Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 6

In the sixth episode of the Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: scientific experiments to defeat death; a Russian spacesuit; the blue-skinned family. [Be sure to turn on English captions.]

If you like this episode please consider subscribing to the channel, and most of all spread the word. Enjoy!

Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

Unearthing Gorini, The Petrifier

This post originally appeared on The Order of the Good Death

Many years ago, as I had just begun to explore the history of medicine and anatomical preparations, I became utterly fascinated with the so-called “petrifiers”: 19th and early 20th century anatomists who carried out obscure chemical procedures in order to give their specimens an almost stone-like, everlasting solidity.
Their purpose was to solve two problems at once: the constant shortage of corpses to dissect, and the issue of hygiene problems (yes, back in the time dissection was a messy deal).
Each petrifier perfected his own secret formula to achieve virtually incorruptible anatomical preparations: the art of petrifaction became an exquisitely Italian specialty, a branch of anatomy that flourished due to a series of cultural, scientific and political factors.

When I first encountered the figure of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881), I made the mistake of assuming his work was very similar to that of his fellow petrifiers.
But as soon as I stepped foot inside the wonderful Gorini Collection in Lodi, near Milan, I was surprised at how few scientifically-oriented preparations it contained: most specimens were actually whole, undissected human heads, feet, hands, infants, etc. It struck me that these were not meant as medical studies: they were attempts at preserving the body forever. Was Gorini looking for a way to have the deceased transformed into a genuine statue? Why?
I needed to know more.

A biographical research is a mighty strange experience: digging into the past in search of someone’s secret is always an enterprise doomed to failure. No matter how much you read about a person’s life, their deepest desires and dreams remain forever inaccessible.
And yet, the more I examined books, papers, documents about Paolo Gorini, the more I felt I could somehow relate to this man’s quest.
Yes, he was an eccentric genius. Yes, he lived alone in his ghoulish laboratory, surrounded by “the bodies of men and beasts, human limbs and organs, heads with their hair preserved […], items made from animal substances for use as chess or draughts pieces; petrified livers and brain tissue, hardened skin and hides, nerve tissue from oxen, etc.”. And yes, he somehow enjoyed incarnating the mad scientist character, especially among his bohemian friends – writers and intellectuals who venerated him. But there was more.

It was necessary to strip away the legend from the man. So, as one of Gorini’s greatest passions was geology, I approached him as if he was a planet: progressing deeper and deeper, through the different layers of crust that make up his stratified enigma.
The outer layer was the one produced by mythmaking folklore, nourished by whispered tales, by fleeting glimpses of horrific visions and by popular rumors. “The Magician”, they called him. The man who could turn bodies into stone, who could create mountains from molten lava (as he actually did in his “experimental geology” public demonstrations).
The layer immediately beneath that unveiled the image of an “anomalous” scientist who was, however, well rooted in the Zeitgeist of his times, its spirit and its disputes, with all the vices and virtues derived therefrom.
The most intimate layer – the man himself – will perhaps always be a matter of speculation. And yet certain anecdotes are so colorful that they allowed me to get a glimpse of his fears and hopes.

Still, I didn’t know why I felt so strangely close to Gorini.

His preparations sure look grotesque and macabre from our point of view. He had access to unclaimed bodies at the morgue, and could experiment on an inconceivable number of corpses (“For most of my life I have substituted – without much discomfort – the company of the dead for the company of the living…”), and many of the faces that we can see in the Museum are those of peasants and poor people. This is the reason why so many visitors might find the Collection in Lodi quite unsettling, as opposed to a more “classic” anatomical display.
And yet, here is what looks like a macroscopic incongruity: near the end of his life, Gorini patented the first really efficient crematory. His model was so good it was implemented all over the world, from London to India. One could wonder why this man, who had devoted his entire life to making corpses eternal, suddenly sought to destroy them through fire.
Evidently, Gorini wasn’t fighting death; his crusade was against putrefaction.

When Paolo was only 12 years old, he saw his own father die in a horrific carriage accident. He later wrote: “That day was the black point of my life that marked the separation between light and darkness, the end of all joy, the beginning of an unending procession of disasters. From that day onwards I felt myself to be a stranger in this world…
The thought of his beloved father’s body, rotting inside the grave, probably haunted him ever since. “To realize what happens to the corpse once it has been closed inside its underground prison is a truly horrific thing. If we were somehow able to look down and see inside it, any other way of treating the dead would be judged as less cruel, and the practice of burial would be irreversibly condemned”.

That’s when it hit me.


This was exactly what made his work so relevant: all Gorini was really trying to do was elaborate a new way of dealing with the “scandal” of dead bodies.
He was tirelessly seeking a more suitable relationship with the remains of missing loved ones. For a time, he truly believed petrifaction could be the answer. Who would ever resort to a portrait – he thought – when a loved one could be directly immortalized for all eternity?
Gorini even suggested that his petrified heads be used to adorn the gravestones of Lodi’s cemetery – an unfortunate but candid proposal, made with the most genuine conviction and a personal sense of pietas. (Needless to say this idea was not received with much enthusiasm).

Gorini was surely eccentric and weird but, far from being a madman, he was also cherished by his fellow citizens in Lodi, on the account of his incredible kindness and generosity. He was a well-loved teacher and a passionate patriot, always worried that his inventions might be useful to the community.
Therefore, as soon as he realized that petrifaction might well have its advantages in the scientific field, but it was neither a practical nor a welcome way of dealing with the deceased, he turned to cremation.

Redefining the way we as a society interact with the departed, bringing attention to the way we treat bodies, focusing on new technologies in the death field – all these modern concerns were already at the core of his research.
He was a man of his time, but also far ahead of it. Gorini the scientist and engineer, devoted to the destiny of the dead, would paradoxically encounter more fertile conditions today than in the 20th century. It’s not hard to imagine him enthusiastically experimenting with alkaline hydrolysis or other futuristic techniques of treating human remains. And even if some of his solutions, such as his petrifaction procedures, are now inevitably dated and detached from contemporary attitudes, they do seem to have been the beginning of a still pertinent urge and of a research that continues today.

The Petrifier is the fifth volume of the Bizzarro Bazar Collection. Text (both in Italian and English) by Ivan Cenzi, photographs by Carlo Vannini.

 

The Petrifier: The Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection

 

The fifth volume in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection will come out on February 16th: The Petrifier is dedicated to the Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection in Lodi.

Published by Logos and featuring Carlo Vannini‘s wonderful photographs, the book explores the life and work of Paolo Gorini, one of the most famous “petrifiers” of human remains, and places this astounding collection in its cultural, social and political context.

I will soon write something more exhaustive on the reason why I believe Gorini is still so relevant today, and so peculiar when compared to his fellow petrifiers. For now, here’s the description from the book sheet:

Whole bodies, heads, babies, young ladies, peasants, their skin turned into stone, immune to putrescence: they are the “Gorini’s dead”, locked in a lapidary eternity that saves them from the ravenous destruction of the Conquering Worm.
They can be admired in a small museum in Lodi, where, under the XVI century vault with grotesque frescoes, a unique collection is preserved: the marvellous legacy of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881). Eccentric figure, characterised by a clashing duality, Gorini devoted himself to mathematics, volcanology, experimental geology, corpse preservation (he embalmed the prestigious bodies of Giuseppe Mazzini and Giuseppe Rovani); however, he was also involved in the design of one of the first Italian crematory ovens.
Introverted recluse in his laboratory obtained from an old deconsecrated church, but at the same time women’s lover and man of science able to establish close relationships with the literary men of his era, Gorini is depicted in the collective imagination as a figure poised between the necromant and the romantic cliché of the “crazy scientist”, both loved and feared. Because of his mysterious procedures and top-secret formulas that could “petrify” the corpses, Paolo Gorini’s life has been surrounded by an air of legend.
Thanks to the contributions of the museum curator Alberto Carli and the anthropologist Dario Piombino-Mascali, this book retraces the curious historic period during which the petrifaction process obtained a certain success, as well as the value and interest conferred to the collection in Lodi nowadays.
These preparations, in fact, are not silent witnesses: they speak about the history of the long-dated human obsession for the preserving of dead bodies, documenting a moment in which the Westerners relationship with death was beginning to change. And, ultimately, they solve Paolo Gorini’s enigma: a “wizard”, man and scientist, who, traumatised at a young age by his father’s death, spent his whole life probing the secrets of Nature and attempting to defeat the decay.

The Petrifier is available for pre-order at this link.

A Most Unfortunate Execution

The volume Celebrated trials of all countries, and remarkable cases of criminal jurisprudence (1835) is a collection of 88 accounts of murders and curious proceedings.
Several of these anecdotes are quite interesting, but a double hanging which took place in 1807 is particularly astonishing for the collateral effects it entailed.

On November 6, 1802, John Cole Steele, owner of a lavander water deposit, was travelling from Bedfont, on the outskirts of London, to his home on Strand. It was deep in the night, and the merchant was walking alone, as he couldn’t find a coach.
The moon had just come up when Steele was surrounded by three men who were hiding in the bushes. They were John Holloway and Owen Haggerty — two small-time crooks always in trouble with the law; with them was their accomplice Benjamin Hanfield, whom they had recruited some hours earlier at an inn.
Hanfield himself would prove to be the weak link. Four years later, under the promise of a full pardon for unrelated offences, he would vividly recount in court the scene he had witnessed that night:

We presently saw a man coming towards us, and, on approaching him, we ordered him to stop, which he immediately did. Holloway went round him, and told him to deliver. He said we should have his money,
and hoped we would not ill-use him. [Steele] put his hand in his pocket, and gave Haggerty his money. I demanded his pocket-book. He replied that he had none. Holloway insisted that he had a book, and if he
did not deliver it, he would knock him down. I then laid hold of his legs. Holloway stood at his head, and swore if he cried out he would knock out his brains. [Steele] again said, he hoped we would not ill-use him. Haggerty proceeded to search him, when [Steele] made some resistance, and struggled so much that we got across the road. He cried out severely, and as a carriage was coming up, Holloway said, “Take care, I’ll silence the b—–r,” and immediately struck him several violent blows on the head and body. [Steele] heaved a heavy groan, and stretched himself out lifeless. I felt alarmed, and said, “John, you have killed the man”. Holloway replied, that it was a lie, for he was only stunned. I said I would stay no longer, and immediately set off towards London, leaving Holloway and Haggerty with the body. I came to Hounslow, and stopped at the end of the town nearly an hour. Holloway and Haggerty then came up, and said they had done the trick, and, as a token, put the deceased’s hat into my hand. […] I told Holloway it was a cruel piece of business, and that I was sorry I had any hand in it. We all turned down a lane, and returned to London. As we came along, I asked Holloway if he had got the pocketbook. He replied it was no matter, for as I had refused to share the danger, I should not share the booty. We came to the Black Horse in Dyot-street, had half a pint of gin, and parted.

A robbery gone wrong, like many others. Holloway and Haggerty would have gotten away with it: investigations did not lead to anything for four years, until Hanfield revealed what he knew.
The two were arrested on the account of Hanfield’s testimony, and although they claimed to be innocent they were both sentenced to death: Holloway and Haggerty would hang on a Monday, February 22, 1807.
During all Sunday night, the convicts kept on shouting out they had nothing to do with the murder, their cries tearing the “awful stillness of midnight“.

On the fatal morning, the two were brought at the Newgate gallows. Another person was to be hanged with them,  Elizabeth Godfrey, guilty of stabbing her neighbor Richard Prince.
Three simultaneous executions: that was a rare spectacle, not to be missed. For this reason around 40.000 perople gathered to witness the event, covering every inch of space outside Newgate and before the Old Bailey.

Haggertywas the first to walk up, silent and resigned. The hangman, William Brunskill, covered his head with a white hood. Then came Holloway’s turn, but the man lost his cold blood, and started yelling “I am innocent, innocent, by God!“, as his face was covered with a similar cloth. Lastly a shaking Elizabeth Godfrey was brought beside the other two.
When he finished with his prayers, the priest gestured for the executioner to carry on.
Around 8.15 the trapdoors opened under the convicts’ feet. Haggerty and Holloway died on the instant, while the woman convulsively wrestled for some time before expiring. “Dying hard“, it was called at the time.

But the three hanged persons were not the only victims on that cold, deadly morning: suddenly the crowd started to move out of control like an immense tide.

The pressure of the crowd was such, that before the malefactors appeared, numbers of persons were crying out in vain to escape from it: the attempt only tended to increase the confusion. Several females of low stature, who had been so imprudent as to venture amongst the mob, were in a dismal situation: their cries were dreadful. Some who could be no longer supported by the men were suffered to fall, and were trampled to death. This was also the case with several men and boys. In all parts there were continued cries “Murder! Murder!” particularly from the female part of the spectators and children, some of whom were seen expiring without the possibility of obtaining the least assistance, every one being employed in endeavouring to preserve his own life. The most affecting scene was witnessed at Green-Arbour Lane,
nearly opposite the debtors’ door. The lamentable catastrophe which took place near this spot, was attributed to the circumstance of two pie-men attending there to dispose of their pies, and one of them having his basket overthrown, some of the mob not being aware of what had happened, and at the
same time severely pressed, fell over the basket and the man at the moment he was picking it up, together with its contents. Those who once fell were never more enabled to rise, such was the pressure of the crowd. At this fatal place, a man of the name of Herrington was thrown down, who had in his hand his younger son, a fine boy about twelve years of age. The youth was soon trampled to death; the father recovered, though much bruised, and was amongst the wounded in St. Bartholomew’s Hospital.

The following passage is especially dreadful:

A woman, who was so imprudent as to bring with her a child at the breast, was one of the number killed: whilst in the act of falling, she forced the child into the arms of the man nearest to her, requesting him, for God’s sake, to save its life; the man, finding it required all his exertion to preserve himself, threw the infant from him, but it was fortunately caught at a distance by anotner man, who finding it difficult to ensure its safety or his own, disposed of it in a similar way. The child was again caught by a person, who contrived to struggle with it to a cart, under which he deposited it until the danger was over, and the mob had dispersed.

Others managed to have a narrow escape, as reported by the 1807 Annual Register:

A young man […] fell down […], but kept his head uncovered, and forced his way over the dead bodies, which lay in a pile as high as the people, until he was enabled to creep over the heads of the crowd to a lamp-iron, from whence he got into the first floor window of Mr. Hazel, tallow-chandler, in the Old Bailey; he was much bruised, and must have suffered the fate of his companion, if he had not been possessed of great strength.

The maddened crowd left a scene of apocalyptic devastation.

After the bodies were cut down, and the gallows was removed to the Old Bailey yard, the marshals and constables cleared the streets where the catastrophe had occurred, when nearly one hundred persons, dead or in a state of insensibility, were found in the street. […] A mother was seen to carry away the body of her dead son; […] a sailor boy was killed opposite Newgate, by suffocation; in a small bag which he carried was a quantity of bread and cheese, and it is supposed he came some distance to witness the execution. […] Until four o’clock in the afternoon, most of the surrounding houses contained some person in a wounded state, who were afterwards taken away by their friends on shutters or in hackney coaches. At Bartholomew’s Hospital, after the bodies of the dead were stripped and washed, they were ranged round a ward, with sheets over them, and their clothes put as pillows under their heads; their faces were uncovered, and there was a rail along the centre of the room; the persons who were admitted to see the shocking spectacle, and identified many, went up on one side and returned on the other. Until two o’clock, the entrances to the hospital were beset with mothers weeping for their sons! wives for their husbands! and sisters for their brothers! and various individuals for their relatives and friends!

There is however one last dramatic twist in this story: in all probability, Hollow and Haggerty were really innocent after all.
Hanfield, the key witness, might have lied to have his charges condoned.

Solicitor James Harmer (the same Harmer who incidentally inspired Charles Dickens for Great Expectations), even though convinced of their culpability in the beginning, kept on investigating after the convicts death and eventually changed his mind; he even published a pamphlet on his own expenses to denounce the mistake made by the Jury. Among other things, he discovered that Hanfield had tried the same trick before, when charged with desertion in 1805: he had attempted to confess to a robbery in order to avoid military punishment.
The Court itself was aware that the real criminals had not been punished, for in 1820, 13 years after the disastrous hanging, a John Ward was accused of the murder of Steele, then acquitted for lack of evidence (see Linda Stratmann in Middlesex Murders).

In one single day, Justice had caused the death of dozens of innocent people — including the convicts.
Really one of the most unfortunate executions London had ever seen.

___________________

I wrote about capital punsihment gone wrong in the past, in this article about Jack Ketch; on the same topic you can also find this post on ‘Bloody Murders’ pamphlets from Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (both articles in Italian only, sorry!).

“La Veglia Eterna” è qui!

Img8_9788857607351Web-800x800

Vi avevamo anticipato che il primo volume della Collana Bizzarro Bazar sarebbe stato disponibile nelle librerie a partire dal 15 ottobre. E infatti, per il comune e ignaro avventore sarà così. Ma per voi appassionati, che seguite regolarmente il blog, c’è una sorpresa!

In anteprima per tutti i lettori di Bizzarro Bazar, La Veglia Eterna (Logos Edizioni) è infatti già disponibile ordinando direttamente da questo link. Tutte le copie, precedentemente prenotate oppure ordinate a partire da questo momento, verranno spedite immediatamente.

Il libro è un’esplorazione delle Catacombe dei Cappuccini di Palermo che ripercorre la storia, la rilevanza antropologica, le tecniche di conservazione dei corpi e i curiosi aneddoti relativi a questa cripta cimiteriale, che ospita la più grande collezione di mummie naturali e artificiali del mondo. Ad accompagnarci e a guidare il nostro sguardo, mentre scendiamo gli scalini delle Catacombe, saranno le straordinarie fotografie di Carlo Vannini.

In chiusura, segnaliamo che lo splendido blog Salone del Lutto ha pubblicato proprio oggi questa recensione del nostro libro.

Buona lettura a tutti!

La veglia eterna

Robert E. Cornish

cornish1

Robert E. Cornish, classe 1903, era un bambino prodigio. Si laureò con lode all’Università della California a soli 18 anni, e conseguì il dottorato a 22. Eppure talvolta una mente brillante può smarrirsi all’inseguimento di sfide perse in partenza e di scommesse impossibili: di sicuro, pur con tutte le sue doti, il Dr. Cornish non eccelleva per lungimiranza.

Così, appena accettato un posto all’Istituto di Biologia Sperimentale presso l’Università, immediatamente si impelagò in una serie di ricerche che non avevano un futuro, come ad esempio un progetto per un paio di lenti che permettessero di leggere il giornale sott’acqua. (Se pensate – a ragione – che questa sia un’idea bislacca, date un’occhiata ai brevetti di cui abbiamo parlato in quest’articolo).

Nel 1932, a ventisette anni, Cornish cominciò ad essere ossessionato dall’idea di poter rianimare i cadaveri. Mise a punto una tavola basculante, una sorta di letto rotante fissato su un fulcro, su cui avrebbe dovuto essere legato il morto da riportare in vita. Ovviamente il decesso doveva essere accaduto da poco, e senza gravi danni agli organi interni: secondo le sue stesse parole, “facendolo muovere in su e in giù, mi aspetto una circolazione artificiale del sangue”.

revive_dead

Erano gli anni ’30, e non era più facile come un tempo procurarsi dei corpi freschi su cui sperimentare come facevano i “rianimatori di cadaveri” di una volta (vedi questo articolo), ma Cornish riuscì comunque a testare la sua tavola su vittime di attacchi cardiaci, morti per annegamento o folgorati. Purtroppo, nessuno di essi tornò in vita dopo essere stato sbatacchiato in alto e in basso. In un rapporto confidenziale per l’Università della California, Cornish segnalava che dopo un’ora passata a basculare il cadavere di un uomo “il suo volto sembrava essersi improvvisamente riscaldato, gli occhi erano tornati a brillare, e si potevano osservare delle deboli pulsazioni in prossimità della trachea”. Un po’ pochino per affermare che la tecnica fosse efficace.

2013-12-27 17.31.46

Così Cornish decise che, prima di ritentare sugli uomini, sarebbe stato più saggio mettere a punto il suo metodo sugli animali. Nel 1934 iniziò gli esperimenti che gli avrebbero dato la fama e che, allo stesso tempo, avrebbero decretato la fine della sua carriera.

Le vittime sacrificali di queste nuove ricerche erano cinque fox terrier, chiamati (neanche troppo ironicamente) Lazarus I, II, III, IV e V. Per ucciderli, Cornish usò una miscela di azoto ed etere, asfissiandoli fino alla completa cessazione del respiro e del battito cardiaco. Dichiarati clinicamente morti, i cani venivano poi sottoposti alle tecniche sperimentali di rianimazione, che prevedevano – oltre al basculamento –  delle iniezioni di adrenalina ed eparina (un anticoagulante), mentre Cornish aspirava dell’ossigeno da una cannuccia e lo soffiava nella bocca aperta del cane morto.

cornish3

cornish2

cornish4

Lazarus I, II e III furono un buco nell’acqua, ostinandosi a rimanere deceduti. Ma ecco la sorpresa: nel 1934 e 1935, con Lazarus IV e V, qualcosa effettivamente successe. I cani ripresero conoscenza, e ritornarono a respirare e a vivere. Certo, i danni cerebrali che avevano subito erano irreparabili: i cani erano completamente ciechi e non riuscivano a stare in piedi da soli. Ma la stampa amplificò questo piccolo successo a dismisura, e in breve tempo Cornish acquistò la fama di novello Frankenstein, anche grazie al suo strabismo divergente che gli donava uno sguardo da vero e proprio scienziato pazzo.

lrg_dog_life

Nel 1935 anche Hollywood cercò di far cassa sulla popolare vicenda, con la realizzazione del (pessimo) film Life Returns, ispirato alle ricerche di Cornish: quest’ultimo compare in una scena del film, nei panni di se stesso, mentre esegue dal vero uno dei suoi esperimenti di “rivitalizzazione” di un cane.

Life_Returns_FilmPoster
Forse Cornish pensava che l’esposizione mediatica gli avrebbe consentito maggiori fondi e più libertà di ricerca, ma accadde l’esatto opposto. Questi esperimenti erano un po’ troppo estremi, perfino per la sensibilità del tempo, e l’Università della California di fronte alle proteste degli animalisti decise di bandire Cornish dal campus, e tagliò tutti i ponti con lui.

Ritiratosi nella sua casa di Berkeley, Cornish mantenne un basso profilo per tredici anni. Ogni tanto doveva calmare l’ostilità dei vicini, per via delle fughe di pecore e cani dal suo laboratorio, o per varie esalazioni di componenti chimici che appestavano l’aria e scrostavano la vernice dagli edifici della zona. Ma nel 1947, eccolo ritornare sulla ribalta, affermando di aver finalmente perfezionato la tecnica, e dichiarandosi pronto a resuscitare un condannato a morte. L’audace impresa sarebbe stata tentata, questa volta, senza l’aiuto di tavole basculanti (concetto che aveva ormai completamente abbandonato), ma grazie ad una macchina cuore-polmoni assemblata in maniera artigianale e quantomeno fantasiosa: era composta dall’aspiratore di un aspirapolvere, dal tubo di un radiatore, da una ruota d’acciaio, da alcuni cilindri e da un tubo di vetro contenente 60.000 occhielli per lacci da scarpa.

Robert_Cornish_02
Un detenuto del braccio della morte di San Quintino, Thomas McMonigle, condannato per l’omicidio di una ragazzina, si propose volontariamente come cavia – con l’intesa che, se anche l’esperimento fosse riuscito ed egli fosse sopravvissuto alla camera a gas grazie all’apparecchio di Cornish, sarebbe comunque rimasto in carcere.

article55885785-3-001
Le autorità della California negarono però nettamente la richiesta di Cornish di poter sperimentare con il corpo del condannato a morte. Con quest’ultima sconfitta, la sua ricerca non aveva più alcuna possibilità di continuare. Ritiratosi nuovamente a vita privata, sbarcò il lunario vendendo un dentifricio di sua invenzione, il “Dentifricio del Dottor Cornish”, fino alla sua morte improvvisa nel 1963.

Speciale: Fotografare la morte – III

paris---joel-peter-witkin---vernissage-a0300-la-bnf-26-03-2012

Joel-Peter Witkin è ritenuto uno dei maggiori e più originali fotografi viventi, assurto negli anni a vera e propria leggenda della fotografia moderna. È nato a Brooklyn nel 1939, da padre ebreo e madre cattolica, che si separarono a causa dell’inconciliabilità delle loro posizioni religiose. Fin da giovane, quindi, Witkin conobbe la profonda influenza dei dilemmi della fede. Come ha più volte raccontato, un altro episodio fondamentale fu assistere ad un incidente stradale, mentre un giorno, da bambino, andava a messa con sua madre e suo fratello; nella confusione di lamiere e di grida, il piccolo Joel si trovò improvvisamente da solo e vide qualcosa rotolare verso di lui. Era la testa di una giovane ragazzina. Joel si chinò per carezzarle il volto, parlarle e rasserenarla, ma prima che potesse allungare una mano qualcuno lo portò via.
In questo aneddoto seminale sono già contenute alcune di quelle che diverranno vere e proprie ossessioni tematiche per Witkin: lo spirito, la compassione per la sofferenza e la ricerca della purezza attraverso il superamento di ciò che ci spaventa.

Dopo essersi laureato in discipline artistiche, ed aver iniziato la sua carriera come fotografo di guerra in Vietnam, nel 1982 Witkin ottiene il permesso di scattare alcune fotografie a dei preparati anatomici, e riceve in prestito per 24 ore una testa umana sezionata longitudinalmente. Witkin decide di posizionare le due metà gemelle nell’atto di baciarsi: l’effetto è destabilizzante e commovente, come se il momento della morte fosse un’estrema conciliazione con il sé, un riconoscere la propria parte divina e finalmente amarla senza riserve.

the-kiss-le-baiser-new-mexico-joel-peter-witkin

The Kiss è lo scatto che rende il fotografo di colpo celebre, nel bene e nel male: se da una parte alcuni critici comprendono subito la potente carica emotiva della fotografia, dall’altra molti gridano allo scandalo e la stessa Università, appena scopre l’uso che ha fatto del preparato, decide che Witkin è persona non grata.
Egli si trasferisce quindi nel Nuovo Messico, dove può in ogni momento attraversare il confine ed aggirare così le stringenti leggi americane sull’utilizzo di cadaveri. Da quel momento il lavoro di Witkin si focalizza proprio sulla morte, e sui “diversi”.

tumblr_l7xk5hk26r1qc3atx

Joel-Peter-Witkin-9

Lavorando con cadaveri o pezzi di corpi, con modelli transessuali, mutilati, nani o affetti da diverse deformità, Witkin crea delle barocche composizioni di chiara matrice pittorica (preparate con maniacale precisione a partire da schizzi e bozzetti), spesso reinterpretando grandi opere di maestri rinascimentali o importanti episodi religiosi.

joel-peter-witkin-7

Joel-Peter-Witkin-19

Witkin Archive
Scattate rigorosamene in studio, dove ogni minimo dettaglio può essere controllato a piacimento dall’artista, le fotografie vengono poi ulteriormente lavorate in fase di sviluppo, nella quale Witkin interviene graffiando la superficie delle foto, disegnandoci sopra, rovinandole con acidi, tagliando e rimaneggiando secondo una varietà di tecniche per ottenere il suo inconfondibile bianco e nero “anticato” alla maniera di un vecchio dagherrotipo.

Nonostante i soggetti scabrosi ed estremi, lo sguardo di Witkin è sempre compassionevole e “innamorato” della sacralità della vita. Anche la fiducia che i suoi soggetti gli accordano, nel venire fotografati, è proprio da imputarsi alla sincerità con cui egli ricerca i segni del divino anche nei fisici sfortunati o differenti: Witkin ha il raro dono di far emergere una sensualità e una purezza quasi sovrannaturale dai corpi più strani e contorti, catturando la luce che pare emanare proprio dalle sofferenze vissute. Cosa ancora più straordinaria, egli non ha bisogno che il corpo sia vivo per vederne, e fotografarne, l’accecante bellezza.

Ecco le nostre cinque domande a Joel-Peter Witkin.

Witkin-harvest-1984
1. Perché hai deciso che era importante raffigurare la morte nei tuoi lavori fotografici?

La morte è parte della vita di ognuno di noi. La morte è anche il grande discrimine fra la fede umana e gli aspetti terreni, temporali – è il sonno senza tempo, per chi è religioso, è la vita eterna assieme a Dio.

Witkin Archive

2. Quale credi che sia lo scopo, se ce n’è uno, delle tue fotografie post-mortem? Stai soltanto fotografando i corpi, o sei alla ricerca di qualcos’altro?

Fotografare la morte e i resti umani è sempre un “lavoro sacro”. Quello che fotografo, coloro che ritraggo, in realtà siamo sempre noi stessi. Io vedo la bellezza nei soggetti che fotografo.

joel-peter-witkin-1996
3. Come succede per tutto ciò che mette alla prova il nostro rifiuto della morte, il tono macabro e sconvolgente delle tue fotografie potrebbe essere visto da alcuni come osceno e irrispettoso. Ti interessa scioccare il pubblico, e come ti poni nei riguardi della carica di tabù presente nei tuoi soggetti?

I grandi dipinti e la scultura del passato hanno sempre affrontato il tema della morte. Amo dire che “la morte è come il pranzo – sta arrivando!”. Un tempo la gente nasceva e moriva nella propria casa. Oggi nasciamo e moriamo in apposite istituzioni. Portiamo tutti un numero tatuato sul nostro polso. Muoriamo soli.
Quindi, ovviamente, le persone rimangono sconvolte nel vedere, in un certo senso, il loro stesso volto. Credo che nulla dovrebbe mai essere tabù. In realtà quando sono abbastanza privilegiato da riuscire a fotografare la morte, resto solitamente molto toccato dallo spirito che è ancora presente nei corpi di quelle persone.

Witkin Archive

B017634

4. È stato difficile approcciare i cadaveri, a livello personale? C’è qualche aneddoto particolare o interessante riguardo le circostanze di una tua foto?

Quando ho fotografato “l’uomo senza testa”, (Man Without A Head, un cadavere, seduto su una sedia all’obitorio, la cui testa era stata rimossa a scopo di ricerca) lui indossava dei calzetti neri. Quel dettaglio rese il tutto un po’ più personale. Il dottore, il suo assistente ed io alzammo quest’uomo morto dal tavolo settorio e posizionammo il suo corpo su una sedia di acciaio. Dovetti lavorare un po’ con il cadavere, per bilanciare le sue braccia in modo che non cadesse per terra. Alla fine, nella foto, il pavimento era tutto ricoperto dal sangue fluito dal suo collo, dove la testa era stata tagliata. Gli fui molto grato di aver lavorato con me.

BL10629

joel-peter-witkin-10

5. Riguardo alle foto post-mortem, ti piacerebbe che te ne venisse scattata una dopo che sei morto? Come ti immagini una simile foto?

Ho già preso provvedimenti affinché i miei organi siano rimossi dopo la mia morte per aiutare chi ancora è in vita. Qualsiasi cosa rimanga, verrà seppellita in un cimitero militare, visto che sono un veterano dell’esercito. Quindi temo che mi perderò l’occasione di cui mi chiedi!

P.S. Io non voglio “mantenere bizzarro il mondo” (un riferimento allo slogan del nostro blog, n.d.r.)… voglio renderlo più amorevole!

med_witkin-1-jpg

Joel-Peter-Witkin-23

Speciale: Fotografare la morte – II

4c00b5c14b2cbf98ccfa325e5266

Negli ultimi trent’anni Jack Burman ha esplorato il mondo alla ricerca dei morti. Da quando, negli anni ’80, ha visitato le catacombe dei Cappuccini a Palermo, la sua arte è divenuta instancabilmente concentrata sull’esplorazione di ciò che rimane del corpo dopo la morte.

tumblr_mehdnwueNq1qzfvn2o1_1280.png
Dal Sud America all’Italia, dalla Spagna alla Francia e alla Germania, Burman ha visitato luoghi sacri, musei di anatomia, obitori e scuole di medicina; in ognuno di questi luoghi ha fotografato quei morti che al  tempo stesso “riposano” e “non riposano”, poiché le loro spoglie sono ancora visibili e intatte, che siano delle mummie o delle reliquie, o dei preparati conservati per lo studio medico.

tumblr_mdmzqoaSNU1r1cxwoo1_500

tumblr_m6ubzceyZk1rq4squo1_500
L’approccio di Burman a questo soggetto macabro ed estremo è di grandissimo rispetto: spesso inquadrati di fronte a un backdrop nero, sapientemente illuminati, questi resti umani acquistano una nobiltà e un’astrazione inaspettate. La testa di una donna è racchiusa in un vaso di vetro: i suoi occhi socchiusi, la serenità dell’espressione, l’immobilità della carne le donano un’aura quasi sacra; questa donna ha conosciuto il segreto, è passata dall’altra parte e la sua seraficità ci parla di una conoscenza per noi irraggiungibile. Sarebbe facile parlare di memento mori – eppure forse c’è di più. Di fronte agli scatti di Burman, paradossalmente, il sentimento che proviamo non è quello della morte che conquista ogni cosa: non assistiamo alla decomposizione che annulla ogni speranza, ma siamo invece confrontati con un concetto forse ormai fuori moda – la dignità.

tumblr_lwl26bJNHs1qljj84o1_500
Le fotografie di Burman ci mostrano con estrema compassione la bellezza e il dramma dell’uomo, fissate per sempre nell’istante ultimo. Impossibile non immaginare le aspirazioni, le passioni, la vitalità dei soggetti ritratti: e le composizioni del fotografo sembrano perpetuare questa forza vitale, come se i morti fossero ancora in grado di parlarci della vita quaggiù, delle nostre stesse esistenze, piccole ma commoventi, in cui lo splendore e la miseria sono le due facce dell’identica medaglia. Più si guardano queste fotografie, e più cresce forte la sensazione di essere guardati. E chi ha attraversato la soglia forse ha elementi in più, ha per così dire un quadro più completo – ma il suo mistero è inaccessibile, e Burman immortala questi “resti”, cosciente di fotografare uno scrigno che non potrà mai essere aperto.

jb-argentina11-2001
Ecco le nostre cinque domande a Jack Burman.

1. Perché hai deciso che era importante raffigurare la morte nei tuoi lavori fotografici?

Sebald ha scritto che “la fisicità è scolpita più fortemente, e la sua natura diviene più percettibile nell’indistinto confine con la trascendenza”. Io cerco di lavorare vicino al corpo e porre il mio lavoro proprio su quel confine.

tumblr_m5kc7kqeEP1qjhtoto1_500

tumblr_lyncwst1Bs1qjv0slo1_500
2. Quale credi che sia lo scopo, se ce n’è uno, delle tue fotografie post-mortem? Stai soltanto fotografando i corpi, o sei alla ricerca di qualcos’altro?

Una parte di questa domanda trova già risposta nella prima. Fammi aggiungere questo: io cerco di trovare una parte della presenza del corpo. La forza del danno e della perdita. La durezza e i moti del tempo che si depositano sulla (e sotto la) pelle. Il sentimento.

JB_Germany33_low_Res

jack_burman4_448
3. Come succede per tutto ciò che mette alla prova il nostro rifiuto della morte, il tono macabro e sconvolgente delle tue fotografie potrebbe essere visto da alcuni come osceno e irrispettoso. Ti interessa scioccare il pubblico, e come ti poni nei riguardi della carica di tabù presente nei tuoi soggetti?

Ricordi i capelli della ragazza all’inizio di Dell’amore e di altri demoni di Garcia Marquez? I capelli sono le orecchie, gli occhi, i nervi della ragazza. Così ciascuna mano, ed il volto.  Quando entro nella sfera privata dei morti, lo faccio con un lento e forte rispetto per le loro mani, braccia, spalle e occhi. I pochi collezionisti che comprano le mie stampe (o il mio libro) per portarle fra le loro mani e nelle loro stanze – almeno quelli che conosco – vedono le cose con lo stesso rigore.

jack_burman1_1000
4. È stato difficile approcciare i cadaveri, a livello personale? C’è qualche aneddoto particolare o interessante riguardo le circostanze di una tua foto?

No, non è stato mai difficile.
Tempo fa, il mio lavoro mi portò in una cittadina sulle Ande Peruviane. Ogni mattino, all’alba, una mandria di alpaca veniva condotta al pascolo attraverso uno stretto vicolo proprio dietro al muro contro il quale stava il mio letto. Il loro movimento attraversava il muro e faceva vibrare il letto. Era interessante poi alzarsi e andare a lavorare con dei cadaveri del 1500.

burman_germany3_2008
5. Riguardo alle foto post-mortem, ti piacerebbe che te ne venisse scattata una dopo che sei morto? Come ti immagini una simile foto?

Sì, mi piacerebbe, a condizione che la persona che la scatterà sia capace di vedere attraverso i miei occhi, il mio passato, i miei bisogni.
La immagino pulita; scura; danneggiata; semplice; punteggiata dalla luce.

BURMAN

1

02

Questo è il sito ufficiale dell’artista. Il suo libro fotografico The Dead può essere acquistato sul sito di Magenta.

Speciale: Fotografare la morte – I

Tutte le fotografie sono dei memento mori.

Scattare una foto significa partecipare alla

mortalità, vulnerabilità e mutevolezza

di un’altra persona.

(Susan Sontag)

Abbiamo deciso di proporre cinque domande, sempre le stesse, ad alcuni fra i più grandi fotografi che durante la loro carriera hanno affrontato direttamente il tema della morte e del cadavere. Alcuni hanno gentilmente declinato l’invito, come ad esempio Jeffrey Silverthorne, che già negli anni ’70 aveva rifiutato di comparire nel fondamentale saggio The Grotesque in Photography di A. D. Coleman. Altri, invece, ci hanno generosamente concesso questa breve intervista in esclusiva.

ANDRES SERRANO

Nato a New York nel 1950, figlio unico di padre honduregno e madre afro-cubana, Andres Serrano ha passato gran parte della giovinezza a Brooklyn. La rigida educazione cattolica ricevuta da ragazzo giocherà un ruolo fondamentale nella sua ricerca artistica; affascinato dai pittori del Rinascimento, da Rembrandt così come dai surrealisti, Serrano esplora fin da subito le connessioni nascoste ed estatiche fra l’iconografia religiosa e la concretezza del corpo. Il sangue, archetipo mistico e simbolo di vita e morte al tempo stesso, diviene uno degli elementi fondamentali dei suoi lavori. Più tardi comincerà ad utilizzare altri fluidi corporei, come urina, latte e sperma, rendendoli non semplici oggetti delle sue fotografie, ma veri e propri mezzi espressivi.

Le sue due serie Body Fluids e Immersions (1985-90) fecero scoppiare una furibonda polemica che colse di sorpresa l’autore stesso. Una fotografia, in particolare, si rivelò di una forza provocatoria destinata a rimanere immutata nei decenni successivi: si tratta di Piss Christ, e mostra un crocefisso immerso nell’urina. Considerata blasfema e offensiva, nel 1989 fu oggetto di un acceso dibattito al Senato degli Stati uniti; vandalizzata in Australia e presa di mira da un gruppo di naziskin in Svezia nel 2007, nel 2011 venne distrutta da un gruppo cattolico ad Avignone. Nelle intenzioni dell’artista, la serie Immersions si prefiggeva di visualizzare la dicotomia fra la condizione umana, corporale, terrena, e la tensione mistica: Piss Christ e le altre fotografie della serie sembrano affermare che è possibile trovare la divinità perfino nella fisicità umana, nei fluidi e nella carne, perché in fondo il nostro corpo è santo in tutte le sue manifestazioni.


Nell’immaginario popolare da quel momento Serrano è divenuto un artista “maledetto”, estremo e provocatore. La sua visione non ha mai deviato a causa delle polemiche, ed egli ha sempre rifiutato di censurare le sue fotografie, anche quelle più scabrose contenute nella serie A History of Sex; ma ridurre la sua opera a pietra dello scandalo significherebbe dimenticare le sue abilità di ritrattista mostrate in Nomads (1990), Klan series (1990, che ritrae membri del KKK) o in Budapest Series (1992).

Ma le fotografie che ci interessano qui sono ovviamente quelle contenute nella celebre The Morgue (1992). Serrano ha dichiarato: “credo che sia necessario cercare la bellezza anche nei luoghi meno convenzionali o nei candidati più insospettabili. Se non incontro la bellezza non sono capace di scattare alcuna fotografia”.

In The Morgue, l’obbiettivo del fotografo si concentra sui corpi arrivati all’obitorio, talvolta ancora quasi perfetti, talvolta decomposti, mutilati, dilaniati. Ritratti in composizioni rigorose, veri e propri tableaux dall’illuminazione caravaggesca e dai colori accesi, i morti sembrano in bilico fra la reificazione ultima e una sorta di postuma soggettività.

L’intrusione della macchina di Serrano in questo luogo nascosto, il suo indugiare su questi cadaveri vulnerabili e indifesi è una violazione dell’intimità, o un commosso omaggio? Il suo occhio cede alla seduzione morbosa del macabro, oppure è alla ricerca di qualche segreto dettaglio che dia significato alla morte stessa? Impossibile, e forse inutile, risolvere questa ambiguità. La potenza delle immagini di Andres Serrano sta proprio in questa capacità di estetizzare ciò che viene normalmente reputato osceno, e nella testarda convinzione di poter mostrare la meraviglia anche nel più triste e quotidiano degli orrori.


Ecco quindi la nostra intervista ad Andres Serrano.

1. Perché hai deciso che era importante raffigurare la morte nei tuoi lavori fotografici?

La morte è una parte della vita. Esserne incuriositi è naturale. Io fotografo la morte come un’investigazione, allo stesso tempo spirituale ed estetica. È una ricerca sulla vita alla fine del suo corso.


2. Quale credi che sia lo scopo, se ce n’è uno, delle tue fotografie post-mortem? Stai soltanto fotografando i corpi, o sei alla ricerca di qualcos’altro?

Lo scopo del mio lavoro sui morti è lo stesso del mio lavoro sui vivi: creare opere d’arte potenti e avvincenti.


3. Come succede per tutto ciò che mette alla prova il nostro rifiuto della morte, il tono macabro e sconvolgente delle tue fotografie potrebbe essere visto da alcuni come osceno e irrispettoso. Ti interessa scioccare il pubblico, e come ti poni nei riguardi della carica di tabù presente nei tuoi soggetti?

Lavorando nell’obitorio, a fianco di dottori e assistenti clinici, mi sono sentito parte di un gruppo di professionisti che hanno scelto di lavorare con i cadaveri. Non c’è nulla di disgustoso o irrispettoso nel lavorare con i morti, o nel volere mostrare la bellezza che è nella morte. Non considero il mio lavoro scioccante, né tabù.


4. È stato difficile approcciare i cadaveri, a livello personale? C’è qualche aneddoto particolare o interessante riguardo le circostanze di una tua foto?

Non è mai difficile fare il lavoro che vuoi fare e che ti senti spinto a intraprendere. Non saprei dire se è successo qualcosa che potrei definire aneddotico; l’unica cosa che mi ha sorpreso è che davvero poche persone erano morte di morte naturale. La maggior parte di quei cadaveri erano morti inaspettatamente e prematuramente.


5. Riguardo alle foto post-mortem, ti piacerebbe che te ne venisse scattata una dopo che sei morto? Come ti immagini una simile foto?

Preferirei scattarmela da solo, perché nessun altro saprebbe farla come me.

Ecco un interessante saggio (PDF in inglese) su The Morgue, e il sito ufficiale di Andres Serrano.

L’incidente del Passo Dyatlov

L’alpinismo porta con sé dei rischi, ma anche tutta la bellezza
che si nasconde nell’avventura dell’affrontare l’impossibile.
(Reinhold Messner)

Siamo riluttanti, qui su Bizzarro Bazar, ad affrontare tematiche “paranormali” o misteriose; il senso di meraviglia che possono provocare ci sembra sempre un po’ troppo facile, risaputo e sensazionalistico. Per questo di solito lasciamo questi argomenti ad alcune trasmissioni televisive notoriamente trash, dalle quali qualsiasi rigore scientifico è bandito per contratto.

Quello che stiamo per raccontarvi è però un episodio realmente accaduto, e ben documentato. È una storia inquietante, e nonostante le innumerevoli ipotesi che sono state avanzate, gli strani eventi che avvennero più di 50 anni fa su uno sperduto crinale di montagna nel centro della Russia rimangono a tutt’oggi senza spiegazione.

Il 25 Gennaio 1959 dieci sciatori partirono dalla cittadina di Sverdlovsk, negli Urali orientali, per un’escursione sulle cime più a nord: in particolare erano diretti alla montagna chiamata Otorten.

Per il gruppo, capitanato dall’escursionista ventitreenne Igor Dyatlov, quella “gita” doveva essere un severo allenamento per le future spedizioni nelle regioni artiche, ancora più estreme e difficili: tutti e dieci erano alpinisti e sciatori esperti, e il fatto che in quella stagione il percorso scelto fosse particolarmente insidioso non li spaventava.

Arrivati in treno a Ivdel, si diressero con un furgone a Vizhai, l’ultimo avamposto abitato. Da lì si misero in marcia il 27 gennaio diretti alla montagna. Il giorno dopo, però, uno dei membri si ammalò e fu costretto a tornare indietro: il suo nome era Yuri Yudin… l’unico sopravvissuto.

Gli altri nove proseguirono, e il 31 gennaio arrivarono ad un passo sul versante orientale della montagna chiamata Kholat Syakhl, che nel dialetto degli indigeni mansi significa “montagna dei morti”, una vetta simbolica per quel popolo e centro di molte leggende (cosa che in seguito contribuirà alle più fantasiose speculazioni). Il giorno successivo decisero di tentare la scalata, ma una tempesta di neve ridusse la visibilità e fece loro perdere l’orientamento: invece di proseguire verso il passo e arrivare dall’altra parte del costone, il gruppo deviò e si ritrovò a inerpicarsi proprio verso la cima della montagna. Una volta accortisi dell’errore, i nove alpinisti decisero di piantare le tende lì dov’erano, e attendere il giorno successivo che avrebbe forse portato migliori condizioni meteorologiche.

Tutto questo lo sappiamo grazie ai diari e alle macchine fotografiche ritrovate al campo, che ci raccontano la spedizione fino questo fatidico giorno e ci mostrano le ultime foto del gruppo allegro e spensierato. Ma cosa successe quella notte è impossibile comprenderlo. Più tardi Yudin, salvatosi paradossalmente grazie alle sue condizioni di salute precarie, dirà: “se avessi la possibilità di chiedere a Dio una sola domanda, sarebbe ‘che cosa è successo davvero ai miei amici quella notte?'”.

I nove, infatti, non fecero più ritorno e dopo un periodo di attesa (questo tipo di spedizione raramente si conclude nella data prevista, per cui un periodo di tolleranza viene di norma rispettato) i familiari allertarono le autorità, e polizia ed esercito incominciarono le ricerche; il 26 febbraio, in seguito all’avvistamento aereo del campo, i soccorsi ritrovarono la tenda, gravemente danneggiata.

Risultò subito chiaro che qualcosa di insolito doveva essere accaduto: la tenda era stata tagliata dall’interno, e le orme circostanti facevano supporre che i nove fossero fuggiti in fretta e furia dal loro riparo, per salvarsi da qualcosa che stava già nella tenda insieme a loro, qualcosa di talmente pericoloso che non ci fu nemmeno il tempo di sciogliere i nodi e uscire dall’ingresso.


Seguendo le tracce, i ricercatori fanno la seconda strana scoperta: poco distante, a meno di un chilometro di distanza, vengono trovati i primi due corpi, sotto un vecchio pino al limitare di un bosco. I rimasugli di un fuoco indicano che hanno tentato di riscaldarsi, ma non è questo il fatto sconcertante: i due cadaveri sono scalzi, e indossano soltanto la biancheria intima. Cosa li ha spinti ad allontanarsi seminudi nella tormenta, a una temperatura di -30°C? Non è tutto: i rami del pino sono spezzati fino a un’altezza di quattro metri e mezzo, e brandelli di carne vengono trovati nella corteccia. Da cosa cercavano di scappare i due uomini, arrampicandosi sull’albero? Se scappavano da un animale aggressivo perché i loro corpi sono stati lasciati intatti dalla fiera?

A diverse distanze, fra il campo e il pino, vengono trovati altri tre corpi: le loro posizioni indicano che stavano tentando di ritornare al campo. Uno in particolare tiene ancora in mano un ramo, e con l’altro braccio sembra proteggersi il capo.

All’inizio i medici che esaminarono i cinque corpi conclusero che la causa della morte fosse il freddo: non c’erano segni di violenza, e il fatto che non fossero vestiti significava che l’ipotermia era sopravvenuta in tempi piuttosto brevi. Uno dei corpi mostrava una fessura nel cranio, che non venne però ritenuta fatale.

Ma due mesi dopo, a maggio, vennero scoperti gli ultimi quattro corpi sepolti nel ghiaccio all’interno del bosco, e di colpo il quadro di insieme cambiò del tutto. Questi nuovi cadaveri, a differenza dei primi cinque, erano completamente vestiti. Uno di essi aveva il cranio sfondato, e altri due mostravano fratture importanti al torace. Secondo il medico che effettuò le autopsie, la forza necessaria per ridurre cosÏ i corpi doveva essere eccezionale: aveva visto fratture simili soltanto negli incidenti stradali. Escluse che le ferite potessero essere state causate da un essere umano.

La cosa bizzarra era che i corpi non presentavano ferite esteriori, né ematomi o segni di alcun genere; impossibile comprendere che cosa avesse sfondato le costole verso l’interno. Una delle ragazze morte aveva la testa rovesciata all’indietro: esaminandola, i medici si accorsero che la sua lingua era stata strappata alla radice (anche se non riuscirono a comprendere se la ferita fosse stata causata post-mortem oppure mentre la povera donna era ancora in vita). Notarono anche che alcuni degli alpinisti avevano addosso vestiti scambiati o rubati ai loro compagni: come se per coprirsi dal freddo avessero spogliato i morti. Alcuni degli indumenti e degli oggetti trovati addosso ai corpi pare emettessero radiazioni sopra la media.

L’unica descrizione possibile degli eventi è la seguente: a notte fonda, qualcosa terrorizza i nove alpinisti che fuggono tagliando la tenda; alcuni di loro si riparano vicino all’albero, cercando di arrampicarvici (per scappare? per controllare il campo che hanno appena abbandonato?). Il fatto che alcuni di loro fossero seminudi nonostante le temperature bassissime potrebbe essere ricollegato al fenomeno dell’undressing paradossale; comunque sia, essendo parzialmente svestiti, comprendono che stanno per morire assiderati. Così alcuni cercano di ritornare al campo, ma muoiono nel tentativo. Il secondo gruppetto, sceso più a valle, riesce a resistere un po’ di più; ma ad un certo punto succede qualcos’altro che causa le gravi ferite che risulteranno fatali.

Cosa hanno incontrato gli alpinisti? Cosa li ha terrorizzati così tanto?

Le ipotesi sono innumerevoli: in un primo tempo si sospettò che una tribù mansi li avesse attaccati per aver invaso il loro territorio – ma nessun’orma fu rinvenuta a parte quelle delle vittime. Inoltre nessuna lacerazione esterna sui corpi faceva propendere per un attacco armato, e come già detto l’entità delle ferite escluderebbe un intervento umano. Altri hanno ipotizzato che una paranoia da valanga avesse colpito il gruppo il quale, intimorito da qualche rumore simile a quello di una imminente slavina, si sarebbe precipitato a cercare riparo; ma questo non spiega le strane ferite. Ovviamente c’è chi giura di aver avvistato quella notte strane luci sorvolare la montagna… e qui la fantasia comincia a correre libera e vengono chiamati in causa gli alieni,  oppure delle fantomatiche operazioni militari russe segretissime su armi sperimentali (missilistiche o ad infrasuoni), e addirittura un “abominevole uomo delle nevi” tipico degli Urali chiamato almas. Eppure l’enigma, nonostante le decadi intercorse, resiste ad ogni tentativo di spiegazione. Come un estremo, beffardo indizio, ecco l’ultima fotografia scattata dalla macchina fotografica del gruppo.

Il luogo dei drammatici eventi è ora chiamato passo Dyatlov, in onore al leader del gruppo di sfortunati sciatori che lì persero tragicamente la vita.

Ecco la pagina di Wikipedia dedicata all’incidente del passo Dyatlov.

(Grazie, Frankie Grass!)