERLAND_HR

SUTHERLAND_HSC

SUTHERLAND_HSC2

Garigarigarigari-mati-8

Nel giro di quattro anni furono vendute due milioni e mezzo di bottiglie, per un fatturato di oltre tre milioni di dollari. Le sorelle Sutherland si ritrovarono di colpo ricche sfondate.
Ritornarono nella loro cittadina natale in pompa magna, e costruirono un’enorme villa in stile vittoriano proprio dove si trovava un tempo la povera e fatiscente baracca del padre. Le sette stanze da letto della nuova casa erano tutte equipaggiate con acqua corrente e sfarzosi bagni in marmo. Il grande serbatoio sul tetto che consentiva questo lusso veniva riempito quotidianamente dagli operai.
Erano finiti i tempi in cui le sorelle venivano evitate come la peste: ora che tutti facevano la corte a queste donne (e alla fortuna che avevano accumulato), esse cominciarono a prendersi qualche rivincita mantenendo orgogliosamente le distanze e ostentando comportamenti eccentrici. I loro cagnolini avevano guardaroba estivi e invernali, e quando uno di questi cuccioli moriva, le sorelle celebravano principeschi funerali con tanto di necrologi sul giornale locale. I cavalli della loro carrozza erano ferrati in oro. Alle cene di gala, non mancavano mai gli spettacoli di fuochi d’artificio.
Ma questo periodo di fastosa spensieratezza non era destinato a durare, perché una serie di sfortune e tragedie attendevano le sorelle Sutherland.

Naomi_Sutherlandx

Naomi Sutherland (1861 – 1893)

Per prima morì Naomi, moglie di Henry Bailey. Le sorelle accarezzarono l’idea di costruire un mausoleo da 30.000 dollari, ma il progetto venne abbandonato e infine il corpo di Naomi, dopo essere rimasto nella villa per alcune settimane, venne sepolto nel lotto di famiglia senza nemmeno una lapide.

Fra i vari cercatori di fortuna attirati dal patrimonio milionario delle Sutherland vi era anche Fredrick Castlemaine, un bellimbusto di 27 anni dal fascino irresistibile. Si pensava che ci fosse del tenero fra lui e Dora, ma Fredrick colse tutti di sorpresa sposando Isabella, di 40 anni. Quanto a bizzarrie, anche questo nuovo membro della famiglia non scherzava: pare che il suo passatempo preferito fosse sedersi sul portico della villa e sparare alle ruote dei carri che passavano; pagava poi laute somme di denaro ai contadini inferociti, per calmare la loro comprensibile rabbia.
Dipendente da oppio e morfina, Fredrick si tolse la vita nel 1897, mentre accompagnava le sorelle in una tournée promozionale.

Isabella_Sutherland

Isabella Sutherland (1855 – 1914)

Isabella portò a casa il corpo del marito, e lo depose nella stanza della musica dove venne rinchiuso in una bara con il coperchio di vetro: le sorelle si recavano giornalmente a rendere visita al cadavere, e improvvisavano piccoli spettacolini in cui cantavano all’unisono le canzoni preferite di Fredrick.
Passate diverse settimane, il dipartimento della sanità fu costretto a intervenire, e impose alle sorelle di seppellire il corpo. Fredrick venne inumato in un enorme mausoleo di granito, costato 10.000 dollari; ogni notte Isabella prendeva una lanterna e camminava per tre miglia fino al cimitero, per comunicare con il defunto marito.

Dopo due anni di lutto, Isabella cadde nuovamente nel mirino di un approfittatore. Si trattava questa volta di Alonzo Swain, di 16 anni più giovane di lei. Swain fomentò litigi e attriti fra Isabella e le altre sorelle, e infine riuscì a convincerla a lasciare la casa, vendere la sua parte di azioni dell’impresa di famiglia, e investirle in una nuova lozione che avrebbe fatto concorrenza alla famosa The Seven Sutherlands; ma questa avventura commerciale fallì miseramente. Alonzo scomparve, e Isabella morì in miseria.

Victoria_Sutherlandx

Victoria Sutherland (1853 – 1902)

Evidentemente la vicenda di Isabella non bastò come esempio: Victoria a quasi 50 anni sposò un ragazzo di soli 19 anni. Le altre sorelle, indignate dal suo comportamento, le tolsero la parola fino a quando non fu sul letto di morte.

Mary_Sutherlandx

Mary Sutherland (1865 – 1939)

sarah_sutherlandx

Sarah Sutherland (1851 – 1919)

Che fosse causata dal passaggio dall’estrema povertà ai fasti della ricchezza, oppure da una tara di famiglia, la follia cominciò in ogni caso a serpeggiare sempre più insistentemente fra le sorelle. Mary Sutherland doveva perfino essere rinchiusa nella sua stanza per lunghi periodi, a causa di violenti attacchi psicotici.

Dora_Sutherlandx

Dora “Kitty” Sutherland (1863 – 1926)

Anche la fortuna della celebre lozione per capelli stava tramontando: con l’avvento, negli anni ’20, delle acconciature femminili corte, l’interesse per le pozioni Sutherland svanì di colpo. Nel 1926, le tre sorelle rimaste (Mary, Grace e Dora) si recarono ad Hollywood per partecipare alla realizzazione di un film tratto dalle loro vite. Mentre si trovavano là, Dora restò uccisa in un incidente automobilistico. Il film fu annullato.

Grace_Sutherlandx

Grace Sutherland (1859 – 1946)

Mary e Grace, ridotte sul lastrico, finirono i loro giorni nella stessa povertà che avevano conosciuto da bambine. Vendettero la villa, e morirono dimenticate da tutti. Pochi anni dopo che l’ultima delle sorelle Sutherland era stata sepolta, la grande casa prese fuoco, e non ne rimase altro che un cumulo di macerie fumanti.

A1rCNnj2VdL

La memoria della loro strana e tragica vicenda, però, non si spense in quel rogo: oggi, nelle aste online, una bottiglia di vetro contenente il coltivatore di capelli The Seven Sutherlands è quotata intorno ai 250 dollari.

niagara-county-historical

7SutherlandSistersBottle

(Grazie, AlmaCattleya!)

Il giorno in cui piansero i clown

Era una calda giornata, il 6 luglio del 1944 nella cittadina di Hartford, Connecticut. Era anche un giorno di festa per migliaia di adulti e bambini, diretti verso il tendone di uno dei circhi più grandi del mondo, il Ringling Bros. e Barnum & Bailey. Se la folla era sorridente e pronta a rimpinzarsi di popcorn e zucchero filato, sul volto di alcuni dei lavoratori del circo si leggeva invece una leggera ombra di inquietudine. Erano arrivati con il treno due giorni prima, ma a causa di un ritardo non avevano fatto in tempo ad alzare subito i tendoni per lo show: avevano dovuto perdere un giorno, e per i circensi scaramantici saltare uno spettacolo era un cattivo segno, portava sfortuna. Ma tutto sommato, il tempo e l’affluenza della gente facevano ben sperare; e nessuno poteva immaginare che quella giornata sarebbe stata teatro di uno dei maggiori disastri della storia degli Stati Uniti e ricordata come “il giorno in cui piansero i clown”.

Lo spettacolo cominciò senza intoppi. A venti minuti dall’inizio, mentre si esibivano i Great Wallendas, una famiglia di trapezisti ed equilibristi, il capo dell’orchestra Merle Evans notò che una piccola fiamma stava bruciando un pezzetto di tendone. Disse immediatamente ai suoi orchestrali di intonare Stars And Stripes Forever, il pezzo musicale che serviva da segnale d’emergenza segreto per tutti i lavoratori del circo. Il presentatore cercò di avvertire il pubblico di dirigersi, senza panico, verso l’uscita, ma il microfono smise di funzionare e nessuno lo sentì.

Nel giro di pochi minuti si scatenò l’inferno. Il tendone del circo era infatti stato impermeabilizzato, come si usava allora, con paraffina e kerosene, e il fuoco avvampò a una velocità spaventosa: la paraffina, sciogliendosi, cominciò a cadere come una pioggia infuocata sulla gente. Due delle uscite erano inoltre bloccate dai tunnel muniti di grate che venivano utilizzati per far entrare e uscire gli animali dalla scena. L’isteria s’impadronì della folla, c’era chi lanciava i bambini oltre il recinto, come fossero bambolotti, nel tentativo di salvarli; in molti saltavano giù dalle scalinate cercando di strisciare sotto il tendone, ma rimanevano schiacciati dagli altri che saltavano dopo di loro – li avrebbero trovati carbonizzati anche in strati di tre persone, le une sopra le altre. Altri riuscirono a scappare, ma rientrarono poco dopo per cercare i familiari; altri ancora non fecero altro che correre in tondo, intorno alla pista, alla ricerca dei propri cari. Dopo otto minuti di terrore, il tendone in fiamme crollò sulle centinaia di persone ancora bloccate all’interno, seppellendole sotto quintali di ferro incandescente.

Ufficialmente almeno 168 persone morirono nel disastroso incendio e oltre 700 vennero ferite: ma i numeri reali sono probabilmente molto più alti, perché secondo alcuni studiosi il calore sarebbe stato talemente elevato da incenerire completamente alcuni corpi; e, fra i feriti, molti altri furono visti aggirarsi giorni dopo in stato di shock, senza essere stati soccorsi.

Fra coloro che persero la vita nell’incendio di Hartford vi furono diversi bambini, ma la più celebre fu la misteriosa “Little Miss 1565” (così soprannominata dal numero assegnatole dall’obitorio): una bella bambina bionda di circa sei anni, il cui corpo non venne mai reclamato, e sulla cui identità si è speculato fino ad oggi. Fra biglietti anonimi lasciati sulla sua tomba (“Sarah Graham is her Name!“) e investigatori che dichiarano di aver scoperto tutta la verità sulla sua famiglia, la piccola senza nome rimane una delle immagini iconiche di quella strage.

Così come iconica è senza dubbio la fotografia che ritrae Emmett Kelly, un pagliaccio, mentre disperato porta un secchio d’acqua verso il tendone in fiamme.

Secondo alcuni il motivo dell’incendio sarebbe stata una sigaretta buttata distrattamente da qualcuno del pubblico addosso al “big top”; secondo altre teorie il fuoco sarebbe stato doloso. Ma, nonostante un piromane avesse confessato, sei anni dopo, di aver appiccato l’incendio, non vi furono mai abbastanza prove a sostegno di questa ipotesi. Fra accuse, battaglie legali per i danni, confusioni e misteri, il disastro di Hartford è un incidente che ci affascina ancora oggi, forse perché la tragedia ha colpito uno dei simboli del divertimento e dell’arte popolare. Quel giorno che doveva essere lieto e felice per molte persone divenne in pochi istanti un luogo di morte e desolazione. La magia del circo, si sa, è quella di riuscire, per il tempo d’uno spettacolo, a farci tornare bambini. E non c’è niente di peggio, per il bambino che è in noi, che vedere un pagliaccio che piange.

Ecco un sito interamente dedicato al disastro di Hartford; e la pagina Wikipedia (in inglese).

Schlitzie

Fra tutti i freaks, pochi sono stati amati come Schlitzie. Chi l’ha conosciuto lo descrive come un raggio di sole, un folletto del buonumore, un individuo meraviglioso capace di intenerire anche il cuore più granitico, e a cui era impossibile non affezionarsi.

Le sue origini sono ancora oggi ammantate di mistero. Secondo alcuni il suo vero nome sarebbe stato Simon Metz, ma non si sa con precisione quando sia nato (la data più probabile è il 10 settembre 1901), né chi fossero i suoi genitori; molto probabilmente lo vendettero a qualche sideshow già in tenera età. Schlitzie – questo il suo nome d’arte – era affetto da microcefalia, un’alterazione genetica che comporta una circonferenza cranica di molto inferiore al normale. Il cervello, così costretto, non può svilupparsi pienamente e possono insorgere diversi impedimenti cognitivi e psicomotori, a seconda della gravità. Nel mondo dello spettacolo circense, in cui fin dall’Ottocento venivano esibiti, gli individui microcefali venivano usualmente chiamati pinheads (“teste a spillo”). Nei sideshow, i pinhead erano presentati come “anelli evolutivi mancanti” (fra la scimmia e l’uomo), “meraviglie azteche”, “esseri da un altro pianeta” o anche in spettacoli chiamati più semplicemente “Che cos’è?”.

Schlitzie questi fantasiosi appellativi se li passò tutti, durante la sua sfolgorante carriera con i più grandi circhi del mondo. Spesso presentato come una donna in virtù delle ampie tuniche che gli facevano indossare (in realtà per mascherare la sua incontinenza), all’apertura del sipario lasciava tutti a bocca aperta per il suo aspetto; eppure bastavano pochi minuti perché il pubblico mettesse da parte ogni timore e si sciogliesse in fragorosi applausi.
Le folle lo adoravano, ma mai quanto i suoi colleghi. Schlitzie aveva, dicevano, il cervello di un bambino di tre o quattro anni: parlava a monosillabi, non poteva badare a se stesso, eppure forse era più intelligente di quanto si pensasse, vista la sua capacità di imitare le persone e la sua incredibile velocità di reazione. Mentre si aggirava fra le carrozze e le tende dei circhi sembrava uno spiritello sempre allegro, gioioso, che non vedeva l’ora di ballare davanti a qualcuno pur di attirare l’attenzione su di sé.

Negli anni ’30 i maggiori circhi se lo contendevano: Schlitzie si esibì per i famosi Ringling Bros., nonché per il Barnum & Bailey Circus, poi vennero il Clyde Beatty Circus, il Tom Mix Circus, i West Coast Shows… e la lista sarebbe ancora molto lunga. Anche il cinema lo corteggiò: apparve nel classico Freaks (1932) di Tod Browning, e in Island Of Lost Souls (1933) di E.C. Kenton con Charles Laughton e Bela Lugosi.
Dal 1936 Schlitzie fu legalmente affidato a George Surtees, un allevatore di scimpanzé per il Circo Tom Mix; Surtees divenne il padre amorevole e premuroso che Schlitzie non aveva mai avuto, prendendosi cura di lui fino alla sua morte. E fuproprio con la dipartita di questo “angelo custode”, avvenuta negli anni ’60, che cominciarono i veri problemi per Schlitzie: la figlia di Surtees, infatti, non se la sentì di tenerlo in casa e decise di affidarlo a una clinica.

Così Schlitzie scomparve.
Per molto tempo non si seppe più nulla del pinhead più celebre del mondo, finché un giorno il mangiatore di spade Bill Unks, che alla fine della stagione teatrale lavorava come infermiere, lo riconobbe in un reparto della clinica in cui prestava servizio. Schlitzie era tristissimo, depresso e soprattutto ammalato di solitudine. Gli mancavano i suoi amici, gli mancavano gli spettacoli, gli applausi, gli mancava il sideshow.
Bill Unks riuscì a convincere le autorità che farlo ritornare a esibirsi sarebbe stato essenziale per la sua salute.

Schlitzie rientrò con grande entusiasmo nel sideshow, e praticamente vi rimase per il resto della sua vita.
La grande famiglia dei carnies, cioè la gente del circo e degli spettacoli itineranti, lo riempì di attenzioni e affetto e infine comperò per lui un appartamento a Los Angeles dove visse i suoi ultimi anni: molti lo ricordano mentre dava da mangiare ai piccioni, si meravigliava per qualsiasi piccolo aspetto della vita, da un fiore a un minuscolo insetto, o danzava per chiunque si fermasse a parlargli.
Morì nel 1971 all’età di 71 anni, ma ancora eterno bambino; oggi la sua figura, fra le icone più riconoscibili della storia del circo, continua ad ispirare artisti di tutto il mondo.