Simone Unverdorben, The False Martyr

Article by guestblogger La cara Pasifae

A little boy went out to play.
When he opened his door he saw the world.
As he passed through the doorway he caused a riflection.
Evil was born!
Evil was born and followed the boy.

(D. Lynch, Inland Empire, 2006)

It was a nice late-summer afternoon, in 2013. I remember well.
A friend had invited me to the opening of his latest exhibition. He had picked an unusual place for the event: an ancient and isolated parish church that stood high up on a hill, the church of Nanto. The building had been recently renovated, and it was open to the public only on specific occasions.
Once there, one immediately feels the urge to look around. The view is beautiful, but it pays the price of the impact the construction industry (I was almost about to say “architecture”) has had on the surroundings, with many industrial buildings covering the lanscapes of Veneto region like a tattoo. Better go inside and look at the paintings.

I was early for the opening, so I had the artist, his works and the entire exhibition area all for myself. I could walk and look around without any hurry, and yet I felt something disturbing my peace, something I couldn’t quite pin down at first:  it kind of wormed its way into my visual field, calling for attention. On a wall, as I was passing from one painted canvas to the next, I eventually spotted a sudden, indefinite blur of colors. A fresco. An image had been resting there well before the exhibition paintings were placed in front of it!

Despite the restoration, as it happens with many medieval and Renaissance frescoes, some elements were still confused and showed vanishing, vaporous outlines. But once in focus, an unsettling vision emerged: the fresco depicted a quite singular torture scene, the likes of which I had never encountered in any other artwork (but I wouldn’t want to pass as an expert on the subject).
Two female figures, standing on either side, were holding the arms of a blonde child (a young Christ, a child-saint, or a puer sacer, a sacred and mystical infant, I really couldn’t say). The kid was being tortured by two young men: each holding a stiletto, they were slicing the boy’s skin all over, and even his face seemed to have been especially brutalized.


Blood ran down the child’s bound feet into a receiving bowl, which had been specifically placed under the victim’s tormented limbs.

The child’s swollen face (the only one still clearly visible) had an ecstatic expression that barely managed to balance the horror of the hemorrhage and of the entire scene: in the background, a sixth male figure sporting a remarkable beard, was twisting a cloth band around the prisoner throat. The baby was being choked to death!

What is the story of this fresco? What tale does it really tell?
The five actors do not look like peasants; the instruments are not randomly chosen: these are thin, sharp, professional blades. The incisions on the victim’s body are too regular. Who perpetrated this hideous murder, who was the object of the resentment the author intended to elicit in the onlookers? Maybe the fresco was a representation — albeit dramatic and exaggerated — of a true crime. Should the choking, flaying and bleeding be seen as a metaphor for some parasitic exploitation, or do they hint at some rich and eccentric nobleman’s quirkiness? Is this a political allegory or a Sadeian chronicle?
The halo surrounding the child’s head makes him an innocent or a saved soul. Was this a homage, a flattering detail to exhalt the commissioner of this work of art? What character was meant to be celebrated here, the subjects on the sides who are carrying out a dreadful, but unavoidable task, or the boy at the center who looks so obscenely resigned to suffer their painful deeds? Are we looking at five emissaries of some brutal but rational justice as they perform their duties, or the misadventure of a helpless soul that fell in the hands of a ferocious gang of thugs?

At the bottom of the fresco, a date: «ADI ⋅ 3 ⋅ APRILE 1479».
This historical detail brought me back to the present. The church was already crowded with people.
I felt somehow crushed by the overload of arcane symbols, and the frustation of not having the adequate knowledge to interpret what I had seen. I furtively took a snapshot. I gave my host a warm farewell, and then got out, hoping the key to unlock the meaning of the fresco was not irretrievably lost in time.

As I discovered at the beginning of my research on this controversial product of popular iconography, the fresco depicts the martyrdom of Saint Simonino of Trent. Simone Unverdorben, a two-year-old toddler from Trent, disappeared on March 23, 1475. His body was found on Easter Day. It was said to have been mauled and strangled. In Northern Italy, in those years, antisemitic abuses and persecutions stemmed from the widely influential sermons of the clergy. The guilt for the heinous crime immediately fell upon the Trent Jewish community. All of its members had to endure one of the biggest trials of the time, being subjected to tortures that led to confessions and reciprocal accusations.

During the preliminary investigations of the Trent trial, a converted Jew was asked if the practice of ritual homicide of Christian toddlers existed within the Hebrew cult. […] The converted Jew, at the end of the questioning, confirmed with abundant details the practice of ritual sacrifice in the Jewish Easter liturgy.
Another testimony emerged from the interrogation of another of the alleged killers of the little Simone, the Jewish physician Tobia. He declared on the rack there was a commerce in Christian blood among Jews. A Jewish merchant called Abraam was said to have left Trent shortly before Simone’s death with the intention of selling Christian blood, headed to Feltre or Bassano, and to have asked around which of the two cities was closer to Trent. Tobia’s confession took place under the terrifying threat of being tortured and in the desperate attempt to avoid it: he therefore had to be cooperative to the point of fabrication; but it was understood that his testimony, whenever made up, should be consistent and plausible.
[…] Among the others, another converted man named Israele (Wolfgang, after converting) was  also interrogated under torture. He declared he had heard about other cases of ritual murders […]. These instances of ritual homicides were inventions whose protagonists had names that came from the interrogee’s memory, borrowed to crowd these fictional stories in a credible way.

(M. Melchiorre, Gli ebrei a Feltre nel Quattrocento. Una storia rimossa,
in Ebrei nella Terraferma veneta del Quattrocento,
a cura di G.M. Varanini e R.C. Mueller, Firenze University Press 2005)

Many were burned at the stake. The survivors were exiled from the city, after their possessions had been confiscated.
According to the jury, the child’s collected blood had been used in the ritual celebration of the “Jewish Easter”.

The facts we accurately extracted from the offenders, as recorded in the original trials, are the following. The wicked Jews living in Trent, having maliciously planned to make their Easter solemn through the killing of a Christian child, whose blood they could mix in their unleavened bread, commisioned it to Tobia, who was deemed perfect for the infamous deed as he was familiar with the town on the account of being a professional doctor. He went out at 10 pm on Holy Thursday, March 23, as all believers were at the Mass, walked the streets and alleys of the city and having spotted the innocent Simone all alone on his father’s front door, he showed him a big silver piece, and with sweet words and smiles he took him from via del Fossato, where his parents lived, to the house of the rich Jew Samuele, who was eagerly waiting for him. There he was kept, with charms and apples, until the hour of the sacrifice arrived. At 1 am, little twenty-nine-months-old Simone was taken to the chamber adjoining the women’s synagogue; he was stripped naked and a band or belt was made from his clothes, and he was muzzled with a handkerchief, so that he wouldn’t immediately choke to death nor be heard; Moses the Elder, sitting on a stall and holding the baby in his lap, tore a piece of flesh off his cheek with a pair of iron pliers. Samuele did the same while Tobia, assisted by Moar, Bonaventura, Israele, Vitale and another Bonaventura (Samuele’s cook) collected in a basin the blood pouring from the wound. After that, Samuele and the aforementioned seven Jews vied with each other to pierce the flesh of the holy martyr, declaring in Hebrew that they were doing so to mock the crucified God of the Christians; and they added: thus shall be the fate of all our enemies. After this feral ordeal, the old Moses took a knife and pierced with it the tip of the penis, and with the pliers tore a chunk of meat from the little right leg and Samuel, who replaced him, tore a piece out of the other leg. The copious blood oozing from the puerile penis was harvested in a different vase, while the blood pouring from the legs was collected in the basin. All the while, the cloth plugging his mouth was sometimes tightened and sometimes loosened; not satisfied with the outrageous massacre, they insisted in the same torture a second time, with greater cruelty, piercing him everywhere with pins and needles; until the young boy’s blessed soul departed his body, among the rejoicing of this insane riffraff.

(Annali del principato ecclesiastico di Trento dal 1022 al 1540, pp. 352-353)

Very soon Simonino (“little Simone”) was acclaimed as a “blessed martyr”, and his cult spread thoughout Northern Italy. As devotion grew wider, so did the production of paintings, ex voto, sculptures, bas reliefs, altar decorations.

Polichrome woodcut, Daniel Mauch’s workshop, Museo Diocesano Tridentino.

Questionable elements, taken from folktales and popular belief, began to merge with an already established, sterotyped antisemitism.

 

From Alto Adige, April 1, 2017.

Despite the fact that the Pope had forbidden the cult, pilgrims kept flocking. The fame of the “saint” ‘s miracles grew, together with a wave of antisemitism. The fight against usury led to the accusation of loan-sharking, extended to all Jews. The following century, Pope Sistus V granted a formal beatification. The cult of Saint Simonino of Trent further solidified. The child’s embalmed body was exhibited in Trent until 1955, together with the alleged relics of the instruments of torture.

In reality, Simone Unverdorben (or Unferdorben) was found dead in a water canal belonging to a town merchant, near a Jewish man’s home, probably a moneylender. If he wasn’t victim of a killer, who misdirected the suspects on the easy scapegoat of the Jewish community, the child might have fallen in the canal and drowned. Rats could have been responsible for the mutilations. In the Nineteenth Century, accurate investigations proved the ritual homicide theory wrong. In 1965, five centuries after the murder, the Church abolished  the worship of Saint “Martyr” Simonino for good.

A violent fury against the very portraits of the “torturers” lasted for a long time. Even the San Simonino fresco in Nanto was defaced by this rage. This is the reason why, during that art exhibition, I needed some time to recognize a painting in that indistinct blur of light and colors.

My attempt at gathering the information I needed in order to make sense of the simulacrum in the Nanto parish church, led me to discover an often overlooked incident, known only to the artists who represented it, their commissioners, their audience; but the deep discomfort I felt when I first looked at the fresco still has not vanished.

La cara Pasifae


Suggested bibliography:
– R. Po – Chia Hsia, Trent 1475. Stories of a Ritual Murder Trial, Yale 1992
– A. Esposito, D. Quaglioni, Processi contro gli Ebrei di Trento (1475-1478), CEDAM 1990
– A. Toaff, Pasque di sangue: ebrei d’Europa e omicidi rituali, Il Mulino 2008

An elephant on the gallows

The billboards for Sparks World Famous Shows, which appeared in small Southern American towns a couple of days before the circus’ arrival, seem quite anomalous to anyone who has a familiarity with this kind of poster design from the beginning of the Twentieth Century.
Where one could expect to see emphatic titles and hyperbolic advertising claims, Sparks circus — in a much too unpretentious way — was defined as a “moral, entertaining and instructive” spectacle; instead of boasting unprecedented marvels, the only claim was that the show “never broke a promise” and publicized its “25 years of honest dealing with the public“.

The reason why owner Charlie Sparks limited himself to stress his show’s transparency and decency, was that he didn’t have much else to count on, in order to lure the crowd.
Despite Sparks’ excellent reputation (he was among the most respected impresarios in the business), his was ultimately a second-category circus. It consisted of a dozen cars, against the 42 cars of his main rival in the South, John Robinson’s Circus. Sparks had five elephants, Robinson had twelve. And both of them could never hope to compete with Barnum & Bailey’s number one circus, with its impressive 84-car railroad caravan.
Therefore Sparks World Famous Shows kept clear of big cities and made a living by serving those smaller towns, ignored by more famous circuses, where the residents would find his attractions worth paying for.

Although Sparks circus was “not spectacularly but slowly and surely” growing, in those years it didn’t offer much yet: some trained seals, some clowns, riders and gymnasts, the not-so-memorable “Man Who Walks on His Head“, and some living statues like the ones standing today on public squares, waiting for a coin.
The only real resource for Charlie Sparks, his pride and joy widely displayed on the banners, was Mary.

Advertides as being “3 inches taller than Jumbo” (Barnum’s famous elephant), Mary was a 5-ton indian pachyderm capable of playing different melodies by blowing horns, and of throwing a baseball as a pitcher in one of her most beloved routines. Mary represented the main source of income for Charlie Sparks, who loved her not just for economical but also for sentimental reasons: she was the only real superior element of his circus, and his excuse for dreaming of entering the history of entertainment.
And in a sense it is because of Mary if Sparks is still remembered today, even if not for the reason he might have suspected or wanted.

On September 11, 1916, Sparks pitched his Big Top in St. Paul, a mining town in Clinch River Valley, Virginia. On that very day Walter “Red” Eldridge, a janitor in a local hotel, decided that he had enough of sweeping floors, and joined the circus.
Altough Red was a former hobo, and clearly knew nothing about elephants, he was entrusted with leading the pachyderms during the parade Sparks ran through the city streets every afternoon before the show.
The next day the circus moved to Kingsport, Tennessee, where Mary paraded quietly along the main street, until the elephants were brought over to a ditch to be watered. And here the accounts begin to vary: what we know for sure is that Red hit Mary with a stick, infuriating the beast.
The rogue elephant grabbed the inexperienced handler with its trunk, and threw him in the air. When the body fell back on the ground, Mary began to trample him and eventually crushed his head under her foot. “And blood and brains and stuff just squirted all over the street“, as one witness put it.

Charlie Sparks immediately found himself in the middle of the worst nightmare.
Aside from his employee’s death on a public street — not really a “moral” and “instructive” spectacle — the real problem was that the whole tour was now in jeopardy: what town would allow an out-of-control elephant near its limits?
The crowd demanded the animal to be suppressed and Sparks unwillingly understood that if he wanted to save what was left of his enterprise, Mary had to be sacrified and, with her, his personal dreams of grandeur.
But killing an elephant is no easy task.

The first, obvious attempt was to fire five 32-20 rounds at Mary. There’s a good reason however if elephants are called pachyderms: the thick skin barrier did not let the bullets go deep in the flesh and, despite the pain, Mary didn’t fall down. (When in 1994 Tyke, a 3.6-ton elephant, killed his handler running amok on the streets of Honolulu, it took 86 shots to stop him. Tyke became a symbol for the fights against animal cruelty in circuses, also because of the heartbreaking footage of his demise.)
Someone then suggested to try and eliminate Mary by electrocution, a method used more than a decade before in the killing of Topsy in Coney Island. But there was no nearby way of producing the electricity needed to carry out the execution.
Therefore it was decided that Mary would be hung.

The only gallows that could bear such a weight was to be found in the railyards in Erwin, where there was a derrick capable of lifting railcars to place them on the tracks.
Charlie Sparks, knowing he was about to lose an animal worth $20.000, was determined to make the most out of the desperate situation. In the brief time that took for Mary to be moved from Kingsport to Erwin, he had already turned his elephant’s execution into a public event.

On September 13, on a rainy and foggy afternoon, more than 2.500 people gathered at the railyards. Children stood in the front line to witness the extraordinary endeavour.
Mary was brought to the makeshift gallows, and her foot was chained to the tracks while men struggled to pass a chain around her neck. They then tied the chain to the derric, started the winch, and the hanging began.
In theory, the weight of her body would have had to quickly break her neck. But Mary’s agony was to be far from swift and painless; in the heat of the moment, someone forgot to untie the animal’s foot, which was still bound to the rails.

When they began to lift her up — a witness recalled — I heard the bones and ligaments cracking in her foot“; the men hastily released the foot, but right then the chain around Mary’s neck broke with a metallic crack.

The elephant fell on the ground and sat there upright, unable to move because in falling she had broken her hip.

The crowd, unaware that Mary at this point was wounded and paralyzed, panicked upon seeing the “murderous” elephant free from any restraint. As everyone ran for cover, one of the roustabouts climbed on the animal’s back and applaied a heavier chain to her neck.
The derrick once more began to lift the elephant, and this time the chain held the weight.
After she was dead, Mary was left to hang for half an hour. Her huge body was then buried in a large grave which had been excavated further up the tracks.

Mary’s execution, and the photograph of her hanging, were widely reported in the press. But to search for an article where this strange story was recounted with special emotion or participation would be useless. Back then, Mary’s incident was little more than quintessential, small-town oddity piece of news.
After all, people were used to much worse. In Erwin, in those very years, a black man was burned alive on a pile of crosstiles.

Today the residents of this serene Tennessee town are understandably tired of being associated with a bizarre and sad page of the city history — a century-old one, at that.
And yet still today some passing foreigner asks the proverbial, unpleasand question.
Didn’t they hang an elephant here?

A well-researched book on Mary’s story is The Day They Hung the Elephant by Charles E. Price. On Youtube you can find a short documentary entitled Hanging Over Erwin: The Execution of Big Mary.

Balthus’ adolescents

Art should comfort the disturbed,
and disturb the comfortable.

(Cesar A. Cruz)

Until January 31 2016 it is possible to visit the Balthus retrospective in Rome, which is divided in two parts, a most comprehensive exhibit being held at the Scuderie del Quirinale, and a second part in Villa Medici focusing on the artist’s creative process and giving access to the rooms the painter renovated and lived in during his 16 years as director of the Academy of France.

In many ways Balthus still remains an enigmatic figure, so unswervingly antimodernist to keep the viewer at distance: his gaze, always directed to the Renaissance (Piero della Francesca above all), is matched by a constant and meticulous research on materials, on painting itself before anything else. Closely examined, his canvas shows an immense plastic work on paint, applied in uneven and rugged strokes, but just taking a few steps back this proves to be functional to the creation of that peculiar fine dust always dancing within the light of his compositions, that kind of glow cloaking figures and objects and giving them a magical realist aura.

Even if the exhibit has the merit of retracing the whole spectrum of influences, experimentations and different themes explored by the painter in his long (but not too prolific) career, the paintings he created from the 30s to the 50s are unquestionably the ones that still remain in the collective unconscious. The fact that Balthus is not widely known and exhibited can be ascribed to the artist’s predilection for adolescent subjects, often half-undressed young girls depicted in provocative poses. In Villa Medici are presented some of the infamous polaroids which caused a German exhibit to close last year, with accusations of displaying pedophilic material.

The question of Balthus’ alleged pedophilia — latent or not — is one that could only arise in our days, when the taboo regarding children has grown to unprecedented proportions; and it closely resembles the shadows cast over Lewis Carroll, author of Alice in Wonderland, guilty of taking several photographs of little girls (pictures that Balthus, by the way, adored).

But if some of his paintings cause such an uproar even today, it may be because they bring up something subtly unsettling. Is this eroticism, pornography, or something else?

Trying to find a perfect definition separating eroticism from pornography is an outdated exercise. More interesting is perhaps the distinction made by Angela Carter (a great writer actively involved in the feminist cause) in her essay The Sadeian Woman, namely the contrast between reactionary pornography and “moral” (revolutionary) pornography.

Carter states that pornography, despite being obscene, is largely reactionary: it is devised to comfort and strenghten stereotypes, reducing sexuality to the level of those crude graffiti on the walls of public lavatories. This representation of intercourse inevitably ends up being just an encounter of penises and vaginas, or their analogues/substitutes. What is left out, is the complexity behind every sexual expression, which is actually influenced by economics, society and politics, even if we have a hard time acknowledging it. Being poor, for intance, can limit or deny your chance for a sophisticated eroticism: if you live in a cold climate and cannot afford heating, then you will have to give up on nudity; if you have many children, you will be denied intimacy, and so on. The way we make love is a product of circumstances, social class, culture and several other factors.

Thus, the “moral” pornographer is one who does not back up in the face of complexity, who does not try to reduce it but rather to stress it, even to the detriment of his work’s erotic appeal; in doing so, he distances himself from the pornographic cliché that would want sexual intercourse to be just an abstract encounter of genitals, a shallow and  meaningless icon; in giving back to sexuality its real depth, this pornographer creates true literature, true art. This attitude is clearly subversive, in that it calls into question biases and archetypes that our culture — according to Carter — secretely inoculates in our minds (for instance the idea of the Male with an erect sex ready to invade and conquer, the Female still bleeding every month on the account of the primordial castration that turned her genitals passive and “receptive”, etc.).

In this sense, Carter sees in Sade not a simple satyr but a satirist, the pioneer of this pornography aiming to expose the logic and stereoptypes used by power to mollify and dull people’s minds: in the Marquis’ universe, in fact, sex is always an act of abuse, and it is used as a narrative to depict a social horizon just as violent and immoral. Sade’s vision is certainly not tender towards the powerful, who are described as revolting monsters devoted by their own nature to crime, nor towards the weak, who are guilty of not rebelling to their own condition. When confronting his pornographic production with all that came before and after him, particularly erotic novels about young girls’ sexual education, it is clear how much Sade actually used it in a subversive and taunting way.

Pierre Klossowksi, Balthus’ brother, was one of Sade’s greatest commentators, yet we probably should not assign too much relevance to this connection; the painter’s frirendship with Antonin Artaud could be more enlightening.

Beyond their actual collaborations (in 1934 Artaud reviewed Balthus’ first personal exhibit, and the following year the painter designed costumes and sets for the staging of The Cenci), Artaudian theories can guide us in reading more deeply into Balthus’ most controversial works.

Cruelty was for Artaud a destructive and at the same time enlivening force, essential requisite for theater or for any other kind of art: cruelty against the spectator, who should be violently shaken from his certainties, and cruelty against the artist himself, in order to break every mask and to open the dizzying abyss hidden behind them.

Balthus’ Uncanny is not as striking, but it moves along the same lines. He sees in his adolscents, portrayed in bare bourgeois interiors and severe geometric perspectives, a subversive force — a cruel force, because it referes to raw instincts, to that primordial animalism society is always trying to deny.

Prepuberal and puberal age are the moments in which, once we leave the innocence of childhood behind, the conflict between Nature and Culture enters our everyday life. The child for the first time runs into prohibitions that should, in the mind of adults, create a cut from our wild past: his most undignified instincts must be suppressed by the rules of good behavior. And, almost as if they wanted to irritate the spectators, Balthus’ teenagers do anything but sit properly: they read in unbecoming positions, they precariously lean against the armchair with their thighs open, incorrigibly provocative despite their blank faces.

But is this a sexual provocation, or just ironic disobedience? Balthus never grew tired of repeating that malice lies only in the eyes of the beholder. Because adolescents are still pure, even if for a short time, and with their unaffectedness they reveal the adults inhibitions.

This is the subtle and elegant subversive vein of his paintings, the true reason for which they still cause such an uproar: Balthus’ cruelty lies in showing us a golden age, our own purest soul, the one that gets killed each time an adolescent becomes an adult. His aesthetic and poetic admiration is focused on this glimpse of freedom, on that instant in which the lost diamond of youth sparkles.

And if we want at all costs to find a trace of eroticism in his paintings, it will have to be some kind of “revolutionary” eroticism, like we said earlier, as it insinuates under our skin a complexity of emotions, and definitely not reassuring ones. Because with their cheeky ambiguity Balthus’ girls always leave us with the unpleasant feeling that we might be the real perverts.

Veneri anatomiche: l’ossessione del femmineo

C’è un’ossessione profonda, che attraversa i secoli e non accenna a placarsi. L’ossessione maschile per il corpo della donna.

Un corpo magnetico che conduce a sé (seduce), tirando i fili del simbolo; carne duttile e plasmabile, che nell’atto sessuale ha funzione ricettiva, eppure voragine abissale nella quale ci si può perdere; corpo castrante, che eccita la violenza e l’idolatria, corpo di dea callipigia da deflorare; scrigno che racchiude il segreto della vita, sessualità ambigua il cui piacere è sconosciuto e terribile.

Così è capitato che nel corpo femminile si sia scavato, per cavarne fuori questo suo mistero, aprendolo, smembrandolo in pezzi da ricombinare, cercando le occulte e segrete analogie, le geometrie nascoste, l’algebra del desiderio, come ha fatto ad esempio Hans Bellmer in tutta la sua carriera. Nei suoi scritti e nelle sue opere pittoriche (oltre che nelle sue bambole, di cui avevo parlato qui) l’artista tedesco ha maniacalmente decostruito la figura femminile disegnando paralleli inaspettati e perturbanti fra le varie parti anatomiche, in una sorta di febbrile feticismo onnicomprensivo, in cui occhi, vulve, piedi, orecchie si fondono assieme fluidamente, fino a creare inedite configurazioni di carne e di sogno.

illustration-by-hans-bellmer-from-lanatomie-de-limage-anatomy-of-the-image-1344796896_b

histoire de l'oeil (1)

L’erotismo di Bellmer è uno sguardo psicopatologico e assieme lucidissimo, freddo e visionario al tempo stesso; ed è nella sua opera Rose ouverte la nuit (1934), e nelle successive declinazioni del tema, che l’artista dà la più esatta indicazione di quale sia la sua ricerca. Nel dipinto, una ragazza solleva la pelle del suo stesso ventre per esaminare le proprie viscere.

d84a8f3348d02876c5b9d3cbf8e276ab

L’atto di alzare la pelle della donna, come si potrebbe sollevare una gonna, è una delle più potenti raffigurazioni dell’ossessione di cui parliamo. È lo strip-tease finale che lascia la femmina più nuda del nudo, che permette di scrutare all’interno della donna alla ricerca di un segreto che forse, beffardamente, non si troverà mai.
Ma l’immagine non è nuova, anzi vuole riecheggiare lo stesso turbamento che si può provare di fronte alle numerose e meravigliose veneri anatomiche a grandezza naturale scolpite in passato da abili artisti, una tradizione nata a Firenze alla fine del XVII secolo.

anatomicalvenus7padmfladm

tumblr_n0syitD0Ar1rvqo0ho1_1280

182jxc39k1lddjpg

venere

Queste bellissime fanciulle adagiate in pose languide aprono l’interno del loro corpo allo sguardo dello spettatore, senza pudore, senza mostrare dolore. Anzi, dalle espressioni dei loro volti si direbbe quasi che vi sia in loro un sottile compiacimento, un piacere estatico nell’offrirsi in questa nudità assoluta.
Perché questi corpi non sono rappresentati come cadaveri, ma essenzialmente vivi e coscienti?
L’esistenza stessa di simili sculture oggi può disorientare, ma è in realtà una naturale evoluzione delle preoccupazioni artistiche, scientifiche e religiose dei secoli precedenti. Prima di parlare di queste straordinarie opere ceroplastiche, facciamo dunque un rapido excursus che ci permetta di comprenderne appieno il contesto; sottolineo che non mi interesso qui alla storia delle veneri, né esclusivamente alla loro portata scientifica, quanto piuttosto al loro particolarissimo ruolo in riguardo al femmineo.

Vesalius_Fabrica_fronticepiece

Il dominio dello sguardo
Quando Vesalio, con incredibile coraggio (o spavalderia), si fece immortalare sul frontespizio della sua De humani corporis fabrica (1543) nell’atto di dissezionare personalmente un cadavere, stava lanciando un messaggio rivoluzionario: la medicina galenica, indiscussa fino ad allora, era colma di errori perché nessuno si era premurato di aprire un corpo umano e guardarci dentro con i propri occhi. Uomo del Rinascimento, Vesalio era strenuo sostenitore dell’esperienza diretta – in un’epoca, questo è ancora più notevole, in cui la “scienza” come la conosciamo non era ancora nata – e fu il primo a scindere il corpo da tutte le altre preoccupazioni metafisiche. Dopo di lui, il funzionamento del corpo umano non andrà più cercato nell’astrologia, nelle relazioni simbolico-alchemiche o negli elementi, ma in esso stesso.
Da questo momento, la dissezione occuperà per i secoli a venire il centro di ogni ricerca medica. Ed è lo sguardo di Vesalio, uno sguardo di sfida, altero e duro come la pietra, a imporsi come il paradigma dell’osservazione scientifica.

1543-Vesalio1

Il problema morale
Bisogna tenere a mente che nei secoli che stiamo prendendo in esame, l’anatomia non era affatto distaccata dalla visione religiosa, anzi si riteneva che studiare l’uomo – centro assoluto della Natura, immagine e somiglianza del Creatore e culmine della sua opera – significasse avvicinarsi un po’ di più anche a Dio.

Eppure, per quanto si riconoscesse come fondamentale l’esperienza diretta, era difficile liberarsi dall’idea che dissezionare una salma fosse in realtà una sorta di sacrilegio. Questa sensazione scomoda venne aggirata cercando soggetti di studio che avessero in qualche modo perso il loro statuto di “uomini”: criminali, suicidi o poveracci che il mondo non reclamava. Candidati ideali per il tavolo settorio. La violazione che si osava infliggere ai loro corpi era poi ulteriormente giustificata in quanto alle spoglie dissezionate venivano garantite, in cambio del sacrificio, una messa e una sepoltura cristiana che altrimenti non avrebbero avuto. Grazie al loro contributo alla ricerca, avendo scontato per così dire la loro pena, essi tornavano ad essere accettati dalla società.

Lo stesso senso di colpa per l’attività di dissezione spiega il successo delle tavole anatomiche che raffigurano i cosiddetti écorché, gli scorticati. Per raffigurare gli apparati interni, si decise di mostrare soggetti in pose plastiche, vivi e vegeti a dispetto delle apparenze, anzi spesso artefici o complici delle loro stesse dissezioni. Una simile visione era certamente meno fastidiosa e scioccante che vedere le parti anatomiche esposte su un tavolo come carne da macello (cfr. M. Vène, Ecorchés : L’exploration du corps, XVIème-XVIIIème siècle, 2001).

L’uomo, che si è scorticato da solo, osserva l’interno della sua stessa pelle come a carpirne i segreti. Da Valverde, Anatomia del corpo humano (1560).

Dal medesimo volume, dissezione del peritoneo in tre atti. Nella terza figura, il personaggio tiene fra i denti la propria parete addominale per mostrarne il reticolo vascolare.

Dal medesimo volume, dissezione del peritoneo in tre atti. Nella terza figura, il personaggio tiene fra i denti il proprio grembiule omentale per mostrarne il reticolo vascolare.

casseri_p57

Spiegel e Casseri, De humani corporis fabrica libri decem (1627).

casseri_p27

Spiegel e Casseri, Ibid.

Venere detronizzata
Già nelle stampe degli écorché si nota una differenza fra figure maschili e femminili. Per illustrare il sistema muscolare venivano utilizzati soggetti maschili, mentre le donne esibivano spesso e volentieri gli organi interni, e fin dalle primissime rappresentazioni erano nella quasi totalità dei casi gravide. Il feto visibile all’interno del grembo femminile sottolineava la primaria funzione della donna come generatrice di vita, mentre dall’altro canto gli écorché maschi si presentavano in pose virili che ne esaltavano la prestanza fisica.

Spiegel e Casseri, Ibid.

Estienne_p250

Un muscoloso corpo maschile posa per una tavola che in realtà descrive una dissezione del cranio. Dal De dissectione partium corporis humani libri tres di C. Estienne (1545).

Dal medesimo volume, l’anatomia degli intestini è baroccamente inserita all’interno di una corazza da guerriero romano.

Lo svelamento dell’utero, messa in scena simbolica della denudazione. Dal Carpi commentaria cum amplissimis additionibus super Anatomia Mundini (1521).

20151027_104247

La gravida di Pietro Berrettini (1618) si alza snella e graziosa per esibire il suo apparato riproduttivo.

Come si vede nelle stampe qui sotto, già dalla metà del ‘500 i soggetti femminili mostrano una certa sensualità, mentre si abbandonano a pose che in altri contesti risulterebbero indecenti e impudiche. L’artista qui si spinse addirittura a realizzare delle versioni anatomiche di celebri stampe erotiche clandestine, ricopiando le pose dei personaggi ma scorticandoli secondo la tradizione anatomica, “raffreddando” così ironicamente la scena.

20151027_104550

Donna che tiene la placenta di due gemelli. Ispirata a una stampa erotica di Perino Del Vaga. Dal De dissectione partium corporis humani libri tres di C. Estienne (1545).

20151027_104600

Dal medesimo testo, gravida che espone l’apparato riproduttivo. Il contesto di camera da letto dona alla posa una connotazione marcatamente erotica.

20151027_104515

Altra illustrazione ispirata a una stampa erotica di Perino del Vaga (vedi sotto).

Ecco il modello “proibito” per la stampa anatomica precedente. (G.G. Caraglio, Giove e Antiope, da Perino del Vaga)

Non bisogna dimenticare infatti che un altro sottotesto — decisamente più misogino — di alcune stampe anatomiche femminili, è quello che intende smentire, sfatare il fascino della donna. Tutta la sua carica erotica, tutta la sua bellezza tentatrice viene disinnescata tramite l’esposizione delle interiora.
Difficile non pensare a Memento di Tarchetti:

Quando bacio il tuo labbro profumato,
cara fanciulla, non posso obbliare
che un bianco teschio vi è sotto celato.

Quando a me stringo il tuo corpo vezzoso,
obbliar non poss’io, cara fanciulla,
che vi è sotto uno scheletro nascosto.

E nell’orrenda visïone assorto,
dovunque o tocchi, o baci, o la man posi,
sento sporgere le fredda ossa di morto.

(Disjecta, 1879)

Se dobbiamo credere a Baudrillard (Della seduzione, 1979), l’uomo ha sempre avuto il controllo sul potere concreto, mentre la femmina si è appropriata nel tempo del potere sull’immaginario. E il secondo è infinitamente più importante del primo: ecco spiegata l’origine dell’ossessione maschile, quel senso di impotenza di fronte alla forza del simbolo detenuto dalla donna. Pur con tutte le sue violente guerre e le sue conquiste virili, egli ne è sedotto e soggiogato senza scampo.
Ricorre dunque all’estrema soluzione: frustrato da un mistero che non riesce a svelare, finisce per negare che esso sia mai esistito.
Ecce mulier! Questa è la tanto vagheggiata femmina, che fa perdere la testa agli uomini e induce al peccato: soltanto un ammasso di disgustosi organi e budella.

large_Valverde_1586_woman

Da Valverde, Anatomia del corpo humano (1560).

La messa in scena dell’osceno
Alcune stampe cinquecentesche erano composte di diversi fogli ritagliati, in modo che il lettore potesse sollevarli e scostare poco a poco i vari “strati” del corpo del soggetto, scoprendone l’anatomia in maniera attiva. L’immagine qui sotto, del 1570 circa e poi numerose volte ristampata, è un esempio di questi antesignani dei pop-up book; pensata ad uso dei barbieri-chirurghi (l’uomo tiene la mano in una bacinella di acqua calda per gonfiare le vene del braccio prima di un salasso), consiste di quattro risvolti incollati da sfogliare in successione per vedere gli organi interni.

Anatomical_sheet00

Anatomical_sheet01

Le veneri anatomiche, decomponibili, non erano dunque che la versione tridimensionale di questo genere di stampe. Gli studenti avevano la possibilità di smontare gli organi, studiarne la morfologia e la posizione senza dover ricorrere a un cadavere.

naamloos

History-of-Medicine-2

feat_DOLLS-1440x564_c
Se la ceroplastica si propose quindi fin dal principio come sostituto o complemento della dissezione, ottimo strumento didattico per medici e anatomisti spesso in cronica penuria di salme fresche, le statue in cera costituirono anche uno dei primi esempi di spettacolo anatomico accessibile anche alla gente comune. Le dissezioni vere e proprie erano già un educativo divertissement per la buona società, che pagava volentieri il biglietto di entrata per il teatro anatomico approntato solitamente nei pressi dell’Università. Ma la collezione fiorentina di cere anatomiche contenute all’interno del Museo della Specola, voluto dal Granduca di Toscana, era visitabile anche dai profani.

Da sovrano illuminato e da appassionato di scienza qual era, si rese conto, con molto anticipo rispetto agli altri regnanti, di quanto fosse importante la cultura scientifica e di come questa dovesse essere resa accessibile a tutti. […] C’erano orari diversi per le persone istruite e per il popolo: quest’ultimo infatti poteva visitare il Museo dalle 8 alle 10 “purché politamente vestito” lasciando poi spazio fino “alle 1 dopo mezzogiorno… alle persone intelligenti e studiose”. Anche se ora questa distinzione ci suona un po’ offensiva, si capisce quanto fosse innovativa per quell’epoca l’apertura anche al grosso pubblico.

(M. Poggesi, La collezione ceroplastica del Museo La Specola, in Encyclopaedia anatomica, 2001)

Le cere anatomiche dunque, oltre ad essere un supporto di studio, facevano anche appello ad altre, più nascoste fascinazioni che attiravano con enorme successo masse di visitatori di ogni estrazione sociale, divenendo tra l’altro tappa fissa dei Grand Tour.

Susini_Venerina_face

907956328_e84bdb4de2_o

907107457_4bee8ce169_o

Venus091

Allo stesso modo delle stampe antiche, anche nelle statue di cera si ritrova la stessa esposizione del corpo della donna – passiva, sottomessa all’anatomista che (presumibilmente) la sta aprendo, spesso gravida del feto che porta dentro di sé, il volto mai scorticato e anzi seducente; e la figura maschile è invece ancora una volta utilizzata principalmente per illustrare l’apparato muscolo-scheletrico, i vasi sanguigni e linfatici ed è priva della sensualità che contraddistingue i soggetti femminili.

907120343_603ce35820_o

9175f3bea8cfb331b98c3b107279b18a.jpg

907952846_ceb7e5bad7_o

firenze_mostra_cere_vive_03

Eros, Thanatos e crudeltà
Le veneri anatomiche fiorentine non potevano non suscitare l’interesse di Sade.
Il Marchese ne parla una prima volta, col tono discreto del turista, nel suo Viaggio in Italia; le menziona ancora in Juliette, quando la sua perversa eroina scopre con giubilo cinque piccoli tableaux di Zumbo che mostrano le fasi della decomposizione di un cadavere. Ma è nelle 120 giornate di Sodoma che le cere sono utilizzate nella loro dimensione più sadiana: qui una giovane fanciulla viene accompagnata all’interno di una stanza che racchiude diverse veneri anatomiche, e dovrà decidere in quale modo preferisce essere uccisa e squartata.

Venus061

182jrd4ufq4uljpg

182jrd2vcp3bgjpg

Lo sguardo lucido di Sade ha dunque colto il volto oscuro, cioè l’erotismo perturbante e crudele, di queste straordinarie opere d’arte scientifica. Sono senza dubbio i volti serafici, in alcuni casi quasi maliziosi, di queste donne a suggerire un loro malcelato piacere nell’essere lacerate e offerte al pubblico; e allo stesso tempo questi modelli tridimensionali rendono ancora più evidente la surreale contraddizione degli écorché, che restano in vita come nulla fosse, nonostante le ferite mortali.
Si può discutere se il Susini e gli altri ceroplasti suoi emuli fossero o meno perfettamente coscienti di un simile aspetto, forse non del tutto secondario, della loro opera; ma è innegabile che una parte del fascino di queste sculture provenga proprio dalla loro sensuale ambiguità.
Bataille fa notare (Le lacrime di Eros, 1961) che, nel momento in cui l’uomo ha preso coscienza della morte, seppellendo i suoi morti con rituali funebri, ha anche cominciato a raffigurare se stesso, sulle pareti delle grotte, con il sesso eretto; a dimostrazione di quanto morte e sesso siano collegati a doppio filo, quali opposti che spesso si confondono.

 venerina

2310525622_e26ab8c2ce

907956890_1e9de6a3fe_o

Le veneri anatomiche, in questo senso, racchiudono in maniera perfetta tutta la complessità di questi temi. Splendidi e preziosi strumenti di indagine scientifica, meravigliosi oggetti d’arte, misteriosi e conturbanti simboli; con il loro misto di innocenza e crudeltà sembrano ancora oggi raccontarci le intricate peripezie del desiderio umano.

cere_vive

Ecco la pagina dedicata alle cere anatomiche del Museo di Storia Naturale di Firenze.

The Devil and the Seven Dwarfs

A pale sun just came up that morning, when a soldier came knocking at the Angel’s door. He would never have disturbed his sleep, if he wasn’t sure to bring him a tryly exceptional discovery. Once he heardthe news, the Angel dressed up quickly and rushed towards the gates, his eyes burning with anticipation
It was May 19, 1944, in Auschwitz-Birkenau, and Josef Mengele was about to meet the largest all-dwarf family ever recorded.

The Ovitz family originated from Rozavlea, a village in the district of Maramureș, Transilvania (Romania). Their patriarch was the itinerant rabbi Shimson Eizik Ovitz, who sufferd from pseudoachondroplasia, a form of dwarfism; over two marriages, he had ten children, seven of which were stricken by his same genetic condition. Five of them were female, two males.
Dwarfism made them unfit for heavy work: how could they solve the paradox of having such a large family with virtually no labor force? The Ovitzs decided to stick together as much as possible, and they embarked in the only activity that could grant them a decent life: entertainment.

They founded the “Lilliput Troupe”, a traveling show in which only the seven dwarf siblings performed onstage; the other, medium-height members of the family warked backstage, writing sketches, preparing costumes or managing their next gigs. Their two-hour show mainly consisted of musical numbers, in which the family covered popular hits of the day on especially tailored instruments (small guitars, violas, violins, accordeons). For 15 years they toured Central Europe with huge success, the only all-dwarf act in the history of entertainment, until Nazism’s dark shadow reached them.

bc63cece7552787a28a6f49891a1c2db

f3e1279f2123dcce84193738bac38f73

8524100000000000

In theory, the Ovitzs were bound to die. First of all because they were observant Jews; and secondly, because they were considered “malformed” and, according to the Aktion T4 euthanasia program their lives were “unworthy of life” (Lebensunwertes Leben). At the time of their arrival in Auschwitz, they were twelve. The youngest was a 18-months-old child.

WP_Josef_Mengele_1956

Josef Mengele, nicknamed the “Angel of Death” (Todesengel), still remains one of the most sadly infamous figures in those unimaginable years of terror. In the tales of the survivors, he is without doubt the most enigmatic and unsettling character: a cultivated and elegant man, with doctorates received in anthropology and medecine, fascinating as a Hollywood star, Mengele possessed another face, one of violence and cruelty which could burst out in a totally disinhibited way. According to some accounts, he could bring sugar to the children in the nomad camp, play the violin for them, and shortly after inject them with chloroform on the operation table or personally carry out a mass execution. As the camp’s physician, he often began his day by staning on the platform and selecting with a gesture of his hand who among the newly arrived deportees was fit to work and who was destined to be eliminated in the gas chambers.

He was known for his obsession with twins, who according to his studies and those of his mentor Otmar von Verschuer (who was well-informed about his pupil’s activities) could undisclose the ultimate secrets of eugenics. Mengele carried out human experiments of unprecedented sadism, infecting healthy individuals with various diseases, dissecting live patients without anesthesia, injecting ink into their eyes in order to make them more “aryan-looking”, experimenting poisons and burning genitals with acid. Mengele was not a mad scientist, operating under cover, as was first understood, but was backed by the elite of German scientific community: under the Third Reich, these scientists enjoyed an uncommon freedom, as long as they proved their research was going in the direction of building a superior race of soldiers – one of Hitler’s obsessions.

War2_1687882a

The-Ovitz-family-006

“I now have work for 20 years”, Mengele exclaimed. As soon as he saw the Ovitz family, he immediately ordered that they be spared and arranged in privileged living quarters, where they would be given larger food portions and enjoyed better hygiene. He was particularly interested in the fact that the family included both dwarfs and middle-height individuals, so he ordered the “normal” members also to be spared from gas chambers. Hearing this, some other prisoners from the Ovitz’ village claimed to be blood-related to them (and the Ovitz of course did not deny it), and were moved along with them.

In exchange for their relatively more comfortable life, in respect to other inmates – their hair was not shorn, nor were they forced to part from their clothes – the Ovitzs were subjected to a long series of experiments. Mengele regularly took blood samples from them (even from the 18-months-old child).

Written accounts of inmate doctors shed further light on the endless anthropological measurements and comparisons between the Ovitzs and their neighbours, whom Mengele mistook for family. The doctors extracted bone marrow, pulled out healthy teeth, plucked hair and eyelashes, and carried out psychological and gynaecological tests on them all.
The four married female dwarves were subjected to close gynaecological scrutiny. The teenage girls in the group were terrified by the next phase in the experiment: that Mengele would couple them with the dwarf men and turn their wombs into laboratories, to see what offspring would result. Mengele was known to have done it to other experimental subjects.

(Koren & Negev, The dwarfs of Auschwitz)

The “White Angel” kept a voluntarily ambiguous relationship with the family, constantly walking a fine line between mercyless cruelty and surprising kindness. In fact, although he had already gathered hundreds of twins, and could sacrifice them if need be (accounts tell of seven couples of twins killed in one single night), he only had one family of dwarfs.
Still, the Ovitzs didn’t indulge in false hopes: they were conscious that, despite their privileges, they would die in there.

Instead, they lived to see the liberation of Auschwitz on January 27, 1945. They walked for seven months to get back to their village, only to find their home looted; four years later they emigrated to Israel, where they resumed touring with their show until they eventually retired in 1955.

The-Ovitzs-leaving-the-ca-008

Perla-and-Elizabeth-Ovitz-008

a237651196d324ad85d3a93da92c60aa

Mengele, as is known, escaped to South America under a false name, and during his more than thirty years as a fugitive his legend grew out of proportion; his already terrible deeds were somewhat exaggerated until he became a demon-like character trowing live children in the ovens and killing people just for fun. Reliable accounts evoke a less colourful image of the man, but no less unsettling: the human experiments carried out at Birkenau (and in China, at the same time, inside the infamous Unit 731) rank among the most dreadful examples of scientific research completely detaching itself from moral issues.

The last survivor in the family, Perla Ovitz, died in 2001. Until the end, she kept recounting her family’s tale, encapsulating all the helplessness and painful absurdity of this experience, which she could not possibly explain to herself and to the world, in a single sentence: “I was saved by the grace of the devil“.

perla_III

Further material:

An excerpt from the documentary The Seven Dwarfs of Auschwitz (available here), featuring Perla Ovitz.
Giants: The Dwarfs of Auschwitz (Koren & Negev, 2013) is the main in-depth research on the Ovitz family, based on interviews with Perla and other Auschwitz survivors.
Children of the Flames: Dr. Josef Mengele and the Untold Story of the Twins of Auschwitz (Lagnado & Dekel 1992) is an account of Mengele’s experiments on twins, with interviews with several survivors.
– The video in which Mengele’s son, Rolf, recounts his meeting with his father – whom he had never knew and who was living incognito in Brazil.
The truth about Cândido Godói, a small village in Brazil with a high twin births rate, where in the Sixties a strange German physician was often seen wandering: did Mengele continue his experiments in South America?

Ecstatic bodies: hagiography and eroticism

la_pal2

The body plays a fundamental role in Christian tradition.
Among the three great monotheistic religions, Christianity is indeed the only one to imply a God who became a man himself, thus granting an essential value to flesh and blood. According to Christian doctrine, it is told that resurrection will not be merely spiritual, but will also concern the physical body. Nevertheless, our flesh never got rid of its intrinsic duplicity: on the one hand, it lets the perfection of God’s work shine through – so much so that a holy body can “retain” within itself a part of the sanctity of the soul, whence the cult of relics – while on the other hand, of all human elements, it is the weakest and more susceptible to falling into temptation. The corruption of the flesh cannot be avoided except by mortifying sensuality or – in the most extreme cases – through the final sacrifice, more or less voluntary.

During the Middle Ages a distinction actually arose, ever sharper, between the carnal body and the body which will be resurrected at the end of times. As LeGoff writes, “the body of the Christian, dead or alive, lives in expectation of the body of glory it will take on, if it does not revel in the wretched physical body. The entire funeral ideology of Christianity revolves around the interplay between the wretched body and the glorious body, and is so organized as to wrest one from the other“.

That is why, in the lives of the saints, a disdainful denial of physicality and earthly life prevails. But, and that’s where things get interesting, there is a clear difference between male and female saints.
If the male saint usually accepts his martyrdom with courage and abnegation, in the vitae of female saints, female bodies are relentelssly destroyed or degraded, reaching superhuman extents in the hagiographic imagery.
As Elisabeth Roudinesco writes (in Our Dark Side: A History of Perversion, 2007):

When they were adopted by certain mystics, the great sacrificial rituals – from flagellation to the ingestion of unspeakable substances – became proof of their saintly exaltation. […] While the first duty of male saints was, following the Christian interpretation of the Book of Job, to annihilate any form of desire to fornicate, woman saints condemned themselves to a radical sterilization of their wombs, which became putrid, either by eating excrement or by exhibiting their tortured bodies.

Gilles Tétart in his Saintes coprophages: souillure et alimentation sacrée en Occident chrétien (2004, in Corps et Affects, edited by F. Héritier and M. Xanthakou) recounts several examples of this paroxysmal crusade against the flesh and its temptations.

Margaret Mary Alacoque, a French nun who lived in the Sevententh Century and was known for her mystic raptures, was “so sensitive that anything dirty made her heart jump“. But after Jesus had called her back to order, she could clean up the vomit of a sick woman by making it her food. She later absorbed the fecal matter of a woman with dysentery. By divine grace, what once would have disgusted her to death, now provoked in her the most intense visions of Christ, holding her with her mouth pressed against his wound: “If I had a thousand bodies, a thousand loves, a thousand lives, I would sacrifice them to be your slave“, she uttered.

According to some accounts, Catherine of Siena sucked the pus from the breasts of a woman with cancer, and stated that she had never eaten anything more delicious. Christ appeared to her, and reassuringly said: “My beloved, you have fought great battles for me and, with my help, you are still victorious. You have never been dearer or more agreeable to me […]. Not only have you scorned sensual pleasures; you have defeated nature by drinking a horrible beverage with joy and for the love of me. Well, as you have perfomed a supernatural act for me, I want to give you a supernatural liquor“.

Pompero_batoni,_estasi_di_s._caterina_da_siena,_1743,_da_s._caterina,_lu_2

Before we go further, it is important to always keep in mind that hagiographies are not History. They are in fact literary works in which every element finds its place inside the narration for a specific purpose – that is not the accuracy of facts. The purpose of these tales is rather to create a bond with the reader, who at the time was supposed not only to deeply admire the saints, but to empathize with their suffering, to feel the pain in first person, even if vicariously, to identify with their tormented body.

Secondly, it should be considered that the lives of saint women were mainly written by male monks, and clearly reflect male enthusiasm and fantasies. All this has brought several authors (B. Burgwinkle e C. Howie, G. Sorgo, S. Schäfer-Athaus, R. Mills) to analyze the hidden parallelisms between hagiography and pornography, as the two genres – all obvious differences considered – share some common features: for instance, the special attention given to the body, the importance of identification, the extremely detailed descritptions, the use of stylized characters, and so on.

Codex_Bodmer_127_039v_Detail

Sarah Schäfer-Althaus, in her paper Painful Pleasure. Saintly Torture on the Verge of Pornography (in Woods, Ian et alii, Mirabilia 18 2014/1) focuses on three saint women: Saint Agatha, Saint Apollonia e Saint Christina.
In the case of Saint Agatha, according to some versions, during the torture a significant inversion occurs. If Saint Catherine, as we’ve seen, found the horrid pus “delicious”, for Saint Agatha the suffering turns into pleasure.

“The pains are my delight”, she literally exclaims, “it is as if I were hearing some good news” – an announcement, which enrages her male tormentor to such an extent that he redirects his attention not only back at her already mutilated body, but especially at her breast – the utmost signifier of her femininity – and has it brutally cut off. Once more, contemporary readers might expect a reaction denoting anguish and pain, a cry for heavenly relief for her suffering, yet instead, Agatha angrily replies in several versions of her legend: “Are you not ashamed to cut off that which you yourself wanted to suck?”

Tela_Sant'Agata_Lecce

Therefore the aggression reveals a sexual nuance, or at least there is some kind of erotic tension in the martyrdom, which in itself can be read as a symbolic defloration of the saint’s femininity. A real defloration or penetration – it must be stressed, cannot happen  the saint woman can’t be actually raped, because it is essential for the hagiographic tale that she preserves her virginity to her death.

Francisco_de_Zurbarán_035

The same goes for Saint Apollonia and Saint Christina: here too, the penetration is merely symbolic, so that the protagonists can be joined with Christ while still chaste, and therefore their mouths end up being violated. Saint Apollonia endures the torment of having all of her teeth pulled out, and Christina has her tongue cut off.
At first glance the sexual allusion in these tortures might not be evident, but Schäfer-Althaus unveils its metaphorical code:

In medieval common knowledge, the mouth was on the one hand considered a “lock” with the teeth functioning as the final “barrier”, deciding what ideas and thoughts enter and leave the body. On the other hand, however, from Antiquity up to the ninteenth century, the mouth was linked to the female genitals and the tongue was often paralleled with the clitoris. The clitoris was in return often described as a “little tongue” and belonged to one of “woman’s shameful members”.

So these two torments could imply sexual violence, although it is only symbolic in order to allow the reunification with Jesus. These are, eventually, tortures which violate all of the most feminine body parts, yet preserving the purity of the soul.
So much so that Saint Christina can dare pick up her freshly cut tongue, and throw it in the face of her tormentor.

And her tongue, this instrument of speech and this symbolic clitoris, takes away his eyesight.

8NZ0062A

If the parallel between hagiography and pornography is intersting but let’s face it a little risky, undoubtedly these hyperbolic tales compiled, as mentioned, by male authors in a monastic environment, give us a glimpse of medieval male fantasies.
There are scholars, like the already quoted Roudinesco, who have come as far as to recognize in these medieval tales an anticipation of Sade’s themes or, more precisely, a source of inspiration for the Marquis‘ work:

This is why The Golden Legend, a work of piety that relates the lives of saints, can be read as prefiguring Sade’s perverse inversion of the Law in The One Hundred and Twenty Days of Sodom. We find in both the same tortured bodies that have been stripped naked and covered in filth. There is no difference between these two types of martyrdom. The Marquis adopts the model of monastic confinement, which is full of maceration and pain, removes the presence of God, and invents a sort of sexological zoo given over to the combinatory of a boundless jouissance of bodies.

After all, the line between pleasure and pain is often blurred, and this is even more true in hagiographic literature, since in martyrdom the pain of sacrifice is inseparable from the joy of reunification with God.
And the hidden gratification for the most atrocious details, the colourful language and the vivid descriptions, had to provoke in the reader a desire: desire to emulate these fearless saints and these powerful, incorruptible virgins who were able to transform pain into ecstasy.

Sebastiano_del_Piombo_001

Gli ammutinati della Batavia

bat-hist2_0

Il viaggio della Batavia era partito male fin dall’inizio.
Quando questa nave della Compagnia Olandese delle Indie Orientali salpò da Texel, nei Paesi Bassi, il 29 ottobre 1628, una violenta tempesta la separò dalle altre sei imbarcazioni della flotta. Tornata la calma, soltanto tre navi erano in vista: la Batavia, appunto, Assendelft e la Buren. Proseguirono il loro viaggio fino al Capo di Buona Speranza, arrivandoci perfino in anticipo di un mese sulla tabella di marcia. Ma già a questo punto era chiaro che c’era sangue amaro fra il comandante Francisco Pelsaert e il capitano Adrian Jacobsz.
Pelsaert era uno degli uomini di maggiore esperienza di tutta la Compagnia, e mal sopportava l’amore del capitano per la bottiglia: l’aveva ripreso severamente, in pubblico e di fronte alla ciurma. Jacobsz, pur facendo buon viso a cattivo gioco, covava la sua vendetta.

Il terzo uomo più importante sulla nave, dopo il comandante e il capitano, era un certo Jeronimus Cornelisz. La sua era una storia strana, perché non era davvero un marinaio: aveva sempre svolto l’attività di farmacista, come suo padre prima di lui. Ma nel 1627 il suo figlioletto di pochi mesi era morto a causa della sifilide, e Cornelisz si era impuntato nel voler dimostrare che era stata l’infermiera a contagiare il bambino, e non sua moglie. Invischiato in azioni legali, era presto andato in bancarotta. Si era imbarcato sulla Batavia proprio per scappare dall’Olanda e fuggire i suoi guai finanziari.
A bordo della nave, Cornelisz divenne amico di Jacobsz; assieme, i due cominciarono a tramare un piano di ammutinamento per spodestare il comandante Pelsaert.

Le navi ripartirono da Città del Capo dirette verso Java, ma poco dopo aver lasciato la terra si persero di vista. La Batavia ora era sola nell’Oceano Indiano. Durante la traversata, Pelsaert si ammalò e restò per gran parte del tempo chiuso nella sua cabina. Fra gli uomini della ciurma, senza il rigido controllo del comandante, le cose cominciarono a precipitare.

Dei 341 passeggeri circa due terzi erano ufficiali ed equipaggio, circa un centinaio erano soldati e il resto era costituito da civili tra cui alcune donne e bambini. Come si può immaginare, essere donna in così stretta minoranza su una nave che ospitava centinaia di uomini, lasciati a se stessi senza una vera disciplina, era piuttosto rischioso. La prima a fare le spese di questa pesante situazione fu Lucretia Jans, una ventisettenne dell’alta società oladese che viaggiava per raggiungere suo marito a Giacarta. Jacobsz ce l’aveva con lei perché aveva rifiutato le sue avances; così nel pieno dell’oceano Lucretia venne assalita da uomini mascherati che la “appesero fuori bordo per i piedi e maltrattarono indecentemente il suo corpo“. Più tardi la donna dichiarerà di aver riconosciuto Jacobz e un suo scagnozzo dalle voci dei molestatori. Non è chiaro se questo incidente facesse in realtà parte del piano di ammutinamento: se Lucretia non avesse riconosciuto gli assalitori, il comandante Palseart avrebbe dovuto punire tutta la ciurma, e forse Jacobz puntava su un’eventualità simile per diffondere il malcontento fra i marinai.
Ma Palseart, a causa della sua malattia, non arrestò né punì i colpevoli. Mentre Cronelisz e Jacobsz architettavano nuovi espedienti per scatenare l’ammutinamento, la notte del 4 giugno 1629 successe qualcosa di imprevisto.

Il 4 di Giugno, un lunedì mattina, il secondo giorno di Pentecoste, con luna piena e chiara circa due ore prima dell’alba durante la veglia del capitano (Ariaen Jacobsz), giacevo ammalato nella mia cuccetta e tutto d’un tratto sentii, con un duro e terribile movimento, l’urto del timone della nave, e immediatamente dopo sentii la nave incagliarsi nelle rocce, tanto che caddi giù dalla branda. A quel punto corsi di sopra e scoprii che tutte le vele erano spiegate, il vento da sudovest […] e che stavamo nel mezzo di una densa nebbia. Attorno alla nave c’era soltanto una rada schiuma, ma poco dopo sentii il mare infrangersi violentemente intorno a noi. Dissi, “Capitano, cosa avete fatto, a causa della vostra incauta sbadataggine avete passato questo cappio attorno al nostro collo?”

(Diario di Pelsaert)

bat-hist3_0

La Batavia si era incagliata sulla barriera corallina di Morning Reef, nell’arcipelago di Houtman Abrolhos, quaranta miglia al largo della costa ovest dell’Australia. A poco a poco i sopravvissuti vennero trasportati su due isole vicine, Beacon Island e Traitor’s Island. Alcuni uomini, fra cui Cornelisz, rimasero a bordo del relitto. Ma l’arcipelago non offriva a prima vista possibilità di sostentamento per tutti quegli uomini: il cibo scarseggiava (sulle isole si potevano trovare soltanto degli uccelli e qualche leone marino), e il problema più grave era la mancanza d’acqua dolce. Palseart decise, coraggiosamente, di tentare un’impresa impossibile – raggiungere Giacarta con le scialuppe di salvataggio che rimanevano a disposizione.

Alla fine, dopo aver discusso a lungo e ponderato che non c’era speranza di portare l’acqua fuori dal relitto a meno che la nave non fosse caduta a pezzi e i barili fossero arrivati galleggiando fino a terra, o che venisse una buona pioggia quotidiana per alleviare la nostra sete (ma questi erano tutti mezzi molto incerti), decidemmo dopo lungo dibattito […] che saremmo dovuti andare a cercare l’acqua nelle isole limitrofe o sul continente per mantenerci in vita, e se non avessimo trovato acqua, che avremmo allora navigato con le barche senza indugio per Batavia [antico nome di Giacarta], e con la grazia di Dio raccontato laggiù la nostra triste, inaudita, disastrosa vicenda.

(Diario di Pelsaert)

Pelsaert prese con sé 48 uomini fra ufficiali e passeggeri, Jacobsz incluso, e salpò per Giacarta. Ci arrivò 33 giorni dopo, incredibilmente senza perdite umane. Una volta nella capitale, Jacobsz venne arrestato per negligenza. Pelsaert cominciò a organizzare il viaggio di ritorno per salvare i superstiti, ma quello che non sapeva è che nel frattempo qualcosa di davvero inimmaginabile era successo sulle isole.

Cornelisz era rimasto sulla Batavia, incagliata nel corallo; ma poco dopo la partenza di Pelsaert la nave si era completamente sfasciata, portando con sé sott’acqua 40 uomini. Cornelisz riuscì a salvarsi e ad arrivare a riva aggrappandosi ai relitti galleggianti. I naufraghi erano amareggiati e furibondi d’essere stati abbandonati nel momento del bisogno dal loro comandante; Cornelisz quindi ebbe facile gioco nel reclutare una quarantina di uomini senza scrupoli per assicurarsi il potere sul gruppo. La sua intenzione iniziale era quella di catturare qualsiasi barca fosse arrivata per salvarli, e usarla per partire per conto proprio. Ma con il passare dei giorni un altro, più oscuro e folle progetto si fece strada nella sua mente: sarebbe diventato il tiranno incontrastato di quelle piccole e sconosciute isole, e avrebbe costruito un suo privato regno di piacere e di terrore, nel quale passare il resto della sua vita.

Chiaramente Cornelisz doveva eliminare qualsiasi oppositore o individuo pericoloso; così cominciò sistematicamente a sbarazzarsi degli altri sopravvissuti. All’inizio Cornelisz procedette in maniera subdola, spedendo per esempio una quarantina di mozzi a Seal Island, con il pretesto che lì si trovavano delle fonti d’acqua dolce; egli sapeva bene che in realtà non ce n’erano, e li abbandonò al loro destino. Un gruppo di soldati al comando di un certo Wiebbe Hayes vennero mandati ad esplorare delle isole all’orizzonte (West Wallabi Island), con l’intesa che sarebbero stati recuperati appena avessero acceso dei fuochi di segnalazione. Anche questa volta Cornelisz, ovviamente, non aveva alcuna intenzione di tornare a riprenderli.

Se fino ad allora Cornelisz si era mosso discretamente, pian piano ogni scrupolo venne a cadere. Alcuni uomini furono imbarcati per finte ricognizioni, e spinti fuori bordo dai sicari di Cornelisz; altri annegati direttamente sulla spiaggia. I potenziali oppositori erano ormai debellati, il dominio di Cornelisz divenne assoluto e con esso l’escalation di violenza non conobbe più freni. Cornelisz aveva stabilito che il numero ideale di abitanti dell’isola era di 45 persone – tutti gli altri andavano decimati senza pietà. Vennero organizzate le esecuzioni, infermi e malati per primi. I bambini vennero tutti massacrati. Alcune donne furono risparmiate soltanto per diventare schiave sessuali dei nuovi padroni dell’isola; Cornelisz si riservò come ancella personale proprio quella Lucretia Jans già concupita da molti marinai sulla Batavia.
Quando ci si accorse che sulla vicina Seal Island il gruppo d’esplorazione abbandonato a morire era in realtà ancora in vita (si potevano vedere i superstiti aggirarsi sulla spiaggia), Cornelisz inviò i suoi uomini ad ucciderli; missione che essi portarono a termine senza problemi.

Il controllo di Cornelisz era totale. Nonostante non avesse commesso personalmente alcuno dei crimini (aveva provato ad avvelenare un bambino senza successo, lasciando poi ad altri il compito di strangolarlo), con il suo carisma induceva i sottoposti ad agire per lui. A dire la verità, con il passare dei giorni, non vi fu nemmeno più il bisogno di convincerli:

Con una banda devota di giovani assassini, Cornelisz cominciò a uccidere sistematicamente chiunque credeva potesse essere un problema per il suo regno di terrore, o un peso per le loro limitate risorse. Gli ammutinati divennero inebriati di omicidi, e nessuno poteva più fermarli. Avevano bisogno soltanto della minima scusa per annegare, picchiare, strangolare o pugnalare a morte le loro vittime, donne e bambini inclusi.

(Mike Dash, Batavia’s Graveyard)

Ongeluckige_voyagie_vant_schip_Batavia_(Plate_3)

Fra i testimoni, il predicatore Gijsbert Bastiaenz assistette impotente a tutte queste orribili carneficine, e vide trucidare di fronte a sé sua moglie e le sue figlie, tranne la primogenita che uno degli uomini di Cornelisz aveva preteso per sé. Scriverà il resoconto dell’eccidio in una lettera che ci è arrivata intatta.

Ma un giorno successe qualcosa che Cornelisz non aveva previsto: un fuoco di segnalazione venne avvistato su una delle isole all’orizzonte dove erano stati abbandonati Wiebbe Hayes e i suoi soldati. Chiaramente erano riusciti a trovare dell’acqua, e questo complicava le cose per Cornelisz: significava che il gruppo aveva mezzi per sopravvivere, e il pericolo era che quei soldati raggiungessero per primi le eventuali navi di salvataggio in arrivo.
Wiebbe Hayes però era stato avvisato dei massacri che avevano luogo su Beacon Island da alcuni uomini riusciti a fuggire; aveva dunque avuto il tempo di organizzare le sue difese. I suoi soldati avevano costruito armi di fortuna con i materiali arrivati a riva dal naufragio; avevano perfino costruito un piccolo fortino con pietre e blocchi di corallo. A questo punto erano meglio nutriti, e meglio addestrati, dei sicari di Cornelisz, e quando questi arrivarono per dare battaglia riuscirono a sconfiggerli facilmente in diversi scontri.

Quando Cornelisz vide tornare i suoi uomini a mani vuote, andò su tutte le furie e decise di prendere direttamente il comando delle operazioni. Attaccò Hayes, ma venne fatto prigioniero; e qui il suo regno sanguinario, durato per ben due mesi, conobbe la sua fine. A questo punto infatti comparve all’orizzonte una nave. Era Pelsaert che tornava a salvare i naufraghi, ignaro dei terribili eventi.

bat-hist5_0

Il giorno 17, di mattina all’alba, abbiamo levato ancora l’ancora, il vento a nord. […] Prima di mezzogiorno, avvicinandoci all’isola, vedemmo del fumo su un lungo isolotto due miglia ad ovest del relitto, e anche su un’altra piccola isola vicino al relitto, fatto per cui eravamo tutti molto felici, sperando di trovare un buon numero, se non tutti quanti, ancora vivi. Quindi, appena gettata l’ancora, navigai in barca fino all’isola più vicina, portando con me un barile d’acqua, pane di mais, e un fusto di vino; arrivato, non vidi nessuno, cosa che ci diede da pensare. Sbarcai a riva, e allo stesso momento vedemmo una piccola barca con quattro uomini che aggirava la punta nord; uno di loro, Wiebbe Haynes, saltò giù e corse verso di noi, gridando da lontano, “Benvenuti, ma tornate immediatamente a bordo, perché c’è un gruppo di furfanti sulle isole vicino al relitto, con due imbarcazioni, che hanno intenzione di catturare la vostra nave”.

(Diario di Pelsaert)

Haynes spiegò al comandante che aveva preso in ostaggio Cornelisz; Pelsaert catturò senza problemi gli ammutinati, e nei successivi interrogatori ricostruì l’intero accaduto. I crimini commessi, oltre ovviamente all’omicidio di svariate persone, includevano anche innumerevoli stupri e il furto di beni della Compagnia e di effetti personali dei passeggeri.
Il 2 ottobre 1629 venne eseguita, sulla stessa Seal Island, la condanna dei colpevoli. Agli ammutinati venne tagliata la mano destra, prima di essere impiccati. Per Cornelisz la pena comportò l’amputazione di entrambe le mani, prima di salire sul patibolo.

Cornelisz_execution

A Giacarta infine si decisero le sorti degli ultimi protagonisti di questa vicenda.
Il capitano Jacobsz, che era già prigioniero, nonostante le torture non confessò mai di aver tentato l’ammutinamento sulla Batavia; morì probabilmente in prigione.
Il comandante Pelsaert venne ritenuto responsabile di mancanza d’autorità. Gli vennero confiscati tutti gli averi, e nel giro di un anno morì di stenti.
Wiebbe Hayes, che aveva invece combattuto coraggiosamente, divenne un eroe. La Compagnia lo promosse a sergente e in seguito a luogotenente.

batavia-remains-beacon-island

dooienederlander

batavia-wreck

Quello della Batavia è considerato uno degli ammutinamenti più sanguinosi della storia: dei 341 passeggeri originari, soltanto 68 sopravvissero (intorno al centinaio secondo altre fonti). Alcune vittime furono ritrovate, in fosse comuni, durante gli scavi archeologici. Se il relitto e i resti umani sono esposti al Western Australian Museum, a Lelystad nei Paesi Bassi è possibile ammirare una straordinaria replica della Batavia, eseguita a cavallo fra gli anni ’80 e ’90, e costruita con gli stessi attrezzi, metodi e materiali che si usavano nel Seicento.

DCF 1.0

DCF 1.0

Martiri

Roma, il Pomarancio e l’arte sacra crudele

martirio_thomas_cranmer_1563

I martiri costituiscono uno dei temi prediletti dall’arte cristiana fin dagli albori. Eppure inizialmente le rappresentazioni dei supplizi subìti dai santi in testimonianza della loro fede mostravano comunque dei toni abbastanza neutri. Come scrive Umberto Eco nella sua Storia della bruttezza:

Raramente nell’arte medievale il martire è rappresentato imbruttito dai tormenti come si era osato fare col Cristo. Nel caso di Cristo si sottolineava l’immensità inimitabile del sacrificio compiuto, mentre nel caso dei martiri (per esortare a imitarli) si mostra la serenità serafica con cui essi sono andati incontro alla propria sorte. Ed ecco che una sequenza di decapitazioni, tormenti sulla graticola, asportazione dei seni, può dar luogo a composizioni aggraziate, quasi in forma di balletto. Il compiacimento per la crudeltà del tormento sarà caso mai reperibile più tardi […], nella pittura seicentesca.

In realtà già nel Tardo Manierismo, vale a dire verso la fine del ‘500, la Controriforma aveva riportato una rigorosa ortodossia nell’arte sacra; nel 1582 il Cardinale Gabriele Paleotti pubblica il suo fondamentale Discorso intorno alle immagini sacre e profane, in cui vengono dettate le direttive iconografiche ecclesiastiche da seguire. Da questo momento gli artisti dovranno concentrarsi su scene bibliche educative, di immediata lettura, allontanandosi dai temi classici e attenendosi scrupolosamente a quanto riportato nelle Scritture; nel caso dei martiri, si dovrà cercare di rendere il più possibile concreta la descrizione della sofferenza, in modo da favorire l’immedesimazione del fedele. In questo clima di propaganda, nacquero quindi affreschi e dipinti di una violenza senza precedenti.

A Roma soprattutto si trovano alcune chiese particolarmente ricche di simili raffigurazioni. La più significativa è quella di Santo Stefano Rotondo al Celio; poco distante si trova la Chiesa dei Santi Nereo e Achilleo; in via Nazionale, invece, sorge la Basilica di San Vitale. Innumerevoli altri esempi sono sparsi un po’ ovunque nella capitale, ma queste tre chiese da sole costituiscono una sorta di enciclopedia illustrata della tortura.

In particolare le prime due ospitano gli affreschi di Niccolò Circignani detto il Pomarancio (ma attenzione, perché il nomignolo venne dato anche a suo figlio Antonio e al pittore Cristoforo Roncalli). Autore manierista ma lontano dagli eccessi bizzarri del periodo, Niccolò Circignani mostrava una spiccata teatralità compositiva, e un’esecuzione semplice ma efficace, dai colori vivaci e incisivi.

Celio_-_s_Stefano_Rotondo_1040178-80

20150215_101327

20150215_100827

20150215_100827b

20150215_101053

20150215_101728

Untitled-5

Untitled-6
Il ciclo del martiriologio a Santo Stefano Rotondo è impressionante ancora oggi per il realismo cruento e a tratti rivoltante delle scene: dal supplizio di Sant’Agata, a cui le tenaglie dilaniano il petto, alla lapidazione del primo martire della storia (Santo Stefano, appunto), fino alla “pena forte e dura“, le pareti della chiesa sono un susseguirsi di santi bolliti vivi o soffocati dal piombo fuso, lingue strappate, occhi e budella sparse, corpi fatti a pezzi, mazzolati, bruciati, straziati in ogni possibile variante.

20150215_100738b

20150215_100840

20150215_101216

20150215_101238

20150215_101510

20150215_101526

20150215_101613

20150215_101622

20150215_101601

20150215_101708

Sempre al Pomarancio sono attribuite altre opere situate nella Chiesa dei Santi Nereo e Achilleo. Qui San Simone viene segato a metà a partire dal cranio, San Giacomo Maggiore decapitato, San Bartolomeo scorticato vivo, e via dicendo.

5436818602_559f6c182c_o

5436822184_67cf6331e3_o

5436211495_83462b1130_o

Tortura5

5436819140_23d2f976ca_o

Tortura1

Nella Basilica di San Vitale possiamo ammirare il santo omonimo che viene prima torturato sulla ruota, e poi sepolto vivo – anche se in questo caso i dipinti sono ad opera di Agostino Ciampelli. La chiesa contiene anche decapitazioni e teste mozzate.

San_Vitale_giorgio_clementi

Tortura2

ciampelli-dx

Tortura4

Certo, nelle intenzioni queste scene dovevano essere educative, e spingere all’imitazione di questi esempi di fede incrollabile. Ma che dire dell’evidente compiacimento nel mostrare le varie torture e i supplizi? Il nostro sadismo non è forse stuzzicato da queste rappresentazioni?

È questo fascino oscuro che spinge Eco a parlare di “erotica del dolore“; e d’altronde Bataille termina il suo excursus nell’arte erotica (Le lacrime di Eros) sulla fotografia di un condannato alla pena cinese del lingchi, la morte dai mille tagli, “inevitabile conclusione di una storia dell’erotismo” e simbolo dell’ “erotismo religioso, l’identità dell’orrore e del religioso“.
Fotografia talmente insostenibile che il filosofo confessa: “a partire da questa violenza – ancora oggi io non riesco a propormene un’altra più folle, più orribile – io fui così sconvolto che accedetti all’estasi“. Rapimento mistico, orgasmo e orrore sono, per Bataille, inscindibili.

v6Bs0

Questa seduzione ambigua delle immagini violente, però, è intrinseca in ogni crudeltà. Il concetto trova infatti origine in due ceppi etimologici diversi – da una parte cruor, la carne sanguinosa, il sangue sparso, e dall’altra crudus, il crudo, tutto ciò che è animalesco, primordiale e non ancora conquistato dalla cultura umana (conoscere il fuoco e utilizzarlo per cuocere il cibo è, sostiene Lévi-Strauss ne Il crudo e il cotto, uno dei momenti fondanti dell’umanità, rispetto alla vita bestiale).
In questo senso la crudeltà oscilla fra due opposti perturbanti: l’orrore e l’oscenità della violenza, e il segreto giubilo di vedere riaffiorare l’istinto represso, che minaccia l’ordine costituito.
Starebbe in questo nucleo di sentimenti contrapposti la calamita che attira il nostro sguardo verso simili immagini, eccitandoci e repellendoci al tempo stesso, e forse facendoci in questo modo accedere alla parte più nascosta del nostro essere.

 3296820149_4bc8d8a9fa_b

Per approfondire i risvolti concettuali della crudeltà, il saggio di riferimento è l’eccellente Filosofia della crudeltà. Etica ed estetica di un enigma di Lucrezia Ercoli.
Se vi interessa conoscere meglio la figura del Pomarancio, ecco un esaustivo podcast di Finestre sull’arte.

Sport bestiali: il gioco, il sangue, la crudeltà

famoso Orson Welles con ordonez

Orson Welles, come è noto, ha cambiato la storia del cinema a soli 26 anni con l’inarrivabile Quarto Potere, un film che già nel 1941 mostrava un linguaggio inaspettatamente moderno e complesso. Welles era anche un eccellente prestigiatore e illusionista, ma quello che pochi sanno è che in gioventù il poliedrico artista e intellettuale aveva accarezzato il sogno di diventare un torero. La sua passione per le battaglie con i tori scemò progressivamente negli anni, quando Welles vide prevalere l’aspetto sensazionalistico e folkloristico della corrida sul suo significato simbolico – nelle sue parole, il sacrificio della “bestia coraggiosa” che incontra un “uomo coraggioso” in una battaglia rituale. “Odio tutto quello che è folkloristico. Ma non ce l’ho con la corrida perché ha bisogno di tutti quei giapponesi nella prima fila per continuare ad esistere (e ne ha bisogno davvero); piuttosto, mi è successa la stessa cosa di mio padre, che era un grande cacciatore e di colpo smise di cacciare, perché disse: ho ucciso troppi animali, e adesso mi vergogno di me stesso“.
Nella stessa splendida intervista con Michael Parkinson, Welles definiva la corrida “indifendibile e irresistibile” allo stesso tempo.

Irresistibile. Qualsiasi scontro violento fra uomo e animale, o fra animale e animale, attira inevitabilmente il nostro sguardo. Sarà forse un richiamo primitivo che ci riporta in contatto con l’antica paura di diventare prede; ma alzi la mano chi non è rimasto, almeno da bambino, incantato di fronte alle immagini televisive dei leoni maschi che combattono per il privilegio sulla femmina, o dei cervi che si scornano per il territorio. La lotta, la violenza sono parte integrante della natura, ed esercitano ancora su di noi un fascino potente e ancestrale.

Questo è probabilmente lo stimolo che sottende un tipo di “show” (se così si può chiamare), già avversato sotto il profilo etico nell’800, e ormai quasi universalmente condannato per la sua crudeltà: si tratta dei cosiddetti bloodsport, definiti dal Cambridge Dictionary come “qualsiasi sport che implica l’uccisione o il ferimento di animali per l’eccitazione degli spettatori o delle persone che ne prendono parte”.
Combattimenti fra galli, fra cani, fra tori, fra orsi, fra ratti, fra tassi: la fantasia non ha mai avuto confini quando si trattava di spingere due animali ad un duello per il semplice gusto dello spettacolo. In questo articolo passeremo in rassegna alcuni dei bloodsport più bizzarri – e probabilmente farete fatica a credere che alcune di queste forme di “intrattenimento” esistano, o siano esistite, per davvero.

rat_killing_dog

Il tiro dell’oca viene praticato ancora oggi in alcune regioni del Belgio, dell’Olanda, e della Germania, ma si utilizza un’oca già morta, uccisa con “metodi umani” da un veterinario. Non era così al principio della tradizione: l’oca, ancora viva, veniva legata per le zampe ad un’asse o a una corda sospesa; si spalmavano attentamente la testa e il collo dell’animale con grasso o sapone. I concorrenti, a turno, dovevano cavalcare sotto il palo e tentare di afferrare la scivolosa testa dell’oca. L’eroe del giorno era chi riusciva a staccare la testa all’uccello, e spesso il premio per la vincita era semplicemente l’oca stessa. Poteva sembrare un’impresa semplice, ma non lo era affatto, come testimonia un passaggio di William G. Simms:

Soltanto al cavaliere esperto, e all’esperto sportivo, è possibile assicurarsi il successo. I giovani principianti, che considerano l’impresa piuttosto facile, sono costantemente scornati; molti scoprono che è impossibile per loro passare nel punto giusto; molti vengono tirati giù dalla sella, e anche quando siano riusciti a passare sotto all’albero senza disastri, falliscono nell’afferrare l’oca, che continua a svolazzare e gridare; oppure, non riescono, andando al galoppo, a mantenere la presa sul collo scivoloso come un’anguilla e sulla testa che hanno preso.

Remington_-_A_Gander-Pull

Gänsereiten_2010

Ganzenrijden-2116-Edit

Nato nel XVII secolo in Olanda, questo sport si diffuse anche in Inghilterra e nel Nord America e, nonostante fosse criticato da molte voci autorevoli dell’epoca, resistette oltreoceano fino alla fine dell’800. Una versione leggermente diversa, ma altrettanto antica, si tiene ogni anno in Svizzera, a Sursee, durante la festa chiamata Gansabhauet: i concorrenti indossano una maschera che rappresenta il volto del Sole e una casacca rossa; la maschera impedisce di vedere alcunché e i partecipanti, procedendo alla cieca, devono riuscire a decapitare un’oca (già morta) appesa ad una corda, utilizzando una spada a cui, per aumentare la difficoltà, è stato tolto il filo.

gansabhauet

Gansabhauet1

Gansabhauet2

Gansabhauet

4cdaca987a1b3

Un altro sport stravagante vide la luce invece in tempi più recenti, durante gli anni ’60. Si tratta dell’octopus wrestling: senza bombole o boccagli di sorta, i concorrenti dovevano riuscire ad afferrare una piovra gigante a mani nude e riportarla in superficie. Il peso del polpo determinava il vincitore. L’animale veniva in seguito cucinato, donato all’acquario locale oppure rimesso in libertà.

13206070723_5bdc6155ee_o

octopus_wrestling

Agli inizi degli anni ’60 si teneva annualmente un Campionato Mondiale di octopus wrestling, che attraeva migliaia di persone, tanto da essere ripreso perfino dalla televisione; nell’edizione del 1963 vennero pescati un totale di 25 polpi giganti del Pacifico, il più grosso dei quali pesava quasi 26 chili. Si aggiudicò la medaglia d’oro lo scozzese Alexander Williams, che catturò ben tre animali.

trail of the octopus

In Giappone, nella cittadina di Kajiki, ogni anno si tiene il festival tradizionale Kumo Gassen, che è il più celebre evento di lotta fra ragni. Praticata un po’ in tutto il Sud Est asiatico, questa disciplina prevede l’utilizzo di argiopi a strisce nere e gialle. Amorevolmente allevati come fossero dei cuccioli, i ragni sono liberi di vagare per la casa, di camminare sulla faccia e sul corpo dei loro padroni, e di costruirsi le loro ragnatele a piacimento: lo scotto da pagare per questa libertà è il duro allenamento alla lotta. A dire il vero, questi aracnidi non sono per loro natura particolarmente aggressivi, e anche durante il combattimento, che avviene per mezzo di un bastoncino sul quale i ragni si scontrano, è raro che si feriscano brutalmente. In ogni caso, è presente un arbitro addetto a separarli, se le cose dovessero farsi troppo violente.

30a05d23113f9782fbaa97cb1f0f00c91

130616kumo2

Kumo Gassen

photo8418

arañas

Se il Kumo Gassen non è in definitiva uno sport particolarmente cruento rispetto ad altri, concludiamo invece con quello che è forse il più agghiacciante fra tutti: il fuchsprellen, popolare nel XVII e XVIII secolo.
Immaginate la scena. In un’arena chiusa (il cortile di un castello, oppure uno spazio appositamente delimitato) si radunavano le coppie di partecipanti al gioco. Nobili con le loro consorti, alti dignitari e rampolli di grandi casate. Ogni coppia era spesso composta da marito e moglie, in modo da aumentare la competitività dei concorrenti. A sei o sette metri di distanza l’uno dall’altra, entrambi tenevano in mano il capo di una rete o di una serie di corde poggiata per terra: questa era la loro fionda.
Ad un tratto, una volpe veniva liberata nel cortile: spaventata, correva di qua e di là finché non passava sopra alla fionda di una delle coppie. In quell’esatto momento i due concorrenti dovevano tirare gli estremi della rete con tutta la forza, per lanciare l’animale il più in alto possibile.

Fox_tossing_1719

Untitled-2

Untitled-1

Vulpes-11b

Nel campionato di lancio della volpe indetto da Augusto II di Polonia, non furono soltanto questi bellissimi animali a venire sparati in aria: vennero fiondati in totale 647 volpi, 533 lepri, 34 tassi e 21 gatti selvatici. Il Re in persona partecipò ai giochi, e dimostrò (a quanto si racconta) la sua forza tenendo la rete con un solo dito, mentre all’altro capo stavano due dei cortigiani più muscolosi. Ogni tanto si provava anche qualche nuova variante: nel 1648 vennero liberati nel recinto 34 cinghiali “con grande diletto dei cavalieri, ma causando il terrore delle nobildonne, fra le gonne delle quali i cinghiali crearono grande scompiglio, per l’ilarità senza fine dell’illustre compagnia ivi assembrata“. Nello stesso campionato si provò a lanciare tre lupi.
Leopoldo I d’Asburgo invece si univa con gioia ai nani di corte per finire a mazzate gli animali appena atterrati, tanto che un ambasciatore annotò la sua sorpresa nel vedere l’Imperatore del Sacro Romano Impero accompagnarsi con quella cricca di “minuscoli ragazzi, e idioti“.

Indifendibile, ma non certo irresistibile.

(Grazie, Gianluca!)