Criminal Heads

Two dissected heads. Color plate by Gautier D’Agoty (1746).

Starting from the end of the Middle Ages, the bodies of those condemned to death were commonly used for anatomical dissections. It was a sort of additional penalty, because autopsy was still perceived as a sort of desecration; perhaps because this “cruelty” aroused a certain sense of guilt, it was common for the dissected bodies to be granted a burial in consecrated ground, something that would normally have been precluded to criminals.

But during the nineteenth century dissecting the bodies of criminals began to have a more specific reason, namely to understand how the anatomy of a criminal differed from the norm. A practice that continued until almost mid-twentieth century.
The following picture shows the head of Peter Kürten (1883-1931), the infamous Vampire of Düsseldorf whose deeds inspired Fritz Lang’s masterpiece M (1931). Today it is exhibited at Ripley’s Believe It Or Not by Winsconsin Dells.

Cesare Lombroso, who in spite of his controversial theories was one of the pioneers and founders of modern criminology, was convinced that the criminal carried in his anatomy the anomalous signs of a genetic atavism.

The Museum dedicated to him, in Turin, retraces his reasoning, his convictions influenced by theories in vogue at the time, and gives an account of the impressive collection of heads he studied and preserved. Lombroso himself wanted to become part of his museum, where today the criminologist’s entire skeleton is on display; his preserved, boneless head is not visible to the public.

Head of Cesare Lombroso.

Similar autopsies on the skull and brain of the murderers almost invariably led to the same conclusion: no appreciable anatomical difference compared to the common man.

A deterministic criminology — the idea, that is, that criminal behavior derives from some anatomical, biological, genetic anomaly — has a comforting appeal for those who believe they are normal.
This is the classic process of creation/labeling of the different, what Foucault called “the machinery that makes qualifications and disqualifications“: if the criminal is different, if his nature is deviant (etymologically, he strays from the right path on which we place ourselves), then we will sleep soundly.

Numerous research suggests that in reality anyone is susceptible to adopt socially deplorable behavior, given certain premises, and even betray their ethical principles as soon as some specific psychological mechanisms are activated (see P. Bocchiaro, Psicologia del male, 2009). Yet the idea that the “abnormal” individual contains in himself some kind of predestination to deviance continues to be popular even today: in the best case this is a cognitive bias, in the worst case it’s plain deceit. A striking example of mala fides is provided by those scientific studies financed by tobacco or gambling multinationals, aimed at showing that addiction is the product of biological predisposition in some individuals (thus relieving the funders of such reasearch from all responsibility).

But let’s go back to the obsession of nineteenth-century scientists for the heads of criminals.
What is interesting in our eyes is that often, in these anatomical specimens, what was preserved was not even the internal structure, but rather the criminal’s features.

In the picture below you can see the skin of the face of Martin Dumollard (1810-1862), who killed more than 6 women. Today it is kept at the Musée Testut-Latarjet in Lyon.
It was tanned while his skull was being studied in search of anomalies. It was the skull, not the skin, the focus of the research. Why then take the trouble to prepare also his face, detached from the skull?

Dumollard is certainly not the only example. Also at the Testut-Latarjet lies the facial skin of Jules-Joseph Seringer, guilty of killing his mother, stepfather and step-sister. The museum also exhibits a plaster cast of the murderer, which offers a more realistic account of the killer’s features, compared to this hideous mask.

For the purposes of physiognomic and phrenological studies of the time, this plaster bust would have been a much better support than a skinned face. Why not then stick to the cast?

The impression is that preserving the face or the head of a criminal was, beyond any scientific interest, a way to ensure that the memory of guilt could never vanish. A condemnation to perpetual memory, the symbolic equivalent of those good old heads on spikes, placed at the gates of the city — as a deterrent, certainly, but also and above all as a spectacle of the pervasiveness of order, a proof of the inevitability of punishment.

Head of Diogo Alves, beheaded in 1841.

Head of Narcisse Porthault, guillotined in 1846. Ph. Jack Burman.

 

Head of Henri Landru, guillotined in 1922.

 

Head of Fritz Haarmann, beheaded in 1925.

This sort of upside-down damnatio memoriæ, meant to immortalize the offending individual instead of erasing him from collective memory, can be found in etchings, in the practice of the death masks and, in more recent times, in the photographs of guillotined criminals.

Death masks of hanged Victorian criminals (source).

Guillotined: Juan Vidal (1910), Auguste DeGroote (1893), Joseph Vacher (1898), Canute Vromant (1909), Lénard, Oillic, Thépaut and Carbucci (1866), Jean-Baptiste Picard (1862), Abel Pollet (1909), Charles Swartewagher (1905), Louis Lefevre (1915), Edmond Claeys (1893), Albert Fournier (1920), Théophile Deroo (1909), Jean Van de Bogaert (1905), Auguste Pollet (1909).

All these heads chopped off by the executioner, whilst referring to an ideal of justice, actually celebrate the triumph of power.

But there are four peculiar heads, which impose themselves as a subversive and ironic contrappasso. Four more heads of criminals, which were used to mock the prison regime.


These are the effigies that, placed on the cushions to deceive the guards, allowed Frank Morris, together with John and Clarence Anglin, to famously escape from Alcatraz (the fourth accomplice, Allen West, remained behind). Sculpted with soap, toothpaste, toilet paper and cement powder, and decorated with hair collected at the prison’s barbershop, these fake heads are the only remaining memory of the three inmates who managed to escape from the maximum security prison — along with their mug shots.

Although unwittingly, Morris and his associates had made a real détournement of a narrative which had been established for thousands of years: an iconography that aimed to turn the head and face of the condemned man into a mere simulacrum, in order to dehumanize him.

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 7

Back with Bizzarro Bazar’s mix of exotic and quirky trouvailles, quite handy when it comes to entertaining your friends and acting like the one who’s always telling funny stories. Please grin knowingly when they ask you where in the world you find all this stuff.

  • We already talked about killer rabbits in the margins of medieval books. Now a funny video unveils the mystery of another great classic of illustrated manuscripts: snail-fighting knights. SPOILER: it’s those vicious Lumbards again.
  • As an expert on alternative sexualities, Ayzad has developed a certain aplomb when discussing the most extreme and absurd erotic practices — in Hunter Thompson’s words, “when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro“. Yet even a shrewd guy like him was baffled by the most deranged story in recent times: the Nazi furry scandal.
  • In 1973, Playboy asked Salvador Dali to collaborate with photographer Pompeo Posar for an exclusive nude photoshoot. The painter was given complete freedom and control over the project, so much so that he was on set directing the shooting. Dali then manipulated the shots produced during that session through collage. The result is a strange and highly enjoyable example of surrealism, eggs, masks, snakes and nude bunnies. The Master, in a letter to the magazine, calimed to be satisfied with the experience: “The meaning of my work is the motivation that is of the purest – money. What I did for Playboy is very good, and your payment is equal to the task.” (Grazie, Silvia!)

  • Speaking of photography, Robert Shults dedicated his series The Washing Away of Wrongs to the biggest center for the study of decomposition in the world, the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State University. Shot in stark, high-contrast black and white as they were shot in the near-infrared spectrum, these pictures are really powerful and exhibit an almost dream-like quality. They document the hard but necessary work of students and researchers, who set out to understand the modifications in human remains under the most disparate conditions: the ever more precise data they gather will become invaluable in the forensic field. You can find some more photos in this article, and here’s Robert Shults website.

  • One last photographic entry. Swedish photographer Erik Simander produced a series of portraits of his grandfather, after he just became a widower. The loneliness of a man who just found himself without his life’s companion is described through little details (the empty sink, with a single toothbrush) that suddenly become definitive, devastating symbols of loss; small, poetic and lacerating touches, delicate and painful at the same time. After all, grief is a different feeling for evry person, and Simander shows a commendable discretion in observing the limit, the threshold beyond which emotions become too personal to be shared. A sublime piece of work, heart-breaking and humane, and which has the merit of tackling an issue (the loss of a partner among the elderly) still pretty much taboo. This theme had already been brought to the big screen in 2012 by the ruthless and emotionally demanding Amour, directed by Michael Haneke.
  • Speaking of widowers, here’s a great article on another aspect we hear very little about: the sudden sex-appeal of grieving men, and the emotional distress it can cause.
  • To return to lighter subjects, here’s a spectacular pincushion seen in an antique store (spotted and photographed by Emma).

  • Are you looking for a secluded little place for your vacations, Arabian nights style? You’re welcome.
  • Would you prefer to stay home with your box of popcorn for a B-movies binge-watching session? Here’s one of the best lists you can find on the web. You have my word.
  • The inimitable Lindsey Fitzharris published on her Chirurgeon’s Apprentice a cute little post about surgical removal of bladder stones before the invention of anesthesia. Perfect read to squirm deliciously in your seat.
  • Death Expo was recently held in Amsterdam, sporting all the latest novelties in the funerary industry. Among the best designs: an IKEA-style, build-it-yourself coffin, but above all the coffin to play games on. (via DeathSalon)
  • I ignore how or why things re-surface at a certain time on the Net. And yet, for the last few days (at least in my whacky internet bubble) the story of Portuguese serial killer Diogo Alves has been popping out again and again. Not all of Diogo Alves, actually — just his head, which is kept in a jar at the Faculty of Medicine in Lisbon. But what really made me chuckle was discovering one of the “related images” suggested by Google algorythms:

Diogo’s head…

…Radiohead.

  • Remember the Tsavo Man-Eaters? There’s a very good Italian article on the whole story — or you can read the English Wiki entry. (Thanks, Bruno!)
  • And finally we get to the most succulent news: my old native town, Vicenza, proved to still have some surprises in store for me.
    On the hills near the city, in the Arcugnano district, a pre-Roman amphitheatre has just been discovered. It layed buried for thousands of years… it could accomodate up to 4300 spectators and 300 actors, musicians, dancers… and the original stage is still there, underwater beneath the small lake… and there’s even a cave which acted as a megaphone for the actors’ voices, amplifying sounds from 8 Hz to 432 Hz… and there’s even a nearby temple devoted to Janus… and that temple was the real birthplace of Juliet, of Shakespearean fame… and there are even traces of ancient canine Gods… and of the passage of Julius Cesar and Cleopatra…. and… and…
    And, pardon my rudeness, wouldn’t all this happen to be a hoax?


No, it’s not a mere hoax, it is an extraordinary hoax. A stunt that would deserve a slow, admired clap, if it wasn’t a plain fraud.
The creative spirit behind the amphitheatre is the property owner, Franco Malosso von Rosenfranz (the name says it all). Instead of settling for the traditional Italian-style unauthorized development  — the classic two or three small houses secretely and illegally built — he had the idea of faking an archeological find just to scam tourists. Taking advantage of a license to build a passageway between two parts of his property, so that the constant flow of trucks and bulldozers wouldn’t raise suspicions, Malosso von Rosenfranz allegedly excavated his “ancient” theatre, with the intention of opening it to the public at the price of 40 € per visitor, and to put it up for hire for big events.
Together with the initial enthusiasm and popularity on social networks, unfortunately came legal trouble. The evidence against Malosso was so blatant from the start, that he immediately ended up on trial without any preliminary hearing. He is charged with unauthorized building, unauthorized manufacturing and forgery.
Therefore, this wonderful example of Italian ingenuity will be dismanteled and torn down; but the amphitheatre website is fortunately still online, a funny fanta-history jumble devised to back up the real site. A messy mixtre of references to local figures, famous characters from the Roman Era, supermarket mythology and (needless to say) the omnipresent Templars.


The ultimate irony is that there are people in Arcugnano still supporting him because, well, “at least now we have a theatre“. After all, as the Wiki page on unauthorized building explains, “the perception of this phenomenon as illegal […] is so thin that such a crime does not entail social reprimand for a large percentage of the population. In Italy, this malpractice has damaged and keeps damaging the economy, the landscape and the culture of law and respect for regulations“.
And here resides the brilliance of old fox Malosso von Rosenfranz’s plan: to cash in on these times of post-truth, creating an unauthorized building which does not really degrade the territory, but rather increase — albeit falsely — its heritage.
Well, you might have got it by now. I am amused, in a sense. My secret chimeric desire is that it all turns out to be an incredible, unprecedented art installations.  Andthat Malosso one day might confess that yes, it was all a huge experiment to show how little we care abot our environment and landscape, how we leave our authenticarcheological wonders fall apart, and yet we are ready to stand up for the fake ones. (Thanks, Silvietta!)

Medicina legale illustrata

Grazie al cinema e alla televisione, oggi tutti possono vantare una certa familiarità con le tecniche di medicina forense: sulla scena del crimine gli esperti si avvalgono di avanzate tecnologie, e le indagini coprono settori interdisciplinari quali la balistica, la chimica, la biologia, l’entomologia, la dattiloscopia, la tossicologia, e via dicendo.

La medicina forense nacque verso la metà dell’800 fra Austria e Germania, quando alcuni medici compresero l’importanza degli studi criminologici e si impegnarono affinché la disciplina adottasse scrupolosamente il metodo scientifico. Eduard von Hoffmann, medico praghese, fu uno dei padri di questa moderna tendenza. Le sue opere fondamentali sono Lehrbuch für gerichtliche Medizin (“Manuale di Medicina Legale”, 1878) e Atlas der gerichtlichen Medizin (“Atlante di Medicina Legale”, 1898).

Eduard_von_Hofmann_c1875
Quest’ultimo volume, in particolare, è arricchito da 193 fotografie e 56 illustrazioni a colori, per venire incontro alla sempre più pressante richiesta di riferimenti e materiali visivi.
La cromolitografia, tecnica artistica nata a metà secolo, permetteva di rendere con particolare realismo il colorito, la texture e le ombreggiature dei soggetti ritratti, e questo risultava di fondamentale importanza per insegnare agli studenti e ai colleghi le recenti scoperte e i nuovi metodi di analisi.
Le splendide tavole contenute nel libro sono opera di un certo A. Schmitson: nella prefazione Hoffmann loda l’artista, del tutto “digiuno” del tema trattato, per l’abilità esecutiva e l’accuratezza della comprensione. (Per quanto profano, secondo le nostre ricerche Schmitson ha illustrato almeno altri due atlanti medici, in particolare di anatomia patologica e ginecologia).

Ecco dunque una selezione di alcune fra le migliori illustrazioni dell’Atlante.

Neonato. Soffocamento da porzione di membrana.

Neonato. Soffocamento da porzione di membrana.

 

Omicidio a causa di varie ferite inferte con strumenti differenti (ferro da stiro, coltello, calci, pressione del petto).

Omicidio a causa di varie ferite inferte con strumenti differenti (ferro da stiro, coltello, calci, pressione del petto).

 

Suicidio per sgozzamento.

Suicidio per sgozzamento.

 

Suicidio per accoltellamento.

Suicidio per accoltellamento multiplo.

 

Ferita circolare da pistola (il proiettile è stato deviato dalla calotta cranica, girando attorno al cervello).

Ferita circolare da pistola (il proiettile è stato deviato dalla calotta cranica, girando attorno al cervello).

 

Suicidio per impiccagione; sospensione del corpo per diversi giorni; distribuzione peculiare dell'ipostasi cadaverica.

Suicidio per impiccagione; sospensione del corpo per diversi giorni; distribuzione peculiare dell’ipostasi cadaverica.

 

Suicidio per impiccagione con doppia corda. Posizione asimmetrica del nodo.

Suicidio per impiccagione con doppia corda. Posizione asimmetrica del nodo.

 

Suicidio per impiccagione con vecchia corda arrotolata per cinque volte attorno al collo.

Suicidio per impiccagione con vecchia corda arrotolata per cinque volte attorno al collo.

 

Formazione di Fungo (alga) su un cadavere trovato in acqua. (Stadio iniziale, il neonato è rimasto per 14 giorni nell'acqua corrente).

Formazione di Fungo (alga) su un cadavere trovato in acqua. (Stadio iniziale, il neonato è rimasto per 14 giorni nell’acqua corrente).

 

Lo stesso bambino dell'immagine precedente, rimasto nell'acqua per quattro settimane.

Lo stesso bambino dell’immagine precedente, rimasto nell’acqua per quattro settimane.

 

Cauterizzazione delle labbra e della regione attorno alla bocca per ingestione di Lysol.

Cauterizzazione delle labbra e della regione attorno alla bocca per ingestione di Lysol.

 

Avvelenamento da fumi di carbone.

Avvelenamento da fumi di carbone.

 

Traumi da caduta al momento della morte.

Traumi da caduta al momento della morte.

 

Situazione anormale del livor mortis come risultato della posizione del corpo.

Situazione anormale del livor mortis come risultato della posizione del corpo.

 

Estremità inferiore di un neonato rimasto per diversi mesi nell'acqua corrente; formazione di adipocera.

Estremità inferiore di un neonato rimasto per diversi mesi nell’acqua corrente; formazione di adipocera.

 

Cadavere mummificato di suicida (scoperto 10 anni dopo la morte).

Cadavere mummificato di suicida (scoperto 10 anni dopo la morte).

L’Atlante di Eduard von Hoffmann è consultabile gratuitamente online nella sua traduzione inglese a questo indirizzo. L’analisi forense svolta dall’autore su questi, ed altri, casi è altrettanto interessante delle illustrazioni, e non soltanto dal punto di vista criminologico: vengono infatti svelati diversi dettagli, talvolta terribili e commoventi, delle vicende umane che hanno portato a queste morti violente.

Arte criminologica

Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Pee Gee Daniel

Accade spesso che per il raggiungimento di mete stupefacenti la via che vi ci conduce si presenti impervia.

Anche in questo caso, al termine di un percorso accidentato, tra gli inestricabili paesini del cuore della Lomellina, sfrecciando lungo sottili assi viari a prova di ammortizzatore, si giunge finalmente a un prodigioso sancta sanctorum per gli amanti del macabro, dell’insolito e del curioso, nascosto – come sempre si conviene a un vero tesoro – nell’ampio soppalco di una grande cascina bianca, dispersa tra le campagne.

1

Là sopra vi attendono, beffardamente occhieggianti dalle loro teche collocate in un ordine rapsodico ma di indubbio impatto, teste sotto formalina galleggianti in barattoli di vetro, mani mozze, corpi mummificati, arti pietrificati, crani di gemelli dicefali, barattoli di larve di sarcophaga carnaria, cadaveri adagiati dentro bare in noce, un austero mezzobusto della Cianciulli (la celeberrima “Saponificatrice di Correggio”), pezzi rari come alcuni documenti olografi di Cesare Lombroso, parti anatomiche provenienti da vecchi gabinetti medici, armi del delitto, strumenti di tortura o per elettroshock in uso in un recente passato, memento di pellagrosi e briganti, tsantsa umane e di scimmia prodotte dalla tribù ecuadoriana dei Jivaros, bambolotti voodoo, cimeli risalenti a efferati fatti di cronaca nostrana.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Creatore e gestore di questa casa-museo del crimine è il facondo Roberto Paparella. Sarà lui a introdurvi e accompagnarvi per le varie installazioni con la giusta dose di erudizione e intrattenimento: un po’ chaperon, un po’ cicerone e un po’ Virgilio dantesco.

Diplomato in arte e restauro (la parte inferiore dell’edificio è infatti occupata da mobilio in attesa di recupero) e criminologo, il Paparella ha saputo combinare questi due aspetti dando vita a una disciplina ibrida che ha voluto battezzare “arte criminologica”, cui è improntata l’intera mostra permanente che ho avuto il piacere di visitare in quel di Olevano. Poiché c’è innanzitutto da dire che non di mero collezionismo si tratta: molti dei pezzi che vi troviamo sono cioè manufatti e ricostruzioni iperrealistiche composti ad hoc dalla sapienza tecnica del nostro, cosicché i reperti storici e i “falsi d’autore” si mescolano e si confondono in maniera pressoché indistinguibile, giocando sul significato più ampio del termine “originale”.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2718

DSCN2709

My beautiful picture

È forse utile spiegare che il museo è ospitato all’interno di una comunità terapeutica. Roberto Paparella infatti, oltre a essere un artista del lugubre, un restauratore, un ricercatore scrupoloso nel campo criminologico e un tabagista imbattibile, è anche stato il più giovane direttore di una comunità per tossicodipendenti in Italia (autore insieme al giurista Guido Pisapia, fratello dell’attuale sindaco di Milano, di un testo per operatori del settore), mentre oggi si occupa di ragazzi usciti dall’istituto penale minorile. Proprio questo, mi ha rivelato, è stato uno dei principali sproni alla sua vera passione: ripercorrere quotidianamente i vari iter giudiziari e la teoria giuridica di delitti e pene in compagnia dei suoi ragazzi ha fatto rinascere in lui questo interesse per delinquenti, vittime, atti omicidiari e “souvenir” a essi connessi.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Una vocazione riaffiorata dal passato, visto che il primo a instillare in lui questo gusto grandguignolesco fu in effetti il padre che, dopo aver visitato il museo delle cere di Milano, aveva deciso di farsene uno in proprio, nello scantinato di casa sua, che aveva poi chiamato La taverna rossa e nel quale amava condurre famigliari e amici nel tentativo di impressionarli con le ricostruzioni di famosi assassini, seppure di produzione casalinga e un po’ naif.
La tradizione familiare peraltro prosegue, visto che i due figli di Paparella, cresciuti tra cadaveri dissezionati più o meno posticci, tengono a fornire spontaneamente i propri pareri in merito alla attendibilità di questa o quella riproduzione artigianale di cui il padre è autore.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2725

Per quanto riguarda la “falsificazione” anatomica di salme o parti di esse, è una cura certosina quella che viene impiegata, avvalendosi di uno studio filologico, di un’attenta scelta dei materiali, di una efficace disposizione scenografica dei corpi stessi e delle luci che ne esalteranno le forme. Come nel caso di Elisa Claps, i cui resti Paparella ha rielaborato ricoprendo uno scheletro in resina con uno speciale ritrovato indiano noto come cartapelle, capace di ricreare l’effetto di un tegumento incartapecorito dalla lunga esposizione agli elementi atmosferici, e infine decorato con altri componenti di provenienza umana (l’apparato dentario è fornito da alcuni studi odontoiatrici, mentre i capelli vengono recuperati da vecchie parrucche di capelli veri, scovate nei mercatini).
Paparella afferma che nel suo operato si cela anche una motivazione morale: la volontà di ridare una consistenza tridimensionale alle vittime come ai carnefici, nella speranza di muovere dentro allo spettatore quelli che potremmo individuare come i due momenti aristotelici della pietà e del terrore.

Continuando la visita, incontriamo il corpo del cosiddetto Vampiro della Bergamasca, già esaminato a suo tempo dal Lombroso, alle cui misurazioni antropometriche lo scultore si è attenuto fedelmente: per la cronaca, Vincenzo Verzeni era un serial killer o, secondo la terminologia clinica del tempo, un «monomaniaco omicida necrofilomane, antropofago, affetto da vampirismo», che provava una frenesia erotica nello strappare coi denti larghi brani di carne alle proprie vittime.

Accanto, ecco lo scheletro di un morto di mafia, con sasso in bocca e mani amputate, che emerge faticosamente dalla terra mentre, sull’altro lato, in una posizione rattrappita, una mummia azteca lancia al visitatore una versione parodistica dell’Urlo di Munch. Alle sue spalle, addossata all’estesa parete, un’intera schiera di calchi delle teste di alienati e criminali ci osserva in maniera inquietante, a breve distanza dai calchi dei genitali di stupratori e di pazienti affette dal terribile tribadismo.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Si prosegue lungo una parete tappezzata di scatti ANSA di celebri processi del secondo dopoguerra, finché – in un accostamento emblematico dello stile di questo stravagante museo – poggiato su una lapide di candido marmo, ci si imbatte in un set anti-vampiri completo, con tanto di teschio, altarino portatile, barattolo contenente terra consacrata, chiodone in ferro in luogo dell’abusato paletto di frassino, argilla, paramenti ecclesiastici vari, pipistrelli essiccati, breviario e crocefisso a portar via, il tutto serbato in uno scrigno ligneo di pregevole fattura.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Ritornati all’entrata, al momento del commiato, troverete a salutarvi il manichino animato di Antonio Boggia, pluriomicida della Milano ottocentesca. A qualche passo dall’automa, l’occhio cade su una pesante mannaia in ferro, usata dallo stesso Boggia per le sue esecuzioni. Vera o falsa? Non sta a noi rivelarvelo. Se vi va, andando alla mostra (che vi si offrirà ben più particolareggiata di questo mio stringato resoconto) portatevi in tasca il giusto quantitativo di carbonio 14, oppure, più semplicemente, godetevi lo spettacolo senza porvi troppe domande.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture
Museo di Arte Criminologica
, via Cascina Bianca 1, 27020 Olevano di Lomellina (PV)
È necessario prenotare: tel. 3333639136 tel./fax 038451311 email: [email protected]

Speciale: Mariano Tomatis

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ama l’appellativo di wonder injector, istillatore di meraviglia o “tecnico dello stupore”. Quello che comincia come un rapido giro sul suo sito o sul suo blog si trasforma inevitabilmente in un viaggio di diverse ore, in preda ad una vertigine crescente. È difficile raccontare o definire Mariano Tomatis, ed è bello che lo sia.

Mariano si occupa di illusionismo, magia, matematica, criminologia e tecnologia. Ma, qualsiasi campo stia affrontando, lo fa inevitabilmente da un punto di vista inaspettato. Il suo lavoro è tutto proteso a un nuovo modo di relazionarsi con la meraviglia, a farla irrompere nel nostro quotidiano superando i modi triti e ritriti di quei misteri che in queste pagine abbiamo spesso definito “da supermarket”, preconfezionati, tipici di tanti libri o trasmissioni televisive.

Mariano Tomatis è il tipo di persona che, leggendo uno strano trattato esoterico seicentesco contenente alcune tavole crittografate secondo un sistema complicatissimo, si domanda: che tipo di computer avranno usato per codificarlo, all’epoca? E lo costruisce.

20130322m

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

20130322f

20130322g
È anche il tipo di persona che, vedendo l’ennesimo numero di magia in cui una bella ragazza viene tagliata a metà, sa scorgerne le implicazioni sessiste e non esita a raccontarci come un numero simile sia nato sorprendentemente proprio da problematiche politiche legati agli albori dei diritti della donna (in questo breve documentario).

20130526f

20130526h
O, ancora, esaminando uno dei quadri più celebri della storia dell’arte ci racconta le infinite risme di ipotesi, sempre più fantascientifiche, che il dipinto ha originato… per poi gelarci con un’interpretazione molto più semplice e illuminante.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jvE_hcbxrM]

La performance che ha scritto assieme a Ferdinando Buscema ha aperto Ingenuity, una sontuosa celebrazione dell’intelligenza, della curiosità e della meraviglia che ha coinvolto scienziati, artisti, scrittori, designer, musicisti e maghi provenienti da tutto il mondo, organizzata da BoingBoing, uno dei siti di informazione geek e cyberpunk più letti al mondo. Potete vedere la performance qui.

20130814c

Oltre ad aver scritto libri sul mentalismo, sui numeri e sull’illusionismo, Mariano ci regala continuamente nuovi stimoli, riportando storie curiose e poco note che affronta con scrupolo, determinato com’è a “illuminare le meraviglie sul confine tra Scienza e Mistero”.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
In esclusiva per Bizzarro Bazar, ecco la nostra intervista a Mariano Tomatis.

Qual è la tua formazione?

Ho una laurea in Informatica e mi occupo di illusionismo da quindici anni.

Come hai incominciato ad appassionarti di illusionismo, misteri e scienza?

Recentemente ho ritrovato un tema scritto quando facevo le elementari, in cui mi ripromettevo – quando fossi stato “grande” – di fare luce sui principali misteri: dal mostro di Lochness al triangolo delle Bermude, fino alla perduta città di Atlantide. Ho incontrato l’illusionismo ammirando il mago Silvan e formandomi sulle sue scatole magiche. Vivendo a Torino, ho avuto la fortuna di scoprire e frequentare il Circolo Amici della Magia, dove l’arte magica è particolarmente valorizzata. Da qualche anno, insieme a Ferdinando Buscema, stiamo definendo il concetto di “magic experience design” – un approccio all’illusionismo che trascende il contesto teatrale e interviene sulla realtà, facendo succedere eventi magici nel quotidiano.

Il tuo approccio ai cosiddetti “misteri” (quello di Rennes-le-Château viene in mente per primo) è del tutto originale – ironico, scettico, e allo stesso tempo entusiasta: come concili queste tendenze? Si può dire che tu stia sfruttando il fascino di questi enigmi per parlarci in realtà di qualcos’altro?

Conciliare una consapevolezza razionale e un’immersione ingenua nei misteri potrebbe sembrare il tentativo di avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca, eppure si tratta di un equilibrio su cui molti autori hanno scritto pagine brillanti. Michael Saler lo chiama “incanto disincantato”. Joshua Landy parla di “sistemi di credenze consapevoli della propria illusorietà”. Orhan Pamuk confessa di scrivere romanzi la cui funzione principale è quella di coltivare tale capacità nel lettore. Il padre della prestigiazione moderna, Robert-Houdin, costruiva i suoi spettacoli in modo da premiare un atteggiamento di distaccata credulità. Con Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle ha creato un personaggio talmente verosimile che oggi i suoi fan continuano a visitare la sua casa in Baker Street a Londra, del tutto consapevoli di partecipare a un gioco. Coltivare nel lettore moderno questo atteggiamento è una scelta estetica a cui aderisco pienamente.
Nel dichiarare i suoi intenti, il Cicap afferma di usare il fascino dei misteri per spiegare la Scienza. Nel mio caso, spiegare la Scienza è solo un effetto collaterale: il mio intento è quello di contribuire al re-incantamento del mondo, e credo che il miglior modo di farlo sia l’educazione all’incanto disincantato.

In diversi tuoi lavori si avverte una particolare vertigine, che è quella di non poter esattamente sapere a che punto finiscono i fatti, e quando incomincia il “trucco”. Anche qui ho la sensazione che mischiare realtà e finzione sia, certamente, un gioco divertente; ma al tempo stesso, vista la sistematicità con cui lo utilizzi, che vi sia dietro un progetto più preciso.

Credo di averti risposto sopra. Per citare un altro dei miei autori più amati, Lovecraft mescolò in modi raffinati realtà e finzione, producendo potenti sensazioni di straniamento attraverso i suoi racconti. Nel suo Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy Graham Harman ne esplora le tecniche narrative con una notevole ampiezza di analisi. Leggendo Harman, oggi mi chiedo come Lovecraft avrebbe sfruttato Twitter, Facebook e YouTube per produrre le stesse sensazioni disturbanti. Accostare personaggi di epoche lontane alle moderne tecnologie offre straordinari spunti creativi. Se c’è un progetto dietro la sistematicità con cui lavoro su questi confini, esso riguarda la possibilità di portare alla luce modi per meravigliare sempre nuovi, più profondi e al passo coi tempi. E magari di ispirare un Lovecraft 2.0!

Lovecraft-Facebook
Il mentalismo è intrigante soprattutto in quanto smaschera le trappole del nostro pensiero. Si può dire che vi sia un utilizzo “sano” del mistero e della meraviglia, e un altro invece “pericoloso”?

Michael Saler identifica nell’ironia l’elemento che è alla base della meraviglia “sana”. Inganno (e autoinganno) diventano pericolosi dove non c’è consapevolezza ironica, ma aperta volontà di approfittare di un altro individuo. Dovremmo sempre tenere in mente le parole di Joseph Pulitzer: «Non esiste delitto, inganno, trucco, imbroglio e vizio che non vivano della loro segretezza. Portate alla luce del giorno questi segreti, descriveteli, rendeteli ridicoli agli occhi di tutti e prima o poi la pubblica opinione li getterà via. La sola divulgazione di per sé non è forse sufficiente, ma è l’unico mezzo senza il quale falliscono tutti gli altri».

Hai parlato di educazione alla complessità: come sta cambiando, o come deve secondo te cambiare, la magia nell’era tecnologica, non soltanto a livello di nuovi strumenti ma anche di portata etica?

La mentalità postmoderna deve contaminare l’illusionismo molto più di quanto abbia fatto finora. È ora che i prestigiatori si interroghino seriamente sul ruolo che possono avere le loro storie nel mondo contemporaneo. Terence McKenna diceva che «il vero segreto della magia è che il mondo è fatto di parole, e che se tu conosci le parole di cui il mondo è fatto puoi farne quello che vuoi». Anche se sembra una considerazione esoterica, è un’immagine precisa del potere che hanno le storie nel plasmare la realtà. Concordo con Wu Ming 4 quando scrive che “le narrazioni ci appartengono almeno quanto noi apparteniamo a esse. Noi interagiamo con le narrazioni allo stesso modo in cui interagiamo con il mondo che ci circonda, consapevoli che per cambiarlo abbiamo innanzi tutto bisogno di raccontarlo diversamente”. Credo che l’illusionismo, come la letteratura militante, possa avere una dimensione marziale – e che tale forza sia ampiamente da esplorare. Il mio documentario Donne a metà (2013) va in quella direzione. Penn&Teller sono la coppia di illusionisti più all’avanguardia su questo versante.

magic-and-the-brain_1

Da specialista dell’incanto per il tuo pubblico, c’è qualcosa oggi che riesce ad incantare te?

Continuamente. Aderisco totalmente alla metafora che David Pescovitz usò per rispondere alla domanda della rivista Edge “Che cosa ti rende ottimista?” L’editor del blog BoingBoing scrisse di essere ottimista perché il mondo è una gigantesca Wunderkammer, pronta a stupirci a ogni angolo.
Un blog come il tuo ha il grande valore di dimostrarlo quotidianamente.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y13tSEyOqGs]

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Mariano Tomatis.

Il Museo Criminologico di Roma

2013-01-03 11.01.00

Nella seconda metà dell’800, in Europa e in Italia, divenne sempre più evidente la necessità di una riforma carceraria; allo stesso tempo, e grazie agli intensi dibattiti sulla questione, crebbe l’interesse per lo studi delle cause della delinquenza, e dei possibili metodi per curarla. Mentre quindi la Polizia Scientifica muoveva i primi passi, il grande criminologo Cesare Lombroso studiava le possibili correlazioni fra la morfologia fisica e l’attitudine al delitto, e grazie a lui prendeva vita il primo, grande museo di antropologia criminale a Torino.

A Roma, invece, si dovette aspettare fino al 1931 perché potesse aprire al pubblico il “Museo Criminale”, che ospitava la collezione di reperti utilizzati precedentemente per gli studi della scuola di Polizia scientifica. Il Museo ebbe poi fasi e fortune alterne, tanto da venire chiuso nel 1968, e riaperto solo nel 1975 con la nuova denominazione “MUCRI – Museo criminologico”. La nuova sede, all’interno delle carceri del palazzo del Gonfalone, è quella in cui il Museo si trova ancora oggi. Dalla fine degli anni ’70 il museo è stato nuovamente chiuso per quasi vent’anni, per riaprire al pubblico nel 1994.

Il Museo oggi conta centinaia di reperti, divisi in tre grandi sezioni: la Giustizia dal Medioevo al XIX secolo, l’Ottocento e l’evoluzione del sistema penitenziario, il Novecento e i protagonisti del crimine.

2013-01-03 10.41.38

2013-01-03 10.49.54

2013-01-03 10.51.53
La prima sezione, che ripercorre i metodi di punizione e di tortura in uso dal Medioevo fino al XIX secolo, è ovviamente la più impressionante. Dalle asce per decapitazione cinquecentesche, alle gogne, ai banchi di fustigazione, alle mordacchie, agli strumenti di tortura dell’Inquisizione, tutto ci parla di un’epoca in cui la crudeltà delle pene eguagliava, se non addirittura superava, quella del crimine stesso. Fra gli oggetti esposti segnaliamo la tonaca del celebre boia pontificio Mastro Titta, la spada che decapitò Beatrice Cenci, una forca e tre ghigliottine (fra cui quella in uso a Piazza del Popolo fino al 1869).

517507417_db6b739f85_z

2013-01-03 10.52.41

2013-01-03 10.52.26

2013-01-03 10.47.10
Nella seconda sezione, dedicata all’Ottocento, troviamo traccia della nascita dell’antropologia criminale, e dell’evoluzione del sistema carcerario. Possiamo vedere il calco del cranio del brigante Giuseppe Villella (su cui Lombroso scoprì nel 1872 la “prova” della delinquenza atavica: la “fossetta occipitale mediana”); lo spazio dedicato agli attentati politici espone, tra l’altro, il cranio, il cervello e gli scritti dell’anarchico lucano Giovanni Passannante, che attentò alla vita del re Umberto I a Napoli, nel 1878. Ugualmente impressionanti il letto di contenzione e le camicie di forza che testimoniano la nascita dei manicomi criminali.

giovannipassannante_cervello

7165628283_224f9178e4_c

2013-01-03 11.03.08

2013-01-03 11.02.55

2013-01-03 10.57.08

2013-01-03 10.56.39

2013-01-03 11.00.33

2013-01-03 11.02.23
Ma forse la parte più sorprendente è quella delle cosiddette “malizie carcerarie”, ovvero i sotterfugi con cui i detenuti comunicavano tra di loro, occultavano armi o inventavano sistemi per evadere o compiere atti di autolesionismo. Un’estrema inventiva che si tinge di toni tristi e spesso macabri.

7165624283_d429147e2e_c
L’ultima sezione, quella dedicata ai grandi episodi di cronaca nera del Novecento, è una vera e propria wunderkammer del crimine, dove decine e decine di oggetti e reperti sono esposti in un percorso eterogeneo che spazia dagli anni ’30 agli anni ’90. Una stanza ospita armi e indizi trovati sulla scena dei delitti italiani fra i più celebri, come ad esempio quelli perpetrati da Leonarda Cianciulli, la “saponificatrice di Correggio”; tra gli altri, sono esibiti gli oggetti personali di Antonietta Longo, la “decapitata di Castelgandolfo”, le armi della banda Casaroli, la pistola con cui la contessa Bellentani uccise il suo amante durante una sfarzosa serata di gala. Vi si trovano anche materiali pornografici sequestrati (quando erano ancora illegali), ed esempi di merce di contrabbando, inclusi numerosi quadri ed opere d’arte.

7350834806_d8df25bcfb_c

2013-01-03 11.07.17

2013-01-03 11.10.56

2013-01-03 11.04.53
Altre vetrine interessanti ripercorrono le testimonianze relative alla criminalità organizzata, al banditismo (con oggetti appartenuti a Salvatore Giuliano), al terrorismo, e a tutte le declinazioni possibili del crimine (furti, falsi, giochi d’azzardo, ecc.). Nella sezione dedicata allo spionaggio si può ammirare uno splendido e curioso baule dentro il quale fu rinvenuto, dopo un rocambolesco inseguimento, un piccolo ometto seduto su un seggiolino, legato con le cinghie e avvolto da coperte e cuscini. Si trattava di una spia che cercava di imbarcarsi clandestinamente all’aeroporto di Fiumicino.

2013-01-03 11.15.06

2013-01-03 11.15.18
Il Museo Criminologico si trova in Via del Gonfalone 29 (una laterale di Via Giulia), ed è aperto dal martedì al sabato dalle ore 9 alle 13; martedì e giovedì dalle 14.30 alle 18.30. Ecco il sito ufficiale del MUCRI.

AGGIORNAMENTO: dal 01 giugno 2016 il MUCRI è chiuso, e non è stata comunicata una data di riapertura.