Myrtle The Four-Legged Girl

Mrs. Josephine M. Bicknell died only one week before her sixtieth birthday; she was buried in Cleburne, Texas, at the beginning of May, 1928.

Once the coffin was lowered into the ground,her husband James C. Bicknell stood watching as the grave was filled with a thick layer of cement; he waited for an hour, maybe two, until the cement dried completely. Eventually James and the other relatives could head back home, relieved: nobody would be able to steal Mrs. Bicknell’s body – not the doctors, nor the other collectors who had tried to obtain it.

It is strange to think that a lifeless body could be tempting for so many people.
But the lady who was resting under the cement had been famous across the United States, many years before, under her maiden name: Josephine Myrtle Corbin, the Four-Legged Girl from Texas.

Myrtle was born in 1868 in Lincoln County, Tennessee, with a rare fetal anomaly called dipygus: her body was perfectly formed from her head down to her navel, below which it divided into two pelvises, and four lower limbs.

Her two inner legs, although capable of movement, were rudimentary, and at birth they were found laying flat on the belly. They resembled those of a parasitic twin, but in reality there was no twin: during fetal development, her pervis had split along the median axis (in each pair of legs, one was atrophic).

 Medical reports of the time stated that

between each pair of legs there is a complete, distinct set of genital organs, both external and internal, each supported by a pubic arch. Each set acts independently of the other, except at the menstrual period. There are apparently two sets of bowels, and two ani; both are perfectly independent,– diarrhoea may be present on one side, constipation on the other.

Myrtle joined Barnum Circus at the age of 13. When she appeared on stage, nothing gave away her unusual condition: apart from the particularly large hips and a clubbed right foot, Myrtle was an attractive girl and had an altogether normal figure. But when she lifted her gown, the public was left breathless.

She married James Clinton Bicknell when she was 19 years old, and the following year she went to Dr. Lewis Whaley on the account of a pain in her left side coupled with other worrying symptoms. When the doctor announced that she was pregnant in her left uterus, Myrtle reacted with surprise:

“I think you are mistaken; if it had been on my right side I would come nearer believing it”; and after further questioning he found, from the patient’s observation, that her right genitals were almost invariably used for coitus.

That first pregnancy sadly ended with an abortion, but later on Myrtle, who had retired from show business, gave birth to four children, all perfectly healthy.

Given the enormous success of her show, other circuses tried to replicate the lucky formula – but charming ladies with supernumerary legs were nowhere to be found.
With typical sideshow creativity, the problem was solved by resorting to some ruse.
The two following diagrams show the trick used to simulate a three-legged and a four-legged woman, as reported in the 1902 book The New Magic (source: Weird Historian).

If you search for Myrtle Corbin’s pictures on the net, you can stumble upon some photographs of Ashley Braistle, the most recent example of a woman with four legs.
The pictures below were taken at her wedding, in July 1994, when she married a plumber from Houston named Wayne: their love had begun after Ashley appeared in a newspaper interview, declaring that she was looking for a “easygoing and sensitive guy“.

Unfortunately on May 11, 1996, Ashley’s life ended in tragedy when she made an attempt at skiing and struck a tree.

Did you guess it?
Ashley’s touching story is actually a trick, just like the ones used by circus people at the turn of the century.
This photographic hoax comes from another bizarre “sideshow”, namely the Weekly World News, a supermarket tabloid known for publishing openly fake news with funny and inventive titles (“Mini-mermaid found in tuna sandwich!” “Hillary Clinton adopts a baby alien!”, “Abraham Lincoln was a woman!”, and so on).

The “news” of Ashley’s demise on the July 4, 1996 issue.

 

Another example of a Weekly World News cover story.

To end on a more serious note, here’s the good news: nowadays caudal duplications can, in some instances, be surgically corrected after birth (it happened for example in 1968, in 1973 and in 2014).

And luckily, pouring cement is no longer needed in order to prevent jackals from stealing an extraordinary body like the one of Josephine Myrtle Corbin Bicknell.

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 3

New miscellanea of interesting links and bizarre facts.

  • There’s a group of Italian families who decided, several years ago, to try and live on top of the trees. In 2010 journalist Antonio Gregolin visited these mysterious “hermits” — actually not as reclusive as you might think —, penning a wonderful reportage on their arboreal village (text in Italian, but lots of amazing pics).

  • An interesting long read on disgust, on the cognitive biases it entails, and on how it could have played an essential role in the rise of morals, politics and laws — basically, in shaping human societies.
  • Are you ready for a travel in music, space and time? On this website you get to choose a country and a decade from 1900 to this day, and discover what were the biggest hits back in the time. Plan your trip/playlist on a virtual taxi picking unconceivably distant stops: you might start off from the first recordings of traditional chants in Tanzania, jump to Korean disco music from the Eighties, and reach some sweet Norwegian psychedelic pop from the Sixties. Warning, may cause addiction.
  • Speaking of time, it’s a real mystery why this crowdfunding campaign for the ultimate minimalist watch didn’t succeed. It would have made a perfect accessory for philosophers, and latecomers.
  • The last issue of Illustrati has an evocative title and theme, “Circles of light”. In my contribution, I tell the esoteric underground of Northern Italy in which I grew up: The Only Chakra.
  • During the terrible flooding that recently hit Louisiana, some coffins were seen floating down the streets. A surreal sight, but not totally surprising: here is my old post about Holt Cemetery in New Orleans, where from time to time human remains emerge from the ground.

  • In the Pelican State, you can always rely on traditional charms and gris-gris to avoid bad luck — even if by now they have become a tourist attraction: here are the five best shops to buy your voodoo paraphernalia in NOLA.
  • Those who follow my work have probably heard me talking about “dark wonder“, the idea that we need to give back to wonder its original dominance on darkness. A beautiful article on the philosophy of awe (Italian only) reiterates the concept: “the original astonishment, the thauma, is not always just a moment of grace, a positive feeling: it possesses a dimension of horror and anguish, felt by anyone who approaches an unknown reality, so different as to provoke turmoil and fear“.
  • Which are the oldest mummies in the world? The pharaohs of Egypt?
    Wrong. Chinchorro mummies, found in the Atacama desert between Chile and Peru, are more ancient than the Egyptian ones. And not by a century or two: they are two thousand years older.
    (Thanks, Cristina!)

  • Some days ago Wu Ming 1 pointed me to an article appeared on The Atlantic about an imminent head transplant: actually, this is not recent news, as neurosurgeon from Turin Sergio Canavero has been a controversial figure for some years now. On Bizzarro Bazar I discussed the history of head transplants in an old article, and if I never talked about Canavero it’s because the whole story is really a bit suspect.
    Let’s recap the situation: in 2013 Canavero caused some fuss in the scientific world by declaring that by 2017 he might be able to perform a human head transplant (or, better, a body transplant). His project, named HEAVEN/Gemini (Head Anastomosis Venture with Cord Fusion), aims to overcome the difficulties in reconnecting the spinal chord by using some fusogenic “glues” such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) or chitosan to induce merging between the donor’s and the receiver’s cells. This means we would be able to provide a new, healthier body to people who are dying of any kind of illness (with the obvious exception of cerebral pathologies).
    As he was not taken seriously, Canavero gave it another try at the beginning of 2015, announcing shortly thereafter that he found a volunteer for his complex surgical procedure, thirty-year-old Russian Valery Spiridonov who is suffering from an incurable genetic disease. The scientific community, once again, labeled his theories as baseless, dangerous science fiction: it’s true that transplant technology dramatically improved during the last few years, but according to the experts we are still far from being able to attempt such an endeavour on a human being — not to mention, of course, the ethical issues.
    At the beginning of this year, Canavero announced he has made some progress: he claimed he successfully tested his procedure on mice and even on a monkey, with the support of a Chinese team, and leaked a video and some controversial photos.
    As can be easily understood, the story is far from limpid. Canavero is progressively distancing himself from the scientific community, and seems to be especially bothered by the peer-review system not allowing him (shoot!) to publish his research without it first being evaluated and examined; even the announcement of his experiments on mice and monkeys was not backed up by any published paper. Basically, Canavero has proved to be very skillful in creating a media hype (popularizing his advanced techinque on TV, in the papers and even a couple of TEDx talks with the aid of… some picturesque and oh-so-very-Italian spaghetti), and in time he was able to build for himself the character of an eccentric and slightly crazy genius, a visionary Frankenstein who might really have found a cure-all remedy — if only his dull collegues would listen to him. At the same time he appears to be uncomfortable with scientific professional ethics, and prefers to keep calling out for “private philantropists” of the world, looking for some patron who is willing to provide the 12.5 millions needed to give his cutting-edge experiment a try.
    In conclusion, looking at all this, it is hard not to think of some similar, well-known incidents. But never say never: we will wait for the next episode, and in the meantime…
  • …why not (re)watch  The Thing With Two Heads (1972), directed by exploitation genius Lee Frost?
    This trashy little gem feature the tragicomic adventures of a rich and racist surgeon — played by Ray Milland, at this point already going through a low phase in his career — who is terminally ill and therefore elaborates a complex scheme to have his head transplanted on a healthy body; but he ends waking up attached to the shoulder of an African American man from death row, determined to prove his own innocence. Car chases, cheesy gags and nonsense situations make for one of the weirdest flicks ever.

An elephant on the gallows

The billboards for Sparks World Famous Shows, which appeared in small Southern American towns a couple of days before the circus’ arrival, seem quite anomalous to anyone who has a familiarity with this kind of poster design from the beginning of the Twentieth Century.
Where one could expect to see emphatic titles and hyperbolic advertising claims, Sparks circus — in a much too unpretentious way — was defined as a “moral, entertaining and instructive” spectacle; instead of boasting unprecedented marvels, the only claim was that the show “never broke a promise” and publicized its “25 years of honest dealing with the public“.

The reason why owner Charlie Sparks limited himself to stress his show’s transparency and decency, was that he didn’t have much else to count on, in order to lure the crowd.
Despite Sparks’ excellent reputation (he was among the most respected impresarios in the business), his was ultimately a second-category circus. It consisted of a dozen cars, against the 42 cars of his main rival in the South, John Robinson’s Circus. Sparks had five elephants, Robinson had twelve. And both of them could never hope to compete with Barnum & Bailey’s number one circus, with its impressive 84-car railroad caravan.
Therefore Sparks World Famous Shows kept clear of big cities and made a living by serving those smaller towns, ignored by more famous circuses, where the residents would find his attractions worth paying for.

Although Sparks circus was “not spectacularly but slowly and surely” growing, in those years it didn’t offer much yet: some trained seals, some clowns, riders and gymnasts, the not-so-memorable “Man Who Walks on His Head“, and some living statues like the ones standing today on public squares, waiting for a coin.
The only real resource for Charlie Sparks, his pride and joy widely displayed on the banners, was Mary.

Advertides as being “3 inches taller than Jumbo” (Barnum’s famous elephant), Mary was a 5-ton indian pachyderm capable of playing different melodies by blowing horns, and of throwing a baseball as a pitcher in one of her most beloved routines. Mary represented the main source of income for Charlie Sparks, who loved her not just for economical but also for sentimental reasons: she was the only real superior element of his circus, and his excuse for dreaming of entering the history of entertainment.
And in a sense it is because of Mary if Sparks is still remembered today, even if not for the reason he might have suspected or wanted.

On September 11, 1916, Sparks pitched his Big Top in St. Paul, a mining town in Clinch River Valley, Virginia. On that very day Walter “Red” Eldridge, a janitor in a local hotel, decided that he had enough of sweeping floors, and joined the circus.
Altough Red was a former hobo, and clearly knew nothing about elephants, he was entrusted with leading the pachyderms during the parade Sparks ran through the city streets every afternoon before the show.
The next day the circus moved to Kingsport, Tennessee, where Mary paraded quietly along the main street, until the elephants were brought over to a ditch to be watered. And here the accounts begin to vary: what we know for sure is that Red hit Mary with a stick, infuriating the beast.
The rogue elephant grabbed the inexperienced handler with its trunk, and threw him in the air. When the body fell back on the ground, Mary began to trample him and eventually crushed his head under her foot. “And blood and brains and stuff just squirted all over the street“, as one witness put it.

Charlie Sparks immediately found himself in the middle of the worst nightmare.
Aside from his employee’s death on a public street — not really a “moral” and “instructive” spectacle — the real problem was that the whole tour was now in jeopardy: what town would allow an out-of-control elephant near its limits?
The crowd demanded the animal to be suppressed and Sparks unwillingly understood that if he wanted to save what was left of his enterprise, Mary had to be sacrified and, with her, his personal dreams of grandeur.
But killing an elephant is no easy task.

The first, obvious attempt was to fire five 32-20 rounds at Mary. There’s a good reason however if elephants are called pachyderms: the thick skin barrier did not let the bullets go deep in the flesh and, despite the pain, Mary didn’t fall down. (When in 1994 Tyke, a 3.6-ton elephant, killed his handler running amok on the streets of Honolulu, it took 86 shots to stop him. Tyke became a symbol for the fights against animal cruelty in circuses, also because of the heartbreaking footage of his demise.)
Someone then suggested to try and eliminate Mary by electrocution, a method used more than a decade before in the killing of Topsy in Coney Island. But there was no nearby way of producing the electricity needed to carry out the execution.
Therefore it was decided that Mary would be hung.

The only gallows that could bear such a weight was to be found in the railyards in Erwin, where there was a derrick capable of lifting railcars to place them on the tracks.
Charlie Sparks, knowing he was about to lose an animal worth $20.000, was determined to make the most out of the desperate situation. In the brief time that took for Mary to be moved from Kingsport to Erwin, he had already turned his elephant’s execution into a public event.

On September 13, on a rainy and foggy afternoon, more than 2.500 people gathered at the railyards. Children stood in the front line to witness the extraordinary endeavour.
Mary was brought to the makeshift gallows, and her foot was chained to the tracks while men struggled to pass a chain around her neck. They then tied the chain to the derric, started the winch, and the hanging began.
In theory, the weight of her body would have had to quickly break her neck. But Mary’s agony was to be far from swift and painless; in the heat of the moment, someone forgot to untie the animal’s foot, which was still bound to the rails.

When they began to lift her up — a witness recalled — I heard the bones and ligaments cracking in her foot“; the men hastily released the foot, but right then the chain around Mary’s neck broke with a metallic crack.

The elephant fell on the ground and sat there upright, unable to move because in falling she had broken her hip.

The crowd, unaware that Mary at this point was wounded and paralyzed, panicked upon seeing the “murderous” elephant free from any restraint. As everyone ran for cover, one of the roustabouts climbed on the animal’s back and applaied a heavier chain to her neck.
The derrick once more began to lift the elephant, and this time the chain held the weight.
After she was dead, Mary was left to hang for half an hour. Her huge body was then buried in a large grave which had been excavated further up the tracks.

Mary’s execution, and the photograph of her hanging, were widely reported in the press. But to search for an article where this strange story was recounted with special emotion or participation would be useless. Back then, Mary’s incident was little more than quintessential, small-town oddity piece of news.
After all, people were used to much worse. In Erwin, in those very years, a black man was burned alive on a pile of crosstiles.

Today the residents of this serene Tennessee town are understandably tired of being associated with a bizarre and sad page of the city history — a century-old one, at that.
And yet still today some passing foreigner asks the proverbial, unpleasand question.
Didn’t they hang an elephant here?

A well-researched book on Mary’s story is The Day They Hung the Elephant by Charles E. Price. On Youtube you can find a short documentary entitled Hanging Over Erwin: The Execution of Big Mary.

On the Midway

Abbiamo spesso parlato dei sideshow e dei luna-park itineranti che si spostavano di città in città attraversando l’America e l’Europa, assieme ai circhi, all’inizio del secolo scorso. Ma cosa proponevano, oltre allo zucchero filato, al tiro al bersaglio, a qualche ruota panoramica e alle meraviglie umane?
In realtà l’offerta di intrattenimenti e di spettacoli all’interno di un sideshow era estremamente diversificata, e comprendeva alcuni show che sono via via scomparsi dal repertorio delle fiere itineranti. Questo articolo scorre brevemente alcune delle attrazioni più sorprendenti dei sideshow americani.

Step right up! Fatevi sotto signore e signori, preparate il biglietto, fatelo timbrare da Hank, il Nano più alto del mondo, ed entrate sulla midway!


All’interno del luna-park, i vari stand e le attrazioni erano normalmente disposti a ferro di cavallo, lasciando un unico grande corridoio centrale in cui si aggirava liberamente il pubblico: la midway, appunto. Su questa “via di mezzo” si affacciavano i bally, le pedane da cui gli imbonitori attiravano l’attenzione con voce stentorea, ipnotica parlantina e indubbio carisma; talvolta si poteva avere una piccola anticipazione di ciò che c’era da aspettarsi, una volta entrati per un quarto di dollaro. Di fianco al signore che pubblicizzava il freakshow, ad esempio, poteva stare seduta la donna barbuta, come “assaggio” dello spettacolo vero e proprio.
A sentire l’imbonitore, ogni spettacolo era il più incredibile evento che occhio umano avesse mai veduto – per questo il termine ballyhoo rimane tutt’oggi nell’uso comune con il significato di pubblicità sensazionalistica ed ingannevole.


Aggirandosi fra gli schiamazzi, la musica di calliope e i colori della midway, si poteva essere incuriositi dalle ultime “danze elettriche”: ballerine i cui abiti si illuminavano magicamente, emanando incredibili raggi di luce… il trucco stava nel fatto che l’abito della performer era completamente bianco, e un riflettore disegnava pattern e fantasie sul suo corpo, mentre danzava. Con l’arrivo dei primissimi proiettori cinematografici, l’idea divenne sempre più elaborata e spettacolare: nel 1899 George La Rose presentò il La Rose’s Electric Fountain Show, che era descritto come

una stupefacente combinazione di Arte, Bellezza e Scienza. Lo show è l’unico al mondo equipaggiato con un grande palco girevole che si alza dall’interno di una fontana. Nel turbinare dell’acqua stanno alcune selezionate artiste che si producono in gruppi statuari, danze illuminate, danze fotografiche e riproduzioni dal vivo dei più raffinati soggetti.

Lo show contava su effetti scenici, cinematografici e si chiudeva con l’eruzione del vulcano Pelée.

L’affascinante e tenebroso esotismo delle tribù “primitive” non passava mai di moda. Ecco quindi i Musei delle Mummie (in realtà minuscoli spazi ricavati all’interno di un carrozzone) che proponevano le tsantsa, teste rimpicciolite degli indios Jivaro, e stravaganze mummificate sempre più fantasiose. Si trattava, ovviamente, di sideshow gaff, ovvero di reperti falsificati ad arte (ne abbiamo parlato in questo articolo) da modellatori e scultori piuttosto abili.

Uno dei migliori in questo campo era certamente William Nelson, proprietario della Nelson Supply House con cui vendeva ai circhi “curiosità mummificate”. Fra le finte mummie offerte a inizio secolo da Nelson, c’erano il leggendario gigante della Patagonia a due teste, King Mac-A-Dula; King Jack-a-Loo-Pa, che secondo la descrizione avrebbe avuto una testa, tre volti, tre mani, tre braccia, tre dita, tre gambe, tre piedi e tre dita dei piedi; il fantastico Poly-Moo-Zuke, creatura a sei gambe; il Grande Cavalluccio Marino, ricavato a partire da un vero teschio di cavallo, la cui coda si divideva in due lunghe pinne munite di zoccoli; mummie egiziane di vario tipo, come ad esempio Labow, il “Doppio Ragazzo Egiziano con Sorella che gli Cresce sul Petto”.

Più avanti la cartapesta verrà soppiantata dalla gomma, con cui si creeranno i finti feti deformi sotto liquido, e dalla cera: nel decennio successivo alla Seconda Guerra, famose attrazioni includevano il cervello di Hitler sotto formalina, e riproduzioni del cadavere del Führer.


Altri classici spettacoli erano le esibizioni di torture. Pubblicizzati dai banner con toni grandguignoleschi, erano in realtà delle ricostruzioni con rozzi manichini che lasciavano sempre un po’ l’amaro in bocca, rispetto alle raffinate crudeltà annunciate. Ma con il tempo anche i walk-through show ampliarono l’offerta, anche sulla scia dei vari successi del cinema noir: ecco quindi che si poteva esplorare i torbidi scenari della prostituzione, delle gambling house in cui loschi figuri giocavano d’azzardo, scene di droga ambientate nelle Chinatown delle grandi città americane, dove mangiatori d’oppio stavano accasciati sulle squallide brandine.

La curiosità per il fosco mondo della malavita stava anche alla base delle attrazioni che promettevano di mostrare straordinari reperti dalle scene del crimine: la gente pagava volentieri la moneta d’entrata per poter ammirare l’automobile in cui vennero uccisi Bonnie e Clyde, su cui erano visibili i fori di proiettile causati dallo scontro a fuoco con le forze dell’ordine. Peccato che quasi ogni sideshow avesse la sua “autentica” macchina di Bonnie e Clyde, così come circolavano decine di Cadillac che sarebbero appartenute ad Al Capone o ad altri famigerati gangster. Anzi, crivellare di colpi una macchina e tentare di venderla al circo poteva rivelarsi un buon affare, come dimostrano le inserzioni dell’epoca.

Nulla, però, fermava le folle come il frastuono delle moto che giravano a tutto gas nel motodromo.
Evoluzione di quelli progettati per le biciclette, già in circolazione dalla metà dell’800, i motodromi con pareti inclinate lasciarono il posto a loro volta ai silodrome, detti anche Wall of Death, con pareti verticali. Assistere a questi spettacoli, dal bordo del “pozzo”, era una vera e propria esperienza adrenalinica, che attaccava tutti i sensi contemporaneamente con l’odore della benzina, il rumore dei motori, le motociclette che sfrecciavano a pochi centimetri dal pubblico e gli scossoni dell’intera struttura in legno, vibrante sotto la potenza di questi temerari centauri. Con lo sviluppo della tecnologia, anche le auto da corsa avranno i loro spettacoli in autodromi verticali; e, per aggiungere un po’ di pepe al tutto, si cominceranno a inserire stunt ancora più impressionanti, come ad esempio l’inseguimento dei leoni (lion chase) che, in alcune varianti, vengono addirittura fatti salire a bordo delle auto che sfrecciano in tondo (lion race).

Ogni sideshow aveva i suoi live act con artisti eclettici: mangiaspade, giocolieri, buttafuoco, fachiri, lanciatori di coltelli, trampolieri, uomini forzuti e stuntman di grande originalità. Ma l’idea davvero affascinante, in retrospettiva, è l’evidente consapevolezza che qualsiasi cosa potesse costituire uno spettacolo, se ben pubblicizzato: dalla ricostruzione dell’Ultima Cena si Gesù, ai primi “polmoni d’acciaio” di cui si faceva un gran parlare, dai domatori di leoni alle gare di scimmie nelle loro minuscole macchinine.


Certo, il principio di Barnum — “ogni minuto nasce un nuovo allocco” — era sempre valido, e una buona parte di questi show possono essere visti oggi come ingannevoli trappole mangiasoldi, studiate appositamente per il pubblico rurale e poco istruito. Eppure si può intuire che, al di là del business, il fulcro su cui faceva leva il sideshow era la più ingenua e pura meraviglia.

Molti lo ricordano ancora: l’arrivo dei carrozzoni del circo, con la musica, le luci colorate e la promessa di visioni incredibili e magiche, per la popolazione dei piccoli villaggi era un vero e proprio evento, l’irruzione del fantastico nella quotidiana routine della fatica. E allora sì, anche se qualche dime era speso a vanvera, a fine serata si tornava a casa consci che quelle quattro mura non erano tutto: il circo regalava la sensazione di vivere in un mondo diverso. Un mondo esotico, sconosciuto, popolato da persone stravaganti e pittoresche. Un mondo in cui poteva accadere l’impossibile.

Gran parte delle immagini è tratta da A. W. Stencell, Seeing Is Believing: America’s Sideshows.

Testa di Legno

Melvin Burkhardt è stato, a suo modo, una leggenda. Ha lavorato nei principali luna park e circhi americani dagli anni ’20 fino al suo ritiro dalle scene nel 1989.

Nel mondo dei sideshow americani, lo spettacolo di Mel faceva parte dei cosiddetti working act, ossia quelle esibizioni incentrate sulle abilità dell’artista piuttosto che sulle sue deformità genetiche o acquisite. Ma quello che davvero lo distingueva da tanti altri performer specializzati in una singola prodezza, era l’incredibile ecletticità del suo talento: nella sua lunghissima carriera, Burkhardt ha ingoiato spade, lanciato coltelli, sputato fuoco, combattuto serpenti, eseguito innovativi numeri di magia, resistito allo shock della sedia elettrica.

melvin-burkhart

È stato anche la prima “Meraviglia Anatomica” della storia del circo, grazie alla sua capacità di risucchiare lo stomaco dentro la gabbia toracica, allungare il collo oltre misura, far protrudere le scapole in maniera grottesca, torcere la testa quasi a 180°, “rigirare” lo stomaco sul suo stesso asse. Mel sapeva anche sorridere con metà faccia, mentre l’altra metà si accigliava preoccupata (provate a coprire alternativamente con una mano la foto qui sotto per rendervi conto della sua incredibile abilità).

Le sue specialità erano talmente tante che, durante la Grande Depressione, Burkhardt riuscì a sostenere da solo ben 9 dei 14 numeri proposti dal circo per cui lavorava. Praticamente un one-man show, tanto che alle volte qualcuno fra il pubblico lo punzecchiava ironicamente gridandogli: “Vedremo qualcun altro, stasera, oltre a te?”
Ma il suo maggiore contributo alla storia dei circhi itineranti è senza dubbio il numero chiamato The Human Blockhead – ovvero, la “Testa di Legno Umana”. La genesi di questo stunt, come tutto quello che concerneva Burkhardt, è piuttosto eccentrica. Ad un certo punto della sua vita, Melvin si era lasciato prendere dalla velleità di diventare un pugile professionista; purtroppo però, dopo la sesta sconfitta consecutiva, si ritrovò con i denti rotti, il labbro tumefatto e il naso completamente fracassato. Finito sotto i ferri del chirurgo, Burkhardt stava contemplando la rovina della sua carriera agonistica mentre il medico, con pinze ed altri strumenti, estraeva dalle sue cavità nasali dei sanguinolenti pezzi di osso. Eppure, mentre veniva operato, ecco che piano piano si faceva strada in lui un’illuminazione: i lunghi attrezzi del medico entravano così facilmente nel naso per rimuovere i frammenti di turbinati fratturati, che forse si poteva sfruttare questa scoperta e costruirci attorno un numero!

Detto fatto: Melvin Burkhardt divenne il primo performer ad esibirsi nell’impressionante atto di piantarsi a martellate un chiodo nel naso.

Lo spettacolo dello Human Blockhead fa leva sulla concezione errata che le nostre narici salgano verso l’alto, percorrendo la cartilagine fino all’attaccatura del naso: l’anatomia ci insegna invece che la cavità nasale si apre direttamente dietro i fori del naso, in orizzontale. Un chiodo o un altro oggetto abbastanza sottile da non causare lesioni interne può essere inserito nel setto nasale senza particolari danni.

chiodo_3

Proprio come accade per i mangiatori di spade, non c’è quindi alcun trucco: si tratta in questo caso di comprendere fino a dove si può spingere il chiodo, come inclinarlo e quale forza applicare. La parte più lunga e difficile sta nell’allenarsi a controllare ed inibire il riflesso dello starnuto, che potrebbe risultare estremamente pericoloso; altri rischi includono infezioni alle fosse nasali, ai seni paranasali e alla gola, rottura dei turbinati, lacerazioni della mucosa e via dicendo (nei casi più estremi si potrebbe arrivare addirittura a danneggiare lo sfenoide). Un lungo periodo di pratica e di studio del proprio corpo è necessario per imparare tutte le mosse necessarie.

human-block-head-3

Mel Burkhardt, però, non era affatto geloso delle sue invenzioni, anzi: con generosità davvero inusuale per il cinico mondo dello show business, insegnava tutti i suoi trucchi ai giovani performer. Così, lo Human Blockhead divenne uno dei grandi classici della tradizione circense, replicato ed eseguito infinite volte nelle decadi successive.

Magic-Brian-and-Tyler-Fyre-perform-The-Human-Blockhead-pic-by-Mitchell-Klein

Anche oggi, dopo che nel 2001 Melvin Burkhardt ci ha lasciato all’età di 94 anni, innumerevoli performer e fachiri continuano a piantarsi chiodi nel naso, nella cornice degli ultimi, rari sideshow – così come nella loro moderna controparte, i talent show televisivi da “guinness dei primati”. Moltissime le varianti rispetto al vecchio e risaputo chiodo: c’è chi nel naso inserisce coltelli, trapani elettrici funzionanti, lecca-lecca, ganci da macellaio, e chi più ne ha più ne metta. Ma nessuno di questi numeri può replicare la sorniona e consumata verve del vecchio Mel Burkhardt che, a chi gli chiedeva se ci fosse un trucco o un segreto, rispondeva serafico: “Uso un naso finto”.

Il giorno in cui piansero i clown

Era una calda giornata, il 6 luglio del 1944 nella cittadina di Hartford, Connecticut. Era anche un giorno di festa per migliaia di adulti e bambini, diretti verso il tendone di uno dei circhi più grandi del mondo, il Ringling Bros. e Barnum & Bailey. Se la folla era sorridente e pronta a rimpinzarsi di popcorn e zucchero filato, sul volto di alcuni dei lavoratori del circo si leggeva invece una leggera ombra di inquietudine. Erano arrivati con il treno due giorni prima, ma a causa di un ritardo non avevano fatto in tempo ad alzare subito i tendoni per lo show: avevano dovuto perdere un giorno, e per i circensi scaramantici saltare uno spettacolo era un cattivo segno, portava sfortuna. Ma tutto sommato, il tempo e l’affluenza della gente facevano ben sperare; e nessuno poteva immaginare che quella giornata sarebbe stata teatro di uno dei maggiori disastri della storia degli Stati Uniti e ricordata come “il giorno in cui piansero i clown”.

Lo spettacolo cominciò senza intoppi. A venti minuti dall’inizio, mentre si esibivano i Great Wallendas, una famiglia di trapezisti ed equilibristi, il capo dell’orchestra Merle Evans notò che una piccola fiamma stava bruciando un pezzetto di tendone. Disse immediatamente ai suoi orchestrali di intonare Stars And Stripes Forever, il pezzo musicale che serviva da segnale d’emergenza segreto per tutti i lavoratori del circo. Il presentatore cercò di avvertire il pubblico di dirigersi, senza panico, verso l’uscita, ma il microfono smise di funzionare e nessuno lo sentì.

Nel giro di pochi minuti si scatenò l’inferno. Il tendone del circo era infatti stato impermeabilizzato, come si usava allora, con paraffina e kerosene, e il fuoco avvampò a una velocità spaventosa: la paraffina, sciogliendosi, cominciò a cadere come una pioggia infuocata sulla gente. Due delle uscite erano inoltre bloccate dai tunnel muniti di grate che venivano utilizzati per far entrare e uscire gli animali dalla scena. L’isteria s’impadronì della folla, c’era chi lanciava i bambini oltre il recinto, come fossero bambolotti, nel tentativo di salvarli; in molti saltavano giù dalle scalinate cercando di strisciare sotto il tendone, ma rimanevano schiacciati dagli altri che saltavano dopo di loro – li avrebbero trovati carbonizzati anche in strati di tre persone, le une sopra le altre. Altri riuscirono a scappare, ma rientrarono poco dopo per cercare i familiari; altri ancora non fecero altro che correre in tondo, intorno alla pista, alla ricerca dei propri cari. Dopo otto minuti di terrore, il tendone in fiamme crollò sulle centinaia di persone ancora bloccate all’interno, seppellendole sotto quintali di ferro incandescente.

Ufficialmente almeno 168 persone morirono nel disastroso incendio e oltre 700 vennero ferite: ma i numeri reali sono probabilmente molto più alti, perché secondo alcuni studiosi il calore sarebbe stato talemente elevato da incenerire completamente alcuni corpi; e, fra i feriti, molti altri furono visti aggirarsi giorni dopo in stato di shock, senza essere stati soccorsi.

Fra coloro che persero la vita nell’incendio di Hartford vi furono diversi bambini, ma la più celebre fu la misteriosa “Little Miss 1565” (così soprannominata dal numero assegnatole dall’obitorio): una bella bambina bionda di circa sei anni, il cui corpo non venne mai reclamato, e sulla cui identità si è speculato fino ad oggi. Fra biglietti anonimi lasciati sulla sua tomba (“Sarah Graham is her Name!“) e investigatori che dichiarano di aver scoperto tutta la verità sulla sua famiglia, la piccola senza nome rimane una delle immagini iconiche di quella strage.

Così come iconica è senza dubbio la fotografia che ritrae Emmett Kelly, un pagliaccio, mentre disperato porta un secchio d’acqua verso il tendone in fiamme.

Secondo alcuni il motivo dell’incendio sarebbe stata una sigaretta buttata distrattamente da qualcuno del pubblico addosso al “big top”; secondo altre teorie il fuoco sarebbe stato doloso. Ma, nonostante un piromane avesse confessato, sei anni dopo, di aver appiccato l’incendio, non vi furono mai abbastanza prove a sostegno di questa ipotesi. Fra accuse, battaglie legali per i danni, confusioni e misteri, il disastro di Hartford è un incidente che ci affascina ancora oggi, forse perché la tragedia ha colpito uno dei simboli del divertimento e dell’arte popolare. Quel giorno che doveva essere lieto e felice per molte persone divenne in pochi istanti un luogo di morte e desolazione. La magia del circo, si sa, è quella di riuscire, per il tempo d’uno spettacolo, a farci tornare bambini. E non c’è niente di peggio, per il bambino che è in noi, che vedere un pagliaccio che piange.

Ecco un sito interamente dedicato al disastro di Hartford; e la pagina Wikipedia (in inglese).

Schlitzie

Fra tutti i freaks, pochi sono stati amati come Schlitzie. Chi l’ha conosciuto lo descrive come un raggio di sole, un folletto del buonumore, un individuo meraviglioso capace di intenerire anche il cuore più granitico, e a cui era impossibile non affezionarsi.

Le sue origini sono ancora oggi ammantate di mistero. Secondo alcuni il suo vero nome sarebbe stato Simon Metz, ma non si sa con precisione quando sia nato (la data più probabile è il 10 settembre 1901), né chi fossero i suoi genitori; molto probabilmente lo vendettero a qualche sideshow già in tenera età. Schlitzie – questo il suo nome d’arte – era affetto da microcefalia, un’alterazione genetica che comporta una circonferenza cranica di molto inferiore al normale. Il cervello, così costretto, non può svilupparsi pienamente e possono insorgere diversi impedimenti cognitivi e psicomotori, a seconda della gravità. Nel mondo dello spettacolo circense, in cui fin dall’Ottocento venivano esibiti, gli individui microcefali venivano usualmente chiamati pinheads (“teste a spillo”). Nei sideshow, i pinhead erano presentati come “anelli evolutivi mancanti” (fra la scimmia e l’uomo), “meraviglie azteche”, “esseri da un altro pianeta” o anche in spettacoli chiamati più semplicemente “Che cos’è?”.

Schlitzie questi fantasiosi appellativi se li passò tutti, durante la sua sfolgorante carriera con i più grandi circhi del mondo. Spesso presentato come una donna in virtù delle ampie tuniche che gli facevano indossare (in realtà per mascherare la sua incontinenza), all’apertura del sipario lasciava tutti a bocca aperta per il suo aspetto; eppure bastavano pochi minuti perché il pubblico mettesse da parte ogni timore e si sciogliesse in fragorosi applausi.
Le folle lo adoravano, ma mai quanto i suoi colleghi. Schlitzie aveva, dicevano, il cervello di un bambino di tre o quattro anni: parlava a monosillabi, non poteva badare a se stesso, eppure forse era più intelligente di quanto si pensasse, vista la sua capacità di imitare le persone e la sua incredibile velocità di reazione. Mentre si aggirava fra le carrozze e le tende dei circhi sembrava uno spiritello sempre allegro, gioioso, che non vedeva l’ora di ballare davanti a qualcuno pur di attirare l’attenzione su di sé.

Negli anni ’30 i maggiori circhi se lo contendevano: Schlitzie si esibì per i famosi Ringling Bros., nonché per il Barnum & Bailey Circus, poi vennero il Clyde Beatty Circus, il Tom Mix Circus, i West Coast Shows… e la lista sarebbe ancora molto lunga. Anche il cinema lo corteggiò: apparve nel classico Freaks (1932) di Tod Browning, e in Island Of Lost Souls (1933) di E.C. Kenton con Charles Laughton e Bela Lugosi.
Dal 1936 Schlitzie fu legalmente affidato a George Surtees, un allevatore di scimpanzé per il Circo Tom Mix; Surtees divenne il padre amorevole e premuroso che Schlitzie non aveva mai avuto, prendendosi cura di lui fino alla sua morte. E fuproprio con la dipartita di questo “angelo custode”, avvenuta negli anni ’60, che cominciarono i veri problemi per Schlitzie: la figlia di Surtees, infatti, non se la sentì di tenerlo in casa e decise di affidarlo a una clinica.

Così Schlitzie scomparve.
Per molto tempo non si seppe più nulla del pinhead più celebre del mondo, finché un giorno il mangiatore di spade Bill Unks, che alla fine della stagione teatrale lavorava come infermiere, lo riconobbe in un reparto della clinica in cui prestava servizio. Schlitzie era tristissimo, depresso e soprattutto ammalato di solitudine. Gli mancavano i suoi amici, gli mancavano gli spettacoli, gli applausi, gli mancava il sideshow.
Bill Unks riuscì a convincere le autorità che farlo ritornare a esibirsi sarebbe stato essenziale per la sua salute.

Schlitzie rientrò con grande entusiasmo nel sideshow, e praticamente vi rimase per il resto della sua vita.
La grande famiglia dei carnies, cioè la gente del circo e degli spettacoli itineranti, lo riempì di attenzioni e affetto e infine comperò per lui un appartamento a Los Angeles dove visse i suoi ultimi anni: molti lo ricordano mentre dava da mangiare ai piccioni, si meravigliava per qualsiasi piccolo aspetto della vita, da un fiore a un minuscolo insetto, o danzava per chiunque si fermasse a parlargli.
Morì nel 1971 all’età di 71 anni, ma ancora eterno bambino; oggi la sua figura, fra le icone più riconoscibili della storia del circo, continua ad ispirare artisti di tutto il mondo.

La donna gorilla

La trasformazione a vista d’occhio di una donna in gorilla è uno dei trucchi storici che hanno avuto maggiore successo nei luna-park, nelle fiere itineranti, nei sideshow e nei circhi di tutto il mondo. Ultimamente sta un po’ passando di moda, dopo decenni di lustro e splendore, ma qualche circo (anche italiano) utilizza ancora questa attrazione per divertire e intrattenere il pubblico.

L’attrazione consiste in questo: voi (il pubblico) entrate in una piccola stanza oscura, e vedete sul palco una gabbia illuminata. All’interno della gabbia, una donna discinta. L’imbonitore sale sul palco, e comincia ad affabularvi con la sua storia. Il più delle volte vi racconterà del celebre “anello mancante”, quel primate che si troverebbe fra lo stadio di scimmia e quello umano, che Darwin non riuscì mai a individuare. Dopo avervi rassicurato della robustezza della gabbia, e avervi preparato allo show più elettrizzante dell’intero pianeta, vi annuncerà che la ragazza sta per mutare di forma sotto ai vostri occhi! Sì, proprio lei, quella bella prigioniera che scuote le sbarre della gabbia grugnendo, è l’anello mancante! Può passare indistintamente dallo stadio umano a quello di scimmia e viceversa! “Guardate i suoi denti divenire feroci fauci, signore e signori!”

Mentre, scettici, aspettate il momento clou, comincia davvero a succedere qualcosa: lentamente, come in un morphing cinematografico, alla ragazza spuntano dei peli, le braccia divengono nere e muscolose e per ultima la sua faccia assume i tratti di uno scimmione tropicale… e poco importa se capite benissimo che il gorilla è in realtà un tizio in un costume, siete colpiti e ipnotizzati dall’effetto della trasformazione, che è talmente vivida e reale… in quel momento sospeso, in quell’attimo di sorpresa, il gorilla con un colpo secco sfonda le sbarre della gabbia, e si avventa verso di voi urlando! Nelle grida di panico e nel fuggi fuggi generale (aiutato dai circensi che, con la scusa di salvarvi la pelle, vi indirizzano gesticolando verso l’uscita), senza sapere come, vi trovate fuori dall’attrazione, insicuri e un po’ frastornati da ciò che avete visto.

Cosa è successo? Si tratta in verità di un ingegnoso trucco ottico messo a punto nei lontani anni 1860 da due scienziati, Henry Dircks e John Henry Pepper (l’effetto prenderà il nome di quest’ultimo, data la sua celebrità nell’epoca vittoriana, nonostante egli avesse più volte cercato di dare il giusto credito al vero inventore, Dircks). Inizialmente studiato per il teatro, non prese mai piede sui grandi palcoscenici: fu invece “riciclato” per i luna-park e viene tutt’ora impiegato nei più grandi parchi a tema del mondo.

Il segreto sta in un pannello di vetro o uno specchio semitrasparente, camuffato e posto tra il pubblico e la scena. Il vetro è angolato (in verde nella figura) in modo da riflettere gli oggetti che vengono illuminati in una seconda camera (nascosta al pubblico, il quale vede soltanto il palco, delimitato dal quadratino rosso). Visto da una posizione più elevata, l’effetto sarebbe visibile in questo modo:

Le due camere (quella di scena e quella “segreta”) devono combaciare perfettamente nel riflesso sul vetro. Il fantasmino nascosto nella stanza di sinistra, quando è illuminato, è visibile nel riflesso come se fosse presente veramente sulla scena; se è illuminato fiocamente, appare come una presenza ectoplasmatica; e se resta al buio, rimane completamente invisibile.

Una volta preparate con cura le due camere e il vetro, il resto diviene semplice: la donna mantiene una posizione fissa in fondo alla stanza visibile, e mentre il gorilla (il fantasma, nello schema) viene gradatamente illuminato, il pubblico vedrà i suoi peli “comparire” a poco a poco, come in una dissolvenza incrociata, sul corpo della giovane fanciulla. Finché, ad un certo punto, resterà soltanto il gorilla, capace (grazie a un cambio di luci repentino e a un calcolato “sbalzo di tensione” che oscura la scena per un paio di secondi) di balzare fuori dalla sua stanza segreta e sfondare la gabbia per gettarsi sul pubblico.

L’effetto, come già detto, era stato pensato per il teatro. Gli attori avrebbero avuto la possibilità di fingere un combattimento o un dialogo con uno spettro realistico. Il vero problema erano però i soldi: sembrava una follia riadattare tutti i teatri soltanto perché Amleto avesse finalmente la possibilità di parlare con uno spettro del padre più “evanescente” del solito.

Oggi la tecnica del “fantasma di Pepper” è utilizzata invece, oltre che nei circhi, anche in molti musei scientifici e culturali, per movimentare la didattica di alcune esibizioni.

Pagina Wikipedia (in inglese) sul Pepper’s Ghost.