Unearthing Gorini, The Petrifier

This post originally appeared on The Order of the Good Death

Many years ago, as I had just begun to explore the history of medicine and anatomical preparations, I became utterly fascinated with the so-called “petrifiers”: 19th and early 20th century anatomists who carried out obscure chemical procedures in order to give their specimens an almost stone-like, everlasting solidity.
Their purpose was to solve two problems at once: the constant shortage of corpses to dissect, and the issue of hygiene problems (yes, back in the time dissection was a messy deal).
Each petrifier perfected his own secret formula to achieve virtually incorruptible anatomical preparations: the art of petrifaction became an exquisitely Italian specialty, a branch of anatomy that flourished due to a series of cultural, scientific and political factors.

When I first encountered the figure of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881), I made the mistake of assuming his work was very similar to that of his fellow petrifiers.
But as soon as I stepped foot inside the wonderful Gorini Collection in Lodi, near Milan, I was surprised at how few scientifically-oriented preparations it contained: most specimens were actually whole, undissected human heads, feet, hands, infants, etc. It struck me that these were not meant as medical studies: they were attempts at preserving the body forever. Was Gorini looking for a way to have the deceased transformed into a genuine statue? Why?
I needed to know more.

A biographical research is a mighty strange experience: digging into the past in search of someone’s secret is always an enterprise doomed to failure. No matter how much you read about a person’s life, their deepest desires and dreams remain forever inaccessible.
And yet, the more I examined books, papers, documents about Paolo Gorini, the more I felt I could somehow relate to this man’s quest.
Yes, he was an eccentric genius. Yes, he lived alone in his ghoulish laboratory, surrounded by “the bodies of men and beasts, human limbs and organs, heads with their hair preserved […], items made from animal substances for use as chess or draughts pieces; petrified livers and brain tissue, hardened skin and hides, nerve tissue from oxen, etc.”. And yes, he somehow enjoyed incarnating the mad scientist character, especially among his bohemian friends – writers and intellectuals who venerated him. But there was more.

It was necessary to strip away the legend from the man. So, as one of Gorini’s greatest passions was geology, I approached him as if he was a planet: progressing deeper and deeper, through the different layers of crust that make up his stratified enigma.
The outer layer was the one produced by mythmaking folklore, nourished by whispered tales, by fleeting glimpses of horrific visions and by popular rumors. “The Magician”, they called him. The man who could turn bodies into stone, who could create mountains from molten lava (as he actually did in his “experimental geology” public demonstrations).
The layer immediately beneath that unveiled the image of an “anomalous” scientist who was, however, well rooted in the Zeitgeist of his times, its spirit and its disputes, with all the vices and virtues derived therefrom.
The most intimate layer – the man himself – will perhaps always be a matter of speculation. And yet certain anecdotes are so colorful that they allowed me to get a glimpse of his fears and hopes.

Still, I didn’t know why I felt so strangely close to Gorini.

His preparations sure look grotesque and macabre from our point of view. He had access to unclaimed bodies at the morgue, and could experiment on an inconceivable number of corpses (“For most of my life I have substituted – without much discomfort – the company of the dead for the company of the living…”), and many of the faces that we can see in the Museum are those of peasants and poor people. This is the reason why so many visitors might find the Collection in Lodi quite unsettling, as opposed to a more “classic” anatomical display.
And yet, here is what looks like a macroscopic incongruity: near the end of his life, Gorini patented the first really efficient crematory. His model was so good it was implemented all over the world, from London to India. One could wonder why this man, who had devoted his entire life to making corpses eternal, suddenly sought to destroy them through fire.
Evidently, Gorini wasn’t fighting death; his crusade was against putrefaction.

When Paolo was only 12 years old, he saw his own father die in a horrific carriage accident. He later wrote: “That day was the black point of my life that marked the separation between light and darkness, the end of all joy, the beginning of an unending procession of disasters. From that day onwards I felt myself to be a stranger in this world…
The thought of his beloved father’s body, rotting inside the grave, probably haunted him ever since. “To realize what happens to the corpse once it has been closed inside its underground prison is a truly horrific thing. If we were somehow able to look down and see inside it, any other way of treating the dead would be judged as less cruel, and the practice of burial would be irreversibly condemned”.

That’s when it hit me.


This was exactly what made his work so relevant: all Gorini was really trying to do was elaborate a new way of dealing with the “scandal” of dead bodies.
He was tirelessly seeking a more suitable relationship with the remains of missing loved ones. For a time, he truly believed petrifaction could be the answer. Who would ever resort to a portrait – he thought – when a loved one could be directly immortalized for all eternity?
Gorini even suggested that his petrified heads be used to adorn the gravestones of Lodi’s cemetery – an unfortunate but candid proposal, made with the most genuine conviction and a personal sense of pietas. (Needless to say this idea was not received with much enthusiasm).

Gorini was surely eccentric and weird but, far from being a madman, he was also cherished by his fellow citizens in Lodi, on the account of his incredible kindness and generosity. He was a well-loved teacher and a passionate patriot, always worried that his inventions might be useful to the community.
Therefore, as soon as he realized that petrifaction might well have its advantages in the scientific field, but it was neither a practical nor a welcome way of dealing with the deceased, he turned to cremation.

Redefining the way we as a society interact with the departed, bringing attention to the way we treat bodies, focusing on new technologies in the death field – all these modern concerns were already at the core of his research.
He was a man of his time, but also far ahead of it. Gorini the scientist and engineer, devoted to the destiny of the dead, would paradoxically encounter more fertile conditions today than in the 20th century. It’s not hard to imagine him enthusiastically experimenting with alkaline hydrolysis or other futuristic techniques of treating human remains. And even if some of his solutions, such as his petrifaction procedures, are now inevitably dated and detached from contemporary attitudes, they do seem to have been the beginning of a still pertinent urge and of a research that continues today.

The Petrifier is the fifth volume of the Bizzarro Bazar Collection. Text (both in Italian and English) by Ivan Cenzi, photographs by Carlo Vannini.

 

The Petrifier: The Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection

 

The fifth volume in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection will come out on February 16th: The Petrifier is dedicated to the Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection in Lodi.

Published by Logos and featuring Carlo Vannini‘s wonderful photographs, the book explores the life and work of Paolo Gorini, one of the most famous “petrifiers” of human remains, and places this astounding collection in its cultural, social and political context.

I will soon write something more exhaustive on the reason why I believe Gorini is still so relevant today, and so peculiar when compared to his fellow petrifiers. For now, here’s the description from the book sheet:

Whole bodies, heads, babies, young ladies, peasants, their skin turned into stone, immune to putrescence: they are the “Gorini’s dead”, locked in a lapidary eternity that saves them from the ravenous destruction of the Conquering Worm.
They can be admired in a small museum in Lodi, where, under the XVI century vault with grotesque frescoes, a unique collection is preserved: the marvellous legacy of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881). Eccentric figure, characterised by a clashing duality, Gorini devoted himself to mathematics, volcanology, experimental geology, corpse preservation (he embalmed the prestigious bodies of Giuseppe Mazzini and Giuseppe Rovani); however, he was also involved in the design of one of the first Italian crematory ovens.
Introverted recluse in his laboratory obtained from an old deconsecrated church, but at the same time women’s lover and man of science able to establish close relationships with the literary men of his era, Gorini is depicted in the collective imagination as a figure poised between the necromant and the romantic cliché of the “crazy scientist”, both loved and feared. Because of his mysterious procedures and top-secret formulas that could “petrify” the corpses, Paolo Gorini’s life has been surrounded by an air of legend.
Thanks to the contributions of the museum curator Alberto Carli and the anthropologist Dario Piombino-Mascali, this book retraces the curious historic period during which the petrifaction process obtained a certain success, as well as the value and interest conferred to the collection in Lodi nowadays.
These preparations, in fact, are not silent witnesses: they speak about the history of the long-dated human obsession for the preserving of dead bodies, documenting a moment in which the Westerners relationship with death was beginning to change. And, ultimately, they solve Paolo Gorini’s enigma: a “wizard”, man and scientist, who, traumatised at a young age by his father’s death, spent his whole life probing the secrets of Nature and attempting to defeat the decay.

The Petrifier is available for pre-order at this link.

A Macabre Monastery

Article by guestblogger Lady Decay

This is the account of a peculiar exploration, different from any other abandonded places I had the chance to visit: this place, besides being fascinating, also had a macabre and mysterious twist.

It was November, 2016. We were venturing — my father, my sister, two friends and I — towards an ex convent, which had been abandoned many years before.
The air was icy-cold. Our objective stood next to a public, still operational structure: the cemetery.
The thorny briers were dead and not very high, so it was simple for us to cut through the vegetation towards the side of the convent that had the only access route to the building, a window.
With a certain difficulty, one by one we all managed to enter the structure thanks to a crooked tree, which stood right next to the small window and which we used as ladder.

Once we caught our breath, and shook the dust off our coats, we realized we just got lost in time. That place seemed to have frozen right in the middle of its vital cycle.

The courtyard was almost entirely engulfed in vines and vegetation, and we had to be very careful around the porch, with its tired, unstable pillars.

Two 19th-Century hearses dominated one side of the courtyard, worn out but still keeping all their magnificence: the wood was dusty and rotten, but we could still see the cloth ornaments dangling from the corners of the carriage; once purple, or dark green, they now had an indefinable color, one that perhaps dosen’t even exist.

We went up a flight of stairs and headed towards a series of empty chambers, the cells where the Friars once lived; some still have their number carved in marble beside the door.

Climbing down again, we stumbled upon a sort of “office” where we were greeted by the real masters of the house – two statues of saints who seemed to welcome and admonish us at the same time.

As we were taking some pictures, we peeked inside the drawers filled with documents and papers going back to the last years of the 18th Century, so old that we were afraid of spoiling them just by looking.

We got back out in the courtyard to enjoy a thin November sun. We were still near the cemetery, which was open to the public, so we had to move carefully and most silently, when all of a sudden we came upon a macabre find: several coffins were lying on the wet grass, some partly open and others with their lid completely off. Just one of them was still sealed.

My friends prefer to step back, but me and my sister could not resist our curiosity and started snooping around. We noted some bags next to the coffins, on which a printed warning read: ‘exhumation organic material‘.

A vague stench lingered in the air, but not too annoying: from this, and from the coffins’ antiquated style, we speculated these exhumations could not be very recent. Those caskets looked like they had been lying there for quite a long time.

And today, a year later, I wonder if they’re still abandoned in the grass, next to that magical ghost convent…

Lady Decay is a Urban Explorer: you can follow her adventures in neglected and abandoned places on her YouTube channel and on her Facebook page.

A Most Unfortunate Execution

The volume Celebrated trials of all countries, and remarkable cases of criminal jurisprudence (1835) is a collection of 88 accounts of murders and curious proceedings.
Several of these anecdotes are quite interesting, but a double hanging which took place in 1807 is particularly astonishing for the collateral effects it entailed.

On November 6, 1802, John Cole Steele, owner of a lavander water deposit, was travelling from Bedfont, on the outskirts of London, to his home on Strand. It was deep in the night, and the merchant was walking alone, as he couldn’t find a coach.
The moon had just come up when Steele was surrounded by three men who were hiding in the bushes. They were John Holloway and Owen Haggerty — two small-time crooks always in trouble with the law; with them was their accomplice Benjamin Hanfield, whom they had recruited some hours earlier at an inn.
Hanfield himself would prove to be the weak link. Four years later, under the promise of a full pardon for unrelated offences, he would vividly recount in court the scene he had witnessed that night:

We presently saw a man coming towards us, and, on approaching him, we ordered him to stop, which he immediately did. Holloway went round him, and told him to deliver. He said we should have his money,
and hoped we would not ill-use him. [Steele] put his hand in his pocket, and gave Haggerty his money. I demanded his pocket-book. He replied that he had none. Holloway insisted that he had a book, and if he
did not deliver it, he would knock him down. I then laid hold of his legs. Holloway stood at his head, and swore if he cried out he would knock out his brains. [Steele] again said, he hoped we would not ill-use him. Haggerty proceeded to search him, when [Steele] made some resistance, and struggled so much that we got across the road. He cried out severely, and as a carriage was coming up, Holloway said, “Take care, I’ll silence the b—–r,” and immediately struck him several violent blows on the head and body. [Steele] heaved a heavy groan, and stretched himself out lifeless. I felt alarmed, and said, “John, you have killed the man”. Holloway replied, that it was a lie, for he was only stunned. I said I would stay no longer, and immediately set off towards London, leaving Holloway and Haggerty with the body. I came to Hounslow, and stopped at the end of the town nearly an hour. Holloway and Haggerty then came up, and said they had done the trick, and, as a token, put the deceased’s hat into my hand. […] I told Holloway it was a cruel piece of business, and that I was sorry I had any hand in it. We all turned down a lane, and returned to London. As we came along, I asked Holloway if he had got the pocketbook. He replied it was no matter, for as I had refused to share the danger, I should not share the booty. We came to the Black Horse in Dyot-street, had half a pint of gin, and parted.

A robbery gone wrong, like many others. Holloway and Haggerty would have gotten away with it: investigations did not lead to anything for four years, until Hanfield revealed what he knew.
The two were arrested on the account of Hanfield’s testimony, and although they claimed to be innocent they were both sentenced to death: Holloway and Haggerty would hang on a Monday, February 22, 1807.
During all Sunday night, the convicts kept on shouting out they had nothing to do with the murder, their cries tearing the “awful stillness of midnight“.

On the fatal morning, the two were brought at the Newgate gallows. Another person was to be hanged with them,  Elizabeth Godfrey, guilty of stabbing her neighbor Richard Prince.
Three simultaneous executions: that was a rare spectacle, not to be missed. For this reason around 40.000 perople gathered to witness the event, covering every inch of space outside Newgate and before the Old Bailey.

Haggertywas the first to walk up, silent and resigned. The hangman, William Brunskill, covered his head with a white hood. Then came Holloway’s turn, but the man lost his cold blood, and started yelling “I am innocent, innocent, by God!“, as his face was covered with a similar cloth. Lastly a shaking Elizabeth Godfrey was brought beside the other two.
When he finished with his prayers, the priest gestured for the executioner to carry on.
Around 8.15 the trapdoors opened under the convicts’ feet. Haggerty and Holloway died on the instant, while the woman convulsively wrestled for some time before expiring. “Dying hard“, it was called at the time.

But the three hanged persons were not the only victims on that cold, deadly morning: suddenly the crowd started to move out of control like an immense tide.

The pressure of the crowd was such, that before the malefactors appeared, numbers of persons were crying out in vain to escape from it: the attempt only tended to increase the confusion. Several females of low stature, who had been so imprudent as to venture amongst the mob, were in a dismal situation: their cries were dreadful. Some who could be no longer supported by the men were suffered to fall, and were trampled to death. This was also the case with several men and boys. In all parts there were continued cries “Murder! Murder!” particularly from the female part of the spectators and children, some of whom were seen expiring without the possibility of obtaining the least assistance, every one being employed in endeavouring to preserve his own life. The most affecting scene was witnessed at Green-Arbour Lane,
nearly opposite the debtors’ door. The lamentable catastrophe which took place near this spot, was attributed to the circumstance of two pie-men attending there to dispose of their pies, and one of them having his basket overthrown, some of the mob not being aware of what had happened, and at the
same time severely pressed, fell over the basket and the man at the moment he was picking it up, together with its contents. Those who once fell were never more enabled to rise, such was the pressure of the crowd. At this fatal place, a man of the name of Herrington was thrown down, who had in his hand his younger son, a fine boy about twelve years of age. The youth was soon trampled to death; the father recovered, though much bruised, and was amongst the wounded in St. Bartholomew’s Hospital.

The following passage is especially dreadful:

A woman, who was so imprudent as to bring with her a child at the breast, was one of the number killed: whilst in the act of falling, she forced the child into the arms of the man nearest to her, requesting him, for God’s sake, to save its life; the man, finding it required all his exertion to preserve himself, threw the infant from him, but it was fortunately caught at a distance by anotner man, who finding it difficult to ensure its safety or his own, disposed of it in a similar way. The child was again caught by a person, who contrived to struggle with it to a cart, under which he deposited it until the danger was over, and the mob had dispersed.

Others managed to have a narrow escape, as reported by the 1807 Annual Register:

A young man […] fell down […], but kept his head uncovered, and forced his way over the dead bodies, which lay in a pile as high as the people, until he was enabled to creep over the heads of the crowd to a lamp-iron, from whence he got into the first floor window of Mr. Hazel, tallow-chandler, in the Old Bailey; he was much bruised, and must have suffered the fate of his companion, if he had not been possessed of great strength.

The maddened crowd left a scene of apocalyptic devastation.

After the bodies were cut down, and the gallows was removed to the Old Bailey yard, the marshals and constables cleared the streets where the catastrophe had occurred, when nearly one hundred persons, dead or in a state of insensibility, were found in the street. […] A mother was seen to carry away the body of her dead son; […] a sailor boy was killed opposite Newgate, by suffocation; in a small bag which he carried was a quantity of bread and cheese, and it is supposed he came some distance to witness the execution. […] Until four o’clock in the afternoon, most of the surrounding houses contained some person in a wounded state, who were afterwards taken away by their friends on shutters or in hackney coaches. At Bartholomew’s Hospital, after the bodies of the dead were stripped and washed, they were ranged round a ward, with sheets over them, and their clothes put as pillows under their heads; their faces were uncovered, and there was a rail along the centre of the room; the persons who were admitted to see the shocking spectacle, and identified many, went up on one side and returned on the other. Until two o’clock, the entrances to the hospital were beset with mothers weeping for their sons! wives for their husbands! and sisters for their brothers! and various individuals for their relatives and friends!

There is however one last dramatic twist in this story: in all probability, Hollow and Haggerty were really innocent after all.
Hanfield, the key witness, might have lied to have his charges condoned.

Solicitor James Harmer (the same Harmer who incidentally inspired Charles Dickens for Great Expectations), even though convinced of their culpability in the beginning, kept on investigating after the convicts death and eventually changed his mind; he even published a pamphlet on his own expenses to denounce the mistake made by the Jury. Among other things, he discovered that Hanfield had tried the same trick before, when charged with desertion in 1805: he had attempted to confess to a robbery in order to avoid military punishment.
The Court itself was aware that the real criminals had not been punished, for in 1820, 13 years after the disastrous hanging, a John Ward was accused of the murder of Steele, then acquitted for lack of evidence (see Linda Stratmann in Middlesex Murders).

In one single day, Justice had caused the death of dozens of innocent people — including the convicts.
Really one of the most unfortunate executions London had ever seen.

___________________

I wrote about capital punsihment gone wrong in the past, in this article about Jack Ketch; on the same topic you can also find this post on ‘Bloody Murders’ pamphlets from Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (both articles in Italian only, sorry!).

Il primo libro di Bizzarro Bazar!

Nel tradizionale post di capodanno, avevamo preannunciato che nel 2014 ci sarebbe stata una grossa novità… eccola infatti: Bizzarro Bazar approda finalmente nelle librerie, e non con un libro, ma con un’intera collana!

Il progetto parte dalla casa editrice Logos, e si propone di esplorare le meraviglie nascoste d’Italia attraverso una serie di volumi monografici.
“Meraviglie”: a chi segua anche saltuariamente questo blog non sarà sfuggito che l’accezione del termine che ci interessa maggiormente è quella etimologica, mirabilia, vale a dire tutte quelle cose strabilianti che destano stupore e curiosità. L’Italia, in questo senso, è un’immensa wunderkammer straripante di luoghi e collezioni incredibili. In linea con l’orientamento editoriale di Bizzarro Bazar, e con la speranza di stimolare la riflessione sul patrimonio antropologico e culturale italiano, esploreremo il lato forse meno celebrato e meno conosciuto della nostra Penisola, alla ricerca dell’incanto.

In questo viaggio saranno centrali le fotografie di Carlo Vannini, artista sul quale è bene spendere qualche parola. Fotografo d’arte fra i più rinomati, Carlo ha aderito con entusiasmo al progetto, conscio che la bellezza non risiede esclusivamente nella proporzione delle forme di stampo classico: più che impreziosirne le pagine, le sue fotografie saranno il vero punto focale dei volumi della collana. Nessuno come lui sa portare alla luce (visto che con essa egli dipinge le sue fotografie) i dettagli che al nostro occhio rimarrebbero inosservati. Così, le sue foto si propongono al lettore come una vera e propria guida alla visione.

Rosalia

Questo primo volume della collana, intitolato La veglia eterna, è dedicato alle Catacombe dei Cappuccini di Palermo. Certamente non un luogo nascosto e sconosciuto, ma un imprescindibile punto di partenza per parlare delle meraviglie “alternative” d’Italia.

Le Catacombe dei Cappuccini ospitano la più grande collezione di mummie artificiali e naturali del mondo. Il libro ripercorre la storia di questo luogo unico che da sempre ha affascinato poeti e intellettuali, analizza la sua rilevanza antropologica e tanatologica, oltre a svelare le tecniche e i processi attraverso i quali i Frati riuscivano a preservare perfettamente i corpi.

_VAN0151

_VAN0476

Dalla cartella stampa:

Il lettore viene accompagnato a scendere i gradini che conducono alle catacombe e, oltrepassato il cancello, eccole: le mummie. Riposano in piedi nelle nicchie bianche, nei loro antichi abiti, e assomigliano a una versione macabra delle vecchie foto in bianco e nero, in cui uomini con grandi baffi e donne con grandi sottane se ne stavano in posa, impalati come manichini. Tra queste spicca la piccola Rosalia, dolcemente adagiata nella sua minuscola bara: il suo volto è sereno, la pelle appare morbida e distesa, e le lunghe ciocche di capelli biondi raccolte in un fiocco giallo le donano un’incredibile sensazione di vita. Se Rosalia Lombardo è stata imbalsamata, come altri corpi presenti nelle Catacombe, la maggior parte delle salme ha invece subìto un processo di mummificazione naturale – vale a dire senza che fossero eliminati viscere e cervello oppure iniettati particolari liquidi conservanti. La mummificazione è una tradizione antichissima in Europa, che in Sicilia ha preso particolarmente piede, e le Catacombe di Palermo rimangono l’espressione più straordinaria di questa tradizione, in ragione del numero di corpi conservati al loro interno (1252 corpi e 600 bare in legno, alcune delle quali vuote, secondo un censimento del 2011). Pagina dopo pagina, il libro si offre come una guida storica e storico-artistica alla più grande collezione di mummie spontanee e artificiali al mondo.

Quello che troverete nel volume è: la storia delle Catacombe, di come siano arrivate a diventare un sito ineguagliato per il numero di mummie presenti al suo interno; la precisa descrizione dei metodi di conservazione (tanatometamorfosi) utilizzati dai Frati per preservare i corpi; vari e curiosi aneddoti sul rapporto dei Palermitani con la morte; l’influenza esercitata dalle Catacombe sulla letteratura; una disamina scrupolosa del contesto antropologico all’interno del quale è stato possibile creare un simile luogo, nonché delle sue implicazioni etiche, religiose e filosofiche.

_VAN0470

_VAN0093

_VAN0460

Il libro è frutto di mesi di lavoro intenso, e dell’entusiasmo di tutte le professionalità coinvolte nella sua realizzazione. Senza esagerare, stimiamo in particolare che le fotografie di Carlo Vannini siano assolutamente inedite, e che mai nella storia di questo straordinario cimitero qualcuno abbia realizzato degli scatti altrettanto significativi.

L’uscita del volume è programmata per la metà di ottobre: potete però prenotare la vostra copia, scontata del 15% sul prezzo di copertina, a questo indirizzo.

Ecco un booktrailer che vi saprà introdurre, meglio di mille parole, alla magia del libro.

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eyca5dF98r8]

Per prenotare il libro: Logos Edizioni.
Il sito di Carlo Vannini.

Ladri di cadaveri

Alfred_Velpeau_02

La storia della medicina e dell’anatomia non è mai stata tutta rose e fiori, come avrete certamente scoperto se avete curiosato un po’ fra i nostri post. Nei secoli scorsi era in particolare la dissezione anatomica a sollevare le più furiose polemiche (paradossalmente spesso più di ordine morale che religioso, come abbiamo spiegato in questo articolo), perché la sua pratica interferiva con un’area sociale che gli antropologi definirebbero “tabù”, ossia il culto dei morti e del cadavere.

In Gran Bretagna, fin dal 1752, era in vigore una legge che consentiva la dissezione a fini medici unicamente sui cadaveri dei criminali condannati alla pena capitale. Ma il sapere scientifico all’epoca stava crescendo in fretta per importanza e scoperte, e velocemente si creavano le basi per quella che sarebbe divenuta la moderna medicina. Quindi, soltanto cinquant’anni dopo, la “scorta” di criminali giustiziati era troppo scarsa per riuscire a soddisfare la domanda di cadaveri delle Università e delle facoltà di anatomia.

Già nel 1810 venne creata in Inghilterra una società anatomica i cui membri avevano lo scopo di sollecitare presso il governo l’urgente modifica della legge; ma nel frattempo c’era chi aveva cominciato ad arrangiarsi in altro modo.

body-snatchers

Alcuni delinquenti compresero subito che i professori avrebbero pagato piuttosto bene per un cadavere fresco su cui eseguire una dissezione durante le loro lezioni, di fronte a un sempre crescente numero di studenti; così, attratti dalla possibilità di un facile guadagno, cominciarono un macabro commercio di salme.

new-york-body-snatchers-granger
I body-snatchers (“ladri di corpi”) agivano di notte, dissotterrando morti sepolti di recente, e trasferendoli di nascosto nelle facoltà scientifiche; divennero presto una realtà diffusa soprattutto nella città di Edimburgo, dove aveva sede la più prestigiosa università di medicina, la Edinburgh Medical School. Sembra addirittura che alcuni cunicoli sotterranei collegassero i sobborghi più malfamati della Old Town con il Royal Mile, l’arteria principale dove aveva sede la scuola: in questo modo i body-snatchers, dopo aver sottratto i cadaveri dal cimitero, riuscivano a portarli indisturbati e nascosti fin sotto all’ingresso della Surgeon’s Hall.

l

tumblr_lz64e3fVIf1qhr2s0o1_500
In breve tempo la situazione sfuggì di mano, e si diffuse la paranoia nei confronti dei cosiddetti resurrection men (“resuscitatori”, un altro nome dei ladri di cadaveri). C’era chi faceva la ronda tutta la notte attorno alle tombe fresche, e chi poteva permetterselo costruiva pesanti sarcofaghi di pietra; i più poveri si accontentavano di seppellire rami e bastoni attorno alla bara, per rendere la riesumazione più complessa e lunga.

Intorno al 1816 vennero inventati i mortsafes, enormi gabbie di ferro o pietra, di forme differenti. Spesso si trattava di complicate strutture in metallo pesante con sbarre e placche, assemblate con bulloni o saldature. I mortsafes si piantavano attorno alla bara, e potevano essere aperti soltanto da due persone armate di chiavi per i lucchetti. Venivano lasciate in posizione per sei settimane; quando il cadavere era rimasto sepolto sufficientemente a lungo per non fare più gola, venivano rimosse e riutilizzate.

1812707_f9da2e10

DSCF5009

footer-450

mortsafes_in_cluny_kirkyard_-_geograph-org-uk_-_174646
Ci si spinse oltre: la pistola cimiteriale veniva caricata e montata nei pressi di una tomba fresca. Il meccanismo le permetteva di girare su se stessa liberamente, e agli anelli venivano attaccati gli estremi di tre corde che venivano fatte passare attorno al luogo dell’inumazione; se un ladro, avvicinandosi nel buio, avesse inavvertitamente urtato una delle corde, la pistola si sarebbe girata nella sua direzione, facendo fuoco.

tumblr_mi8dhtNMb51rnseozo1_1280
Questo tipo di mercato clandestino si stava facendo davvero pericoloso. Alcuni ladri di cadaveri mandavano, durante il giorno, delle donne vestite a lutto, spesso con bambini in braccio, a controllare se fossero state installate pistole o altre difese nei pressi delle tombe; i guardiani del cimitero, a loro volta, avevano imparato ad aspettare l’arrivo del buio per montare questo tipo di armi. Insomma, in retrospettiva, non stupisce che prima o poi a qualcuno venisse l’idea di “saltare” il passaggio più problematico, quello del cimitero appunto, e di procurarsi i cadaveri in modo più diretto.

burke-and-hare
Ad arrivarci per primi furono William Burke e William Hare che, con la complicità delle loro compagne, uccisero in meno di due anni 16 persone, rivendendo i loro corpi all’Università. Vennero scoperti e, una volta finito il processo nel 1829, Hare fu rilasciato, ma Burke finì impiccato; con esemplare contrappasso, il suo corpo venne dissezionato pubblicamente e ancora oggi potete ammirare presso il Museo del Surgeon’s Hall di Edimburgo il suo scheletro, la maschera mortuaria, e un libro rilegato con la sua pelle.

burke

724px-William_Burke's_death_mask_and_pocket_book,_Surgeons'_Hall_Museum,_Edinburgh
Lo scalpore suscitato da questa vicenda, e il disgusto pubblico per il traffico di cadaveri, ebbero un impatto fondamentale per la promulgazione, nel 1832, dell’Anatomy Act; una legge che diede più libertà ai dottori e agli insegnanti di anatomia, permettendo loro di utilizzare per le dissezioni didattiche anche i corpi non reclamati, e incentivando la donazione spontanea con determinate forme di retribuzione (a chi decideva di “prestare” le spoglie di un parente stretto sarebbero state pagate le spese del funerale).

L’Anatomy Act si rivelò efficace nel porre fine al fenomeno dei body-snatchers, e la pratica del traffico di cadaveri per studio medico scomparì quasi istantaneamente.

The-Resurrectionists

L’incidente del Passo Dyatlov

L’alpinismo porta con sé dei rischi, ma anche tutta la bellezza
che si nasconde nell’avventura dell’affrontare l’impossibile.
(Reinhold Messner)

Siamo riluttanti, qui su Bizzarro Bazar, ad affrontare tematiche “paranormali” o misteriose; il senso di meraviglia che possono provocare ci sembra sempre un po’ troppo facile, risaputo e sensazionalistico. Per questo di solito lasciamo questi argomenti ad alcune trasmissioni televisive notoriamente trash, dalle quali qualsiasi rigore scientifico è bandito per contratto.

Quello che stiamo per raccontarvi è però un episodio realmente accaduto, e ben documentato. È una storia inquietante, e nonostante le innumerevoli ipotesi che sono state avanzate, gli strani eventi che avvennero più di 50 anni fa su uno sperduto crinale di montagna nel centro della Russia rimangono a tutt’oggi senza spiegazione.

Il 25 Gennaio 1959 dieci sciatori partirono dalla cittadina di Sverdlovsk, negli Urali orientali, per un’escursione sulle cime più a nord: in particolare erano diretti alla montagna chiamata Otorten.

Per il gruppo, capitanato dall’escursionista ventitreenne Igor Dyatlov, quella “gita” doveva essere un severo allenamento per le future spedizioni nelle regioni artiche, ancora più estreme e difficili: tutti e dieci erano alpinisti e sciatori esperti, e il fatto che in quella stagione il percorso scelto fosse particolarmente insidioso non li spaventava.

Arrivati in treno a Ivdel, si diressero con un furgone a Vizhai, l’ultimo avamposto abitato. Da lì si misero in marcia il 27 gennaio diretti alla montagna. Il giorno dopo, però, uno dei membri si ammalò e fu costretto a tornare indietro: il suo nome era Yuri Yudin… l’unico sopravvissuto.

Gli altri nove proseguirono, e il 31 gennaio arrivarono ad un passo sul versante orientale della montagna chiamata Kholat Syakhl, che nel dialetto degli indigeni mansi significa “montagna dei morti”, una vetta simbolica per quel popolo e centro di molte leggende (cosa che in seguito contribuirà alle più fantasiose speculazioni). Il giorno successivo decisero di tentare la scalata, ma una tempesta di neve ridusse la visibilità e fece loro perdere l’orientamento: invece di proseguire verso il passo e arrivare dall’altra parte del costone, il gruppo deviò e si ritrovò a inerpicarsi proprio verso la cima della montagna. Una volta accortisi dell’errore, i nove alpinisti decisero di piantare le tende lì dov’erano, e attendere il giorno successivo che avrebbe forse portato migliori condizioni meteorologiche.

Tutto questo lo sappiamo grazie ai diari e alle macchine fotografiche ritrovate al campo, che ci raccontano la spedizione fino questo fatidico giorno e ci mostrano le ultime foto del gruppo allegro e spensierato. Ma cosa successe quella notte è impossibile comprenderlo. Più tardi Yudin, salvatosi paradossalmente grazie alle sue condizioni di salute precarie, dirà: “se avessi la possibilità di chiedere a Dio una sola domanda, sarebbe ‘che cosa è successo davvero ai miei amici quella notte?'”.

I nove, infatti, non fecero più ritorno e dopo un periodo di attesa (questo tipo di spedizione raramente si conclude nella data prevista, per cui un periodo di tolleranza viene di norma rispettato) i familiari allertarono le autorità, e polizia ed esercito incominciarono le ricerche; il 26 febbraio, in seguito all’avvistamento aereo del campo, i soccorsi ritrovarono la tenda, gravemente danneggiata.

Risultò subito chiaro che qualcosa di insolito doveva essere accaduto: la tenda era stata tagliata dall’interno, e le orme circostanti facevano supporre che i nove fossero fuggiti in fretta e furia dal loro riparo, per salvarsi da qualcosa che stava già nella tenda insieme a loro, qualcosa di talmente pericoloso che non ci fu nemmeno il tempo di sciogliere i nodi e uscire dall’ingresso.


Seguendo le tracce, i ricercatori fanno la seconda strana scoperta: poco distante, a meno di un chilometro di distanza, vengono trovati i primi due corpi, sotto un vecchio pino al limitare di un bosco. I rimasugli di un fuoco indicano che hanno tentato di riscaldarsi, ma non è questo il fatto sconcertante: i due cadaveri sono scalzi, e indossano soltanto la biancheria intima. Cosa li ha spinti ad allontanarsi seminudi nella tormenta, a una temperatura di -30°C? Non è tutto: i rami del pino sono spezzati fino a un’altezza di quattro metri e mezzo, e brandelli di carne vengono trovati nella corteccia. Da cosa cercavano di scappare i due uomini, arrampicandosi sull’albero? Se scappavano da un animale aggressivo perché i loro corpi sono stati lasciati intatti dalla fiera?

A diverse distanze, fra il campo e il pino, vengono trovati altri tre corpi: le loro posizioni indicano che stavano tentando di ritornare al campo. Uno in particolare tiene ancora in mano un ramo, e con l’altro braccio sembra proteggersi il capo.

All’inizio i medici che esaminarono i cinque corpi conclusero che la causa della morte fosse il freddo: non c’erano segni di violenza, e il fatto che non fossero vestiti significava che l’ipotermia era sopravvenuta in tempi piuttosto brevi. Uno dei corpi mostrava una fessura nel cranio, che non venne però ritenuta fatale.

Ma due mesi dopo, a maggio, vennero scoperti gli ultimi quattro corpi sepolti nel ghiaccio all’interno del bosco, e di colpo il quadro di insieme cambiò del tutto. Questi nuovi cadaveri, a differenza dei primi cinque, erano completamente vestiti. Uno di essi aveva il cranio sfondato, e altri due mostravano fratture importanti al torace. Secondo il medico che effettuò le autopsie, la forza necessaria per ridurre cosÏ i corpi doveva essere eccezionale: aveva visto fratture simili soltanto negli incidenti stradali. Escluse che le ferite potessero essere state causate da un essere umano.

La cosa bizzarra era che i corpi non presentavano ferite esteriori, né ematomi o segni di alcun genere; impossibile comprendere che cosa avesse sfondato le costole verso l’interno. Una delle ragazze morte aveva la testa rovesciata all’indietro: esaminandola, i medici si accorsero che la sua lingua era stata strappata alla radice (anche se non riuscirono a comprendere se la ferita fosse stata causata post-mortem oppure mentre la povera donna era ancora in vita). Notarono anche che alcuni degli alpinisti avevano addosso vestiti scambiati o rubati ai loro compagni: come se per coprirsi dal freddo avessero spogliato i morti. Alcuni degli indumenti e degli oggetti trovati addosso ai corpi pare emettessero radiazioni sopra la media.

L’unica descrizione possibile degli eventi è la seguente: a notte fonda, qualcosa terrorizza i nove alpinisti che fuggono tagliando la tenda; alcuni di loro si riparano vicino all’albero, cercando di arrampicarvici (per scappare? per controllare il campo che hanno appena abbandonato?). Il fatto che alcuni di loro fossero seminudi nonostante le temperature bassissime potrebbe essere ricollegato al fenomeno dell’undressing paradossale; comunque sia, essendo parzialmente svestiti, comprendono che stanno per morire assiderati. Così alcuni cercano di ritornare al campo, ma muoiono nel tentativo. Il secondo gruppetto, sceso più a valle, riesce a resistere un po’ di più; ma ad un certo punto succede qualcos’altro che causa le gravi ferite che risulteranno fatali.

Cosa hanno incontrato gli alpinisti? Cosa li ha terrorizzati così tanto?

Le ipotesi sono innumerevoli: in un primo tempo si sospettò che una tribù mansi li avesse attaccati per aver invaso il loro territorio – ma nessun’orma fu rinvenuta a parte quelle delle vittime. Inoltre nessuna lacerazione esterna sui corpi faceva propendere per un attacco armato, e come già detto l’entità delle ferite escluderebbe un intervento umano. Altri hanno ipotizzato che una paranoia da valanga avesse colpito il gruppo il quale, intimorito da qualche rumore simile a quello di una imminente slavina, si sarebbe precipitato a cercare riparo; ma questo non spiega le strane ferite. Ovviamente c’è chi giura di aver avvistato quella notte strane luci sorvolare la montagna… e qui la fantasia comincia a correre libera e vengono chiamati in causa gli alieni,  oppure delle fantomatiche operazioni militari russe segretissime su armi sperimentali (missilistiche o ad infrasuoni), e addirittura un “abominevole uomo delle nevi” tipico degli Urali chiamato almas. Eppure l’enigma, nonostante le decadi intercorse, resiste ad ogni tentativo di spiegazione. Come un estremo, beffardo indizio, ecco l’ultima fotografia scattata dalla macchina fotografica del gruppo.

Il luogo dei drammatici eventi è ora chiamato passo Dyatlov, in onore al leader del gruppo di sfortunati sciatori che lì persero tragicamente la vita.

Ecco la pagina di Wikipedia dedicata all’incidente del passo Dyatlov.

(Grazie, Frankie Grass!)

La Chiesa dei Morti

La Chiesa dei Morti ad Urbania, nelle Marche, ospita 18 corpi mummificati, di cui 15 sono mummie naturali. I loro corpi, cioè, si sono conservati grazie ad alcune particolarità ambientali, e non a causa di procedimenti artificiali di preservazione.

Sembra che la ragione di questa perfetta mummificazione sia da imputare a una particolare muffa (Hipha bombicina pers): i corpi essiccati, grazie anche alle proprietà geologiche del suolo, si sarebbero ricoperti interamente di questa muffa che avrebbe impedito l’accesso dell’aria ai tessuti, e di conseguenza la putrefazione. I cadaveri, oltre alla struttura scheletrica, conservano la pelle, gli organi interni e in alcuni casi anche i capelli e gli organi genitali.

Dalla pagina del sito ufficiale del Comune dedicata alle mummie (che contiene anche informazioni e orari):

“Ciascuno dei 18 personaggi nasconde vicende e storie sorprendenti.
Al centro del gruppo il priore della Confraternita Vincenzo Piccini, la moglie Maddalena e il figlio (che furono mummificati in seguito, con procedimenti chimici e non naturali). Quindi altri corpi, sormontati da cartigli con frasi bibliche che invitano a meditare sulla caducità della vita.
Tra le mummie più antiche quelle del fornaio detto “Lunano” e della donna morta di parto.
Tra i 18 corpi c’è anche quello del giovane accoltellato in una veglia danzante, con lo squarcio della lama; di questo personaggio viene mostrato il cuore essiccato e trafitto dal pugnale; quindi è esposta la mummia dell’impiccato.
Fra tutte, la storia più drammatica, è certamente quella dell’uomo che, si racconta, fu sepolto vivo in stato di morte apparente e si risvegliò nella tomba.”

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-2UkJzBE9qI]

(Grazie, Giuseppe!)

La mummia più bella del mondo

All’interno delle suggestive Catacombe dei Cappuccini a Palermo, rinomate in tutto il mondo, sono conservate circa 8.000 salme mummificate. Fin dalla fine del Cinquecento, infatti, il convento cominciò ad imbalsamare ed esporre i cadaveri (principalmente provenienti da ceti abbienti, che potevano permettersi i costi di questa particolare sepoltura).

Forse queste immagini vi ricorderanno la Cripta dei Cappuccini a Roma, di cui abbiamo già parlato in un nostro articolo. La finalità filosofica di queste macabre esibizioni di cadaveri è in effetti la medesima: ricordare ai visitatori la transitorietà della vita, la decadenza della carne e l’effimero passaggio di ricchezze e onori. In una frase, memento mori – ricorda che morirai.

Le prime, antiche procedure prevedevano la “scolatura” delle salme, che venivano private degli organi interni e appese sopra a speciali vasche per un anno intero, in modo che perdessero ogni liquido e umore, e rinsecchissero. In seguito venivano lavate e cosparse con diversi olii essenziali e aceto, poi impagliate, rivestite ed esposte.

Ma fra le tante mummie contenute nelle Catacombe (così tante che nessuno le ha mai contate con precisione), ce n’è una che non cessa di stupire e commuovere chiunque si rechi in visita nel famoso santuario. Nella Cappella di Santa Rosalia, in fondo al primo corridoio, riposa “la mummia più bella del mondo”, quella di Rosalia Lombardo, una bambina di due anni morta nel 1920.

La piccola, morta per una broncopolmonite, dopo tutti questi anni sembra ancora che dorma, dolcemente adagiata nella sua minuscola bara. Il suo volto è sereno, la pelle appare morbida e distesa, e le sue lunghe ciocche di capelli biondi raccolte in un fiocco giallo le donano un’incredibile sensazione di vita. Com’è possibile che sia ancora così perfettamente conservata?

Il segreto della sua imbalsamazione è rimasto per quasi cento anni irrisolto, fino a quando nel 2009 un paleopatologo messinese, Dario Piombino Mascali, ha concluso una lunga e complessa ricerca per svelare il mistero. La minuziosa preparazione della salma di Rosalia è stata attribuita all’imbalsamatore palermitano Alfredo Salafia, che alla fine dell’Ottocento aveva messo a punto una sua procedura di conservazione dei tessuti mediante iniezione di composti chimici segretissimi. Salafia aveva restaurato la salma di Francesco Crispi (ormai in precarie condizioni), meritandosi il plauso della stampa e delle autorità ecclesiastiche; aveva perfino portato le sue ricerche in America, dove aveva dato dimostrazioni del suo metodo presso l’Eclectic Medical College di New York , riscuotendo un clamoroso successo.

Fino a pochissimi anni fa si pensava che Salafia avesse portato il segreto del suo portentoso processo di imbalsamazione nella tomba. Il suo lavoro sulla mummia di Rosalia Lombardo è tanto più sorprendente se pensiamo che alcune sofisticate radiografie hanno mostrato che anche gli organi interni, in particolare cervello, fegato e polmoni, sono rimasti perfettamente conservati. Piombino, nel suo studio delle carte di Salafia, ha finalmente scoperto la tanto ricercata formula:  si tratta di una sola iniezione intravascolare di formalina, glicerina, sali di zinco, alcool e acido salicilico, a cui Salafia spesso aggiungeva un trattamento di paraffina disciolta in etere per mantenere un aspetto vivo e rotondeggiante del volto. Anche Rosalia, infatti, ha il viso paffuto e l’epidermide apparentemente morbida come se non fosse trascorso un solo giorno dalla sua morte.

Salafia era già celebre quando nel 1920 effettuò l’imbalsamazione della piccola Rosalia e, come favore alla famiglia Lombardo, grazie alla sua influenza riuscì a far seppellire la bambina nelle Catacombe quando non era più permesso. Così ancora oggi possiamo ammirare Rosalia Lombardo, abbandonata al sonno che la culla da quasi un secolo: la “Bella Addormentata”, come è stata chiamata, è sicuramente una delle mummie più importanti e famose del ventesimo secolo.

E l’imbalsamatore? Dopo tanti anni passati a combattere i segni del disfacimento e della morte, senza ottenere mai una laurea in medicina, Alfredo Salafia si spense infine nel 1933. Nel 2000, allo spurgo della tomba, i familiari non vennero avvisati. Così, come ultima beffa, nessuno sa più dove siano finiti gli ultimi resti di quell’uomo straordinario che aveva dedicato la sua vita a preservare i corpi per l’eternità.

Jenny Saville

Diamo il benvenuto alla nostra nuova guestblogger, Marialuisa, che ha curato il seguente articolo.

La deformità, la carne, il sangue, sono tutti elementi che ci spingono in qualche modo a entrare in contatto con il lato puramente fisico del nostro essere.

Abituati a crearci un’immagine di noi che spesso dipende da elementi astratti e artificiosi quali status sociale, moda, potere, spesso dimentichiamo che siamo corpi di ossa e sangue. Ecco allora che la deformità – di una ferita, della putrefazione, della malattia – entra nei nostri occhi a ricordarci cosa siamo, quanto siamo fragili e in fondo semplici, spogliati dei nostri trucchi.

Jenny Saville, pittrice inglese nata nel 1970, estrapola con i suoi quadri il fascino cruento della deformità, espone corpi oscenamente grassi, feriti, tumefatti e ci lascia entrare nelle vite di questi personaggi bidimensionali. Ci permette di vederli davvero umani in quanto imperfetti; e non possiamo fare a meno di continuare a fissarli perché queste ferite, questi cumuli di adipe, questi sessi in mostra che non rispecchiano il viso di chi li possiede, sono qualcosa di nuovo, di reale e così vivo da essere più bello delle immagini, sterili e patinate, che quotidianamente definiamo “perfette”. L’artista, interessata a quella che chiama “patologia della pittura”, dipinge quadri enormi, le cui dimensioni permettono quasi di sentire la porosità della pelle, di perdersi fra le pieghe e i tagli di questi corpi violati. I nostri occhi vengono indirizzati, dalla composizione dell’immagine e dal sapiente uso dei colori, attraverso un preciso percorso dello sguardo.

Così, Jenny Saville ci rende partecipi di qualcosa che è successo, di un atto. Ci porta a immaginare ciò che è realmente osceno (e che appunto rimane fuori scena): una vita passata a ingozzarsi per sconfiggere la tristezza, o il pugno che si è abbattuto sul viso di un ragazzino, le angosce di chi si sente prigioniero di un corpo sbagliato. La violenza, autoinferta o subìta, è il tema primario – i corpi sono i veri protagonisti, a ricordarci che in fondo è questo che siamo.

Ecco il profilo dell’artista sul sito (in inglese) della Gagosian Gallery di New York. Sempre in inglese, ma più completa della versione italiana, la pagina di Wikipedia dedicata all’artista.