Children of the Grave

They give birth astride of a grave,
the light gleams an instant,
then it’s night once more.

(S. Beckett, Aspettando Godot)

An Italian Horror Story

Castel del Giudice, Italy.
On the 5th of August 1875, a pregnant woman, indicated in the documents with the initials F. D’A., died during labor, before being able to give birth to her child.
On the following day, without respecting the required minimum waiting time before interment, her body was lowered into the cemetery’s fossa carnaria. This was a kind of collective burial for the poorest classes, still common at the time in hundreds of Italian communes: it consisted in a sealed underground space, a room or a pit, where the corpses were stacked and left to rot (some inside coffins, others wrapped in simple shrouds).

For the body of F. D’A., things began to get ugly right from the start:

She had to be lowered in the pit, so the corpse was secured with a rope, but the rope broke and D’A.’s poor body fell from a certain height, her head bumping into a casket. Some people climbed down, they took D’A. and arranged her on her back upon a nearby coffin, where she laid down with a deathly pale face, her hands tied together and resting on her abdomen, her legs joined by stitched stockings. Thus, and not otherwise, D’A. was left by the participants who buried her.

But when, a couple of days later, the pit was opened again in order to bury another deceased girl, a terrible vision awaited the bystanders:

F. D’A.’s sister hurried to give a last goodbye to her dead relative, but as soon as she looked down to the place where her sister was laid to rest, she had to observe the miserable spectacle of her sister placed in a very different position from the one she had been left in; between her legs was the fetus she had given birth to, inside the grave, and together with whom she had miserably died. […] Officers immediately arrived, and found D’A.’s body lying on her left side, her face intensely strained; her hands, still tied by a white cotton ribbon, formed an arch with her arms and rested on her forehead, while pieces of white ribbon were found between her teeth […]. At the mother’s feet stood a male newborn child with his umbilical cord, showing well-proportioned and developed limbs.

Imagine the horror of the poor woman, waking up in the dark in the grip of labor pains; with her last remaining energy she had succeeded in giving birth to her child, only to die shortly after, “besieged by corpses, lacking air, assistance or food, and exhausted by the blood loss suffered during delivery“.
One could hardly picture a more dreadful fate.

The case had a huge resonance all across Italy; a trial took place at the Court of Isernia, and the town physician, the mayor and the undertaker were found guilty of two involuntary murders “aggravated by gross negligence“, sentenced to six months in jail and fined (51 liras) – but the punishment was later cut by half by the Court of Appeal of Naples in November 1877.
This unprecedented reduction of penalty was harshly criticized by the Times correspondant in Italy, who observed that “the circumstances of the case, if well analyzed, show the slight value which is attached to human life in this country“; the news also appeared in the New York Times as well as in other British and American newspapers.

This story, however scary – because it is so scary – should be taken with a pinch of salt.
There’s more than one reason to be careful.

Buried Alive?

First of all, the theme of a pregnant woman believed dead and giving birth in a grave was already a recurring motif in the Nineteeth Century, as taphophobia (the fear of being buried alive) reached its peak.

Folklorist Paul Barber in his Vampires, Burial, and Death: Folklore and Reality (1988) argues that the number of people actually buried alive was highly exaggerated in the chronicles; a stance also shared by Jan Bondeson, who in one of the most complete books on the subject, Buried Alive, shows how the large majority of nineteenth-century premature burial accounts are not reliable.

For the most part it would seem to be a romantic, decadent literary topos, albeit inspired by a danger that was certainly real in the past centuries: interpreting the signs of death was a complex and often approximate procedure, so much so that by the 1700s some treatises (the most famous one being Winslow‘s) introduced a series of measures to verify with greater accuracy the passing of a patient.

A superficial knowledge of decomposition processes could also lead to misunderstandings.
When bodies were exhumed, it was not uncommon to find their position had changed; this was due to the cadaver’s natural tendency to move during decomposition, and to be sometimes subjected to small “explosions” caused by putrefaction gasses – explosions that are powerful enough to rotate the body’s upper limbs. Likewise, the marks left by rodents or other scavengers (loose dirt, scratches, bite marks, torn clothes, fallen hair) could be mistaken for the deceased person’s desperate attempts at getting out.

Yet, as we’ve said, there was a part of truth, and some unfortunate people surely ended up alive inside a coffin. Even with all our modern diagnostic tools, every now and then someone wakes up in a morgue. But these events are, today like yesterday, extremely rare, and these stories speak more about a cultural fear rather than a concrete risk.

Coffin Birth

If being buried alive was already an exceptional fact, then the chances of a pregnant woman actually giving birth inside a grave look even slimmer. But this idea – so charged with pathos it could only fascinate the Victorian sensibility – might as well have come from real observations. Opening a woman’s grave and finding a stillborn child must have looked like a definitive proof of her premature burial.
What wasn’t known at the time is that the fetus can, in rare circumstances, be expelled postmortem.

Anaerobic microorganisms, which start the cadaver’s putrefactive phase, release several gasses during their metabolic activity. During this emphysematous stage, internal tissues stretch and tighten; the torso, abdomen and legs swell; the internal pressure caused by the accumulation of gas can lead, within the body of a woman in the late stages of pregnancy, to a separation of amniotic membranes, a prolapse of the uterus and a subsequent total or partial extrusion of the fetus.
This event appears to be more likely if the dead woman has been pregnant before, on the account of a more elastic cervix.
This  strange phenomenon is called Sarggeburt (coffin birth) in early German forensic literature.

The first case of postmortem delivery dates back to 1551, when a woman hanged on the gallows released, four hours after her execution, the bodies of two twins, both dead. (A very similar episode happened in 2007 in India, when a woman killed herself during labor; in that instance, the baby was found alive and healthy.)
In Brussels, in 1633, a woman died of convulsions and three days later a fetus was spontaneously expelled. The same thing happened in Weißenfels, Saxony, in 1861. Other cases are mentioned in the first medical book to address this strange event, Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine, published in 1896, but for the most part these accidents occurred when the body of the mother had yet to be buried.
It was John Whitridge Williams who, in his fortunate Obstetrics: a text-book for the use of students and practitioners (1904), pointed to the possibility of postmortem delivery taking place after burial.

Fetal extrusion after the mother’s death has also been observed in recent times.

A 2005 case involved a woman who died in her apartment from acute heroine intoxication: upon finding her body, it was noted that the fetus head was protruding from the mother’s underwear; but later on, during the autopsy, the upper part of the baby’s torso was also visible – a sign that gasses had continued to build in the abdominal region, increasing interior pressure.
In 2008 a 38 year-old, 7 months pregnant woman was found murdered in a field in advanced state of decomposition, accelerated by tropical climate. During the autopsy a fetus was found inside the woman’s slips, the umbilical cord still attached to the placenta (here is the forensic case study – WARNING: graphic).

Life In Death

So, going back to that unfortunate lady from Castel del Giudice, what really happened to her?
Sure, the autopsy report filed at the time and quoted in the trial papers mentioned the presence of air in the baby’s lungs, a proof that the child was born alive. And it’s possible that this was the case.

But on one hand this story fits all too perfectly within a specific popular narrative of its time, whose actual statistical incidence has been doubted by scholars; on the other, the possibility of postmortem fetal extrusion is well-documented, so much so that even archeologists sometimes struggle to interpret ancient skeletal findings showing fetuses still partially enclosed within the pelvic bone.

The only certain thing is that these stories – whether they’re authentic or made up – have an almost archetypal quality; birth and death entwined in a single place and time.
Maybe they’re so enthralling because, on a symbolic level, they remind us of a peculiar truth, one expressed in a famous verse from
ManiliusAstronomica:

Nascentes morimur, finisque ab origine pendet.

As we are born we die, our end commences with our beginning.”

A Macabre Monastery

Article by guestblogger Lady Decay

This is the account of a peculiar exploration, different from any other abandonded places I had the chance to visit: this place, besides being fascinating, also had a macabre and mysterious twist.

It was November, 2016. We were venturing — my father, my sister, two friends and I — towards an ex convent, which had been abandoned many years before.
The air was icy-cold. Our objective stood next to a public, still operational structure: the cemetery.
The thorny briers were dead and not very high, so it was simple for us to cut through the vegetation towards the side of the convent that had the only access route to the building, a window.
With a certain difficulty, one by one we all managed to enter the structure thanks to a crooked tree, which stood right next to the small window and which we used as ladder.

Once we caught our breath, and shook the dust off our coats, we realized we just got lost in time. That place seemed to have frozen right in the middle of its vital cycle.

The courtyard was almost entirely engulfed in vines and vegetation, and we had to be very careful around the porch, with its tired, unstable pillars.

Two 19th-Century hearses dominated one side of the courtyard, worn out but still keeping all their magnificence: the wood was dusty and rotten, but we could still see the cloth ornaments dangling from the corners of the carriage; once purple, or dark green, they now had an indefinable color, one that perhaps dosen’t even exist.

We went up a flight of stairs and headed towards a series of empty chambers, the cells where the Friars once lived; some still have their number carved in marble beside the door.

Climbing down again, we stumbled upon a sort of “office” where we were greeted by the real masters of the house – two statues of saints who seemed to welcome and admonish us at the same time.

As we were taking some pictures, we peeked inside the drawers filled with documents and papers going back to the last years of the 18th Century, so old that we were afraid of spoiling them just by looking.

We got back out in the courtyard to enjoy a thin November sun. We were still near the cemetery, which was open to the public, so we had to move carefully and most silently, when all of a sudden we came upon a macabre find: several coffins were lying on the wet grass, some partly open and others with their lid completely off. Just one of them was still sealed.

My friends prefer to step back, but me and my sister could not resist our curiosity and started snooping around. We noted some bags next to the coffins, on which a printed warning read: ‘exhumation organic material‘.

A vague stench lingered in the air, but not too annoying: from this, and from the coffins’ antiquated style, we speculated these exhumations could not be very recent. Those caskets looked like they had been lying there for quite a long time.

And today, a year later, I wonder if they’re still abandoned in the grass, next to that magical ghost convent…

Lady Decay is a Urban Explorer: you can follow her adventures in neglected and abandoned places on her YouTube channel and on her Facebook page.

This Way Up

La quotidiana routine di due operatori funebri – sconvolta da una serie di improbabili eventi – non è mai stata così divertente come nel cortometraggio This Way Up (2008) diretto da Alan Smith e Adam Foulkes e vincitore di numerosi premi, fra cui la nomination agli Oscar 2009 come miglior corto di animazione. In questa folle e imprevedibile corsa contro il tempo, i toni macabri sono stemperati da un irresistibile umorismo nero, estremamente british.

[vimeo https://vimeo.com/102605293]

Le esequie dei Toraja

Sulawesi è un’isola della Repubblica Indonesiana, situata ad est del Borneo e a sud delle Filippine. Nella provincia meridionale dell’isola, sulle montagne, vivono i Toraja, etnia indigena di circa 650.000 persone. I Toraja sono famosi per le loro abitazioni tradizionali a forma di palafitta e dal tetto allungato, chiamate tongkonan, e per le colorate fantasie geometriche con cui intagliano e decorano il legno.

Ma i Toraja sono noti anche per i loro complessi ed elaborati rituali funebri. Essi risalgono ad un’epoca remota, quando i Toraja seguivano ancora la loro religione politeistica tradizionale, chiamata aluk (“la Via”, un sistema di legge, fede e consuetudine); quest’ultima, con il tempo e a causa della lunga guerra contro i musulmani, è oggi divenuta un miscuglio di cristianesimo ed animismo.
Sebbene molti dei rituali “della vita”, cioè quelli propiziatori e purificatori, siano man mano stati abbandonati, le cerimonie “della morte” sono rimaste pressoché invariate.

Per i Toraja, la morte di un membro della famiglia è un evento di fondamentale importanza, e le celebrazioni funebri sono lunghe, complesse ed estremamente dispendiose, tanto da essere probabilmente il principale momento di aggregazione sociale per l’intera popolazione. Più il morto era potente o ricco, più le cerimonie sono fastose: se si tratta di un nobile, il funerale può contare migliaia di partecipanti. A spese della famiglia, in un campo prescelto per i rituali vengono costruite delle tettoie e dei gazebo per ospitare il pubblico, dei depositi per il riso, e altre strutture apposite; per diversi giorni ai pianti e alle lamentazioni si alternano la musica dei flauti e la recitazione di poemi e canzoni in onore del defunto.

Il momento culminante è il sacrificio degli animali – maiali, bufali, polli: ancora una volta, il numero varia a seconda dell’influenza sociale del morto. La lama del machete può abbattersi anche su un centinaio di animali. Particolarmente importanti sono però i bufali d’acqua: oltre ad essere le bestie più costose, sono quelle che assicureranno al morto l’arrivo più celere al Puya, la terra delle anime. Le loro carcasse vengono lasciate in fila sul prato, in attesa che il loro “proprietario” sia partito per il suo viaggio, alla conclusione dei funerali. In seguito, la loro carne verrà spartita fra gli ospiti, mangiata o venduta al mercato.

Viste le enormi spese da sostenere, la famiglia impiega spesso anche anni a cercare i fondi necessari per la cerimonia. Di conseguenza, i funerali si svolgono molto tempo dopo il decesso; in questo periodo di attesa, l’anima del morto è considerata ancora presente a tutti gli effetti e si aggira per il villaggio. Quando finalmente i funerali si sono compiuti, il suo corpo viene seppellito in un cimitero scavato all’interno di una parete di roccia, e un’effigie con le sue fattezze (chiamata tau tau) viene posta a guardia della tomba.

Se invece il morto era meno abbiente, la bara viene fissata proprio sul ciglio della parete, o in alcuni casi sospesa tramite delle funi. I sarcofagi rimarranno appesi fino a quando i sostegni non marciranno, facendoli crollare.

Anche i bambini vengono tumulati in questo modo, ma talvolta è riservato loro un posto in particolari loculi scavati all’interno di grandi tronchi d’albero.

Con questa prima sepoltura, però, il rapporto dei Toraja con i loro morti non è affatto finito. Ogni anno, in agosto, si svolge la cerimonia chiamata Ma’Nene, durante la quale i cadaveri dei defunti vengono riesumati.

I corpi mummificati vengono lavati, pettinati e vestiti in abiti nuovi dai familiari; nel caso fossero rimaste soltanto le ossa, invece, queste vengono comunque lavate e avvolte in stoffe pregiate.

Una volta che i rituali di cosmesi sul cadavere sono completati, i morti vengono fatti “camminare”, tenendoli ritti, e portati in giro per il villaggio. Questa parata, al di là delle valenze religiose, si colora del vero e proprio orgoglio di esibire i propri antenati: la gente li ammira, li tocca, e si scatta delle fotografie assieme a loro. Il Ma’Nene è il segno dell’amore dei parenti per il morto che, in effetti, non potrebbe essere più “vivo” di così.

Alla fine di questa processione d’onore, la salma viene seppellita per la seconda volta, nel suo luogo di ultimo riposo. Completato finalmente il passaggio del morto nell’aldilà, viene così sancita la sua appartenenza agli antenati, ogni sua ira è scongiurata, ed egli diviene una figura esclusivamente positiva, alla quale i discendenti potranno permettersi di chiedere protezione e consiglio.

Il rito del Ma’Nene può sembrare inusuale ed esotico ai nostri occhi odierni, abituati all’occultamento della morte e della salma, ma non è esattamente così: anche in Italia la riesumazione e l’affettuosa pulitura del cadavere fa parte della cultura tradizionale, come abbiamo spiegato in questo articolo.

Molte delle foto che trovate in questo post sono state scattate dall’amico Paul Koudounaris, il cui spettacolare libro fotografico Memento Mori dà conto dei suoi viaggi nei cinque continenti alla ricerca dei costumi funerari più particolari.

(Grazie, Gianluca!)

Ladri di cadaveri

Alfred_Velpeau_02

La storia della medicina e dell’anatomia non è mai stata tutta rose e fiori, come avrete certamente scoperto se avete curiosato un po’ fra i nostri post. Nei secoli scorsi era in particolare la dissezione anatomica a sollevare le più furiose polemiche (paradossalmente spesso più di ordine morale che religioso, come abbiamo spiegato in questo articolo), perché la sua pratica interferiva con un’area sociale che gli antropologi definirebbero “tabù”, ossia il culto dei morti e del cadavere.

In Gran Bretagna, fin dal 1752, era in vigore una legge che consentiva la dissezione a fini medici unicamente sui cadaveri dei criminali condannati alla pena capitale. Ma il sapere scientifico all’epoca stava crescendo in fretta per importanza e scoperte, e velocemente si creavano le basi per quella che sarebbe divenuta la moderna medicina. Quindi, soltanto cinquant’anni dopo, la “scorta” di criminali giustiziati era troppo scarsa per riuscire a soddisfare la domanda di cadaveri delle Università e delle facoltà di anatomia.

Già nel 1810 venne creata in Inghilterra una società anatomica i cui membri avevano lo scopo di sollecitare presso il governo l’urgente modifica della legge; ma nel frattempo c’era chi aveva cominciato ad arrangiarsi in altro modo.

body-snatchers

Alcuni delinquenti compresero subito che i professori avrebbero pagato piuttosto bene per un cadavere fresco su cui eseguire una dissezione durante le loro lezioni, di fronte a un sempre crescente numero di studenti; così, attratti dalla possibilità di un facile guadagno, cominciarono un macabro commercio di salme.

new-york-body-snatchers-granger
I body-snatchers (“ladri di corpi”) agivano di notte, dissotterrando morti sepolti di recente, e trasferendoli di nascosto nelle facoltà scientifiche; divennero presto una realtà diffusa soprattutto nella città di Edimburgo, dove aveva sede la più prestigiosa università di medicina, la Edinburgh Medical School. Sembra addirittura che alcuni cunicoli sotterranei collegassero i sobborghi più malfamati della Old Town con il Royal Mile, l’arteria principale dove aveva sede la scuola: in questo modo i body-snatchers, dopo aver sottratto i cadaveri dal cimitero, riuscivano a portarli indisturbati e nascosti fin sotto all’ingresso della Surgeon’s Hall.

l

tumblr_lz64e3fVIf1qhr2s0o1_500
In breve tempo la situazione sfuggì di mano, e si diffuse la paranoia nei confronti dei cosiddetti resurrection men (“resuscitatori”, un altro nome dei ladri di cadaveri). C’era chi faceva la ronda tutta la notte attorno alle tombe fresche, e chi poteva permetterselo costruiva pesanti sarcofaghi di pietra; i più poveri si accontentavano di seppellire rami e bastoni attorno alla bara, per rendere la riesumazione più complessa e lunga.

Intorno al 1816 vennero inventati i mortsafes, enormi gabbie di ferro o pietra, di forme differenti. Spesso si trattava di complicate strutture in metallo pesante con sbarre e placche, assemblate con bulloni o saldature. I mortsafes si piantavano attorno alla bara, e potevano essere aperti soltanto da due persone armate di chiavi per i lucchetti. Venivano lasciate in posizione per sei settimane; quando il cadavere era rimasto sepolto sufficientemente a lungo per non fare più gola, venivano rimosse e riutilizzate.

1812707_f9da2e10

DSCF5009

footer-450

mortsafes_in_cluny_kirkyard_-_geograph-org-uk_-_174646
Ci si spinse oltre: la pistola cimiteriale veniva caricata e montata nei pressi di una tomba fresca. Il meccanismo le permetteva di girare su se stessa liberamente, e agli anelli venivano attaccati gli estremi di tre corde che venivano fatte passare attorno al luogo dell’inumazione; se un ladro, avvicinandosi nel buio, avesse inavvertitamente urtato una delle corde, la pistola si sarebbe girata nella sua direzione, facendo fuoco.

tumblr_mi8dhtNMb51rnseozo1_1280
Questo tipo di mercato clandestino si stava facendo davvero pericoloso. Alcuni ladri di cadaveri mandavano, durante il giorno, delle donne vestite a lutto, spesso con bambini in braccio, a controllare se fossero state installate pistole o altre difese nei pressi delle tombe; i guardiani del cimitero, a loro volta, avevano imparato ad aspettare l’arrivo del buio per montare questo tipo di armi. Insomma, in retrospettiva, non stupisce che prima o poi a qualcuno venisse l’idea di “saltare” il passaggio più problematico, quello del cimitero appunto, e di procurarsi i cadaveri in modo più diretto.

burke-and-hare
Ad arrivarci per primi furono William Burke e William Hare che, con la complicità delle loro compagne, uccisero in meno di due anni 16 persone, rivendendo i loro corpi all’Università. Vennero scoperti e, una volta finito il processo nel 1829, Hare fu rilasciato, ma Burke finì impiccato; con esemplare contrappasso, il suo corpo venne dissezionato pubblicamente e ancora oggi potete ammirare presso il Museo del Surgeon’s Hall di Edimburgo il suo scheletro, la maschera mortuaria, e un libro rilegato con la sua pelle.

burke

724px-William_Burke's_death_mask_and_pocket_book,_Surgeons'_Hall_Museum,_Edinburgh
Lo scalpore suscitato da questa vicenda, e il disgusto pubblico per il traffico di cadaveri, ebbero un impatto fondamentale per la promulgazione, nel 1832, dell’Anatomy Act; una legge che diede più libertà ai dottori e agli insegnanti di anatomia, permettendo loro di utilizzare per le dissezioni didattiche anche i corpi non reclamati, e incentivando la donazione spontanea con determinate forme di retribuzione (a chi decideva di “prestare” le spoglie di un parente stretto sarebbero state pagate le spese del funerale).

L’Anatomy Act si rivelò efficace nel porre fine al fenomeno dei body-snatchers, e la pratica del traffico di cadaveri per studio medico scomparì quasi istantaneamente.

The-Resurrectionists

F.A.Q. – Il regalo giusto

Caro Bizzarro Bazar, mio nonno ha 90 anni ed è appassionato di automobili. Cosa potrei regalargli per il compleanno?

Il nostro consiglio è come sempre di gran classe. Regalagli un’ultima, fiammeggiante vettura, nel modello proposto qui sotto. Tuo nonno resterà certamente commosso.

Scoperto via Oddity Central.

Oddities

Discovery Channel ha da poco lanciato un nuovo programma che sembra pensato apposta per gli appassionati di collezionismo macabro e scientifico: la serie è intitolata Oddities (“Stranezze”), e racconta la strana e particolare vita quotidiana dei proprietari del famoso negozio newyorkese Obscura Antiques and Oddities, la versione americana del nostrano Nautilus, di cui abbiamo già parlato.

I due simpatici proprietari di questa spettacolare wunderkammer ci mostrano in ogni episodio come vengono a scoprire di giorno in giorno oggetti curiosi, strabilianti o rari, regalandoci anche un’inaspettata galleria di personaggi che frequentano il negozio. Collezionisti seri e compunti che arrivano con la fida ventiquattrore dopo un importante meeting, gente semplice dai gusti particolari, giovani darkettoni appesantiti da centinaia di piercing, compositori musicali del calibro di Danny Elfman, bizzarri personaggi che collezionano articoli funerari e si emozionano per un tavolo da imbalsamazione, ragazzi normali che hanno scoperto nel solaio del nonno una testa di manzo siamese imbalsamata, o una bara ottocentesca, e cercano di ricavarci qualche soldo.

Mike Zohn ed Evan Michelson, i due proprietari di Obscura, passano il loro tempo fra mercati delle pulci e aste di antiquariato, cercando tutto ciò che è inusuale e bizzarro. Nella loro carriera di collezionisti hanno accumulato alcuni fra i pezzi più incredibili.

Purtroppo in Italia questa serie non è ancora arrivata, ed essendo un prodotto di nicchia è probabile che non la vedremo mai sui nostri teleschermi. Per consolarvi, ecco alcuni estratti da YouTube.

Mike ed Evan riescono ad annusare un’autentica mano di mummia egizia, che stando alla loro descrizione esala un “inebriante” odore di resina:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uFepPtBkhpo]

“Oggigiorno è sempre più difficile trovare una testa mummificata”:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mMTg0ZUFZ1I&NR=1]

Un’addetta delle pompe funebri (leggermente disturbata, a quanto sembra) ha una collezione invidiabile di strumenti di imbalsamazione e non sta più nella pelle quando Evan le propone l’acquisto di un tavolo utilizzato per presentare il cadavere nella camera ardente… dopotutto, si intona con gli strumenti antichi che lei ha già… come resistere?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-EoRA25NDA]

Un avventore scopre che quello che ha in mano è l’osso del pene di un tricheco. La maggior parte dei mammiferi (uomo escluso) è dotato di un simile osso. Sarà disposto a sborsare 450 $  per questo articolo?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2XBALa0ehQ]

Un ragazzo ha acquistato al mercato delle pulci una scatola piena di escrementi fossilizzati che gli hanno assicurato essere di dinosauro. Coproliti è il termine scientifico. Purtroppo, Mike gli spiega che quelli sono probabilmente escrementi di mammifero. Le deiezioni di uccelli e rettili sono molto più acquose. Pensate se doveste togliere una cosa del genere dal vostro parabrezza?

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pbcvEOwxQYU]

Macabre collezioni

Abbiamo spesso parlato, su Bizzarro Bazar, di wunderkammer, esibizioni anatomiche, collezionisti del macabro e di oggetti conservati gelosamente nonostante il (o forse proprio a causa del) loro potenziale inquietante. È divertente notare come, nell’immaginario comune, chi si impegna in tale tipo di collezionismo sia normalmente associato alle tendenze dark o, peggio, sataniste; quando spesso si tratta di persone assolutamente comuni che mantengono intatto un quasi infantile senso della curiosità e della meraviglia.

Oggi, grazie a un articolo di Newsweek (segnalatoci da Materies Morbi) questo argomento poco battuto dalla stampa ci risolleva per un attimo dalla superficie di notizie e articoli insipidi quotidiani.

L’autrice dell’articolo, la scrittrice Caroline H. Dworin, si interroga sul perché certe persone provino attrazione verso reperti anatomici, feti sotto formalina, esemplari tassidermici deformi, strumenti chirurgici, o portafogli e antichi grimori rilegati in pelle umana. Alcune parti dell’articolo ci hanno toccato personalmente, visto che anche noi nel nostro piccolo collezioniamo da anni questo tipo di oggetti e reperti. E per una volta ci sembra che le ipotesi fornite dall’articolo siano condivisibili e soprattutto molto umane.

Nell’articolo, la simpatica Joanna Ebstein di Morbid Anatomy viene interpellata sulla sua esperienza come collezionista. Qualche tempo fa noi avevamo chiesto la stessa cosa anche al proprietario del favoloso Nautilus di Torino, e la sua risposta era stata analoga. Quello che attira in questi oggetti è il fatto che sono oggetti che parlano, hanno una storia, e ci interrogano. Sono cioè piccoli pezzi di vita fossilizzata che non possono lasciarci indifferenti. “C’è qualcosa di molto eccitante in simili oggetti, aprono così tante strade differenti: divengono oggetti con un significato”. Joanna sta anche portando avanti un progetto fotografico a lungo termine che documenta i “gabinetti delle meraviglie” privati e le collezioni segrete più incredibili attraverso il globo (Private Cabinets Photo Series).

“Le persone sono veramente attratte dalle cose che creano un ponte fra la vita e la morte”, dice Evan Michelson, proprietaria di Obscura, Antiques and Oddities, un piccolo negozio nell’East Village di New York specializzato in oggetti macabri vittoriani. “Se la tua personalità ha anche solo un’ombra di malinconia, finisci per trovare conforto in cose che altre persone trovano tristi”. Evan ha anche notato che le femmine sembrano essere attratte da questo tipo di collezione in proporzione largamente maggiore dei maschi. La sua collezione personale vanta molti oggetti “malinconici”, elementi di scene del crimine, strumenti medici, stampe di malattie e lesioni incurabili, preparati in barattolo, animali siamesi. “Ho alcuni cuccioli di maiale fusi assieme che sono davvero tristi – aggiunge – sembra che stiano danzando”.

Michelson fa anche collezione di bare per infanti. “Ho a casa mia una delle più piccole bare commerciali mai realizzate. Reca l’iscrizione Soffrite bambini per arrivare a Me. Ha le sue piccole cerniere, e i sostegni per i portatori, come se fossero stati realmente necessari dei portatori”.

Altri ancora trovano in questi oggetti una fonte di ispirazione artistica. Roald Dahl, l’autore di tante favole moderne per bambini, dopo un intervento chirurgico aveva conservato la testa del suo stesso femore, così come alcuni pezzi della sua spina dorsale in un barattolo. Lo aiutavano a meditare, e a scrivere.

“C’è molto poco, a questo mondo, che sia solo bianco o nero”. Così si esprime J. Bazzel, direttore delle comunicazioni del celebre Mütter Museum di Philadelphia, e racconta che nella immensa collezione anatomica del museo trovano posto diversi esemplari di cuoio umano. “Sentiamo parlare di cuoio umano, e subito pensiamo ai Nazisti – ma c’era un periodo in cui rilegare in pelle umana un testo scientifico o medico era un segno di rispetto. Magari un paziente aveva aiutato a scoprire una nuova conoscenza, a capire qualcosa di documentato in quel testo, e utilizzare la sua pelle era un modo di commemorarlo, onorarlo, e tributargli rispetto”. Seguendo questo ragionamento, lo stesso Bazzel, 38 anni, ha donato parte del suo corpo al museo: le sue ossa del bacino, rimosse chirurgicamente anni or sono a causa di uno sfibramento osseo dovuto alla reazione ad un farmaco utilizzato contro l’AIDS, di cui è affetto. Le ha donate al museo per testimoniare e insegnare ai visitatori quanto complessa e devastante la cura di questa sindrome possa risultare. “C’è molto poco a questo mondo, che sia bianco o nero… La paura di una persona è la gioia di un’altra; l’incubo di uno è la realtà di un altro”.

Sarcofagi a vite

Donald Scruggs ha brevettato, nel 2007, delle bare piuttosto particolari, pensate per semplificare l’operazione di interramento: vanno avvitate nel terreno.

Su Google Patents trovate il brevetto integrale. Le bare, a tenuta stagna, sono pensate per poter essere posizionate anche sul fondo di laghetti artificiali, o altri specchi d’acqua.

Scoperto via BoingBoing.

Safety Coffins

80440770.6oV1pAGT.safety_dead

I safety coffins, bare di sicurezza, si diffusero nel XVIII e XIX secolo, ed erano dei feretri attrezzati in caso di esequie premature.

La paura di essere sepolti vivi era diffusa e fondata: erano infatti regolari i rapporti che parlavano del ritrovamento, durante la riesumazione, di corpi usciti per metà dalla cassa, o dalla posizione scomposta e dalle unghie strappate, o dei coperchi ricoperti di graffi. La letteratura, dal canto suo, sfruttava questa tremenda immagine: Le esequie premature di Edgar Allan Poe, del 1844, racconta proprio di vari casi attestati e del terrore che lo stesso Poe, sofferente di catalessi, aveva di essere sepolto vivo.

Durante l’epidemia di colera a cavallo fra ‘700 e ‘800, la paura raggiunse il suo apice. Cominciarono dunque ad essere costruite le prime “bare sicure”, che prevedevano aperture dall’interno, e molto spesso l’utilizzo di sistemi di comunicazione con l’esterno, quali ad esempio una campana la cui corda aveva un’ estremità che finiva dentro alla cassa da morto.

safety-coffin-420-90

Il problema di questo metodo è che la decomposizione poteva causare movimenti improvvisi della salma e portare così a delle “false” richieste di soccorso. Altre variazioni del metodo della campana prevedevano bandiere e fuochi d’artificio. Alcuni brevetti includevano scale, vie di fuga, “cannocchiali” puntati sul volto del defunto – per controllare il suo stato – addirittura tubi per il cibo, ma ironicamente molti erano sprovvisti della funzione basilare: il rifornimento d’aria.

buriedalive36a00d8341c318c53ef00e54f25e7e38833-800wi

Nel 1995, il nostrano Fabrizio Caselli ha brevettato il più moderno dei safety coffin: la bara è dotata di un allarme, un sistema di interfono, una torcia elettrica, un apparecchio di respirazione ad ossigeno, uno stimolatore cardiaco e un sistema di monitoraggio dei battiti del cuore (www.morteserena.it).

Eppure, nonostante tutte le precauzioni che la paura di essere sepolti vivi ha ispirato, non si ha notizia di nessuno che sia stato salvato da una “bara di sicurezza”.

80439853.MiUrgAri