The elephants’ graveyard

Run_Cubbies

In The Lion King (1994), the famous Disney animated film, young lion Simba is tricked by the villain, Scar, and finds himself with his friend Nala in the unsettling elephants’ graveyard: hundreds of immense pachyderm skeletons reach the horizon. In this evocative location, the little cub will endure the ambush of three ravenous hyenas.

The setting of this action-packed scene, in fact, does not come from the screenwriters’ imagination. An elephants’ graveyard had already been shown in Trader Horn (1931), and in some Tarzan flicks, featuring the iconic Johnny Weissmuller.
And the most curious fact is that the existence of a mysterious and gigantic collective cemetery, where for thousands of years the elephants have been retiring to die, had been debated since the middle of XIX Century.

viajes-cementerio-elph-tarzan

This legendary place, described as some sort of secret sanctuary, hidden in the deepest recesses of Black Africa, is one of the most enduring myths of the golden age of explorations and big-game hunting. It was a true African Eldorado, where the courageous adventurer could find an unspeakable treasure: besides the elephants’ skeletons, the cave (or the inaccessible valley) would hold such an immense quantity of ivory that anyone finding it would have become insanely rich.

But finding a similar place, as every respectable legend demands, was no easy task. Those who saw it, either never came back from it… or were not able to locate the entrance anymore. Tales were told about searchers who found the tracks of an old and sick elephant, who had departed from the herd, and followed them for days in hope that the animal would bring them to the hidden graveyard; but they then realized they had been led in a huge circle by the deceptive elephant, and found themselves right where they started.

According to other versions, the elusive ossuary was regarded as a sacred place by indigenous people. Anyone who approached it, even accidentally, would have been attacked by the dreadful guardians of the cemetery, a pack of warriors lead by a shaman who protected the entrance to the sanctuary.

The elephants’ graveyard legend, which was mentioned even by Livingstone and circulated in Europe until the first decades of the XX Century, is indeed a legend. But where does it come from? Is it possible that this myth is somewhat grounded in reality?

First of all, there really are some places where high concentrations of elephant bones can be found, as if several animals had traveled there, to a single, precise spot to let themselves die.

The most plausible explanation can be found, surprisingly enough, in dentition. Elephants actually have only two sets of teeth: molars and incisors. Tusks are nothing more than modified incisors, slowly and incessantly growing, whose length is regulated by constant wear. On the contrary, molars are cyclically replaced: during the animal’s lifespan, reaching fifty or sixty years of age in a natural environment, new teeth grow on the back of the mandible and push forward the older ones.

jaw_of_a_deceased_loxodonta_africana_juvenile_individual_found_within_the_voyager_ziwani_safari_camp_on_the_edge_of_the_tsavo_west_national_park_near_ziwani_kenya_3_edited

An elephant can have up to a maximum of six molar cycles during its whole existence.
But if the animal lives long enough, which is to say several years after the last cycle occurred, there is no replacement and its wore-down dentition ceases to be functional. These old elephants then find it difficult to feed on shrubs and harder plants, and therefore move to areas where the presence of a water spring guarantees softer and more nutrient herbs. The weariness of old age brings them to prefer regions featuring higher vegetation density, where they need less to struggle to find food. According to some researchers, the muddy waters of a spring could bring relief to the suffering and dental decay of these aging pachyderms; the malnourished animals would then begin to drink more and more water, and this could actually lead to a worsening of their health by diluting the glucose in their blood.
Anyways, the search for water and a more suitable vegetation could draw several sick elephants towards the same spring. This hypothesis could explain the findings of bone stacks in relatively circumscribed areas.

elephant-skeleton

A second explanation for the legend, if a sadder one, could be connected to ivory commerce and smuggling. It’s not rare, still nowadays, for some “elephants’ graveyards” to be found — except they turn out to be massacre sites, where the animals were hunted and mutilated of their precious tusks by poachers. Similar findings, back in the days, could have suggested the idea that the herd had collected there on purpose, to wait for the end to come.

But the stories about a hidden cemetery could also have risen from the observation of elephants’ behavior when facing the death of a counterpart.
These animals are in fact thought to be among the most “intelligent” mammals, in that they show quite complex social relations within the group, elaborate behavioral characteristics, and often display surprising altruistic conduct even towards other species. An emblematic example is that of one domestic indian elephant, employed in following a truck which was carrying logs; at the master’s sign, the animal lifted one of the logs from the trailer and placed it in the appropriate hole, excavated earlier on. When the elephant came to a specific hole, it refused to follow the order; the master came down to investigate, and he found a dog sleeping at the bottom of the hole. Only when the dog was taken out of the hole did the elephant drive the log into it (reported by C. Holdrege in Elephantine Intelligence).

When an elephant dies — especially if it’s the matriarch — the other members of the herd remain around the carcass, standing in silence for days. They gently touch it with their trunks, as if staging an actual mourning ritual; they take turns to leave the body to find water and food, then get back to the place, always keeping guard of the body. They sometimes carry out a sort of rudimentary burial practice, hiding and covering the carcass with dry twigs and torn branches. Even when encountering the bones of an unknown deceased elephant, they can spend hours touching and scattering the remains.

Ethologists obviously debate over these behaviors: the animals could be attracted and confused by the ivory in the remains, as ivory is used as a socially fundamental communication device; according to some researches, they show sometimes the same “stupor” for birds’ remains or even simple pieces of wood. But they seem to be undoubtedly fascinated by their counterparts, wounded or dead.

Being the only animals, other than men and some primate species, who show this kind of participation in death and dying, elephants have always been associated with human emotions — particularly by those indigenous people who live in strict contact with them. There has always been an important symbolic bond between man and elephant: thus unfolds the last, and deepest level of the story.

The hidden graveyard legend, besides its undeniable charm, is also a powerful allegory of voluntary death, the path the elder takes in order to die in solitude and dignity. Releasing his community from the weight of old age, and leaving behind a courageous and strong image, he proceeds towards the sacred place where he will be in contact with his ancestors’ spirits, who are now ready to honorably welcome him as one of their own.70

Post inspired by this article.

Roadkill cuisine

La nostra serie di articoli sui tabù alimentari, The Dangerous Kitchen, è conclusa da tempo; ma torniamo a parlare di cucina. Nouvelle cuisine, potremmo dire, se non altro “nuova” e sconosciuta all’assaggio per la maggioranza di chi legge (e per chi scrive). Da non scartare a priori in tempi di crisi e di dilemmi etici sulle crudeltà verso gli animali da macello, la roadkill cuisine offre innumerevoli vantaggi per la buona forchetta. L’ingrediente di base sono infatti le carcasse degli animali accidentalmente colpiti ed uccisi sulle strade.

Certo, ad una prima occhiata l’idea di andare a caccia di animali selvatici spiaccicati, staccarli dall’asfalto, portarli in cucina, scuoiarli e metterli in pentola può sembrare un po’ distante dalle raffinatezze nostrane. Sarà perché le asettiche confezioni di carne già preparata al supermercato ci aiutano a dimenticare il “lavoro sporco” del curare e preparare l’animale. Eppure, a pensarci bene, superando la nostra ripugnanza per il corpo morto, quale differenza ci sarebbe fra un coniglio di allevamento e una lepre investita da un’auto? Si tratta pur sempre di cibo altamente vitaminico e proteico, senza grassi saturi e di sicuro privo di conservanti, coloranti, steroidi, nitriti, nitrati o altri additivi chimici alimentari. E se poi vi capitasse di trovare un cervo morto, avreste lo stesso identico bottino di una partita di caccia… meno la violenza del massacro volontario.

Bisogna però prestare particolare attenzione alla scelta dell’animale: il rischio è quello delle malattie. I due principi di base, a sentire i sostenitori di questa particolare dieta, sono: “Quanto fresco è? Quanto è spiaccicato?“. C’è evidentemente una bella differenza, per fare un esempio, fra una volpe sbalzata sul bordo della strada e morta per trauma cranico, ma il cui corpo è ancora intatto, rispetto a un’altra a cui sono passati sopra una dozzina di veicoli.

 La carne, inoltre, va cotta più del normale, proprio come si farebbe con la selvaggina, per evitare infezioni batteriche. In ogni caso, il consiglio è di evitare del tutto i ratti, se non volete ritrovarvi con la poco simpatica leptospirosi.

Mangiare animali vittime di incidenti stradali è legale, o perlomeno non regolamentato, nella maggior parte degli stati: le eccezioni riguardano normalmente specie protette, o di grossa taglia, come cervi o alci. In Alaska, ad esempio, il corpo di un caribu investito da un’auto è proprietà dello Stato, e normalmente viene macellato dai volontari sul luogo dell’incidente. La carne viene poi distribuita alle mense dei poveri. Ma dagli orsi e dalle alci in Canada, alle celeberrime zuppe di scoiattolo e gli stufati di opossum degli Stati Uniti, fino ai barbecue di canguro in Australia, diverse tradizioni culinarie “insospettabili” dimostrano che praticamente tutto è commestibile. In America, la roadkill cuisine è piuttosto diffusa, tanto da essere perfino divenuta un topos da barzelletta per ridicolizzare una certa fascia medio-bassa della popolazione del Sud (i redneck, termine spregiativo per gli “zotici” del Sud).

41AHGHSPR6L

926291_d39c_625x1000

Tra i propugnatori di questo stile di alimentazione vi sono però anche ambientalisti critici del sistema industriale di produzione della carne, veri e propri amanti degli animali, e la loro è una scelta di vita. Jonathan McGowan mangia esclusivamente piccole vittime del traffico da 30 anni: “Ho visto quanto erano sporchi gli animali nelle fattorie, e quanto erano poco salutari. Una volta andavo anche al mercato della carne, dove gli animali erano trattati in maniera grottesca dagli allevatori. Non ero contento di ciò che vedevo, per nulla“. Questo il suo motivo per passare a piccioni, gabbiani, tassi, talpe e corvi falcidiati dalle macchine.

L’ex-biologo Arthur Boyt gratta via donnole, ricci, scoiattoli e lontre dalle strade vicino alla sua dimora in Cornovaglia addirittura da 50 anni. Pur appassionato di cani (sia detto senza ironia), afferma che il gusto del labrador è squisito come l’agnello. Non sopporta che la carne vada sprecata, ma non ucciderebbe un animale per nulla al mondo.

L’attivista Fergus Drennan, impegnato in lotte per l’ambiente e contro le fattorie industrializzate, confessa invece che, nonostante apprezzi la roadkill cuisine, lui non potrebbe mai mangiare animali domestici: “una delle poche cose che tendo ad evitare sono gatti e cani. In teoria, non dovrei avere problemi a mangiarli… ma hanno sempre nomi e targhette sui loro collari, e siccome ho due gatti, è un po’ troppo per me“.

Lasciando da parte cani e gatti, ecco una tabella nutrizionale che abbiamo tradotto dalla pagina Wiki inglese dedicata alla roadkill cuisine:

Due le spontanee domande che, a questo punto, il neofita gourmet delle carogne arrotate si starà certamente ponendo. 1. Non sono un biologo: come faccio a sapere con sicurezza quale animale mi trovo di fronte? 2. Una volta identificato, come lo cucino?

Non disperi il nostro impavido sperimentatore del gusto. Masticando un po’ d’inglese, entrambi i dubbi avranno risposta. Per riconoscere gli animali spiaccicati, non c’è miglior soluzione della guida di Roger Knutson dall’esplicito titolo Flattened Fauna (“Fauna appiattita”), che descrive aspetto, abitudini e particolarità biologiche delle specie pelose più comuni, dunque a rischio investimento, sulle strade dell’America del Nord. Per quanto riguarda le modalità di cottura, nessuno invece batte Buck Peterson, vero esperto del settore e autore di numerosi ricettari che coniugano un leggero humor nero con la serietà nell’approccio (soprattutto per quanto riguarda i consigli igienico-sanitari). Anche se non avete alcuna intenzione di convertirvi a questa particolare arte culinaria, noi vi consigliamo ugualmente il suo The Original Road Kill Cookbook: se non altro, è un ottimo libro da tenere in bella vista sul bancone della cucina, quando avete ospiti a cena.

La corazza di corpi

I reduvidi sono fra i più aggressivi insetti conosciuti: attaccano altri insetti, ragni, ma anche vertebrati fra cui l’uomo. Arrivano a mangiarsi fra di loro, e in alcuni casi è stato osservato il più estremo dei cannibalismi: la madre che divora la propria prole appena nata. Per questo e altri comportamenti i reduvidi sono chiamati anche “cimici assassine”.

Questa famiglia di attaccabrighe conta 7000 specie. Una di queste è l’acanthaspis petax, che vive in Malaysia. A una prima occhiata l’acanthaspis non sembrerebbe particolare – è lungo poco meno di un centimetro, e si nutre di altri insetti. Anche la sua tecnica venatoria non è speciale in sé, l’acanthaspis immobilizza la preda (normalmente una formica) e le inietta un enzima che scioglie le carni dall’interno, in modo da poterle tranquillamente succhiare fuori.

Quello che è davvero notevole riguardo a questo piccolo insetto è l’uso che fa della sua vittima dopo averla mangiata. Una volta bevuto il “frullato” di carne, l’acanthaspis si attacca quello che rimane della preda sulla schiena per camuffarsi.

Essendo il suo corpo piuttosto largo, può arrivare a sostenere una piramide anche di una ventina di cadaveri; la robusta chitina degli esoscheletri protegge l’insetto, e nel caso di un attacco improvviso da parte di un ragno, quest’ultimo punterà dritto alla parte del corpo dal volume maggiore… la pila di scheletri, appunto, di cui l’acanthaspis si può liberare immediatamente, battendo in ritirata.

Ecco un video che ci mostra alcuni di questi insetti mentre sfoggiano orgogliosi le loro corazze di cadaveri.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l0dScmH8c5U]

Jhator

Siamo abituati a considerare la salma di un caro estinto con estremo rispetto: nonostante la convinzione che si tratti in definitiva di un involucro vuoto, le esequie occidentali si iscrivono nella tradizione cristiana della conservazione del cadavere, in attesa della resurrezione della carne. Anche esulando dall’ambito strettamente religioso, il rispetto per la salma non cambia: addirittura la cremazione, pur disfacendo il corpo, viene principalmente intesa da noi come metodo per “salvare” il corpo dalla naturale putrefazione, o per dissolvere metaforicamente l’anima del defunto nel mondo.

In Tibet, invece, le esequie tradizionali hanno assunto dei connotati decisamente distanti dalla nostra sensibilità, ma non per questo meno stimolanti o affascinanti. La cerimonia funebre del jhator, o “funerale del cielo”, si è sviluppata a causa della mancanza, alle grandi altitudini himalayane, della vegetazione necessaria alla cremazione e dell’estrema durezza del suolo che impedisce la sepoltura vera e propria. Jhator significa letteralmente “elemosina agli uccelli”, ed infatti sono proprio questi ultimi i protagonisti della cerimonia.

Dopo alcuni giorni di canti e preghiere, il corpo del defunto viene portato all’alba nel luogo sacro destinato al funerale, sul fianco di una montagna che guarda ad est.  Il punto esatto delle esequie può essere in prossimità di templi (stupa), marcato da altari oppure da semplici lastre di pietra. Qui il corpo viene liberato dal sudario, e al sorgere del sole alcuni uomini (chiamati rogyapa, “distruttori di corpi”) cominciano a tagliare la salma secondo le indicazioni di un lama, seguendo un preciso ordine di dissezione rituale.

I primi pezzi di carne, strappati dalle ossa, vengono gettati a qualche metro di distanza, per attirare gli avvoltoi. Se questi non si avvicinano, viene eseguita una danza propiziatoria, il cui canto intriso di versi e suoni gutturali serve da richiamo per gli animali. In breve tempo alcune dozzine di uccelli sono allineati in fremente attesa. Dopo aver proceduto a rimuovere gli organi interni e a tagliare il corpo in pezzi sempre più piccoli, i rogyapa, con dei grossi martelli o con delle pietre, frantumano le ossa per mischiarle alla polpa.

Ogni brandello di carne viene dato in offerta agli avvoltoi, e niente va conservato: una volta sazi, questi enormi uccelli lasciano i rimasugli ai falchi e ai corvi più piccoli, che hanno pazientemente aspettato a debita distanza. Talvolta le carni vengono mischiate alla farina, per sottolineare come questo “pasto” sia davvero un’offerta.

Questo rito funebre, che può apparire barbaro agli occhi di un occidentale, è in realtà intriso di un profondo sentimento: quello dell’impermanenza, una delle grandi verità buddiste. Siamo soltanto di passaggio, appariamo e subito svaniamo nel nulla, in un continuo cambiamento di forma; l’accettazione di questa realtà rende la salma niente più che un guscio, utile a nutrire altri esseri viventi. Così il jhator è innanzitutto un atto rituale di generosità, ma dona anche la sensazione che il morto non sia mai veramente uscito dal ciclo naturale della vita.

In poco meno di un’ora del corpo non rimane più nulla, e i parenti si allontanano dal sacro luogo per far ritorno, più a valle, alle loro gioie e alle loro difficoltà quotidiane. Forse, per ricordare chi se ne è andato, è sufficiente lanciare uno sguardo alle vette dell’Himalaya, che brillano, immense, nel sole.

Ecco la pagina di Wikipedia (in inglese) sul jhator.