Rita Fanari: The Last of the Dwarfs

ROLL UP! ROLL UP! The great phenomenon of nature, the smallest woman in the world, 70 cm tall, 57 years old, weighing 5 Kg. RITA FANARI, from UXELLUS. She has been blind since the age of 14 and yet she threads yarn throug a needle, she sews, and all this in the presence of the public. She responds to any query. Every day at all hours you can see this great phenomenon.

So read the 1907 billboard announcing the debut on the scene of Rita Fanari. Unfortunately it was not a prestigious stage, but a sideshow at the Santa Reparata fair in the small town of Usellus (Oristano), at the time a very remote town in Sardinia, a community of just over a thousand souls. Rita shared her billboard – and perhaps even the stage – with a taxidermy of a two-headed lamb: we can suppose that whoever made that poster added it because he doubted that the tiny woman, alone, would be able to fascinate the gaze of passers-by… So right from the start, little Rita’s career was certainly not stellar.

Rita Fanari was born on 26 January 1850, daughter of Appolonia Pilloni and Placito Fanari. She suffered from pituitary dwarfism, and her sight abandoned her during adolescence; she lived with her parents until in 1900, when they probably died and she was adopted, at the age of fifty, by the family of Raimondo Orrù. This educated and wealthy man exhibited her in various fairs and village festivals including that of Santa Croce in Oristano. Since she had never found a husband, Rita used to appear on stage wearing the traditional dress for bagadia manna (elderly unmarried woman), and over time she gained enough notoriety to even enter vernacular expressions: when someone sang with a high-pitched  voice, people used to mock them by saying “mi paris Arrita Fanài cantendi!” (“You sound like Rita Fanari singing!”).

Rita died in 1913. Her life might seem humble, as negligible as her own stature. A blind little woman, who managed to survive thanks to the interest of a landowner who forced her to perform at village fairs: a person not worthy of note, mildly interesting only to those researching local folklore. One of the “last”, those people whose memory is fogotten by history.

Yet, on closer inspection, her story is significant for more than one reason. Not only she was the only documented case of a Sardinian woman suffering from dwarfism who performed at a sideshow; Rita Fanari was also a rather unusual case for Italy in those years. Let’s try to understand why.

Among all congenital malformations, dwarfism has always attracted particular attention over the centuries. People suffering from this growth deficiency, often considered a sign of good luck and fortune (or even divine incarnations, as apparently was the case among the Egyptians), sometimes enjoyed high favors and were in great demand in all European courts. Owning and even “collecting” dwarfs became an obsession for many rulers, from Sigismund II Augustus to Catherine de’ Medici to the Tsar Peter the Great — who in 1710 organized the scandalous “wedding of dwarfs” I mentioned in this article (Italian only).

The public exhibition of Rita Fanari should therefore not surprise us that much, especially if we think of the success that human wonders were having in traveling circuses and amusement parks around the world. A typical American freak show consisted exactly in what Fanari did: the deformed person would sit on the stage, ready to satisfy the curiosity and answer questions from the spectators (“she responds to any query“, emphasized Rita’s poster).

Yet in the early 1900s the situation in Italy was different compared to the rest of the world. Only in Italian circuses, in fact, the figure of the dwarf clown had evolved into that of the “bagonghi”.

The origin of this term is uncertain, and according to some sources it comes from the surname of a Bolognese chestnut street seller who was 70 centimeters high and who in 1890 was hired by the Circus Guillaume. However, this nickname soon became a generic name identifying a unique act in the circus world. The bagonghi was not a simple “midget clown”, but a complete artist:

The bagonghi does not merely display his deformity, he performs – leaping, juggling, jesting; and he needs, therefore, like any other actor or clown, talent, devotion and long practice of his art. But he also must be from the beginning monstrous and afflicted, which is to say, pathetic. Indeed, there is a pop mythology dear to Italian journalists which insists on seeing all bagonghi as victims of their roles.

(L. Fiedler, Freaks: Myths and Images of the Secret Self, 1978)

A few examples: the bagonghi Giuseppe Rambelli, known as Goliath, was an acrobat as well as an equestrian vaulter; Andrea Bernabè, born in Faenza in 1850, performed as an acrobat on the carpet, a magician, a juggler; Giuseppe Bignoli, born in 1892 – certainly the most famous bagonghi in history – was considered one of the best acrobatic riders tout court, so much so that many circuses were fighting for the chance to book him.

Giuseppe Bignoli (1893-1939)

After the war Francesco Medori and Mario Bolzanella, both employed in the Circo Togni, became famous; the first, a skillful stunter, died trying to tame a terrible fire in 1951; the second hit the headlines when he married Lina Traverso, who was also a little person, and above all when the news brok that a jealous circus chimpazee had scratched the bride in the face. A comic and grotesque scene, perfectly fitting with the classical imagery of the bagonghi, who

can be considered as a sort of Harlequin born between the end of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth century, and that quickly became a typical character, like those of the commedia dell’arte. The bagonghi is therefore a sort of modern masked “type” that first appeared and was developed within the Italian circus world, and then spread worldwide.

(M. Fini, Fenomeni da baraccone. Miti e avventure dei grandi circensi italiani, Italica Edizioni, 2013)

Going back to our Rita Fanari, we can understand why her career as a “great phenomenon of nature” was decidedly unusual and way too old for a time when the audience had already started to favor the show of diversity (a theatrical, choreographic performance) over its simple exhibition.

The fact that her act was more rudimentary than those performed in the rest of Italy can be undoubtedly explained with the rural context she lived in, and with her visual impairment. A handicap that, despite being advertised as a doubtful added value, actually did not allow her to show off any other skill other than to put the thread through the needle’s eye and start sewing. Not exactly a dazzling sight.
Rita was inevitably the last among the many successful dwarfs, little people like her who in those years were having a huge success under the Big Top, and who sometimes got very rich ( “I spent my whole life amassing a fortune”, Bignoli wrote in his last letter). As she was cut off from actual show business, and incapacitated by her disability, her luck was much more modest; so much so that her very existence would certainly have been forgotten, if a few years ago Dr. Raimondo Orru, the descendant and namesake of her benefactor, had not found some details of her life in the family archives.

But those very circumstances that prevented her from keeping up with the times, also made her “the last one” in a more meaningful sense. Perhaps because of the rustic agro-pastoral context, her act was very old-fashioned. In fact, hers may have been the last historical case in Italy of a person with dwarfism exhibited as a pure lusus naturae, an exotic “freak of nature”, a prodigy to parade and display.
In mainland Italy, as we said, things were already changing. Midgets and dwarfs, well before any other “different” or disabled person, had to prove their desire to overcome their condition, making a show of their skills and courage, performing exceptional stunts.
Along with this idea, and with the definitive pathologization of physical anomalies during the twentieth century, the mythological aura surrounding exceptional, uneven bodies will be lost; and a gaze of pity/admiration will become established. Today, the spectacle of disability is only accepted in these two modes — it’s either tragedy, the true motor of charity events and telethons, or the exemplum, the heroic overcoming of the disabled person’s own “limits”, with all the plethora of inspirational, motivational, life-affirming anecdotes that come with it.

It is impossible to know precisely how the villagers considered Rita at the time. Was she the object of ridicule, or wonder?
The only element available to us, that billboard from 1907, definitely shows her as an admirable creature in herself. In this sense Rita was really someone out of the past, because she presented herself in the public eye just for what she was. The last of the dwarfs of times past, who had the capacity to fascinate without having to do acrobatics: she needed nothing more than herself and her extraordinary figure, half old half child, to be at least considered worthy the price of admission.

On the ethics of our approach to disability, check out my article Freaks: Gaze and Disability.
I would like to thank Stefano Pisu, beacuse all the info on Rita Fanari in this article come from a Facebook post he wrote on the page of the Associazione culturale Julia Augusta di Usellus.
Pictures of the original billboard are shown here courtesy of Raimondo Orru; his findings on Rita’s life are included in the book Usellus. Costume popolare e matrimonio (Edizioni Grafica del Parteolla, 2000).

Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 15

  • Cogito, ergo… memento mori“: this Descartes plaster bust incorporates a skull and detachable skull cap. It’s part of the collection of anatomical plasters of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and it was sculpted in 1913 by Paul Richer, professor of artistic anatomy born in Chartres. The real skull of Descartes has a rather peculiar story, which I wrote about years ago in this post (Italian only).
  • A jarring account of a condition which you probably haven’t heard of: aphantasia is the inability of imagining and visualizing objects, situations, persons or feelings with the “mind’s eye”. The article is in Italian, but there’s also an English Wiki page.
  • 15th Century: reliquaries containing the Holy Virgin’s milk are quite common. But Saint Bernardino is not buying it, and goes into a enjoyable tirade:
    Was the Virgin Mary a dairy cow, that she left behind her milk just like beasts let themselves get milked? I myself hold this opinion, that she had no more and no less milk than what fitted inside that blessed Jesus Christ’s little mouth.

  • In 1973 three women and five men feigned hallucinations to find out if psychiatrists would realize that they were actually mentally healthy. The result: they were admitted in 12 different hospitals. This is how the pioneering Rosenhan experiment shook the foundations of psychiatric practice.
  • Can’t find a present for your grandma? Ronit Baranga‘s tea sets may well be the perfect gift.

  • David Nebreda, born in 1952, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 19. Instead of going on medication, he retired as a hermit in a two-room apartment, without much contact with the outside world, practicing sexual abstinence and fasting for long periods of time. His only weapon to fight his demons is a camera: his self-portraits undoubtedly represent some kind of mental hell — but also a slash of light at the end of this abyss; they almost look like they capture an unfolding catharsis, and despite their extreme and disturbing nature, they seem to celebrate a true victory over the flesh. Nebreda takes his own pain back, and trascends it through art. You can see some of his photographs here and here.
  • The femme fatale, dressed in glamourous clothes and diabolically lethal, is a literary and cinematographic myth: in reality, female killers succeed in becoming invisible exactly by playing on cultural assumptions and keeping a low and sober profile.
  • Speaking of the female figure in the collective unconscious, there is a sci-fi cliché which is rarely addressed: women in test tubes. Does the obsessive recurrence of this image point to the objectification of the feminine, to a certain fetishism, to an unconscious male desire to constrict, seclude and dominate women? That’s a reasonable suspicion when you browse the hundred-something examples harvested on Sci-Fi Women in Tubes. (Thanks, Mauro!)

  • I have always maintained that fungi and molds are superior beings. For instance the slimy organisms in the pictures above, called Stemonitis fusca, almost seem to defy gravity. My first article for the magazine Illustrati, years ago, was  dedicated to the incredible Cordyceps unilateralis, a parasite which is able to control the mind and body of its host. And I have recently stumbled upon a photograph that shows what happens when a Cordyceps implants itself within the body of a tarantula. Never mind Cthulhu! Mushrooms, folks! Mushrooms are the real Lords of the Universe! Plus, they taste good on a pizza!

  • The latest entry in the list of candidates for my Museum of Failure is Adelir Antônio de Carli from Brazil, also known as Padre Baloeiro (“balloon priest”). Carli wished to raise funds to build a chapel for truckers in Paranaguá; so, as a publicity stunt, on April 20, 2008, he tied a chair to 1000 helium-filled balloons and took off before journalists and a curious crowd. After reaching an altitude of 6,000 metres (19,700 ft), he disappeared in the clouds.
    A month and a half passed before the lower part of his body was found some 100 km off the coast.

  • La passionata is a French song covered by Guy Marchand which enjoyed great success in 1966. And it proves two surprising truths: 1- Latin summer hits were already a thing; 2- they caused personality disorders, as they still do today. (Thanks, Gigio!)

  • Two neuroscientists build some sort of helmet which excites the temporal lobes of the person wearing it, with the intent of studying the effects of a light magnetic stimulation on creativity.  And test subjects start seeing angels, dead relatives, and talking to God. Is this a discovery that will explain mystical exstasy, paranormal experiences, the very meaning of the sacred? Will this allow communication with an invisible reality? Neither of the two, because the truth is a bit disappointing: in all attempts to replicate the experiment, no peculiar effects were detected. But it’s still a good idea for a novel. Here’s the God helmet Wiki page.
  • California Institute of Abnormalarts is a North Hollywood sideshow-themed nightclub featuring burlesque shows, underground musical groups, freak shows and film screenings. But if you’re afraid of clowns, you might want to steer clear of the place: one if its most famous attractions is the embalmed body of Achile Chatouilleu, a clown who asked to be buried in his stage costume and makeup.
    Sure enough, he seems a bit too well-preserved for a man who allegedly died in 1912 (wouldn’t it happen to be a sideshow gaff?). Anyways, the effect is quite unsettling and grotesque…

  • I shall leave you with a picture entitled The Crossing, taken by nature photographer Ryan Peruniak. All of his works are amazing, as you can see if you head out to his official website, but I find this photograph strikingly poetic.
    Here is his recollection of that moment:
    Early April in the Rocky Mountains, the majestic peaks are still snow-covered while the lower elevations, including the lakes and rivers have melted out. I was walking along the riverbank when I saw a dark form lying on the bottom of the river. My first thought was a deer had fallen through the ice so I wandered over to investigate…and that’s when I saw the long tail. It took me a few moments to comprehend what I was looking at…a full grown cougar lying peacefully on the riverbed, the victim of thin ice.

Il giorno in cui piansero i clown

Era una calda giornata, il 6 luglio del 1944 nella cittadina di Hartford, Connecticut. Era anche un giorno di festa per migliaia di adulti e bambini, diretti verso il tendone di uno dei circhi più grandi del mondo, il Ringling Bros. e Barnum & Bailey. Se la folla era sorridente e pronta a rimpinzarsi di popcorn e zucchero filato, sul volto di alcuni dei lavoratori del circo si leggeva invece una leggera ombra di inquietudine. Erano arrivati con il treno due giorni prima, ma a causa di un ritardo non avevano fatto in tempo ad alzare subito i tendoni per lo show: avevano dovuto perdere un giorno, e per i circensi scaramantici saltare uno spettacolo era un cattivo segno, portava sfortuna. Ma tutto sommato, il tempo e l’affluenza della gente facevano ben sperare; e nessuno poteva immaginare che quella giornata sarebbe stata teatro di uno dei maggiori disastri della storia degli Stati Uniti e ricordata come “il giorno in cui piansero i clown”.

Lo spettacolo cominciò senza intoppi. A venti minuti dall’inizio, mentre si esibivano i Great Wallendas, una famiglia di trapezisti ed equilibristi, il capo dell’orchestra Merle Evans notò che una piccola fiamma stava bruciando un pezzetto di tendone. Disse immediatamente ai suoi orchestrali di intonare Stars And Stripes Forever, il pezzo musicale che serviva da segnale d’emergenza segreto per tutti i lavoratori del circo. Il presentatore cercò di avvertire il pubblico di dirigersi, senza panico, verso l’uscita, ma il microfono smise di funzionare e nessuno lo sentì.

Nel giro di pochi minuti si scatenò l’inferno. Il tendone del circo era infatti stato impermeabilizzato, come si usava allora, con paraffina e kerosene, e il fuoco avvampò a una velocità spaventosa: la paraffina, sciogliendosi, cominciò a cadere come una pioggia infuocata sulla gente. Due delle uscite erano inoltre bloccate dai tunnel muniti di grate che venivano utilizzati per far entrare e uscire gli animali dalla scena. L’isteria s’impadronì della folla, c’era chi lanciava i bambini oltre il recinto, come fossero bambolotti, nel tentativo di salvarli; in molti saltavano giù dalle scalinate cercando di strisciare sotto il tendone, ma rimanevano schiacciati dagli altri che saltavano dopo di loro – li avrebbero trovati carbonizzati anche in strati di tre persone, le une sopra le altre. Altri riuscirono a scappare, ma rientrarono poco dopo per cercare i familiari; altri ancora non fecero altro che correre in tondo, intorno alla pista, alla ricerca dei propri cari. Dopo otto minuti di terrore, il tendone in fiamme crollò sulle centinaia di persone ancora bloccate all’interno, seppellendole sotto quintali di ferro incandescente.

Ufficialmente almeno 168 persone morirono nel disastroso incendio e oltre 700 vennero ferite: ma i numeri reali sono probabilmente molto più alti, perché secondo alcuni studiosi il calore sarebbe stato talemente elevato da incenerire completamente alcuni corpi; e, fra i feriti, molti altri furono visti aggirarsi giorni dopo in stato di shock, senza essere stati soccorsi.

Fra coloro che persero la vita nell’incendio di Hartford vi furono diversi bambini, ma la più celebre fu la misteriosa “Little Miss 1565” (così soprannominata dal numero assegnatole dall’obitorio): una bella bambina bionda di circa sei anni, il cui corpo non venne mai reclamato, e sulla cui identità si è speculato fino ad oggi. Fra biglietti anonimi lasciati sulla sua tomba (“Sarah Graham is her Name!“) e investigatori che dichiarano di aver scoperto tutta la verità sulla sua famiglia, la piccola senza nome rimane una delle immagini iconiche di quella strage.

Così come iconica è senza dubbio la fotografia che ritrae Emmett Kelly, un pagliaccio, mentre disperato porta un secchio d’acqua verso il tendone in fiamme.

Secondo alcuni il motivo dell’incendio sarebbe stata una sigaretta buttata distrattamente da qualcuno del pubblico addosso al “big top”; secondo altre teorie il fuoco sarebbe stato doloso. Ma, nonostante un piromane avesse confessato, sei anni dopo, di aver appiccato l’incendio, non vi furono mai abbastanza prove a sostegno di questa ipotesi. Fra accuse, battaglie legali per i danni, confusioni e misteri, il disastro di Hartford è un incidente che ci affascina ancora oggi, forse perché la tragedia ha colpito uno dei simboli del divertimento e dell’arte popolare. Quel giorno che doveva essere lieto e felice per molte persone divenne in pochi istanti un luogo di morte e desolazione. La magia del circo, si sa, è quella di riuscire, per il tempo d’uno spettacolo, a farci tornare bambini. E non c’è niente di peggio, per il bambino che è in noi, che vedere un pagliaccio che piange.

Ecco un sito interamente dedicato al disastro di Hartford; e la pagina Wikipedia (in inglese).

The Tiger Lillies

Band di culto formata a Londra nel 1989, i Tiger Lillies sono tra i più originali e sconcertanti gruppi musicali in circolazione. Il loro stile unico è un misto di cabaret gitano, di rimandi brechtiani e di black humor, il tutto condito dall’uso di strumenti talvolta inusuali e da arrangiamenti rétro.

I loro testi, spesso controversi, esplorano l’universo oscuro dei depravati e dei perdenti, raccontando sordide storie di violenza, morte, sesso e blasfemia. Il loro mondo è una sorta di bassofondo crepuscolare e post-apocalittico in cui prostitute, freaks, ubriachi e assassini incontrano sorti orribili. Ma l’incredibile espressività facciale del cantante Martyn Jacques, il suo look da clown “andato a male” e la sua voce in falsetto (sgradevole, inquietante, eppure magnetica) contribuiscono a stemperare i toni delle liriche, calandole in una dimensione teatrale e surreale.

Così quando i Tiger Lillies ci cantano le loro fiabe macabre piene di bambini che sanguinano a morte, prostitute ubriache dalla pelle di serpente, accoppiamenti con animali e altre simili atrocità, l’umorismo nerissimo riesce comunque a distanziarci e a lasciarci turbati, sì, ma anche ghignanti.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xCGz8rc-HY]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhrGspR0yQo]

Sito ufficiale.

Buon compleanno!

Bizzarro Bazar festeggia oggi il suo primo compleanno.

Un anno fa, pubblicando il primo post, non sapevamo quale interesse potesse suscitare un blog incentrato sul meraviglioso, il macabro, il weird e il perturbante. Il bilancio però è stato positivo. Con il passare dei mesi Bizzarro Bazar si è guadagnato una folta schiera di lettori in cerca di nuove sorgenti di stupore, pronti a mettersi in discussione, a valorizzare il difforme e il deforme, e a confrontarsi con argomenti talvolta considerati tabù. Per un blog così “di nicchia”, superare le 7000 visite mensili è un bel traguardo. Soprattutto quando le prime visite ti arrivano da qualche anonimo utente che digita su Google le parole chiave “cerco belle donne amputate sopra il ginocchio”, o “fotografia necrofila con animali”. Rischi del mestiere… Ognuno è sempre stato il benvenuto qui, anche quando le sue idee cozzavano con le nostre (vedi il putiferio scatenato da questo post, e proseguito su Facebook e su numerosi altri siti e forum animalisti che hanno rebloggato l’articolo originale).

Per il nostro sollievo, abbiamo constatato che la maggior parte delle persone che arrivano su questo blog stanno cercando trattazioni di argomenti specifici, poco affrontati altrove: il post sui gemelli siamesi è il più ricercato, seguito dall’articolo sul crush fetish, la lobotomia, e l’acrotomofilia. Ma il vero segno che le nostre “esplorazioni” hanno fatto breccia nei vostri teneri cuoricini è il fatto che il primato assoluto vada alle parole “Bizzarro Bazar”, le più digitate per giungere fino a noi.

Bizzarro Bazar va di pari passo con la nostra continua ricerca quotidiana di motivi di meraviglia. Crediamo fermamente che la fantasia e lo stupore siano le principali virtù dell’uomo meritevoli di lode. Assieme all’umorismo, qualità imprescindibile.

Questo mondo è talmente strano e sorprendente che siamo certi di non rimanere mai a corto di argomenti. Un sentito ringraziamento va a quanti ci seguono costantemente, ci segnalano notizie e curiosità, e ritornano a leggerci ogni qualvolta abbiamo tempo di pubblicare un nuovo post.

Keep the world weird!