Alberto Martini, The “Maudit” of Italian Art

Those who live in dream are superior beings;
those who live in reality are unhappy slaves.
Alberto Martini, 1940

Alberto Giacomo Spiridione Martini (1876-1954) was one of the most extraordinary Italian artists of the first half of the twentieth century.
He was the author of a vast graphic production which includes engravings, lithographs, ex libris, watercolors, business cards, postcards, illustrations for books and novels of various kinds (from Dante to D’Annunzio, from Shakespeare to Victor Hugo, from Tassoni to Nerval).

Born in Oderzo, he studied drawing and painting under the guidance of his father Giorgio, a professor of design at the Technical Institute of Treviso. Initially influenced by the German sixteenth-century mannerism of Dürer and Baldung, he then moved towards an increasingly personal and refined symbolism, supported by his exceptional knowledge of iconography. At only 21 he exhibited for the first time at the Venice Biennale; from then on, his works will be featured there for 14 consecutive years.
The following year, 1898, while he was in Munich to collaborate with some magazines, he met the famous Neapolitan art critic Vittorio Pica who, impressed by his style, will forever be his most convinced supporter. Pica remembers him like this:

This man, barely past twenty, […] immediately came across as likable in his distinguished, albeit a bit cold, discretion […], in the subtle elegance of his person, in the paleness of his face, where the sensual freshness of his red lips contrasted with that strange look, both piercing and abstract, mocking and disdainful.

(in Alberto Martini: la vita e le opere 1876-1906, Oderzo Cultura)

After drawing 22 plates for the historical edition of the Divine Comedy printed in 1902 by the Alinari brothers in Florence, starting from 1905 he devoted himself to the cycle of Indian ink illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories, which remains one of the peaks of his art.
In this series, Martini shows a strong visionary talent, moving away from the meticulous realistic observation of his first works, and at the same time developing a cruel and aesthetic vein reminiscent of Rops, Beardsley and Redon.

During the First World War he published five series of postcards entitled Danza Macabra Europea: these consist of 54 lithographs meant as satirical propaganda against the Austro-Hungarian empire, and were distributed among the allies. Once again Martini proves to possess a grotesque boundless fantasy, and it is also by virtue of these works that he is today considered a precursor of Surrealism.

Disheartened by how little consideration he was ebjoying in Italy, he moved to Paris in 1928. “They swore — he wrote in his autobiography — to remove me as a painter from the memory of Italians, preventing me from attending exhibitions and entering the Italian market […] I know very well that my original way of painting can annoy the myopic little draftsman and paltry critics“.
In Paris he met the Surrealist group and developed a series of “black” paintings, before moving on to a more intense use of color (what he called his “clear” manner) to grasp the ecstatic visions that possessed him.

The large window of my studio is open onto the night. In that black rectangle, I see my ghosts pass and with them I love to converse. They incite me to be strong, indomitable, heroic, and they tell me secrets and mysteries that I shall perhaps reveal you. Many will not believe and I am sorry for them, because those who have no imagination vegetate in their slippers: comfortable life, but not an artist’s life. Once upon a starless night, I saw myself in that black rectangle as in a mirror. I saw myself pale, impassive. It is my soul, I thought, that is now mirroring my face in the infinite and that once mirrored who knows what other appearance, because if the soul is eternal it has neither beginning nor end, and what we are now is nothing but one of its several episodes. And this revealing thought troubled me […]. As I was absorbed in these intricate thoughts, I started to feel a strange caress on the hand I had laid on a book open under a lamp. […] I turned my head and saw a large nocturnal butterfly sitting next to my hand, looking at me, flapping its wings. You too, I thought, are dreaming; and the spell of your dull eyes of dust sees me as a ghost. Yes, nocturnal and beautiful visitor, I am a dreamer who believes in immortality, or perhaps a phantom of the eternal dream that we call life.

(A. Martini, Vita d’artista, manoscritto, 1939-1940)

In economic hardship, Martini returned to Milan in 1934. He continued his incessant and multiform artistic work during the last twenty years of his life, without ever obtaining the desired success. He died on November 8, 1954. Today his remains lie together with those of his wife Maria Petringa in the cemetery of Oderzo.

The fact that Martini never gained the recognition he deserved within Italian early-twentieth-century art can be perhaps attributed to his preference for grotesque themes and gloomy atmospheres (in our country, fantasy always had a bad reputation). The eclectic nature of his production, which wilfully avoided labels or easy categorization, did not help him either: his originality, which he rightly considered an asset, was paradoxically what forced him to remain “a peripheral and occult artist, doomed to roam, like a damned soul, the unexplored areas of art history” (Barbara Meletto, Alberto Martini: L’anima nera dell’arte).

Yet his figure is strongly emblematic of the cultural transition between nineteenth-century romantic decadentism and the new, darker urgencies which erupted with the First World War. Like his contemporary Alfred Kubin, with whom he shared the unreal imagery and the macabre trait, Martini gave voice to those existential tensions that would then lead to surrealism and metaphysical art.

An interpretation of some of the satirical allegories in the European Macabre Dance can be found here and here.
The Civic Art Gallery of Oderzo is dedicated to Alberto Martini and promotes the study of his work.

Il Turco

Nel 1770, alla corte di Maria Teresa d’Austria, fece la sua prima sconcertante apparizione il Turco.

Vestito come uno stregone mediorientale, con tanto di vistoso turbante, il Turco sedeva ad un grosso tavolo di fronte a una scacchiera, e fumava una lunghissima pipa tradizionale; da sopra la barba nerissima, i suoi occhi grigi, ancorché vuoti e privi d’espressione, sembravano osservare tutto e tutti.  Il Turco era in attesa del coraggioso giocatore che avrebbe osato sfidarlo a scacchi.

Turk-engraving5

Tuerkischer_schachspieler_windisch4

Ciò che davvero impressionò tutti i presenti era che il Turco non era un uomo in carne ed ossa: era un automa. Il suo inventore, Wolfgang von Kempelen, lo aveva creato proprio per compiacere la Regina, con la quale si era vantato l’anno prima di essere in grado di costruire la macchina più spettacolare del mondo. Prima che cominciasse la partita a scacchi, Kempelen aprì le ante dell’enorme scatola sulla quale poggiava la scacchiera, e gli spettatori poterono vedere una intricatissima serie di meccanismi, ruote dentate e strane strutture ad orologeria – non c’era nessun trucco, si poteva vedere da una parte all’altra della struttura, quando Kempelen apriva anche le porte sul retro. Un’altra sezione della macchina era invece quasi vuota, a parte una serie di tubi d’ottone. Quando il Turco era messo in moto, si sentiva chiaramente il ritmico sferragliare dei suoi ingranaggi interni, simile al ticchettio che avrebbe prodotto un enorme orologio.

Il primo volontario si fece avanti e Kempelen lo informò che il Turco doveva avere sempre le pedine bianche, e muovere invariabilmente per primo. A parte questa “concessione”, si scoprì ben presto che il Turco non soltanto era un ottimo giocatore di scacchi, ma aveva anche un certo caratterino. Se un avversario tentava una mossa non valida, il Turco scuoteva la testa, rimetteva la pedina al suo posto e si arrogava il diritto di muovere; se il giocatore ci riprovava una seconda volta, l’automa gettava via la pedina.

arab1
Alla sua presentazione ufficiale a corte, il Turco sbaragliò facilmente qualsiasi avversario. Per Kempelen sarebbe anche potuta finire lì, con il bel successo del suo spettacolo. Ma il suo automa divenne di colpo l’argomento di conversazione preferito in tutta Europa: intellettuali, nobili e curiosi volevano confrontarsi con questa incredibile macchina in grado di pensare, altri sospettavano un trucco, e alcuni temevano si trattasse di magia nera (pochi per la verità, era pur sempre l’epoca dei Lumi). Nonostante volesse dedicarsi a nuove invenzioni, di fronte all’ordine dell’Imperatore Giuseppe II, Kempelen fu costretto controvoglia a rimontare il suo automa e ad esibirsi nuovamente a corte; il successo fu ancora più clamoroso, e all’inventore venne suggerito (o, per meglio dire, imposto) di iniziare un tour europeo.

Kempelen-charcoal

Nel 1783 il Turco viaggiò fra spettacoli pubblici e privati, presso le principali corti europee e nei saloni nobiliari, perdendo alcune partite ma vincendone la maggior parte. A Parigi il più grande scacchista del tempo, François-André Danican Philidor, vinse contro il Turco ma confessò che quella era stata la partita più faticosa della sua carriera. Dopo Parigi vennero Londra, Leipzig, Dresda, Amsterdam, Vienna. A poco a poco si spense il clamore della novità, e il Turco rimase smantellato per una ventina d’anni: nessuno aveva ancora scoperto il suo segreto. Quando Kempelen morì nel 1804, suo figlio decise di vendere il macchinario a Johann Nepomuk Mälzel, un appassionato collezionista di automi. Mälzel decise che avrebbe dato nuova vita al Turco, perfezionandolo e rendendolo ancora più spettacolare. Aggiunse alcune parti, modificò alcuni dettagli, e infine installò una scatola parlante che permetteva alla macchina di pronunciare la parola “échec!” quando metteva sotto scacco l’avversario.

1-0.The_Turk.Granger_Collection_0059574_H.L02645400
Perfino Napoleone Bonaparte volle giocare contro il Turco. Si racconta che l’Imperatore provò una mossa illecita per ben tre volte; le prime due volte l’automa scosse il capo e rimise la pedina al suo posto, ma la terza volta perse le staffe e con un braccio – evidentemente incurante di chi aveva di fronte! – il Turco spazzò via tutti pezzi dalla scacchiera. Napoleone rimase estremamente divertito dal gesto insolente, e giocò in seguito alcune partite più “serie”.

Malzels-exhibition-ad
Nel 1826 Mälzel portò il Turco in America, dove la sua popolarità non smise di crescere su tutta la costa orientale degli States, da New York a Boston a Philadelphia; Edgar Allan Poe scrisse un famoso trattato sull’automa (anche se non azzeccò affatto il suo segreto), e numerosi “cloni” ed imitazioni del Turco cominciarono ad apparire – ma nessuno ebbe il successo dell’originale.

Ma ogni cosa fa il suo tempo. Nel 1838 Mälzel morì, e il Turco, inizialmente messo all’asta, finì relegato in un angolo del Peale Museum di Baltimora. Nel 1854 un incendio raggiunse il Museo, e ci fu chi giurò di aver sentito il Turco, avvolto dalle fiamme, che gridava “Scacco! Scacco!“, mentre la sua voce diveniva sempre più flebile. Dell’incredibile automa si salvò soltanto la scacchiera, che era conservata in un luogo separato.

Nel 1857 Silas Mitchell, figlio dell’ultimo proprietario del Turco, decise che non c’era più motivo di nascondere il vero funzionamento della macchina, visto che era andata ormai distrutta. Così, su una prestigiosa rivista di scacchi, pubblicò infine il “segreto meglio mantenuto di sempre”. Si scoprì che, fra le ipotesi degli scettici e le teorie di chi aveva tentato di risolvere l’enigma, alcune parti dell’ingegnosa opera erano state indovinate, ma mai interamente.

turk-hidden-1-4
Dentro al macchinario del Turco si nascondeva un maestro di scacchi in carne ed ossa. Quando il presentatore apriva i diversi scomparti per mostrarli al pubblico, l’operatore segreto si spostava su un sedile mobile, secondo uno schema preciso, facendo così scivolare in posizione alcune parti semoventi del macchinario. In questo modo, poiché non tutte le ante venivano aperte contemporaneamente, lo scacchista rimaneva sempre al riparo dagli occhi degli spettatori. Ma come poteva sapere in che modo giocare la sua partita?

Sotto ogni pezzo degli scacchi era impiantato un forte magnete, e l’operatore nascosto poteva seguire le mosse dell’avversario perché la calamita attirava a sé altrettanti magneti attaccati con un filo all’interno del coperchio superiore della scatola. L’operatore, per vedere nel buio del mobile in legno, usava una candela i cui fumi uscivano discretamente da un condotto di aerazione nascosto nel turbante del Turco; i numerosi candelabri che illuminavano la scena aiutavano a mascherare la fuoriuscita del fumo. Una complessa serie di leve simili a quelle di un pantografo permettevano al maestro di scacchi di fare la sua mossa, muovendo il braccio dell’automa. C’era perfino un quadrante in ottone con una serie di numeri, che poteva essere visto anche dall’esterno: questo permetteva la comunicazione in codice fra l’operatore all’interno della scatola e il presentatore all’esterno.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

1041323440_a377ac2955
Nel 1989 John Gaughan presentò a una conferenza sulla magia una perfetta ricostruzione del Turco, che gli era costata quattro anni di lavoro. Questa volta, però, non c’era più bisogno di un operatore umano all’interno del macchinario: a dirigere le mosse dell’automa era un programma computerizzato. Meno di dieci anni dopo Deep Blue sarebbe stato il primo computer a battere a scacchi il campione mondiale in carica, Garry Kasparov.

Oggi la tecnologia è arrivata ben oltre le più assurde fantasie di chi rimaneva sconcertato di fronte al Turco; eppure alcune delle domande che ci sono tanto familiari (potranno mai le macchine soppiantare gli uomini? È possibile costruire dei sistemi meccanici capaci di pensiero?) non sono poi così moderne come potremmo credere: nacquero per la prima volta proprio attorno a questa misteriosa e ironica figura dall’esotico turbante.

turk-chess-automaton-01-x640
(Grazie, Giulia!)

Safety Coffins

80440770.6oV1pAGT.safety_dead

I safety coffins, bare di sicurezza, si diffusero nel XVIII e XIX secolo, ed erano dei feretri attrezzati in caso di esequie premature.

La paura di essere sepolti vivi era diffusa e fondata: erano infatti regolari i rapporti che parlavano del ritrovamento, durante la riesumazione, di corpi usciti per metà dalla cassa, o dalla posizione scomposta e dalle unghie strappate, o dei coperchi ricoperti di graffi. La letteratura, dal canto suo, sfruttava questa tremenda immagine: Le esequie premature di Edgar Allan Poe, del 1844, racconta proprio di vari casi attestati e del terrore che lo stesso Poe, sofferente di catalessi, aveva di essere sepolto vivo.

Durante l’epidemia di colera a cavallo fra ‘700 e ‘800, la paura raggiunse il suo apice. Cominciarono dunque ad essere costruite le prime “bare sicure”, che prevedevano aperture dall’interno, e molto spesso l’utilizzo di sistemi di comunicazione con l’esterno, quali ad esempio una campana la cui corda aveva un’ estremità che finiva dentro alla cassa da morto.

safety-coffin-420-90

Il problema di questo metodo è che la decomposizione poteva causare movimenti improvvisi della salma e portare così a delle “false” richieste di soccorso. Altre variazioni del metodo della campana prevedevano bandiere e fuochi d’artificio. Alcuni brevetti includevano scale, vie di fuga, “cannocchiali” puntati sul volto del defunto – per controllare il suo stato – addirittura tubi per il cibo, ma ironicamente molti erano sprovvisti della funzione basilare: il rifornimento d’aria.

buriedalive36a00d8341c318c53ef00e54f25e7e38833-800wi

Nel 1995, il nostrano Fabrizio Caselli ha brevettato il più moderno dei safety coffin: la bara è dotata di un allarme, un sistema di interfono, una torcia elettrica, un apparecchio di respirazione ad ossigeno, uno stimolatore cardiaco e un sistema di monitoraggio dei battiti del cuore (www.morteserena.it).

Eppure, nonostante tutte le precauzioni che la paura di essere sepolti vivi ha ispirato, non si ha notizia di nessuno che sia stato salvato da una “bara di sicurezza”.

80439853.MiUrgAri