Myrtle The Four-Legged Girl

Mrs. Josephine M. Bicknell died only one week before her sixtieth birthday; she was buried in Cleburne, Texas, at the beginning of May, 1928.

Once the coffin was lowered into the ground,her husband James C. Bicknell stood watching as the grave was filled with a thick layer of cement; he waited for an hour, maybe two, until the cement dried completely. Eventually James and the other relatives could head back home, relieved: nobody would be able to steal Mrs. Bicknell’s body – not the doctors, nor the other collectors who had tried to obtain it.

It is strange to think that a lifeless body could be tempting for so many people.
But the lady who was resting under the cement had been famous across the United States, many years before, under her maiden name: Josephine Myrtle Corbin, the Four-Legged Girl from Texas.

Myrtle was born in 1868 in Lincoln County, Tennessee, with a rare fetal anomaly called dipygus: her body was perfectly formed from her head down to her navel, below which it divided into two pelvises, and four lower limbs.

Her two inner legs, although capable of movement, were rudimentary, and at birth they were found laying flat on the belly. They resembled those of a parasitic twin, but in reality there was no twin: during fetal development, her pervis had split along the median axis (in each pair of legs, one was atrophic).

 Medical reports of the time stated that

between each pair of legs there is a complete, distinct set of genital organs, both external and internal, each supported by a pubic arch. Each set acts independently of the other, except at the menstrual period. There are apparently two sets of bowels, and two ani; both are perfectly independent,– diarrhoea may be present on one side, constipation on the other.

Myrtle joined Barnum Circus at the age of 13. When she appeared on stage, nothing gave away her unusual condition: apart from the particularly large hips and a clubbed right foot, Myrtle was an attractive girl and had an altogether normal figure. But when she lifted her gown, the public was left breathless.

She married James Clinton Bicknell when she was 19 years old, and the following year she went to Dr. Lewis Whaley on the account of a pain in her left side coupled with other worrying symptoms. When the doctor announced that she was pregnant in her left uterus, Myrtle reacted with surprise:

“I think you are mistaken; if it had been on my right side I would come nearer believing it”; and after further questioning he found, from the patient’s observation, that her right genitals were almost invariably used for coitus.

That first pregnancy sadly ended with an abortion, but later on Myrtle, who had retired from show business, gave birth to four children, all perfectly healthy.

Given the enormous success of her show, other circuses tried to replicate the lucky formula – but charming ladies with supernumerary legs were nowhere to be found.
With typical sideshow creativity, the problem was solved by resorting to some ruse.
The two following diagrams show the trick used to simulate a three-legged and a four-legged woman, as reported in the 1902 book The New Magic (source: Weird Historian).

If you search for Myrtle Corbin’s pictures on the net, you can stumble upon some photographs of Ashley Braistle, the most recent example of a woman with four legs.
The pictures below were taken at her wedding, in July 1994, when she married a plumber from Houston named Wayne: their love had begun after Ashley appeared in a newspaper interview, declaring that she was looking for a “easygoing and sensitive guy“.

Unfortunately on May 11, 1996, Ashley’s life ended in tragedy when she made an attempt at skiing and struck a tree.

Did you guess it?
Ashley’s touching story is actually a trick, just like the ones used by circus people at the turn of the century.
This photographic hoax comes from another bizarre “sideshow”, namely the Weekly World News, a supermarket tabloid known for publishing openly fake news with funny and inventive titles (“Mini-mermaid found in tuna sandwich!” “Hillary Clinton adopts a baby alien!”, “Abraham Lincoln was a woman!”, and so on).

The “news” of Ashley’s demise on the July 4, 1996 issue.

 

Another example of a Weekly World News cover story.

To end on a more serious note, here’s the good news: nowadays caudal duplications can, in some instances, be surgically corrected after birth (it happened for example in 1968, in 1973 and in 2014).

And luckily, pouring cement is no longer needed in order to prevent jackals from stealing an extraordinary body like the one of Josephine Myrtle Corbin Bicknell.

Freaks: Gaze and Disability

Introduction: those damn colored glasses

The image below is probably my favorite illusion (in fact I wrote about it before).

At a first glance it looks like a family in a room, having breakfast.
Yet when the picture is shown to the people living in some rural parts of Africa, they see something different: a family having breakfast in the open, under a tree, while the mother balances a box on her head, maybe to amuse her children. This is not an optical illusion, it’s a cultural one.

The origins of this picture are not certain, but it is not relevant here whether it has actually been used in a psychological study, nor if it shows a prejudice on life in the Third World. The force of this illustration is to underline how culture is an inevitable filter of reality.

It reminds of a scene in Werner Herzog’s documentary film The Flying Doctors of East Africa (1969), in which the doctors find it hard to explain to the population that flies carry infections; showing big pictures of the insects and the descriptions of its dangers does not have much effect because people, who are not used to the conventions of our graphic representations, do not understand they are in scale, and think: “Sure, we will watch out, but around here flies are never THAT big“.

Even if we would not admit it, our vision is socially conditioned. Culture is like a pair of glasses with colored lenses, quite useful in many occasions to decipher the world but deleterious in many others, and it’s hard to get rid of these glasses by mere willpower.

‘Freak pride’ and disability

Let’s address the issue of “freaks”: originally a derogatory term, the word has now gained a peculiar cultural charm and ,as such, I always used it with the purpose of fighting pietism and giving diversity it its just value.
Any time I set out to talk about human marvels, I experienced first-hand how difficult it is to write about these people.

Reflecting on the most correct angle to address the topic means to try and take off culture’s colored glasses, an almost impossible task. I often wondered if I myself have sometimes succumbed to unintended generalizations, if I unwillingly fell into a self-righteous approach.
Sure enough, I have tried to tell these amazing characters’ stories through the filter of wonder: I believed that – equality being a given – the separation between the ordinary and the extra-ordinary could be turned in favor of disability.
I have always liked those “deviants” who decided to take back their exotic bodies, their distance from the Norm, in some sort of freak pride that would turn the concept of handicap inside out.

But is it really the most correct approach to diversity and, in some cases, disability? To what extent is this vision original, or is it just derivative from a long cultural tradition? What if the freak, despite all pride, actually just wanted an ordinary dimension, what if what he was looking for was the comfort of an average life? What is the most ethical narrative?

This doubt, I think, arose from a paragraph by Fredi Saal, born in 1935, a German author who spent the first part of his existence between hospitals and care homes because he was deemed “uneducable”:

No, it is not the disabled person who experiences him- or herself as abnormal — she or he is experienced as abnormal by others, because a whole section of human life is cut off. Thus this very existence acquires a threatening quality. One doesn’t start from the disabled persons themselves, but from one’s own experience. One asks oneself, how would I react, should a disability suddenly strike, and the answer is projected onto the disabled person. Thus one receives a completely distorted image. Because it is not the other fellow that one sees, but oneself.

(F. Saal, Behinderung = Selbstgelebte Normalität, 1992)

As much as the idea of a freak pride is dear to me, it may well be another subconscious projection: I may just like to think that I would react to disability that way… and yet one more time I am not addressing the different person, but rather my own romantic and unrealistic idea of diversity.

We cannot obviously look through the eyes of a disabled person, there is an insuperable barrier, but it is the same that ultimately separates all human beings. The “what would I do in that situation?” Saal talks about, the act of projecting ourselves onto others, that is something we endlessly do and not just with the disabled.

The figure of the freak has always been ambiguous – or, better, what is hard to understand is our own gaze on the freak.
I think it is therefore important to trace the origins of this gaze, to understand how it evolved: we could even discover that this thing we call disability is actually nothing more than another cultural product, an illusion we are “trained” to recognize in much the same way we see the family having breakfast inside a living room rather than out in the open.

In my defense, I will say this: if it is possible for me to imagine a freak pride, it is because the very concept of freak does not come out of the blue, and does not even entail disability. Many people working in freakshows were also disabled, others were not. That was not the point. The real characteristics that brought those people on stage was the sense of wonder they could evoke: some bodies were admired, others caused scandal (as they were seen as unbearably obscene), but the public bought the ticket to be shocked, amazed and shaken in their own certainties.

In ancient times, the monstrum was a divine sign (it shares its etymological root with the Italian verb mostrare, “to show”), which had to be interpreted – and very often feared, as a warning of doom. If the monstruous sign was usually seen as bearer of misfortune, some disabilities were not (for instance blindness and lunacy, which were considered forms of clairvoyance, see V. Amendolagine, Da castigo degli dei a diversamente abili: l’identità sociale del disabile nel corso del tempo, 2014).

During the Middle Ages the problem of deformity becomes much more complex: on one hand physiognomy suggested a correlation between ugliness and a corrupted soul, and literature shows many examples of enemies being libeled through the description of their physical defects; on the other, theologians and philosophers (Saint Augustine above all) considered deformity as just another example of Man’s penal condition on this earth, so much so that in the Resurrection all signs of it would be erased (J.Ziegler in Deformità fisica e identità della persona tra medioevo ed età moderna, 2015); some Christian female saints even went to the extreme of invoking deformity as a penance (see my Ecstatic Bodies: Hagiography and Eroticism).
Being deformed also precluded the access to priesthood (ordo clericalis) on the basis of a famous passage from the  Leviticus, in which offering sacrifice on the altar is forbidden to those who have imperfect bodies (P. Ostinelli, Deformità fisica…, 2015).

The monstrum becoming mirabile, worthy of admiration, is a more modern idea, but that was around well before traveling circuses, before Tod Browning’s “One of us!“, and before hippie counterculture seized it: this concept is opposed to the other great modern invention in regard to disability, which is commiseration.
The whole history of our relationship with disability fluctuates between these two poles: admiration and pity.

The right kind of eyes

In the German exhibition Der (im)perfekte Mensch (“The (im)perfect Human Being”), held in 2001 in the Deutsches Hygiene Museum in Dresden, the social gaze at people with disabilities was divided into six main categories:

– The astonished and medical gaze
– The annihilating gaze
– The pitying gaze
– The admiring gaze
– The instrumentalizing gaze
– The excluding gaze

While this list can certainly be discussed, it has the merit of tracing some possible distinctions.
Among all the kinds of gaze listed here, the most bothering might be the pitying gaze. Because it implies the observer’s superiority, and a definitive judgment on a condition which, to the eyes of the “normal” person, cannot seem but tragic: it expresses a self-righteous, intimate certainty that the other is a poor cripple who is to be pitied. The underlying thought is that there can be no luck, no happiness in being different.

The concept of poor cripple, which (although hidden behind more politically correct words) is at the core of all fund-raising marathons, is still deeply rooted in our culture, and conveys a distorted vision of charity – often more focused on our own “pious deed” than on people with disabilities.

As for the pitying gaze, the most ancient historical example we know of is this 1620 print, kept at the Tiroler Landesmuseum Ferdinandeum in Innsbruck, which shows a disabled carpenter called  Wolffgang Gschaiter lying in his bed. The text explains how this man, after suffering unbearable pain to his left arm and back for three days, found himself completely paralyzed. For fifteen years, the print tells us, he was only able to move his eyes and tongue. The purpose of this paper is to collect donations and charity money, and the readers are invited to pray for him in the nearby church of the Three Saints in Dreiheiligen.

This pamphlet is interesting for several reasons: in the text, disability is explicitly described as a “mirror” of the observer’s own misery, therefore establishing the idea that one must think of himself as he is watching it; a distinction is made between body and soul to reinforce drama (the carpenter’s soul can be saved, his body cannot); the expression “poor cripple” is recorded for the first time.
But most of all this little piece of paper is one of the very first examples of mass communication in which disability is associated with the idea of donations, of fund raising. Basically what we see here is a proto-telethon, focusing on charity and church prayers to cleanse public conscience, and at the same time an instrument in line with the Counter-Reformation ideological propaganda (see V. Schönwiese, The Social Gaze at People with Disabilities, 2007).

During the previous century, another kind of gaze already developed: the clinical-anatomical gaze. This 1538 engraving by Albrecht Dürer shows a woman lying on a table, while an artist meticulously draws the contour of her body. Between the two figures stands a framework, on which some stretched-out strings divide the painter’s vision in small squares so that he can accurately transpose it on a piece of paper equipped with the same grid. Each curve, each detail is broke down and replicated thanks to this device: vision becomes the leading sense, and is organized in an aseptic, geometric, purely formal frame. This was the phase in which a real cartography of the human body was developed, and in this context deformity was studied in much the same manner. This is the “astonished and medical gaze“, which shows no sign of ethical or pitying judgment, but whose ideology is actually one of mapping, dividing, categorizing and ultimately dominating every possible variable of the cosmos.

In the wunderkammer of Ferdinand II, Archduke of Austria (1529-1595), inside Ambras Castle near Innsbruck, there is a truly exceptional portrait. A portion of the painting was originally covered by a red paper curtain: those visiting the collection in the Sixteenth Century might have seen something close to this reconstruction.

Those willing and brave enough could pull the paper aside to admire the whole picture: thus the subject’s limp and deformed body appeared, portrayed in raw detail and with coarse realism.

What Fifteen-Century observers saw in this painting, we cannot know for sure. To understand how views are relative, it suffices to remind that at the time “human marvels” included for instance foreigners from exotic countries, and a sub-category of foreigners were cretins who were said to inhabit certain geographic regions.
In books like Giovan Battista de’ Cavalieri’s Opera ne la quale vi è molti Mostri de tute le parti del mondo antichi et moderni (1585), people with disabilities can be found alongside monstruous apparitions, legless persons are depicted next to mythological Chimeras, etc.

But the red paper curtain in the Ambras portrait is an important signal, because it means that such a body was on one hand considered obscene, capable of upsetting the spectator’s senibility. On the other hand, the bravest or most curious onlookers could face the whole image. This leads us to believe that monstrosity in the Sixteenth Century had at least partially been released from the idea of prodigy, and freed from the previous centuries superstitions.

This painting is therefore a perfect example of “astonished and medical” gaze; from deformity as mirabilia to proper admiration, it’s a short step.

The Middle Path?

The admiring gaze is the one I have often opted for in my articles. My writing and thinking practice coincides with John Waters’ approach, when he claims he feels some kind of admiration for the weird characters in his movies: “All the characters in my movies, I look up to them. I don’t think about them the way people think about reality TV – that we are better and you should laugh at them.

And yet, here we run the risk of falling into the opposite trap, an excessive idealization. It may well be because of my peculiar allergy to the concept of “heroes”, but I am not interested in giving hagiographic versions of the life of human marvels.

All these thoughts which I have shared with you, lead me to believe there is no easy balance. One cannot talk about freaks without running into some kind of mistake, some generalization, without falling victim to the deception of colored glasses.
Every communication between us and those with different/disabled bodies happens in a sort of limbo, where our gaze meets theirs. And in this space, there cannot ever be a really authentic confrontation, because from a physical perspective we are separated by experiences too far apart.
I will never be able to understand other people’s body, and neither will they.

But maybe this distance is exactly what draws us together.

“Everyone stands alone at the heart of the world…”

Let’s consider the only reference we have – our own body – and try to break the habit.
I will borrow the opening words from the introduction I wrote for Nueva Carne by Claudio Romo:

Our bodies are unknowable territories.
We can dismantle them, cut them up into ever smaller parts, study their obsessive geometries, meticulously map every anatomical detail, rummage in their entrails… and their secret will continue to escape us.
We stare at our hands. We explore our teeth with our tongues. We touch our hair.
Is
this what we are?

Here is the ultimate mind exercise, my personal solution to the freaks’ riddle: the only sincere and honest way I can find to relate diversity is to make it universal.

Johnny Eck woke up in this world without the lower limbs; his brother, on the contrary, emerged from the confusion of shapes with two legs.
I too am equipped with feet, including toes I can observe, down there, as they move whenever I want them to. Are those toes still me? I ignore the reach of my own identity, and if there is an exact point where its extension begins.
On closer view, my experience and Johnny’s are different yet equally mysterious.
We are all brothers in the enigma of the flesh.

I would like to ideally sit with him  — with the freak, with the “monster” — out on the porch of memories, before the sunset of our lives.
‘So, what did you think of this strange trip? Of this strange place we wound up in?’, I would ask him.
And I am sure that his smile would be like mine.

Ulisse Aldrovandi

Dario Carere, our guestblogger who already penned the article about monstrous pedagogy, continues his exploration of the monster figure with this piece on the great naturalist Aldrovandi.

Why are monsters born? The ordering an archiving instinct, which always accompanied scientific analysis, never stopped going along with the interest for the odd, the unclassifiable. What is a monster to us?  It would be interesting to understand when exactly the word monstrum lost its purely marvelous meaning to become more hideous and dangerous. Today what scares us is “monstrous”; and yet monstra have always been the object of curiosity, so much so that they became a scientific category.  The horror movie is a synthesis of our need to be scared, because we do not believe in monsters anymore, or almost.

Bestiaries, wunderkammern and legends about fabulous beasts all have in common a desire to understand nature’s mysteries: this desire never went away, but the difference is that while long ago false things were believed to be true, nowadays the unknown is often exaggerated in order to forcedly obtain an attractive monstrosity, as in the case of aliens, lights in the sky, or Big Foot.

Maybe the wunderkammern, those collections of oddities assembled by rich and cultured men of the past, are the most interesting testimony of the aforementioned instinct.  One of the most famous cabinet of wonders was in Innsbruck, and belonged to Ferdinand II of Austria (1529 – 1595).  Here, beside a splendid woodcarved Image of death, which certainly would have appealed to romantic writers two centuries later, there is a vast array of paintings depicting unique subjects, as well as persons showing strange diseases. The interest for the bizarre becomes here a desire for possession, almost a prestige: what for us would be a news story, at the time was a trophy, a miraculous object; it’s a circus in embryo, where repulsion is the attraction.

Image of death, by Hans Leinberger, XVI Century.

Disabled man, anonimous, XVI Century.

This last fascinating painting, depicting a man who probably made a living out of his deformity, calls to mind another extraordinary collector of oddities: Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522 – 1605), born in Bologna, who dedicated his life to study Henry presentation of living creatures and nature.  His studies on deformity are particularly interesting. This ingenious man wrote several scientific books on common and less common phenomena, commissioning several wonderful illustrations to different artists; these boks were mainly destined to universities, and could be considered as the first “virtual” museum of natural science. After his death, his notes and images of monstrous creatures were collected in a huge posthumous work, the Monstruorum historia, together with various considerations by the scholar who curated the edition.  The one I refer to (1642) can be easily consulted, as many other works by Aldrovandi, in the digital archive of historic works of the University of Bologna.

It was a juicy evolution of the concept of bestiary: the monster was not functional to a moralizing allegory anymore, but became a real case of scientific study, and oddities or deformities were illustrated as an aspect of reality (even if some mythical and literary suggestions remain in the text; the 16th century still had not parted from classical sources, quite fantastic but deemed reliable at the time).

Dc1565

Dc1564

Dc1563

The book mainly examines anthropomorphic monsters; these were often malformed cases, and even if they did not qualify as a new species, for Aldrovandi they were interesting enough for a scientific account. The anatomical malformation began to find place in a medical context, and Aldrovandi anticipated Linnaeus for nomenclatures and precision, even if he wasn’t a systematic classifier: he was preoccupied with presenting the various anomalies to future scholars, but in his work there is still a certain confusion between observation and legend.

Faceless men, armless men, but also men with a surplus of arms or heads were presented along centaurs, satyrs, winged creatures and the Sciapods (legendary men with one gigantic foot which protected them from the sun, as described by Plinius). There were also images of exotic people, wild tribes living in remote places, wearing strange hats or jewelry; although not deformed, they were nonetheless wonderous, strange. All monstra.

Dc1568

Dc1581

A great introduction to Aldrovandi’s “mythology” is Animali e creature mostruose di Ulisse Aldrovandi, curated by Biancastella Antonino. Beside richly presenting wonderful color illustrations of animals, seashells and monsters from Aldrovandi’s work, this book also features some interesting essays; among the contributors, patologist Paolo Scarani speculates that Aldrovandi’s gaze upon his subjects was not always one of curiosity, but also of compassion. If this naturalist saw and met first-hand come “monsters”, how did he feel about them? Maybe the purpose of his studies was to provide the scientific community  with a new approach to the monstrosities of nature − a more humane approach; to prove his point Scarani examines the image of an unlikely bird-man pierced by several arrows. Moreover Scarani examines the illustrations of Aldrovandi’s monsters in the light of now well-known malformations: anencephaly, sirenomelia, parasitic twins, etc., and concludes that Aldrovandi may be considered an innovator in the medical field too, on the account of his peculiar attention to deformity in humans and animals (an example is the seven-legged veal, illustrated from a real specimen).

Dc1580

Dc1574

Dc1569

Dc1576

Given the eccentricity of some of these monsters, it is not always easy to determine exactly when fantasy is mixed to the scientific account. Aldrovandi is an interesting meeting point between ancient beliefs (supported by respected sources that could not be contradicted) and the rising scientific revolution. The appearance of some monsters can be attributed to “familiar” pathologies (two-headed persons, legless persons, people with their face entirely covered with hair are now commonly seen on controversial TV shows), but others look like they came from a fantasy saga or some medieval bas relief. As Scarani puts it:

[Aldrovandi’s care for details], together with the clarity with which the malformations are represented, contributes to the feeling of embarassment before the figures of clearly invented malformations. Later interpolations? I don’t think so. The fact that some illustrations are hybrid, showing known malformations besides fantastic creatures (as a child with a frog’s face), makes me think that Aldrovandi included them, maybe from popular etchings, because it’s the weorld he lived in! They were so widely discussed, even in respected publications, […] that he had to conform to the sources. Of course, respect fo the authority principle and ancient traditions does not help progress. Everyone does what he can.

Aldrovandi’s work can be considered a great wunderkammer, an uneven collection of notable findings, devoid of a rigid and aristotelic classification but inspired by an endless curiosity which pairs the observation with an enthsaism for the wonderous and the unexplainable. Two other scholars from Bologna, B. Sabelli and S. Tommasini, write:

All this [the exposition of miscellaneous objects in the cabinets of curiosities] was inherited from the past, but also followed the spirit of the time which saw natural products as a proof and symbol for the legendary tradition – metamorphosis is a constant element in myths – and considered the work of nature and the work of the artist homogeneous, or even anthagonist, as the artist tried to reach and exceed nature.

From this idea of “exceeding” Nature come those illustrations in which animals we could easily identify (rhinos, lizards, turtles) are altered because the animal lived in a distant land, a place neither Aldrovandi nor the reader would ever visit; and the weirdest oddity was attributed in ancient times to faraway places, also because “normality” is often just a purely geographic concept.

Today, monsters do not inhabit mysterious and distant lands; yet, have our repulsion and our curiosity changed? There’s no use in denying it: we need monsters, even if only to reassure ourselves of out normality, to gain some degree of control over what we do not understand. Aldrovandi anticipated 19th century teratology: many of his illustrations remained perfectly valid through the following centuries, and those “extraordinary lives” we see on TV had already been studied and presented in his work. Examples span from the irsute lady to the woman born with no legs who had, as chronicles reported, an enchanting face. The circus never left town, it has just become standardized. Scarani writes:

What is striking, in these representations, is their being practically superimposable to the other illustrated teratologic casebooks that followed Aldrovandi. Maybe his plates were copied. I don’t think this is the only explanation, even if plausible given the enormous success of Aldrovandi’s iconography. More recent preparations of malformed specimens, or photographs, are still perfectly superimposable to many of Aldrovandi’s plates.

How weird, for our modern sensibility, to find next to these rare patologies the funny and legendary Sciapods, depicted in their canonic posture!

Dc1575

Dc1573

Dc1571

Aldrovandi, on the other hand, did not just chase monsters, for teratology was only one of the many areas of study he engaged in. Within this word, “teratology”, lies the greek root for “monster”, “wild beast”: because of men of extraordinary ingenuity, like Aldrovandi, luckily today we do not associate diversity with evil anymore. Yet the monstrous does not cease to attract us, even now that the general tendency is to “flatten” human categories. It is a reminder of how frail our supremacy over reality is, a reality which seems to be equipping us with a certain number of legs or eyes by mere coincidence. The monster symbolizes chaos, and chaos, even if it is not forcedly evil, even if we no longer have mythical-religious excuses to get rid of it, will perhaps always be seen as an enemy.

Dc1572

Dc1578

Yamanaka Manabu

i16

Dove ci sono uomini
troverai mosche
e Buddha
(Kobayashi Issa)

Chiunque percorra un autentico cammino spirituale dovrà confrontarsi con il lato oscuro, osceno, terribile della vita. Questo è il sottinteso della parabola agiografica che vede il Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama, uscire di nascosto dal suo idilliaco palazzo reale e scoprire con meraviglia e angoscia l’esistenza del dolore (dukkha), che accomuna tutti gli esseri viventi.

Il fotografo giapponese Yamanaka Manabu da 25 anni esplora territori liminali o ritenuti tabù, alla ricerca della scintilla divina. Il suo intento, nonostante la crudezza degli scatti, non è certo quello di provocare un facile shock: piuttosto, lo sforzo che si può leggere nelle sue opere è tutto incentrato sulla scoperta della trascendenza anche in ciò che normalmente, e superficialmente, potrebbe provocare ripugnanza.

Gyahtei: Yamanaka Manabu Photographs è la collezione dei suoi lavori, organizzati in sei serie di fotografie. I sei capitoli si concentrano su altrettanti soggetti “non allineati”, rimossi, reietti, ignorati: sono dedicati rispettivamente a bambini di strada, senzatetto, persone affette da malattie che provocano deformità, anziani, feti abortiti, e carcasse di animali.

17

15

13

10

L’approccio di Manabu è ammirevolmente rigoroso e rispettoso. Le sue non sono foto sensazionalistiche, né ambigue, e ambiscono invece a catturare degli attimi in cui il Buddha risplende attraverso questi corpi sbagliati, emarginati, rifiutati. Con la tipica essenzialità della declinazione giapponese del buddhismo (zen), i soggetti sono perlopiù ritratti su sfondo bianco – e il bianco è il colore del lutto, in Giappone, e sottile riferimento all’impermanenza. Sono foto rarefatte ed essenziali, che lasciano al nostro sguardo il compito di cercare un significato, se mai riusciremo a trovarlo.

Ogni serie di fotografie ha necessitato di 4 o 5 anni di lavoro per vedere la luce. Quella intitolata “Arakan” è emblematica: “Una mattina, incontrai una persona vestita di stracci che camminando lentamente emetteva un odore pungente. Aveva lo sguardo fisso verso un posto lontano, occhi raminghi e fuori fuoco. Cominciai di mattino presto, in bicicletta, cercandoli fra strade affollate e parchi pubblici. Appena li trovavo, chiedevo loro “Per favore, lasciatemi scattare una foto”. Ma non acconsentivano a farsi ritrarre così facilmente. L’idea li disgustava, e io li inseguivo e continuavo a chiedere il permesso ancora e ancora. Ho continuato a seguirli senza curarmi dei loro sputi e dei loro pugni, finché la pazienza veniva meno. Allora finalmente mi concedevano di fotografarli“.
Dopo 4 anni di ricerche, e centinaia di foto, Manabu ha selezionato 16 scatti che a suo parere mostrano degli esseri al confine fra l’umano e la condizione di Risveglio. “Sono sicuro che queste persone meritano di essere chiamate Arakan, titolo riservato a colui il quale recide i legami della carne ed è assiduo nel praticare l’austerità“.

i12

i05

i03

i01

Nella sua sincera indagine sul significato dell’esistenza non poteva mancare la contemplazione della morte. Il suo racconto della ricognizione su una carcassa di cane illustra perfettamente il processo che sottende il suo lavoro.

Nel mio tentativo di comprendere la “morte”, ho deciso di guardare il corpo morto di un cane regolarmente, sulla costa. 

Giorno 1
    – L’ho accarezzato sulla testa, domandandomi se la sua vita fosse stata felice.

Giorno 2
– La sua faccia sembrava triste. Ho sentito l’odore diventare più forte.

Giorno 5
– Molti corvi si sono assiepati sul posto, a beccare i suoi occhi e il suo ano.

o20

o11

Giorno 7
Il suo corpo era gonfio, e sangue e pus ne uscivano. Nuvole di mosche su di lui, e l’odore divenne terribile.

Giorno 10
– La bocca era infestata di larve, e il corpo si era gonfiato del doppio. Quando ho toccato il corpo, era caldo. Pensando che il corpo avesse in qualche modo ripreso vita, mi sentii ispirato e giunsi le mani verso di esso.

Giorno 12
– La pelle dell’addome si era lacerata, e molte larve erano visibili all’interno. Mi sentii deluso quando scoprii che il calore era causato dallo sfregamento degli insetti. Pensai che la “morte” è brutta e dolorosa.

Giorno 15
– Si poteva vedere l’osso da una parte della pelle strappata della faccia. Il corpo divenne sottile come quello di una mummia. L’odore divenne meno penetrante. Il corpo morto sembrava bello come un’immagine di creta, e scattai alcune fotografie.

o06

o05

Giorno 24
– Le larve erano scomparse, e la testa, gli arti e il corpo erano completamente smembrati. Sembrava che nessuna creatura avrebbe potuto mangiarne ancora. In effetti di fronte a questa scena sentii che il cane era veramente morto.

Giorno 32
– Soltanto piccoli pezzi di osso bianco sono rimasti, e sembrano sprofondare nella terra.

Giorno 49
– L’erba nuova è cresciuta sul posto, e l’esistenza del cane è scomparsa.

o01

Ma forse la sua serie più toccante è quella intitolata “Jyoudo” (la casa del Bodhisattva).
Qui siamo confrontati con il volto più crudele della malattia – sindromi genetiche o rare, alle quali alcuni esseri umani sono destinati fin dalla nascita. Senza mai cedere alla tentazione del dettaglio fastidioso, Manabu colleziona degli scatti al contrario pietosi e commoventi, volutamente asciutti. Qui la condizione umana e la sua insensatezza trovano un perfetto compimento: uomini e donne segnati dalla disgrazia, “forse per via di cattive azioni nelle vite passate, o soltanto perché sono pateticamente sfortunati“.

jy12

jy11

jy08

jy07

jy06

jy04

jy03
Il confronto con queste estreme situazioni di malattia è, come sempre in Manabu, molto umano. “In una casa di riposo ho incontrato una giovane ragazza. Non era altro che pelle e ossa, a stento capace di respirare mentre stava distesa. Perché è nata così, e che insegnamento dovremmo trarre da un simile fatto? Per capire il significato della sua esistenza, non potevo fare altro che fotografarla.
Persone che gradualmente diventano più piccole mentre il loro corpo esaurisce tutta l’acqua, persone i cui corpi si putrefanno mentre la loro pelle si stacca e le loro fattezze diventano rosse e gonfie, persone le cui teste pian piano si espandono a causa dell’acqua che si raccoglie all’interno, persone con piedi e mani assurdamente grandi, e via dicendo. Ho incontrato e fotografato molti individui simili, che vivono con malattie inspiegabili, senza speranza di cura. Eppure, perfino in questo stato, quando li guardavo senza farmi vincere dalla paura, vedevo quanto le loro vite fossero veramente naturali. Cominciai a sentire la presenza di Bodhisattva all’interno dei loro corpi. Queste persone erano l’ “Incarnazione del Bodhisattva”, i figli di Dio.

jy18

jy16

jy15

jy14

jy13

Quando un artista, un fotografo in questo caso, decide di esplorare programmaticamente tutto ciò che in questo mondo è terribile e ancora in attesa di significato, il confronto con la vecchiaia è inevitabile. D’altronde i quattro dolori riconosciuti dal Buddha, in quella famosa e improvvisata uscita da palazzo, sono proprio la nascita, la vecchiaia, la malattia e la morte. Quindi i corpi nudi di persone anziane, in attesa del sacrificio ultimo, rappresentano la naturale prosecuzione della ricerca di Manabu. Pelle avvizzita e segnata dal tempo, anime splendenti anche se piegate dal peso degli anni.

p15

p11

p06

p04

p02

E infine ecco la serie dedicata ai feti abortiti o nati morti. “Per una ragione imperscrutabile, non ogni vita è benvenuta in questo mondo. Eppure per uno sfuggente attimo questo piccolo embrione, a cui è stata negata l’ammissione prima ancora che lanciasse il suo primo grido, ha sollecitato in me un’immagine eterna della sua perfetta bellezza.”

21

19

05

07

01

02

04

Quelle di Yamanaka Manabu sono visioni difficili, dure, sconcertanti; forse non siamo più abituati a un’arte che non si fermi alla superficie, che non si nasconda dietro il manierismo o lo sfoggio del “bello”. E qui, invece, siamo di fronte a una vera e propria meditazione sul non-bello (ovvero asubha, ne avevamo parlato in questo articolo).
Nell’apparente semplicità della composizione queste opere ci parlano di una ricerca di verità, di senso, che è senza tempo e senza confini. Fotografie che si interrogano sull’esistenza del dolore. E che cercano di catturare quell’attimo in cui, attraverso e oltre il velo della sofferenza, si può intravvedere l’infinito.

08

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Yamanaka Manabu.

Speciale: Fotografare la morte – III

paris---joel-peter-witkin---vernissage-a0300-la-bnf-26-03-2012

Joel-Peter Witkin è ritenuto uno dei maggiori e più originali fotografi viventi, assurto negli anni a vera e propria leggenda della fotografia moderna. È nato a Brooklyn nel 1939, da padre ebreo e madre cattolica, che si separarono a causa dell’inconciliabilità delle loro posizioni religiose. Fin da giovane, quindi, Witkin conobbe la profonda influenza dei dilemmi della fede. Come ha più volte raccontato, un altro episodio fondamentale fu assistere ad un incidente stradale, mentre un giorno, da bambino, andava a messa con sua madre e suo fratello; nella confusione di lamiere e di grida, il piccolo Joel si trovò improvvisamente da solo e vide qualcosa rotolare verso di lui. Era la testa di una giovane ragazzina. Joel si chinò per carezzarle il volto, parlarle e rasserenarla, ma prima che potesse allungare una mano qualcuno lo portò via.
In questo aneddoto seminale sono già contenute alcune di quelle che diverranno vere e proprie ossessioni tematiche per Witkin: lo spirito, la compassione per la sofferenza e la ricerca della purezza attraverso il superamento di ciò che ci spaventa.

Dopo essersi laureato in discipline artistiche, ed aver iniziato la sua carriera come fotografo di guerra in Vietnam, nel 1982 Witkin ottiene il permesso di scattare alcune fotografie a dei preparati anatomici, e riceve in prestito per 24 ore una testa umana sezionata longitudinalmente. Witkin decide di posizionare le due metà gemelle nell’atto di baciarsi: l’effetto è destabilizzante e commovente, come se il momento della morte fosse un’estrema conciliazione con il sé, un riconoscere la propria parte divina e finalmente amarla senza riserve.

the-kiss-le-baiser-new-mexico-joel-peter-witkin

The Kiss è lo scatto che rende il fotografo di colpo celebre, nel bene e nel male: se da una parte alcuni critici comprendono subito la potente carica emotiva della fotografia, dall’altra molti gridano allo scandalo e la stessa Università, appena scopre l’uso che ha fatto del preparato, decide che Witkin è persona non grata.
Egli si trasferisce quindi nel Nuovo Messico, dove può in ogni momento attraversare il confine ed aggirare così le stringenti leggi americane sull’utilizzo di cadaveri. Da quel momento il lavoro di Witkin si focalizza proprio sulla morte, e sui “diversi”.

tumblr_l7xk5hk26r1qc3atx

Joel-Peter-Witkin-9

Lavorando con cadaveri o pezzi di corpi, con modelli transessuali, mutilati, nani o affetti da diverse deformità, Witkin crea delle barocche composizioni di chiara matrice pittorica (preparate con maniacale precisione a partire da schizzi e bozzetti), spesso reinterpretando grandi opere di maestri rinascimentali o importanti episodi religiosi.

joel-peter-witkin-7

Joel-Peter-Witkin-19

Witkin Archive
Scattate rigorosamene in studio, dove ogni minimo dettaglio può essere controllato a piacimento dall’artista, le fotografie vengono poi ulteriormente lavorate in fase di sviluppo, nella quale Witkin interviene graffiando la superficie delle foto, disegnandoci sopra, rovinandole con acidi, tagliando e rimaneggiando secondo una varietà di tecniche per ottenere il suo inconfondibile bianco e nero “anticato” alla maniera di un vecchio dagherrotipo.

Nonostante i soggetti scabrosi ed estremi, lo sguardo di Witkin è sempre compassionevole e “innamorato” della sacralità della vita. Anche la fiducia che i suoi soggetti gli accordano, nel venire fotografati, è proprio da imputarsi alla sincerità con cui egli ricerca i segni del divino anche nei fisici sfortunati o differenti: Witkin ha il raro dono di far emergere una sensualità e una purezza quasi sovrannaturale dai corpi più strani e contorti, catturando la luce che pare emanare proprio dalle sofferenze vissute. Cosa ancora più straordinaria, egli non ha bisogno che il corpo sia vivo per vederne, e fotografarne, l’accecante bellezza.

Ecco le nostre cinque domande a Joel-Peter Witkin.

Witkin-harvest-1984
1. Perché hai deciso che era importante raffigurare la morte nei tuoi lavori fotografici?

La morte è parte della vita di ognuno di noi. La morte è anche il grande discrimine fra la fede umana e gli aspetti terreni, temporali – è il sonno senza tempo, per chi è religioso, è la vita eterna assieme a Dio.

Witkin Archive

2. Quale credi che sia lo scopo, se ce n’è uno, delle tue fotografie post-mortem? Stai soltanto fotografando i corpi, o sei alla ricerca di qualcos’altro?

Fotografare la morte e i resti umani è sempre un “lavoro sacro”. Quello che fotografo, coloro che ritraggo, in realtà siamo sempre noi stessi. Io vedo la bellezza nei soggetti che fotografo.

joel-peter-witkin-1996
3. Come succede per tutto ciò che mette alla prova il nostro rifiuto della morte, il tono macabro e sconvolgente delle tue fotografie potrebbe essere visto da alcuni come osceno e irrispettoso. Ti interessa scioccare il pubblico, e come ti poni nei riguardi della carica di tabù presente nei tuoi soggetti?

I grandi dipinti e la scultura del passato hanno sempre affrontato il tema della morte. Amo dire che “la morte è come il pranzo – sta arrivando!”. Un tempo la gente nasceva e moriva nella propria casa. Oggi nasciamo e moriamo in apposite istituzioni. Portiamo tutti un numero tatuato sul nostro polso. Muoriamo soli.
Quindi, ovviamente, le persone rimangono sconvolte nel vedere, in un certo senso, il loro stesso volto. Credo che nulla dovrebbe mai essere tabù. In realtà quando sono abbastanza privilegiato da riuscire a fotografare la morte, resto solitamente molto toccato dallo spirito che è ancora presente nei corpi di quelle persone.

Witkin Archive

B017634

4. È stato difficile approcciare i cadaveri, a livello personale? C’è qualche aneddoto particolare o interessante riguardo le circostanze di una tua foto?

Quando ho fotografato “l’uomo senza testa”, (Man Without A Head, un cadavere, seduto su una sedia all’obitorio, la cui testa era stata rimossa a scopo di ricerca) lui indossava dei calzetti neri. Quel dettaglio rese il tutto un po’ più personale. Il dottore, il suo assistente ed io alzammo quest’uomo morto dal tavolo settorio e posizionammo il suo corpo su una sedia di acciaio. Dovetti lavorare un po’ con il cadavere, per bilanciare le sue braccia in modo che non cadesse per terra. Alla fine, nella foto, il pavimento era tutto ricoperto dal sangue fluito dal suo collo, dove la testa era stata tagliata. Gli fui molto grato di aver lavorato con me.

BL10629

joel-peter-witkin-10

5. Riguardo alle foto post-mortem, ti piacerebbe che te ne venisse scattata una dopo che sei morto? Come ti immagini una simile foto?

Ho già preso provvedimenti affinché i miei organi siano rimossi dopo la mia morte per aiutare chi ancora è in vita. Qualsiasi cosa rimanga, verrà seppellita in un cimitero militare, visto che sono un veterano dell’esercito. Quindi temo che mi perderò l’occasione di cui mi chiedi!

P.S. Io non voglio “mantenere bizzarro il mondo” (un riferimento allo slogan del nostro blog, n.d.r.)… voglio renderlo più amorevole!

med_witkin-1-jpg

Joel-Peter-Witkin-23

Scheletri viventi

Il circo è sempre stato interessato ai limiti del corpo umano: dagli acrobati, agli equilibristi, ai contorsionisti, ai mangiatori di spade e via dicendo, le imprese eroiche e spettacolari degli artisti circensi impressionano proprio perché il corpo viene portato oltre i confini delle sue normali capacità. Allo stesso modo, in quelle colorate e pittoresche baracconate che erano i freakshow, il corpo mostrava invece l’aspetto oscuro e osceno della sua fantasia. Ma anche qui, per colpire l’immaginario del pubblico, l’esibizione della deformità passava per gli estremi – nani e giganti, donne obese e uomini magrissimi.

Questi ultimi, in particolare, venivano chiamati living skeletons, “scheletri viventi”, e costituivano uno dei numeri classici di ogni freakshow. Già da qualche secolo i medici riportavano nei testi scientifici i rari casi di magrezza estrema; ma fu Isaac Sprague, nato nel 1841, che decise per primo di esibirsi di fronte ad un pubblico come scheletro vivente.

Fino all’età di dodici anni Isaac era stato un ragazzino normale; poi, a causa di qualche disfunzione mai chiarita, cominciò a perdere peso rapidamente. In poco tempo il profilo dello scheletro si affacciò alla superficie della sua pelle, la sua massa muscolare si restrinse all’inverosimile e di conseguenza Isaac divenne così debole da non potersi più permettere di lavorare né con il padre ciabattino, né come garzone all’emporio locale. Aveva un costante bisogno di nutrimento per affrontare la giornata e recuperare quel minimo di energia sufficiente a tenerlo cosciente: portava al collo una borraccia riempita di latte e zucchero dalla quale beveva ogni volta che sentiva le forze abbandonarlo.
La sua magrezza estrema attirava lo sguardo e i commenti velenosi dei passanti, ed Isaac si era rassegnato a vivere sopportando tutto questo. Era alto un metro e settanta, e pesava meno di 20 chili.

Un giorno però, nel 1865, Isaac volle farsi un giro al luna park, e lì venne notato da uno dei promoter che gli offrì di esibirsi. Sulle prime Isaac rifiutò, ma in breve tempo si fece strada in lui una riflessione più razionale. Lavorare, non poteva; la gente avrebbe comunque e sempre guardato con repulsione e curiosità il suo corpo – e allora tanto valeva che pagassero per farlo.

La scelta di Isaac Sprague di unirsi al luna park itinerante fu quella giusta: esibendosi come “scheletro vivente” nel giro di una manciata di mesi la sua popolarità crebbe talmente che venne provinato da P. T. Barnum in persona, e assunto per la cifra davvero notevole di 80 dollari a settimana. La sua fortuna fu breve: quando l’American Museum di Barnum prese fuoco per la seconda volta nel 1868, Isaac riuscì a sfuggire all’incendio per puro miracolo, magra e sparuta ombra di ossa e pelle che correva con sforzi inimmaginabili fra le fiamme. Dopo la brutta esperienza Sprague lasciò il mondo del freakshow per un po’; si sposò, ebbe tre figli di robusta costituzione, scrisse perfino un’autobiografia. Ritornato con il circo a causa di problemi finanziari, dovuti forse anche alla sua passione per il gioco d’azzardo, morì in povertà il 5 gennaio del 1887.

Un altro celebre scheletro vivente era Dominique Castagna, francese nato in Borgogna, a Saligny, nel 1869. La sua storia però è ben più triste di quella di Sprague.

Se Isaac poteva, nella sfortuna, almeno vantare un volto di bell’aspetto, Dominique aveva una faccia che pochi avrebbero definito attraente: il naso schiacciato e gli occhi bulbosi e sporgenti davano al suo viso un aspetto contorto e innaturale. All’età di due anni il suo corpo smise di svilupparsi normalmente, e da bambino crebbe emaciato e pallido. A dodici anni Castagna era alto 1 metro e 40 e pesava 22 chili: i concittadini lo evitavano per il suo aspetto macilento che scambiavano per qualche malattia mortale o contagiosa, e a sua volta lui imparò ad evitare la gente, vivendo secluso in casa, solitario ed introverso.

La storia racconta che Castagna, una volta adulto, trovò un lavoro d’ufficio a Monaco, l’unico impiego che il suo corpo fragile gli permetteva di assumere. Si dice che un suo collega che lavorava nello stesso ufficio, un certo Cruzel, lo convinse a tentare la strada del sideshow, e Dominique si decise a vincere una volta per tutte la sua timidezza: salì per la prima volta sul palcoscenico nel 1896 a Marsiglia. Ebbe un immediato successo.

Così Castagna e Cruzel divennero soci. Cruzel, in qualità di suo manager, gestiva gli ingaggi e fu lui ad inventare il nome d’arte vincente per Castagna: The Mummy, la mummia. Negli anni che seguirono fra i due nacque e si cementò un’amicizia vera, forse l’unica che Dominique avesse mai avuto. Per la prima volta in vita sua c’era qualcuno che non si mostrava disgustato dal suo aspetto, che non lo giudicava ma che anzi condivideva con lui la faticosa vita nomade e lo sosteneva con affetto nelle difficili esibizioni, quando Dominique era costretto a sopportare gli sguardi del pubblico, da solo sul palco.

Ma tutto ha una fine. Cruzel si innamorò di una donna; possiamo soltanto immaginare quanto questa novità possa aver riempito di angoscia e dolore Castagna, all’idea di rimanere ancora una volta da solo. Le sue paure, infine, si concretizzarono: Cruzel lasciò lo show business e si sposò.
Dominique Castagna decise che non voleva sopportare oltre una vita di solitudine, e si sparò nel 1905 in una camera d’hotel a Liegi, in Belgio.

Šarūnas Sauka

Da quando nel 1944 i Sovietici riconquistarono la Lituania fino al 1991, anno dell’indipendenza, il KGB attuò una politica del terrore per sopprimere qualsiasi insurrezione: a Vilnius, la capitale, l’ex-quartier generale dei servizi segreti è ora divenuto un museo che racconta gli orrori accaduti fra quelle mura. Nella “sala delle esecuzioni” furono giustiziati più di 1000 prigionieri solo fino agli anni ’60, almeno un terzo accusati di aver resistito all’occupazione; e da allora fino al ’91 il terrore è continuato fra interrogatori, torture, prigionia e deportazioni.


Šarūnas Sauka, pittore e scultore originario di Vilnius, è nato nel 1958 e ha vissuto questo angosciante periodo in pieno.

È facile riconoscere nella violenza e nella insostenibile crudeltà dei suoi dipinti il segno di una ferita culturale ancora aperta; eppure l’esperienza di un regime totalitario influenza profondamente anche la visione del mondo e la filosofia di chi è costretto a viverla.

Così sembra quasi che Sauka, con le sue figure ibride, decomposte, grottesche, stia suggerendo una visione tragica della condizione umana: non c’è nulla di divino in questa corporeità deperibile e deforme, anzi la vertigine di fronte ai suoi quadri è quella del vuoto assoluto.


Figure che anelano a uno slancio mitologico o spirituale, ma ricadono nel pantano degli istinti bestiali, condannate a una quasi costante assenza di cielo e di orizzonte. Varie manifestazioni della malattia, della decadenza fisica si muovono in un’oscurità palpabile, un’oscurità in cui non c’è Dio ma soltanto il terrore. Il mondo di Sauka è la fine della metafisica di stampo cristiano, un triste sberleffo alla dottrina della resurrezione della carne, qui ritratta nel disfacimento più irreversibile.


Eppure, in tutta questa cupa desolazione c’è almeno un indizio di riscatto: i personaggi dipinti da Sauka portano nella maggior parte dei casi il suo stesso volto, o il volto di alcuni suoi famigliari. Questo permette di donare un valore catartico inaspettato a queste visioni disperate; attraverso l’alchimia dell’arte, sembra suggerire Sauka, anche l’assenza di significato e la putrida materialità di questa esistenza possono essere trascese.


Šarūnas Sauka, pur essendo forse il più importante pittore lituano postmoderno, è ancora praticamente sconosciuto in occidente, e questo perché la sua monumentale opera non ha avuto, fino alla liberazione, alcun modo di arrivare fino da noi. In Lituania l’artista stesso ha ormai da qualche decennio abbandonato la capitale, e vive da recluso in un remoto villaggio fra laghi e foreste.


Se nell’opera di Sauka quello che colpisce di primo acchito è ovviamente la potenza evocativa delle immagini, non bisogna dimenticare che, per quanto nera e beffarda, l’ironia è comunque e sempre presente nelle sue tele. Per questo vittima e carnefice vengono dipinti entrambi con il volto dell’artista: chi può scagliare la prima pietra, se siamo soltanto animali che continuano a infliggersi dolore l’un l’altro? Forse il vero inferno non sta in un ipotetico “Aldilà”… forse è semplicemente il carosello infinito, la Babele apocalittica della nostra stessa stupidità.

(Grazie, Amelita & David!)

Speciale: James G. Mundie

In esclusiva per Bizzarro Bazar vi proponiamo l’intervista da noi realizzata all’artista James G. Mundie, disegnatore, fotografo e incisore. I suoi lavori più noti sono due serie di opere: la prima, intitolata Prodigies, è un’iconoclasta rivisitazione di alcuni classici della pittura di ogni epoca, all’interno dei quali i soggetti originali sono stati rimpiazzati dai freaks più famosi. Quello che ne risulta è una sorta di ironica storia dell’arte “parallela” o “possibile”, in cui la deformità prende il posto del bello, e in cui per una volta gli emarginati divengono protagonisti.
Il suo altro lavoro molto noto è Cabinet of curiosities, una serie di fotografie, schizzi e incisioni riguardanti le maggiori collezioni anatomiche e teratologiche conservate nei musei di tutto il mondo.

Le fotografie fanno parte dei tuoi progetti tanto quanto i disegni. Ti ritieni più un fotografo o un illustratore?

Mi piace pensarmi come un creatore di immagini che utilizza qualsiasi strumento o mezzo sia appropriato. Questo significa talvolta disegnare, altre volte incidere su legno o fotografare. Comunque, ho cominciato ad considerare la fotografia come mezzo a sé solo da poco tempo. Ho sempre usato le fotografie come riferimenti, o come fossero dei bozzetti per altri progetti. Con il tempo, invece, ho cominciato ad apprezzare le foto che facevo nei loro propri termini estetici. Specialmente da quando sono diventato padre, la relativa immediatezza dell fotografia è stata un cambiamento benvenuto rispetto ai metodi più laboriosi che uso nei disegni e nelle incisioni, che possono prendere settimane o mesi (addirittura anni!) per emergere.

Riguardo alla serie Prodigies, come è nata l’idea di unire il mondo dei freakshow con quello dell’arte classica, e perché?

Ho sempre disegnato ritratti, e intorno al 1996-97 stavo cercando nuove ispirazioni. Ho cominciato a pensare alle fotografie di strane persone, come Jojo il Ragazzo dalla Faccia di Cane, che avevo visto decadi prima, e pensai che sarebbe stato divertente lavorarci. Cominciai a fare ricerche sui sideshow, e presto scoprii qualcosa di molto più bizzarro di quello che ricordavo dalla mia infanzia. Iniziai a trovare anche dettagli sulle vite di questi performer che li fecero risultare molto più veri ai miei occhi – cioè, più di qualcosa di semplicemente anomalo e strampalato. Prodigies è cominciato come una sfida, per vedere se sarei riuscito a mescolare questi inquietanti e affascinanti performer di sideshow ai miei quadri preferiti.
Mi resi conto che la presentazione circense dei freaks era spesso basata sull’esagerazione – ai nani venivano assegnati titoli militari come Generale o Ammiraglio, le persone molto alte venivano reinventate come giganti, ecc.; e nella storia dell’arte succedeva lo stesso, quello che vediamo nei quadri era, all’epoca, una commissione commerciale all’artista da parte di una persona benestante che voleva lasciare un ricordo di sé e del suo successo. In questo senso, un ritratto di Raffaello di un qualsiasi cardinale o poeta non è molto differente dalle cartoline di presentazione dei freaks vendute dal palcoscenico. Entrambe le cose cercano di proiettare e/o vendere un’identità. “Perché non portare il tutto a uno stadio successivo, e permettere ai freaks di abitare o rimodellare le storie raccontate nei dipinti classici?”, pensai. Ovviamente non volevo procedere a casaccio. Dovevo avere un buon motivo per collegare un performer con un certo quadro, che fosse una storia in comune, o un atteggiamento, o un elemento compositivo che mi ricordava la figura di un freak. Questo significa che sto ancora cercando l’accoppiata ideale per alcuni fra i miei performer preferiti, come ad esempio Grady Stiles l’Uomo Aragosta. Dall’altra parte, ci sono dipinti così iconici che risulta difficile utilizzarli senza apparire risaputi o pigri.

La serie Prodigies è percorsa da una vena di humor iconoclasta. Potrebbe essere letta come una “legittimazione” dei diversi, a cui viene data la possibilità di essere protagonisti della storia dell’arte; ma anche come una specie di sberleffo nei confronti del concetto storico e assodato di “bellezza”. Quale interpretazione ti sembra più corretta?

Sono entrambe corrette. Anche se è di moda oggi denigrare i freakshow come una reliquia culturale barbarica da dimenticare, credo che servissero una funzione necessaria nella società – e che non è ancora sparita. E vedo queste persone che lavoravano nei freakshow – anche se spesso sfruttate – come degli eroi, per aver affrontato le circostanze peggiori e averne tratto il maggiore successo possibile. Queste erano persone che non sarebbero mai state accettate nella società beneducata, eppure trovarono una comunità che si strinse attorno a loro e li celebrò. Invece di essere chiusi negli istituti, vissero bene la loro vita con la loro famiglia, recitando sul palcoscenico un ruolo creato ad arte. C’è un certo carattere di nobiltà, in questo. Sì, la gente guardava e di tanto in tanto li scherniva, ma almeno ora pagavano per il privilegio. Quindi, chi è che era veramente sfruttato? Anche ora vogliamo guardare, ma la maggior parte di noi non è abbastanza sincero da ammetterlo.
Molte delle presentazioni utilizzate nei freakshow erano intenzionalmente umoristiche, quasi ridicole. Credo che quello humor servisse perché il pubblico si sentisse meno a disagio, e anche per dare al performer una protezione emotiva. Una parte del fascino dei freakshow è di confrontarsi con le proprie paure. Vedi qualcuno sul palco a cui mancano degli arti oppure deforme, e naturalmente pensi “E se quello fossi io?”. Quindi ho spesso inserito dei piccoli tocchi scherzosi, per aiutarmi a metabolizzare queste domande, e per tirare un salvagente allo spettatore. Allo stesso tempo sto prendendo in giro alcuni dei pilastri della storia dell’arte. C’è un sacco di materiale esilarante con cui lavorare, se lo guardi con mente aperta. Per esempio alcune convenzioni formali che troviamo in antiche istoriazioni sugli altari: è piuttosto divertente, oggi, vedere come i santi sono raffigurati cinque volte più grandi dei meri mortali. È liberatorio camminare in un museo e permetterti di ridere, anche se per molte persone è puro sacrilegio.
Gran parte di ciò che oggi reputiamo “bello” è semplicemente regolare, uniforme. Le nostre idee moderne di bellezza ci vengono propinate dai giornali di moda, televisione e affini. Eppure, in queste strane persone che io disegno – con le loro proporzioni imperfette – andiamo oltre il bello per avvicinarci al sublime. Uno dei principi guida per me in questo progetto è quello che Sir Francis Bacon scrisse nel 1597: “non c’è beltà eccellente che non abbia in sé una qualche misura di stranezza”.

In uno dei tuoi disegni, ti autoritrai nei panni di un anatomista dilettante, e molti dei tuoi lavori raffigurano anomalie patologiche. Qual è il tuo rapporto con i tuoi soggetti? Ritieni di avere un occhio freddo e clinico oppure c’è un’empatia con la sofferenza che spesso implica l’anatomia patologica? E, ancora, cosa vorresti che provasse chi guarda i tuoi disegni?

Anche se un certo distacco è necessario per rimanere oggettivi, non posso impedirmi di immedesimarmi nei miei soggetti. Queste erano persone reali che affrontavano circostanze che non posso nemmeno immaginare. Quando attraverso una collezione anatomica, mi ritrovo a chiedermi chi fosse la persona da cui questa o quella parte è stata tolta e preservata. Oggi, i casi sono presentati in maniera anonima, ma negli scorsi secoli era comune accludere informazioni biografiche sul paziente. Credo che in questa fissazione di proteggere la privacy degli individui stiamo inavvertitamente negando la loro umanità, perché ora ciò che vediamo è una malattia invece che una persona. Anche se non è mia intenzione forzare nello spettatore alcuna emozione o idea (e spesso la gente trova nei miei lavori dei significati che non ho mai inteso esprimere), spero che almeno porti con sé il senso che i miei soggetti sono o erano persone vere, degne di considerazione.

Il tuo nuovo progetto, Cabinet of curiosities, è basato sulle tue visite ai musei anatomici americani ed europei. Cosa ti attrae nei reperti anatomici e teratologici?

Sono sempre stato interessato a come le cose funzionano, in particolare all’anatomia. Quello che mi interessa delle collezioni patologiche o teratologiche è che questi strani esemplari ci mostrano cosa sta succedendo a livello cellulare, genetico. Esaminando il sistema danneggiato, impariamo come funziona quello in salute. Sono anche affascinato dagli antichi sistemi usati per catalogare e organizzare il mondo naturale, e la teratologia – lo studio dei mostri – è un esempio particolarmente interessante. Anche l’idea del museo, nato come collezione personale per diventare istituzione pubblica è affascinante, e condivide molti aspetti con i freakshow. Alcuni di questi preparati sono strani e bellissimi, e presentati in maniera molto elaborata. Quindi Cabinet of Curiosities è un tentativo di documentare il punto in cui questi due mondi si intersecano.

Quale pensi sia il rapporto fra medicina ed arte, e più in generale fra scienza ed arte?

La medicina è stata considerata un’arte per molto più tempo di quanto non sia stata vista come scienza. La società non si libera da una simile associazione da un giorno all’altro, così ancora oggi continuiamo a  parlare dell’abilità di un chirurgo come fosse quella di uno scultore. Ma anche da un punto di vista strettamente pratico, i dottori hanno bisogno degli artisti perché le rappresentazioni artistiche sono da sempre una componente essenziale nell’educazione medica e nella sua comunicazione. Sin dal Rinascimento gli illustratori hanno insegnato l’anatomia a generazioni di medici, e in quel modo la pratica artistica dell’osservazione ha aiutato la medicina ad uscire dalla via puramente teorica. Penso che possiamo affermare che questo ruolo comunicativo valga anche per le scienze in generale, perché l’arte può aiutare a spiegare complesse teorie anche a persone che non masticano la materia. Un artista può fungere da legame tra lo scienziato e il pubblico, rendendo comprensibili le scoperte scientifiche – ma può anche servire come critico. In questo modo, l’arte può divenire una sorta di specchio morale per la scienza.

Nelle tue parole, “questi preparati anatomici rappresentano il punto di intersezione fra scienza, cultura, emozione e mito”. Credi che ci sia bisogno di miti moderni? Pensi che questi nuovi miti possano provenire dal mondo della scienza, invece che da quello magico-religioso come nel passato? Il tuo lavoro fotografico e di illustrazione può essere letto come un tentativo di dare una dimensione mitica ai tuoi soggetti? Sei religioso?

Penso che noi creiamo in continuazione nuovi miti, o che ne risvegliamo e reinventiamo di vecchi. Fa parte della natura umana.
La scienza per molte persone ha sostituito la religione come fondamentale via d’ispirazione, ma in realtà sappiamo ancora così poco dell’universo, che c’è ancora molto terreno fertile per la fantascienza. Con la nascita di Scientology abbiamo visto addirittura la fantascienza trasformarsi in religione! Io non sono assolutamente una persona religiosa, ma penso che spesso cerchiamo di riporre le nostre speranze in un potere che sta al di fuori di noi. Per alcuni, questo significa una divinità che è personalmente interessata a come ci vestiamo, o a cosa mangiamo il venerdì; per altri vuol dire l’idea che il genere umano troverà finalmente la cura per il cancro e imparerà i segreti per viaggiare nel tempo. Così nel mio lavoro mi ritrovo a raccontare storie, o quantomeno a predisporre il seme di una storia che ognuno può trasformare nel racconto che desidera.

Anche tua moglie Kate è un’artista, ma i suoi quadri sembrano essere completamente distanti dal tuo mondo – solari, impressionisti, colorati. Se non sono indiscreto, come vi rapportate l’uno con l’arte dell’altra?

Siamo i migliori critici l’uno dell’altra. Siccome i nostri lavori sono così differenti, non c’è competizione fra noi, e ci diamo costantemente dei pareri e delle idee.

Chi è appassionato di stranezze, corre il rischio di essere reputato egli stesso strano. Cosa pensano delle tue passioni gli amici e i parenti?

Alcune persone amano stare a guardare i treni, o ascoltare gli Abba. Io amo i freaks. Tutte le persone più interessanti sono strambe.

Ecco i siti ufficiali di Prodigies, e di Cabinet of Curiosities.

Una coppia (quasi) perfetta

Juan Baptista Dos Santos nacque attorno al 1843 a Faro, in Portogallo, figlio di una coppia che aveva avuto già due gemelli. Anche questo secondo parto, in realtà, sarebbe dovuto essere gemellare: e invece nacque solo Juan, che portava nel suo corpo le vestigia del fratello mai nato.

Perfettamente formato dalla vita in su, e addirittura di bella presenza, Juan aveva però due peni, due ani (di cui uno non funzionante) e un arto in sovrannumero che pendeva dal suo addome. Ad essere precisi, questa “terza gamba” era il risultato della fusione delle due gambe del gemello parassita. Avendo un rudimentale ginocchio dotato di patella, l’arto si poteva piegare ma non aveva motilità volontaria: Juan quindi prese l’abitudine di legarlo alla coscia destra, in modo da essere più libero nei movimenti e potersi dedicare alla sua passione, l’equitazione.

Esaminato regolarmente dai dottori fin dall’età di sei mesi, Juan si trasferì a Parigi dove sarebbe diventato un caso clinico celebre, assiduo frequentatore di università e invitato a prestigiosi convegni medici come oggetto di studio. Certo, per buona parte della sua vita si esibì nei circhi; ma nel 1865 rifiutò un ingaggio da 200.000 franchi in un freakshow, deciso a concedersi esclusivamente alla ricerca scientifica. Quando, di tanto in tanto, riprendeva a vagabondare con gli spettacoli itineranti, era sempre uno dei nomi di punta del cartellone.

Più passava il tempo, però, e più i dottori si rendevano conto che la particolarità più sensazionale di Juan Baptista erano i suoi due peni. L’urinazione avveniva da entrambi, così come entrambi erano perfettamente funzionanti per capacità erettili e riproduttive, fatto questo più unico che raro. Un rapporto fisiologico del 1865 stilato all’Havana descrive Juan, all’età di 22 anni, come “posseduto da passione animale”, avido di sesso e conosciuto per il suo comportamento promiscuo: utilizzava entrambi i suoi peni nell’atto sessuale, e quando aveva “finito” con uno, continuava con il secondo.

Se esisteva al mondo qualcuno che potesse avere un’affinità elettiva con un uomo particolare come Juan Baptista Dos Santos, era sicuramente Blanche Dumas (o Dumont). Purtroppo della sua vita ci sono arrivati meno dettagli, ma pare che sia nata attorno al 1860 in Martinica, da padre francese e madre meticcia. A quanto riportato nel famoso trattato Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine (1896), Blanche aveva un addome molto largo, che conteneva, nell’ordine: le sue due gambe, malformate; una terza gamba attaccata al coccige; due seni in sovrannumero all’altezza del pube, rudimentali ma completi di capezzoli (ma questo dato è probabilmente falso, alcune foto d’epoca sono in tutta evidenza truccate); e, soprattutto, due vagine con vulve perfettamente formate e dalla sviluppata sensibilità.

Proprio come per Juan Baptista, anche l’appetito sessuale di Blanche era straordinario; si dice che avesse decine di ammiratori e che talvolta si intrattenesse con due uomini alla volta, utilizzando contemporaneamente le sue due vagine. Tanto che ad un certo punto, conscia del successo delle sue particolari “abilità”, Blanche decise di trasferirsi a Parigi dove divenne una prostituta d’alto bordo.

Aveva sentito spesso parlare di Juan Baptista Dos Santos, celebre per i suoi genitali doppi quanto per la sua sfrenata libido; quando seppe della sua presenza a Parigi in occasione di un tour circense europeo, Blanche, incuriosita, decise che era venuto il momento che l’uomo con due peni e la donna con due vagine si incontrassero. Dopotutto, quante possibilità c’erano, nell’intero cosmo, che due esseri talmente straordinari nascessero nello stesso secolo, a distanza di pochi anni, e si ritrovassero nella stessa città? Così, confidando in questo segno del destino, Blanche organizzò l’incontro.

Ma il detto popolare Dio li fa e poi li accoppia non è infallibile. La scintilla della passione, purtroppo, non si accese, e dopo una breve (e molto chiacchierata) relazione i due ritornarono alle loro vite: Juan a girare il mondo con il circo, e Blanche nella sua casa di appuntamenti… e nessuno può dire se vissero felici, o contenti.

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – III

FREAKS – LA COLLEZIONE AKIMITSU NARUYAMA

(2000, Logos)

Ovvero “Lo Sfruttamento Delle Anomalie Fisiche Nei Circhi E Negli Spettacoli Itineranti”.

L’impressionante collezione fotografica di meraviglie umane di Naruyama è un vero tesoro. Immagini storiche, di un’importanza eccezionale, raccolte in un libricino che, pur non offrendo un approfondito background storico, ha il potere di stregare il lettore grazie alla bellezza delle illustrazioni. Dai Lillipuziani alla Meraviglia Senza Braccia, dai Bambini Aztechi ai ragazzi-leone, tutti i più famosi freaks vissuti a cavallo fra diciannovesimo e ventesimo secolo sono presenti nella raccolta; molte delle fotografie sono infatti relative agli spettacoli circensi e alle fiere itineranti americane in cui questi artisti si esibivano. Dopo lo show, un’ulteriore fonte di profitto erano proprio le fotografie che venivano vendute al pubblico, autografate. Per quanto l’esibizione della deformità all’interno dei carnivals americani sia un capitolo affascinante della storia dello spettacolo moderno, questo prezioso libro però, così focalizzato com’è sui ritratti, offre qualcosa di diverso.

La raccolta documenta un’epoca e una società attraverso i suoi corpi meno fortunati, e allo stesso tempo nello scorrere le pagine avvertiamo l’atemporalità di queste anomalie: nell’antichità come nell’epoca moderna, certi uomini hanno dovuto sopportare il fardello di fattezze eccezionali, spesso temuti ed emarginati. Eppure, se è vero che ogni uomo è specchio per il suo prossimo, fissando gli occhi di questi nostri fratelli dai corpi stupefacenti ci accorgiamo che il loro sguardo rimanda il riflesso più puro e vero.

Alex Boese

ELEFANTI IN ACIDO E ALTRI BIZZARRI ESPERIMENTI

(2009, Baldini Castoldi Dalai)

Una buona parte degli articoli di Bizzarro Bazar contenuti nella sezione “Scienza anomala” nasconde un debito verso questo splendido libro. Boese raccoglie, in forma divulgativa e spesso scanzonata, gli esperimenti scientifici più improbabili, sconcertanti, risibili – e, talvolta, illuminanti. Chi pensa che gli scienziati siano persone serie e compite, sempre nascosti dietro provette o lavagne piene di equazioni impossibili, farebbe meglio a ricredersi: l’immagine della scienza che esce dalle pagine di Elefanti in acido è quella di una disciplina viva, fantasiosa, sempre pronta a prendere le strade meno battute, anche a costo di errori madornali e vergognosi fallimenti. In definitiva, una disciplina molto più umana (nel bene o nel male) di come viene normalmente rappresentata.

Molti di questi esperimenti sono spassosi in quanto, a una prima occhiata, totalmente inconcludenti. Dai ricercatori del titolo, che somministrano a un elefante una potentissima dose di LSD, fino allo psicologo che in automobile resta fermo quando scatta il semaforo verde soltanto per cronometrare quanto ci mette l’autista dietro di lui a suonare il clacson, per finire con gli scienziati che costruiscono uno stadio per le corse degli scarafaggi, il tempo perso dagli studiosi in progetti dagli esiti comici può sconcertare. Eppure, come ricorda l’autore, non sempre la scienza ricerca soltanto le risposte alle nobili e grandi domande. Ogni tassello, per quanto insignificante possa sembrare, contribuisce a comprendere qualcosa di più del mondo in cui viviamo. È vero che gli uomini preferiscono le donne difficili da conquistare? Se cadessimo in un pozzo, il nostro cane verrebbe a salvarci? Perché non riusciamo a farci il solletico da soli?

I ricercatori le cui vicende sono narrate in Elefanti in acido hanno una fiducia smisurata nel metodo scientifico, e non esitano ad applicarlo a quesiti di questo tenore. Anche se, come nel caso dello scienziato che si incaponisce a contare tutti i peli pubici dei suoi colleghi, questa fiducia sembra talvolta divenire talmente cieca da non accorgersi dell’assurdità della ricerca stessa. E anche questo è molto umano.