Wunderkammer Reborn – Part II

(Second and last part – you can find the first one here.)

In the Nineteenth Century, wunderkammern disappeared.
The collections ended up disassembled, sold to private citizens or integrated in the newly born modern museums. Scientists, whose discipline was already defined, lost interest for the ancient kind of baroque wonder, perhaps deemed child-like in respect to the more serious postitivism.
This type of collecting continued in sporadic and marginal ways during the first decades of the Twetieth Century. Some rare antique dealer, especially in Belgium, the Netherlands or Paris, still sold some occasional mirabilia, but the golden age of the trade was long gone.
Of the few collectors of this first half of the century the most famous is André Breton, whose cabinet of curiosities is now on permanent exhibit at the Centre Pompidou.

The interest of wunderkammern began to reawaken during the Eighties from two distinct fronts: academics and artists.
On one hand, museology scholars began to recognize the role of wunderkammern as precursors of today’s museal collections; on the other, some artists fell in love with the concept of the chamber of wonders and started using it in their work as a metaphor of Man’s relationship with objects.
But the real upswing came with the internet. The neo-wunderkammer “movement” developed via the web, which opened new possibilities not only for sharing the knowledge but also to revitalize the commerce of curiosities.

Let’s take a look, as we did for the classical collections, to some conceptual elements of neo-wunderkammern.

A Democratic Wunderkammer

The first macroscopic difference with the past is that collecting curiosities is no more an exclusive of wealthy billionaires. Sure, a very-high-profile market exists, one that the majority of enthusiasts will never access; but the good news is that today, anybody who can afford an internet conection already has the means to begin a little collection. Thanks to the web, even a teenager can create his/her own shelf of wonders. All that’s needed is good will and a little patience to comb through the many natural history collectibles websites or online auctions for some real bargain.

There are now children’s books, school activities and specific courses encouraging kids to start this form of exploration of natural wonders.

The result of all this is a more democratic wunderkammer, within the reach of almost any wallet.

Reinventing Exotica

We talked about the classic category of exotica, those objects that arrived from distant colonies and from mysterious cultures.
But today, what is really exotic – etymologically, “coming from the outside, from far away”? After all we live in a world where distances don’t matter any more, and we can travel without even moving: in a bunch of seconds and a few clicks, we can virtually explore any place, from a mule track on the Andes to the jungles of Borneo.

This is a fundamental issue for the collectors, because globalization runs the risk of annihilating an important part of the very concept of wonder. Their strategies, conscious or not, are numerous.
Some collectors have turned their eyes towards the only real “external space” that is left — the cosmos; they started looking for memorabilia from the heroic times of the Space Race. Spacesuits, gear and instruments from various space missions, and even fragments of the Moon.

Others push in the opposite direction, towards the most distant past; consequently the demand for dinosaur fossils is in constant growth.

But there are other kinds of new exotica that are closer to us – indeed, they pertain directly to our own society.
Internal exoticism: not really an oxymoron, if we consider that anthropologists have long turned the instruments of ethnology towards the modern Western worold (take for instance Marc Augé). To seek what is exotic within our own cultre is to investigate liminal zones, fringe realities of our time or of the recent past.

Thus we find a recent fascination for some “taboo” areas, related for example to crime (murder weapons, investigative items, serial killer memorabilia) or death (funerary objecs and Victorian mourning apparel); the medicalia sub-category of quack remedies, as for example electric shock terapies or radioactive pharamecutical products.

Jessika M. collection – photo Brian Powell, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Funerary collectibles.

Violet wand kit; its low-voltage electric shock was marketed as the cure for everything.

Even curiosa, vintage or ancient erotic objects, are an example of exotica coming from a recent past which is now transfigured.

A Dialogue Between The Objects

Building a wunderkammer today is an eminently artistic endeavour. The scientific or anthropological interest, no matter how relevant, cannot help but be strictly connected to aesthetics.
There is a greater general attention to the interplay between the objects than in the past. A painting can interact with an object placed in front of it; a tribal mask can be made to “dialogue” with an other similar item from a completely different tradition. There is undoubtedly a certain dose of postmodern irreverence in this approach; for when pop culture collectibles are allowed entrance to the wunderkammer, ending up exhibited along with precious and refined antiques, the self-righteous art critic is bound to shudder (see for instance Victor Wynd‘s peculiar iconoclasm).

An example I find paradigmatic of this search for a deeper interaction are the “adventurous” juxtapositions experimented by friend Luca Cableri (the man who brought to Moon to Italy); you can read the interview he gave me if you wish to know more about him.

Wearing A Wunderkammer

Fashion is always aware of new trends, and it intercepted some aspects of the world of wunerkammern. Thanks mainly to the goth and dark subcultures, one can find jewelry and necklaces made from naturalistic specimens: on Etsy, eBay or Craigslist, countless shops specialize in hand-crafted brooches, hair clips or other fashion accessories sporting skulls, small wearable taxidermies and so on.

Conceptual Art and Rogue Taxidermists

As we said, the renewed interest also came from the art world, which found in wunderkammern an effective theoretical frame to reflect about modernity.
The first name that comes to mind is of course Damien Hirst, who took advantage of the concept both in his iconic fluid-preserved animals and in his kaleidoscopic compositions of lepidoptera and butterflies; but even his For The Love of God, the well-known skull covered in diamonds, is an excessively precious curiosity that would not have been out of place in a Sixteenth Century treasure chamber.

Hirst is not the only artist taking inspiration from the wunderkammer aesthetics. Mark Dion, for instance, creates proper cabinets of wonders for the modern era: in his work, it’s not natural specimens that are put under formaldeyde, but rather their plastic replicas or even everyday objects, from push brooms to rubber dildos. Dion builds a sort of museum of consumerism in which – yet again – Nature and Culture collide and even at times fuse together, giving us no hope of telling them apart.

In 2013 Rosamund Purcell’s installation recreated a 3D version of the Seventeenth Century Ole Worm Museum: reinvention/replica, postmodern doppelgänger and hyperreal simulachrum which allows the public to step into one of the most famous etchings in the history of wunderkammern.

Besides the “high” art world – auction houses and prestigious galleries – we are also witnessing a rejuvenation of more artisanal sectors.
This is the case with the art of taxidermy, which is enjoying a new youth: today taxidermy courses and workshops are multiplying.

Remember that in the first post I talked about taxidermy as a domestication of the scariest aspects of Nature? Well, according to the participants, these workshops offer a way to exorcise their fear of death on a comfortably small scale, through direct contact and a creative activity. (We shall return on this tactile element.)
A further push towards innovation has come from yet another digital movement, called Rogue Taxidermy.

Artistic, non-traditional taxidermy has always existed, from fake mirabilia and gaffs such as mummified sirens and Jenny Hanivers to Walter Potter‘s antropomorphic dioramas. But rogue taxidermists bring all this to a whole new level.

Initially born as a consortium of three artists – Sarina Brewer, Scott Bibus e Robert Marbury – who were interested in taxidermy in the broadest sense (Marbury does not even use real animals for his creations, but plush toys), rogue taxidermy quickly became an international movement thanks to the web.

The fantastic chimeras produced by these artists are actually meta-taxidermies: by exhibiting their medium in such a manifest way, they seem to question our own relationship with animals. A relationship that has undergone profound changes and is now moving towards a greater respect and care for the environment. One of the tenets of rogue taxidermy is in fact the use of ethically sourced materials, and the animals used in preparations all died of natural causes. (Here’s a great book tracing the evolution and work of major rogue taxidermy artists.)

Wunderkammer Reborn

So we are left with the fundamental question: why are wunderkammern enjoying such a huge success right now, after five centuries? Is it just a retro, nostalgic trend, a vintage frivolous fashion like we find in many subcultures (yes I’m looking at you, my dear hipster friends) or does its attractiveness lie in deeper urgencies?

It is perhaps too soon to put forward a hypothesis, but I shall go out on a limb anyway: it is my belief that the rebirth of wunderkammern is to be sought in a dual necessity. On one hand the need to rethink death, and on the other the need to rethink art and narratives.

Rethinking Death
(And While We’re At It, Why Not Domesticate It)

Swiss anthropologist Bernard Crettaz was among the first to voice the ever more widespread need to break the “tyrannical secrecy” regarding death, typical of the Twentieth Century: in 2004 he organized in Neuchâtel the first Café mortel, a free event in which participants could talk about grief, and discuss their fears but also their curiosities on the subject. Inspired by Crettaz’s works and ideas, Jon Underwood launched the first British Death Café in 2011. His model received an enthusiastic response, and today almost 5000 events have been held in 50 countries across the world.

Meanwhile, in the US, a real Death-Positive Movement was born.
Originated from the will to drastically change the American funeral industry, criticized by founder Caitlin Doughty, the movement aims at lifting the taboo regarding the subject of death, and promotes an open reflection on related topics and end-of-life issues. (You probably know my personal engagement in the project, to which I contributed now and then: you can read my interview to Caitlin and my report from the Death Salon in Philadelphia).

What has the taboo of death got to do with collecting wonders?
Over the years, I have had the opportunity of talking to many a collector. Almost all of them recall, “as if it were yesterday“, the emotion they felt while holding in their hands the first piece of their collection, that one piece that gave way to their obsession. And for the large majority of them it was a naturalistic specimen – an animal skeleton, a taxidermy, etc.: as a friend collector says, “you never forget your first skull“.

The tactile element is as essential today as it was in classical wunderkammern, where the public was invited to study, examine, touch the specimens firsthand.

Owning an animal skull (or even a human one) is a safe and harmless way to become familiar with the concreteness of death. This might be the reason why the macabre element of wunderkammern, which was marginal centuries ago, often becomes a prevalent aspect today.

Ryan Matthew Cohn collection – photo Dan Howell & Steve Prue, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Rethinking Art: The Aesthetics Of Wonder

After the decline of figurative arts, after the industrial reproducibility of pop art, after the advent of ready-made art, conceptual art reached its outer limit, giving a coup the grace to meaning.  Many contemporary artists have de facto released art not just from manual skill, from artistry, but also from the old-fashioned idea that art should always deliver a message.
Pure form, pure signifier, the new conceptual artworks are problematic because they aspire to put a full stop to art history as we know it. They look impossible to understand, precisely because they are designed to escape any discourse.
It is therefore hard to imagine in what way artistic research will overcome this emptiness made of cold appearance, polished brilliance but mere surface nonetheless; hard to tell what new horizon might open up, beyond multi-million auctions, artistars and financial hikes planned beforehand by mega-dealers and mega-collectors.

To me, it seems that the passion for wunderkammern might be a way to go back to narratives, to meaning. An antidote to the overwhelming surface. Because an object is worth its place inside a chamber of marvels only by virtue of the story it tells, the awe it arises, the vertigo it entails.
I believe I recognize in this genre of collecting a profound desire to give back reality to its lost enchantment.
Lost? No, reality never ceased to be wonderous, it is our gaze that needs to be reeducated.

From Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – photo C. Fleurant

Eventually, a  wunderkammer is just a collection of objects, and we already live submerged in an ocean of objects.
But it is also an instrument (as it once was, as it has always been) – a magnifying glass to inspect the world and ourselves. In these bizarre and strange items, the collector seeks a magical-narrative dimension against the homologation and seriality of mass production. Whether he knows it or not, by being sensitive to the stories concealed within the objects, the emotions they convey, their unicity, the wunderkammer collector is carrying out an act of resistence: because placing value in the exception, in the exotic, is a way to seek new perspectives in spite of the Unanimous Vision.

Da Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – foto C. Fleurant

Medicina legale illustrata

Grazie al cinema e alla televisione, oggi tutti possono vantare una certa familiarità con le tecniche di medicina forense: sulla scena del crimine gli esperti si avvalgono di avanzate tecnologie, e le indagini coprono settori interdisciplinari quali la balistica, la chimica, la biologia, l’entomologia, la dattiloscopia, la tossicologia, e via dicendo.

La medicina forense nacque verso la metà dell’800 fra Austria e Germania, quando alcuni medici compresero l’importanza degli studi criminologici e si impegnarono affinché la disciplina adottasse scrupolosamente il metodo scientifico. Eduard von Hoffmann, medico praghese, fu uno dei padri di questa moderna tendenza. Le sue opere fondamentali sono Lehrbuch für gerichtliche Medizin (“Manuale di Medicina Legale”, 1878) e Atlas der gerichtlichen Medizin (“Atlante di Medicina Legale”, 1898).

Eduard_von_Hofmann_c1875
Quest’ultimo volume, in particolare, è arricchito da 193 fotografie e 56 illustrazioni a colori, per venire incontro alla sempre più pressante richiesta di riferimenti e materiali visivi.
La cromolitografia, tecnica artistica nata a metà secolo, permetteva di rendere con particolare realismo il colorito, la texture e le ombreggiature dei soggetti ritratti, e questo risultava di fondamentale importanza per insegnare agli studenti e ai colleghi le recenti scoperte e i nuovi metodi di analisi.
Le splendide tavole contenute nel libro sono opera di un certo A. Schmitson: nella prefazione Hoffmann loda l’artista, del tutto “digiuno” del tema trattato, per l’abilità esecutiva e l’accuratezza della comprensione. (Per quanto profano, secondo le nostre ricerche Schmitson ha illustrato almeno altri due atlanti medici, in particolare di anatomia patologica e ginecologia).

Ecco dunque una selezione di alcune fra le migliori illustrazioni dell’Atlante.

Neonato. Soffocamento da porzione di membrana.

Neonato. Soffocamento da porzione di membrana.

 

Omicidio a causa di varie ferite inferte con strumenti differenti (ferro da stiro, coltello, calci, pressione del petto).

Omicidio a causa di varie ferite inferte con strumenti differenti (ferro da stiro, coltello, calci, pressione del petto).

 

Suicidio per sgozzamento.

Suicidio per sgozzamento.

 

Suicidio per accoltellamento.

Suicidio per accoltellamento multiplo.

 

Ferita circolare da pistola (il proiettile è stato deviato dalla calotta cranica, girando attorno al cervello).

Ferita circolare da pistola (il proiettile è stato deviato dalla calotta cranica, girando attorno al cervello).

 

Suicidio per impiccagione; sospensione del corpo per diversi giorni; distribuzione peculiare dell'ipostasi cadaverica.

Suicidio per impiccagione; sospensione del corpo per diversi giorni; distribuzione peculiare dell’ipostasi cadaverica.

 

Suicidio per impiccagione con doppia corda. Posizione asimmetrica del nodo.

Suicidio per impiccagione con doppia corda. Posizione asimmetrica del nodo.

 

Suicidio per impiccagione con vecchia corda arrotolata per cinque volte attorno al collo.

Suicidio per impiccagione con vecchia corda arrotolata per cinque volte attorno al collo.

 

Formazione di Fungo (alga) su un cadavere trovato in acqua. (Stadio iniziale, il neonato è rimasto per 14 giorni nell'acqua corrente).

Formazione di Fungo (alga) su un cadavere trovato in acqua. (Stadio iniziale, il neonato è rimasto per 14 giorni nell’acqua corrente).

 

Lo stesso bambino dell'immagine precedente, rimasto nell'acqua per quattro settimane.

Lo stesso bambino dell’immagine precedente, rimasto nell’acqua per quattro settimane.

 

Cauterizzazione delle labbra e della regione attorno alla bocca per ingestione di Lysol.

Cauterizzazione delle labbra e della regione attorno alla bocca per ingestione di Lysol.

 

Avvelenamento da fumi di carbone.

Avvelenamento da fumi di carbone.

 

Traumi da caduta al momento della morte.

Traumi da caduta al momento della morte.

 

Situazione anormale del livor mortis come risultato della posizione del corpo.

Situazione anormale del livor mortis come risultato della posizione del corpo.

 

Estremità inferiore di un neonato rimasto per diversi mesi nell'acqua corrente; formazione di adipocera.

Estremità inferiore di un neonato rimasto per diversi mesi nell’acqua corrente; formazione di adipocera.

 

Cadavere mummificato di suicida (scoperto 10 anni dopo la morte).

Cadavere mummificato di suicida (scoperto 10 anni dopo la morte).

L’Atlante di Eduard von Hoffmann è consultabile gratuitamente online nella sua traduzione inglese a questo indirizzo. L’analisi forense svolta dall’autore su questi, ed altri, casi è altrettanto interessante delle illustrazioni, e non soltanto dal punto di vista criminologico: vengono infatti svelati diversi dettagli, talvolta terribili e commoventi, delle vicende umane che hanno portato a queste morti violente.

Arte criminologica

Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Pee Gee Daniel

Accade spesso che per il raggiungimento di mete stupefacenti la via che vi ci conduce si presenti impervia.

Anche in questo caso, al termine di un percorso accidentato, tra gli inestricabili paesini del cuore della Lomellina, sfrecciando lungo sottili assi viari a prova di ammortizzatore, si giunge finalmente a un prodigioso sancta sanctorum per gli amanti del macabro, dell’insolito e del curioso, nascosto – come sempre si conviene a un vero tesoro – nell’ampio soppalco di una grande cascina bianca, dispersa tra le campagne.

1

Là sopra vi attendono, beffardamente occhieggianti dalle loro teche collocate in un ordine rapsodico ma di indubbio impatto, teste sotto formalina galleggianti in barattoli di vetro, mani mozze, corpi mummificati, arti pietrificati, crani di gemelli dicefali, barattoli di larve di sarcophaga carnaria, cadaveri adagiati dentro bare in noce, un austero mezzobusto della Cianciulli (la celeberrima “Saponificatrice di Correggio”), pezzi rari come alcuni documenti olografi di Cesare Lombroso, parti anatomiche provenienti da vecchi gabinetti medici, armi del delitto, strumenti di tortura o per elettroshock in uso in un recente passato, memento di pellagrosi e briganti, tsantsa umane e di scimmia prodotte dalla tribù ecuadoriana dei Jivaros, bambolotti voodoo, cimeli risalenti a efferati fatti di cronaca nostrana.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Creatore e gestore di questa casa-museo del crimine è il facondo Roberto Paparella. Sarà lui a introdurvi e accompagnarvi per le varie installazioni con la giusta dose di erudizione e intrattenimento: un po’ chaperon, un po’ cicerone e un po’ Virgilio dantesco.

Diplomato in arte e restauro (la parte inferiore dell’edificio è infatti occupata da mobilio in attesa di recupero) e criminologo, il Paparella ha saputo combinare questi due aspetti dando vita a una disciplina ibrida che ha voluto battezzare “arte criminologica”, cui è improntata l’intera mostra permanente che ho avuto il piacere di visitare in quel di Olevano. Poiché c’è innanzitutto da dire che non di mero collezionismo si tratta: molti dei pezzi che vi troviamo sono cioè manufatti e ricostruzioni iperrealistiche composti ad hoc dalla sapienza tecnica del nostro, cosicché i reperti storici e i “falsi d’autore” si mescolano e si confondono in maniera pressoché indistinguibile, giocando sul significato più ampio del termine “originale”.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2718

DSCN2709

My beautiful picture

È forse utile spiegare che il museo è ospitato all’interno di una comunità terapeutica. Roberto Paparella infatti, oltre a essere un artista del lugubre, un restauratore, un ricercatore scrupoloso nel campo criminologico e un tabagista imbattibile, è anche stato il più giovane direttore di una comunità per tossicodipendenti in Italia (autore insieme al giurista Guido Pisapia, fratello dell’attuale sindaco di Milano, di un testo per operatori del settore), mentre oggi si occupa di ragazzi usciti dall’istituto penale minorile. Proprio questo, mi ha rivelato, è stato uno dei principali sproni alla sua vera passione: ripercorrere quotidianamente i vari iter giudiziari e la teoria giuridica di delitti e pene in compagnia dei suoi ragazzi ha fatto rinascere in lui questo interesse per delinquenti, vittime, atti omicidiari e “souvenir” a essi connessi.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Una vocazione riaffiorata dal passato, visto che il primo a instillare in lui questo gusto grandguignolesco fu in effetti il padre che, dopo aver visitato il museo delle cere di Milano, aveva deciso di farsene uno in proprio, nello scantinato di casa sua, che aveva poi chiamato La taverna rossa e nel quale amava condurre famigliari e amici nel tentativo di impressionarli con le ricostruzioni di famosi assassini, seppure di produzione casalinga e un po’ naif.
La tradizione familiare peraltro prosegue, visto che i due figli di Paparella, cresciuti tra cadaveri dissezionati più o meno posticci, tengono a fornire spontaneamente i propri pareri in merito alla attendibilità di questa o quella riproduzione artigianale di cui il padre è autore.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2725

Per quanto riguarda la “falsificazione” anatomica di salme o parti di esse, è una cura certosina quella che viene impiegata, avvalendosi di uno studio filologico, di un’attenta scelta dei materiali, di una efficace disposizione scenografica dei corpi stessi e delle luci che ne esalteranno le forme. Come nel caso di Elisa Claps, i cui resti Paparella ha rielaborato ricoprendo uno scheletro in resina con uno speciale ritrovato indiano noto come cartapelle, capace di ricreare l’effetto di un tegumento incartapecorito dalla lunga esposizione agli elementi atmosferici, e infine decorato con altri componenti di provenienza umana (l’apparato dentario è fornito da alcuni studi odontoiatrici, mentre i capelli vengono recuperati da vecchie parrucche di capelli veri, scovate nei mercatini).
Paparella afferma che nel suo operato si cela anche una motivazione morale: la volontà di ridare una consistenza tridimensionale alle vittime come ai carnefici, nella speranza di muovere dentro allo spettatore quelli che potremmo individuare come i due momenti aristotelici della pietà e del terrore.

Continuando la visita, incontriamo il corpo del cosiddetto Vampiro della Bergamasca, già esaminato a suo tempo dal Lombroso, alle cui misurazioni antropometriche lo scultore si è attenuto fedelmente: per la cronaca, Vincenzo Verzeni era un serial killer o, secondo la terminologia clinica del tempo, un «monomaniaco omicida necrofilomane, antropofago, affetto da vampirismo», che provava una frenesia erotica nello strappare coi denti larghi brani di carne alle proprie vittime.

Accanto, ecco lo scheletro di un morto di mafia, con sasso in bocca e mani amputate, che emerge faticosamente dalla terra mentre, sull’altro lato, in una posizione rattrappita, una mummia azteca lancia al visitatore una versione parodistica dell’Urlo di Munch. Alle sue spalle, addossata all’estesa parete, un’intera schiera di calchi delle teste di alienati e criminali ci osserva in maniera inquietante, a breve distanza dai calchi dei genitali di stupratori e di pazienti affette dal terribile tribadismo.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Si prosegue lungo una parete tappezzata di scatti ANSA di celebri processi del secondo dopoguerra, finché – in un accostamento emblematico dello stile di questo stravagante museo – poggiato su una lapide di candido marmo, ci si imbatte in un set anti-vampiri completo, con tanto di teschio, altarino portatile, barattolo contenente terra consacrata, chiodone in ferro in luogo dell’abusato paletto di frassino, argilla, paramenti ecclesiastici vari, pipistrelli essiccati, breviario e crocefisso a portar via, il tutto serbato in uno scrigno ligneo di pregevole fattura.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Ritornati all’entrata, al momento del commiato, troverete a salutarvi il manichino animato di Antonio Boggia, pluriomicida della Milano ottocentesca. A qualche passo dall’automa, l’occhio cade su una pesante mannaia in ferro, usata dallo stesso Boggia per le sue esecuzioni. Vera o falsa? Non sta a noi rivelarvelo. Se vi va, andando alla mostra (che vi si offrirà ben più particolareggiata di questo mio stringato resoconto) portatevi in tasca il giusto quantitativo di carbonio 14, oppure, più semplicemente, godetevi lo spettacolo senza porvi troppe domande.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture
Museo di Arte Criminologica
, via Cascina Bianca 1, 27020 Olevano di Lomellina (PV)
È necessario prenotare: tel. 3333639136 tel./fax 038451311 email: [email protected]

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – XII

domenico-vecchioni-i-signori-della-truffa.jpg w=640

Domenico Vecchioni
I SIGNORI DELLA TRUFFA
L’uomo che vendette la Tour Eiffel e altre incredibili storie di impostura
(2009, Editoriale Olimpia)

Truffatori, specializzati nel plagiare e raggirare, falsari, mistificatori, criminali dell’alta finanza, scrocconi, bugiardi, sempre impegnati a scovare nuovi modi di sfruttare la dabbenaggine del prossimo e magari di soffiargli i risparmi di una vita: possiamo davvero provare della simpatia per questi personaggi? Forse sì, a patto che la truffa che hanno elaborato sia talmente ingegnosa e fantasiosa da non sembrare più una disonesta scorciatoia, ma una vera e propria opera d’arte.
Domenico Vecchioni, ambasciatore italiano a Cuba e scrittore esperto di spionaggio, si concentra in questo libro, dallo stile leggero e scorrevole, proprio su questo tipo di imbroglioni – quei truffatori che, grazie alla loro spavalda faccia tosta e a un’immaginazione fuori dal comune, portano a termine dei “colpi” davvero sorprendenti. Non si tratta certo di un’apologia dell’inganno, anzi: l’autore stesso ammette di aver tirato più di un sospiro di sollievo nel constatare che quasi tutte le truffe finiscono con una giusta punizione. Queste storie sanno però strappare più di una risata; forse a volte un tantino nervosa, perché non avremmo mai sospettato la quantità di espedienti tramite i quali noi stessi potremmo venire beffati.
Fra le vicende più incredibili si può citare quella del clown che si finse nipote del sultano di Costantinopoli e divenne Re d’Albania per due giorni (ma venne smascherato prima di mettere le mani sul tesoro reale e sull’harem che aveva prontamente ordinato di costruire); oppure il più grande pittore falsario di tutti i tempi che, “posseduto” dallo spirito di Vermeer, sfornava quadri del grande maestro olandese fino ad allora sconosciuti, talmente perfetti nello stile da venire acquistati ed esibiti da prestigiosi musei di Amsterdam e Rotterdam. E ancora: l’uomo che convinse trecento sprovveduti a vendere ogni loro avere per trasferirsi nella “Nuova Francia”, un’isola nel Pacifico che si sarebbe rivelata essere non esattamente il Paradiso terrestre pubblicizzato; l’uomo che appaltò lo smontaggio e lo smaltimento della Torre Eiffel agli industriali della siderurgia; l’uomo che inventava banche fittizie con tanto di comparse e attori nel ruolo di clienti, impiegati, guardie, per proporre investimenti fantasma; e molto altro ancora.
Il libro di Vecchioni è una strana esperienza. Testimonia dell’inesauribile inventiva umana; e anche se, in questi casi specifici, essa è incanalata verso obiettivi criminali ed eticamente condannabili, non si riesce a non sorridere di fronte a tanta geniale, visionaria fantasia.

yyL61jH
Paul Koudounaris
HEAVENLY BODIES
Cult treasures & spectacular Saints from the Catacombs
(2013, Thames & Hudson)

In questa rubrica abbiamo raramente consigliato dei libri per cui non esista una traduzione italiana. Questo è uno dei casi che fa eccezione, perché il suo valore è inestimabile.
Dall’autore di Empire of Death (volume presto diventato cult), ecco Heavenly Bodies, un excursus attraverso alcune delle più belle e inquietanti reliquie cristiane. Si tratta di santi i cui corpi, riesumati, vennero spediti in diverse parti d’Europa (Germania, Austria e Svizzera principalmente) per essere adornati e adorati.

- Bürglen, Switzerland, detail of the skull St. Maximus inside armored helmet. One of two surviving skeletons of saints taken from the Roman Catacombs as presumed martyrs and decorated in armor in Switz -

Wil, Katakombenheiliger Pankratius / Foto 2010 - Wil, Switzerland, upper body of St. Pancratius. The relic of a presumed martyr from the Roman Catacombs arrived in the city's church of St. Nicholas in the 1670s. The relic was considered miraculous. -

SK7_2649681b
Corpi miracolosi, venerati, sacri. Rivestiti d’oro, di gemme, di gioielli, inglobati in raffinati e fantastici vestiti. La sontuosità degli orpelli contrasta con la commovente staticità dei cadaveri, tanto da imbarazzare la Chiesa stessa, che cercò di distruggerli o occultarli; eppure, molti di questi santi addobbati sono visibili ancora oggi.

rPnNmEC

jewelledskeletons_02
Le splendide fotografie costituiscono il valore principe di questa pubblicazione: rubini e pietre preziose adornano teschi e scheletri, i cadaveri sembrano indicare ad un tempo stesso la caducità e l’eternità dello splendore della fede, e in tutto questo brillare di diademi e decorazioni vediamo ancora una possibile negazione della morte, un’esaltazione simbolica del corpo che risorgerà vittorioso.

Heavenly_Bodies_1_26019

81bok-THiJL._SL1200_

Bloody Murders

johnson20-cvr-0001-0

Quando state entrando ad un concerto, o a uno spettacolo teatrale, vi viene consegnato il programma della serata. Una cosa simile accadeva, in Inghilterra, anche per un tipo particolare di spettacolo pubblico: le esecuzioni capitali.

tumblr_mcryzmX2HS1rn6z3jo1_500
Nel XVIII e XIX Secolo, infatti, alcune stamperie e case editrici inglesi si erano specializzate in un particolare prodotto letterario. Venivano generalmente chiamati Last Dying Speeches (“ultime parole in punto di morte”) o Bloody Murders (“sanguinosi omicidi”), ed erano dei fogli stampati su un verso solo, di circa 50×36 cm di grandezza. Venivano venduti per strada, per un penny o anche meno, nei giorni precedenti un’esecuzione annunciata; quando arrivava il gran giorno, veniva preparata spesso un’edizione speciale per le folle che si assiepavano attorno al patibolo.

execution-of-wm-corder

008090564_439_height

dying-speeches
Sull’unica facciata stampata si potevano trovare tutti i dettagli più scabrosi del crimine commesso, magari un resoconto del processo, e anche delle accattivanti illustrazioni (un ritratto del condannato, o del suo misfatto, ecc.). Usualmente il testo si concludeva con un piccolo brano in versi, spacciato per “le ultime parole” del condannato, che ammoniva i lettori a non seguire questo funesto esempio se volevano evitare una fine simile.

4787793

4787751

4788099

4787939
La vita di questi foglietti non si esauriva nemmeno con la morte del condannato, perché nei giorni successivi all’esecuzione ne veniva stampata spesso anche una versione aggiornata con le ultime parole pronunciate dal condannato – vere, stavolta -, il racconto del suo dying behaviour (“comportamento durante la morte”) o altre succulente novità del genere.

broadside-detail

2180084755_b2f4e78eb8

4788820
I Bloody Murders erano un ottimo business, appannaggio di poche stamperie di Londra e delle maggiori città inglesi: costavano poco, erano semplici e veloci da preparare, e alcune incisioni (ad esempio la figura di un impiccato in controluce) potevano essere riutilizzate di volta in volta. Il successo però dipendeva dalla tempestività con cui questi volantini venivano fatti circolare.

4787919

4787749

4787747

4787893
Questi foglietti erano pensati per un target preciso, le classi medie e basse, e facevano leva sulla curiosità morbosa e sui toni iperbolici per attirare i loro lettori. Era un tipo di letteratura che anche le famiglie più povere potevano permettersi; e possiamo immaginarle, raccolte attorno al tavolo dopo cena, mentre chi tra loro sapeva leggere raccontava ad alta voce, per il brivido e il diletto di tutti, quelle violente e torbide vicende.

4787678
La Harvard Law School Library è riuscita a collezionare più di 500 di questi rarissimi manifesti, li ha digitalizzati e messi online. Consultabili gratuitamente, possono essere ricercati secondo diversi parametri (per crimine, anno, città, parole chiave, ecc.) sul sito del Crime Broadsides Project.

Il Museo Criminologico di Roma

2013-01-03 11.01.00

Nella seconda metà dell’800, in Europa e in Italia, divenne sempre più evidente la necessità di una riforma carceraria; allo stesso tempo, e grazie agli intensi dibattiti sulla questione, crebbe l’interesse per lo studi delle cause della delinquenza, e dei possibili metodi per curarla. Mentre quindi la Polizia Scientifica muoveva i primi passi, il grande criminologo Cesare Lombroso studiava le possibili correlazioni fra la morfologia fisica e l’attitudine al delitto, e grazie a lui prendeva vita il primo, grande museo di antropologia criminale a Torino.

A Roma, invece, si dovette aspettare fino al 1931 perché potesse aprire al pubblico il “Museo Criminale”, che ospitava la collezione di reperti utilizzati precedentemente per gli studi della scuola di Polizia scientifica. Il Museo ebbe poi fasi e fortune alterne, tanto da venire chiuso nel 1968, e riaperto solo nel 1975 con la nuova denominazione “MUCRI – Museo criminologico”. La nuova sede, all’interno delle carceri del palazzo del Gonfalone, è quella in cui il Museo si trova ancora oggi. Dalla fine degli anni ’70 il museo è stato nuovamente chiuso per quasi vent’anni, per riaprire al pubblico nel 1994.

Il Museo oggi conta centinaia di reperti, divisi in tre grandi sezioni: la Giustizia dal Medioevo al XIX secolo, l’Ottocento e l’evoluzione del sistema penitenziario, il Novecento e i protagonisti del crimine.

2013-01-03 10.41.38

2013-01-03 10.49.54

2013-01-03 10.51.53
La prima sezione, che ripercorre i metodi di punizione e di tortura in uso dal Medioevo fino al XIX secolo, è ovviamente la più impressionante. Dalle asce per decapitazione cinquecentesche, alle gogne, ai banchi di fustigazione, alle mordacchie, agli strumenti di tortura dell’Inquisizione, tutto ci parla di un’epoca in cui la crudeltà delle pene eguagliava, se non addirittura superava, quella del crimine stesso. Fra gli oggetti esposti segnaliamo la tonaca del celebre boia pontificio Mastro Titta, la spada che decapitò Beatrice Cenci, una forca e tre ghigliottine (fra cui quella in uso a Piazza del Popolo fino al 1869).

517507417_db6b739f85_z

2013-01-03 10.52.41

2013-01-03 10.52.26

2013-01-03 10.47.10
Nella seconda sezione, dedicata all’Ottocento, troviamo traccia della nascita dell’antropologia criminale, e dell’evoluzione del sistema carcerario. Possiamo vedere il calco del cranio del brigante Giuseppe Villella (su cui Lombroso scoprì nel 1872 la “prova” della delinquenza atavica: la “fossetta occipitale mediana”); lo spazio dedicato agli attentati politici espone, tra l’altro, il cranio, il cervello e gli scritti dell’anarchico lucano Giovanni Passannante, che attentò alla vita del re Umberto I a Napoli, nel 1878. Ugualmente impressionanti il letto di contenzione e le camicie di forza che testimoniano la nascita dei manicomi criminali.

giovannipassannante_cervello

7165628283_224f9178e4_c

2013-01-03 11.03.08

2013-01-03 11.02.55

2013-01-03 10.57.08

2013-01-03 10.56.39

2013-01-03 11.00.33

2013-01-03 11.02.23
Ma forse la parte più sorprendente è quella delle cosiddette “malizie carcerarie”, ovvero i sotterfugi con cui i detenuti comunicavano tra di loro, occultavano armi o inventavano sistemi per evadere o compiere atti di autolesionismo. Un’estrema inventiva che si tinge di toni tristi e spesso macabri.

7165624283_d429147e2e_c
L’ultima sezione, quella dedicata ai grandi episodi di cronaca nera del Novecento, è una vera e propria wunderkammer del crimine, dove decine e decine di oggetti e reperti sono esposti in un percorso eterogeneo che spazia dagli anni ’30 agli anni ’90. Una stanza ospita armi e indizi trovati sulla scena dei delitti italiani fra i più celebri, come ad esempio quelli perpetrati da Leonarda Cianciulli, la “saponificatrice di Correggio”; tra gli altri, sono esibiti gli oggetti personali di Antonietta Longo, la “decapitata di Castelgandolfo”, le armi della banda Casaroli, la pistola con cui la contessa Bellentani uccise il suo amante durante una sfarzosa serata di gala. Vi si trovano anche materiali pornografici sequestrati (quando erano ancora illegali), ed esempi di merce di contrabbando, inclusi numerosi quadri ed opere d’arte.

7350834806_d8df25bcfb_c

2013-01-03 11.07.17

2013-01-03 11.10.56

2013-01-03 11.04.53
Altre vetrine interessanti ripercorrono le testimonianze relative alla criminalità organizzata, al banditismo (con oggetti appartenuti a Salvatore Giuliano), al terrorismo, e a tutte le declinazioni possibili del crimine (furti, falsi, giochi d’azzardo, ecc.). Nella sezione dedicata allo spionaggio si può ammirare uno splendido e curioso baule dentro il quale fu rinvenuto, dopo un rocambolesco inseguimento, un piccolo ometto seduto su un seggiolino, legato con le cinghie e avvolto da coperte e cuscini. Si trattava di una spia che cercava di imbarcarsi clandestinamente all’aeroporto di Fiumicino.

2013-01-03 11.15.06

2013-01-03 11.15.18
Il Museo Criminologico si trova in Via del Gonfalone 29 (una laterale di Via Giulia), ed è aperto dal martedì al sabato dalle ore 9 alle 13; martedì e giovedì dalle 14.30 alle 18.30. Ecco il sito ufficiale del MUCRI.

AGGIORNAMENTO: dal 01 giugno 2016 il MUCRI è chiuso, e non è stata comunicata una data di riapertura.

Le scarpe del bandito

big_nose

Era l’epoca d’oro dei fuorilegge, quella in cui Jesse James e suo fratello terrorizzavano il far west, gli anni delle rapine alle diligenze e alle ferrovie. In quel tempo, nella seconda metà dell’800, Big Nose George Parrott era lontano dall’essere una leggenda: un outlaw di mezza tacca, ladro di cavalli e borseggiatore. Le cose sarebbero cambiate, la fama l’avrebbe infine raggiunto, ma non nel modo in cui Big Nose si sarebbe potuto aspettare.

Nel 1878, Parrott e la sua banda erano al verde e cercavano un bottino più ghiotto delle solite razzie nelle stalle. Così il 19 agosto decisero di fare il colpo grosso: avrebbero fatto deragliare un treno della Union Pacific e l’avrebbero saccheggiato. Sette fuorilegge si nascosero nei cespugli aspettando l’arrivo del treno, quando una pattuglia di guardia arrivò sul posto e scoprì che la ferrovia era stata manomessa. La polizia venne chiamata e in poco tempo due ufficiali scovarono i malviventi. La gang però ebbe la meglio, e uccise i due poliziotti. Secondo alcune fonti, i banditi smembrarono i corpi come avvertimento a chi avesse tentato di inseguirli.

Questa crudeltà fece imbestialire la Union Pacific Railroad, che moltiplicò gli sforzi per trovare i fuggitivi, e offrì una taglia di 10.000 dollari, più tardi raddoppiata a 20.000, per la loro cattura.

L’anno successivo alcuni membri della gang vennero arrestati; uno di loro, Dutch Charlie, non riuscì neppure ad arrivare al processo: una folla inferocita lo strappò dalle mani dei poliziotti e lo impiccò a un palo del telegrafo. Nel 1880 fu la volta di Big Nose George. Dopo essersi vantato in un saloon, da ubriaco, di aver ucciso i due ufficiali della rapina al treno, Parrott venne arrestato nel 1880 a Miles City.

Riportato nel Wyoming, dove il doppio omicidio era avvenuto, Parrott venne condannato all’impiccagione, prevista per il 2 aprile 1881. Ma Big Nose George non si diede per vinto. Il 22 marzo, con una pietra e un coltellino che era riuscito a nascondere, scassinò le pesanti catene alle sue caviglie; aspettò nascosto nella stanza da bagno e aggredì il secondino, fratturandogli il cranio con le manette che aveva ancora ai polsi; ma la guardia riuscì a resistere e chiamare sua moglie che, arrivata a pistole spianate, costrinse il bandito a ritornare in cella.

Alla notizia dell’ennesima malefatta di Parrott, un gruppo di uomini mascherati fece irruzione nella prigione e, minacciando con una pistola la già malmessa e convalescente guardia carceraria, portò Parrott con sé. Ma non si trattava certo di un salvataggio. Gli uomini mascherati, spalleggiati da più di duecento paesani urlanti, appesero Big Nose George ad un palo e, dopo due tentativi falliti, riuscirono finalmente ad impiccarlo.

Secondo le leggende, una volta tirato giù il criminale dalla forca improvvisata, il becchino ebbe difficoltà a chiudere la bara per via dell’enorme naso di George. Siccome nessun parente si sarebbe mai sognato di reclamare il corpo, le spoglie di Parrott passarono in possesso del dottor John Osborne, affinché potesse studiarne il cervello e capire cosa lo distinguesse da quello di una persona sana di mente e non criminale.

dr-john-osborn
Quello che fece il dottor John Osborne, però, fu del tutto particolare. Assistito dall’allora quindicenne Lillian Heath, Osborne aprì il cranio di Parrott, esaminò il cervello e (sorpresa!) non trovò nulla di particolare. Realizzò una maschera funeraria in gesso del cadavere del bandito: ancora oggi visibile, a questa maschera mancano le orecchie, perché erano state strappate accidentalmente nei tentativi di impiccagione. Ma fin qui, nulla di veramente strano.

Poi però Osborne decise di rimuovere la pelle dalle cosce e dal petto di George, capezzoli inclusi. Li spedì a una conceria, con istruzioni per farne una borsa medica e un paio di scarpe. Quando gli arrivarono, lustrate ad arte, il dottore rimase un po’ deluso che i capezzoli non fossero stati usati; ma le indossò comunque con grande orgoglio (perfino, si dice, nel giorno della sua inaugurazione a governatore dello Stato)… e Big Nose George divenne l’unico cittadino americano della storia ad essere trasformato, dopo la sua morte, in un capo di vestiario.

human-skin-shoes

Il dottore condusse i suoi esperimenti sul cadavere per un anno, conservandolo in un barile di whiskey riempito di una soluzione di sale. Una volta che ebbe finite le sue dissezioni, il barile venne sepolto nel cortile. La calotta cranica venne regalata, come simpatico souvenir, alla giovane assistente, Miss Heath, che sarebbe poi diventata la prima dottoressa femmina del Wyoming, e che negli anni avrebbe usato il macabro resto come posacenere o come fermaporta.

BigNoseBones
L’11 maggio del 1950, durante gli scavi per la costruzione di una banca, alcuni operai dissotterrarono il barile contenente le ossa del fuorilegge… e anche il famoso paio di scarpe. Per fortuna all’epoca la dottoressa Heath era viva e vegeta, e possedeva ancora la calotta cranica di Big Nose George: combaciava perfettamente con il teschio scalottato ritrovato nel barile, e più tardi la prova del DNA identificò senz’ombra di dubbio i resti ritrovati.

lillian-heath-skull-cap
Oggi il teschio di Big Nose George Parrott, la sua maschera funebre e le scarpe forgiate con la sua pelle sono l’attrazione principale del Carbon County Museum a Rawlins, Wyoming, insieme alle scarpe che egli stesso portava durante il suo linciaggio, alle manette e ad altri oggetti. La calotta è conservata allo Union Pacific Museum a Council Bluffs, Iowa. Il resto delle ossa fu seppellito in un posto segreto, e la borsa medica non venne mai ritrovata.

31610759_ea9434bf33

WYRAWshoes

george4-600x399

WYRAWbignose_9888