The elephants’ graveyard

Run_Cubbies

In The Lion King (1994), the famous Disney animated film, young lion Simba is tricked by the villain, Scar, and finds himself with his friend Nala in the unsettling elephants’ graveyard: hundreds of immense pachyderm skeletons reach the horizon. In this evocative location, the little cub will endure the ambush of three ravenous hyenas.

The setting of this action-packed scene, in fact, does not come from the screenwriters’ imagination. An elephants’ graveyard had already been shown in Trader Horn (1931), and in some Tarzan flicks, featuring the iconic Johnny Weissmuller.
And the most curious fact is that the existence of a mysterious and gigantic collective cemetery, where for thousands of years the elephants have been retiring to die, had been debated since the middle of XIX Century.

viajes-cementerio-elph-tarzan

This legendary place, described as some sort of secret sanctuary, hidden in the deepest recesses of Black Africa, is one of the most enduring myths of the golden age of explorations and big-game hunting. It was a true African Eldorado, where the courageous adventurer could find an unspeakable treasure: besides the elephants’ skeletons, the cave (or the inaccessible valley) would hold such an immense quantity of ivory that anyone finding it would have become insanely rich.

But finding a similar place, as every respectable legend demands, was no easy task. Those who saw it, either never came back from it… or were not able to locate the entrance anymore. Tales were told about searchers who found the tracks of an old and sick elephant, who had departed from the herd, and followed them for days in hope that the animal would bring them to the hidden graveyard; but they then realized they had been led in a huge circle by the deceptive elephant, and found themselves right where they started.

According to other versions, the elusive ossuary was regarded as a sacred place by indigenous people. Anyone who approached it, even accidentally, would have been attacked by the dreadful guardians of the cemetery, a pack of warriors lead by a shaman who protected the entrance to the sanctuary.

The elephants’ graveyard legend, which was mentioned even by Livingstone and circulated in Europe until the first decades of the XX Century, is indeed a legend. But where does it come from? Is it possible that this myth is somewhat grounded in reality?

First of all, there really are some places where high concentrations of elephant bones can be found, as if several animals had traveled there, to a single, precise spot to let themselves die.

The most plausible explanation can be found, surprisingly enough, in dentition. Elephants actually have only two sets of teeth: molars and incisors. Tusks are nothing more than modified incisors, slowly and incessantly growing, whose length is regulated by constant wear. On the contrary, molars are cyclically replaced: during the animal’s lifespan, reaching fifty or sixty years of age in a natural environment, new teeth grow on the back of the mandible and push forward the older ones.

jaw_of_a_deceased_loxodonta_africana_juvenile_individual_found_within_the_voyager_ziwani_safari_camp_on_the_edge_of_the_tsavo_west_national_park_near_ziwani_kenya_3_edited

An elephant can have up to a maximum of six molar cycles during its whole existence.
But if the animal lives long enough, which is to say several years after the last cycle occurred, there is no replacement and its wore-down dentition ceases to be functional. These old elephants then find it difficult to feed on shrubs and harder plants, and therefore move to areas where the presence of a water spring guarantees softer and more nutrient herbs. The weariness of old age brings them to prefer regions featuring higher vegetation density, where they need less to struggle to find food. According to some researchers, the muddy waters of a spring could bring relief to the suffering and dental decay of these aging pachyderms; the malnourished animals would then begin to drink more and more water, and this could actually lead to a worsening of their health by diluting the glucose in their blood.
Anyways, the search for water and a more suitable vegetation could draw several sick elephants towards the same spring. This hypothesis could explain the findings of bone stacks in relatively circumscribed areas.

elephant-skeleton

A second explanation for the legend, if a sadder one, could be connected to ivory commerce and smuggling. It’s not rare, still nowadays, for some “elephants’ graveyards” to be found — except they turn out to be massacre sites, where the animals were hunted and mutilated of their precious tusks by poachers. Similar findings, back in the days, could have suggested the idea that the herd had collected there on purpose, to wait for the end to come.

But the stories about a hidden cemetery could also have risen from the observation of elephants’ behavior when facing the death of a counterpart.
These animals are in fact thought to be among the most “intelligent” mammals, in that they show quite complex social relations within the group, elaborate behavioral characteristics, and often display surprising altruistic conduct even towards other species. An emblematic example is that of one domestic indian elephant, employed in following a truck which was carrying logs; at the master’s sign, the animal lifted one of the logs from the trailer and placed it in the appropriate hole, excavated earlier on. When the elephant came to a specific hole, it refused to follow the order; the master came down to investigate, and he found a dog sleeping at the bottom of the hole. Only when the dog was taken out of the hole did the elephant drive the log into it (reported by C. Holdrege in Elephantine Intelligence).

When an elephant dies — especially if it’s the matriarch — the other members of the herd remain around the carcass, standing in silence for days. They gently touch it with their trunks, as if staging an actual mourning ritual; they take turns to leave the body to find water and food, then get back to the place, always keeping guard of the body. They sometimes carry out a sort of rudimentary burial practice, hiding and covering the carcass with dry twigs and torn branches. Even when encountering the bones of an unknown deceased elephant, they can spend hours touching and scattering the remains.

Ethologists obviously debate over these behaviors: the animals could be attracted and confused by the ivory in the remains, as ivory is used as a socially fundamental communication device; according to some researches, they show sometimes the same “stupor” for birds’ remains or even simple pieces of wood. But they seem to be undoubtedly fascinated by their counterparts, wounded or dead.

Being the only animals, other than men and some primate species, who show this kind of participation in death and dying, elephants have always been associated with human emotions — particularly by those indigenous people who live in strict contact with them. There has always been an important symbolic bond between man and elephant: thus unfolds the last, and deepest level of the story.

The hidden graveyard legend, besides its undeniable charm, is also a powerful allegory of voluntary death, the path the elder takes in order to die in solitude and dignity. Releasing his community from the weight of old age, and leaving behind a courageous and strong image, he proceeds towards the sacred place where he will be in contact with his ancestors’ spirits, who are now ready to honorably welcome him as one of their own.70

Post inspired by this article.

Elefanti da guerra

guerras-punicas-2

All’alba dell’ 1 ottobre del 331 a.C., in una spianata situata ai piedi di una montagna che ricordava le gobbe di un cammello, i soldati Macedoni videro qualcosa che non avrebbero voluto vedere. Le truppe nemiche, quelle di Dario III Imperatore di Persia, avevano messo in campo la più poderosa e terribile arma di guerra dell’antichità. Cercate di figurarvi il panico dei Macedoni nel vedere qualcosa che non avevano mai nemmeno immaginato: al centro dello schieramento nemico stavano pronti all’attacco 15 animali sconosciuti, mastodontici, minacciosi, che sembravano partoriti dal peggiore degli incubi. Furono talmente terrorizzati che Alessandro Magno, il loro re e comandante, decise di offrire un sacrificio a Phobos, il Dio della Paura, affinché donasse loro il coraggio di affrontare le bestie incredibili.

Schlacht_bei_Zama_Gemälde_H_P_Motte

Si stima che la battaglia di Gaugamela sia la prima volta in cui dei soldati Europei vennero in contatto con gli elefanti da guerra; eppure i pachidermi venivano utilizzati per scopi militari già da otto secoli, in Asia. Si trattava di un’arma strategicamente esplosiva: quasi impossibili da uccidere con le frecce o le lance (il nome “pachiderma” etimologicamente indica, appunto, una pelle spessa), capaci di arrivare a una velocità di 30 km/h durante una carica, gli elefanti potevano sfondare le difese nemiche, calpestare e, nel caso degli elefanti africani muniti di zanne, infilzare i soldati della fazione avversa. Posti al centro del plotone di attacco, erano capaci di produrre una vera e propria carneficina, incutendo inoltre spavento e paura negli eserciti che non erano nemmeno a conoscenza della loro esistenza, e per i quali sembravano animali fantastici e magici alla stregua dei draghi.

tumblr_mnvzaxoJGd1rnseozo1_1280

War elephants in battle with Dacians and Sarmatians

Gli elefanti da guerra vennero utilizzati dal 1100 a.C. fino all’arrivo della polvere da sparo nel 1400 d.C., quindi per 25 secoli. Vi ricorderete degli elefanti di Pirro e, certamente, di quelli di Annibale, decimati dal freddo delle Alpi. Ma le battaglie in cui venne fatto uso dei mastodontici mammiferi non si contano. Durante le guerre Puniche, sulla schiena dell’elefante veniva spesso montata una piccola torretta capace di ospitare fino a tre arcieri, che potevano colpire da una posizione privilegiata – sembra che la torre del gioco degli scacchi originariamente fosse posta a cavallo di un elefante, e provenga proprio da questo importante pezzo di strategia militare. Non c’era cavalleria che resistesse agli elefanti, anche perché i cavalli erano normalmente impauriti dall’odore dei pachidermi. Sull’elefante venivano inoltre montate lame aggiuntive (sulla proboscide) e rinforzi per le zanne.

ancient_war_elephant

War-elephant-illustrated-london-news
In realtà, l’arma si rivelò piuttosto in fretta a doppio taglio: tutto stava, infatti, nel riuscire a spaventare gli animali. I Romani capirono che bastava ferire gli elefanti, o terrorizzarli con fanfare e trombe molto acute, perché essi cercassero la fuga, spesso ritorcendosi contro il nemico, travolgendo nella loro corsa le falangi che li seguivano. Apposite indicazioni vennero date agli arceri e ai fanti per colpirli al tronco, in modo che le ferite li facessero imbizzarrire. Queste strategie fecero sì che il guidatore dell’elefante, il cosiddetto mahout, fosse dotato di uno scalpello e di un martello, per spezzare la spina dorsale dell’animale nel caso fosse colto dal panico. Ci si accorse anche che gli elefanti erano facilmente spaventati dalle acute grida dei maiali; l’assedio di Megara fu infranto dopo che i Megaresi cosparsero di olio alcuni porci, a cui diedero fuoco e che spinsero poi verso le truppe nemiche. Gli elefanti, terrorizzati dalle grida degli infuocati maiali, devastarono il campo imbizzarriti.

WarElephants

war elephant 1
Alcuni elefanti da guerra divennero famosi, come ad esempio Abul-Abbas, un elefante albino donato a Carlomagno dal califfo di Baghdad. Con l’avvento delle armi da fuoco, questo importante elemento militare venne a sfumare. Ma per concludere ricordiamo il curioso episodio della battaglia di Hildighati, del 1576, combattuta fra le forze di Mewar e l’armata Mughal. Il famoso cavallo Chetak, appartenente al comandante di Mewar, venne corazzato con un’armatura che mirava a camuffarlo come un cucciolo di elefante. L’idea era che gli elefanti da guerra l’avrebbero risparmiato, durante il combattimento, sembrando egli simile ai piccoli della loro specie. Purtroppo il cavallo Chetak morì a causa di ferite fatali dalle lame poste sul muso di un elefante, quindi pare proprio che lo stratagemma non abbia funzionato.

tumblr_mnvzaxoJGd1rnseozo2_500

Il mercato dei feticci

Lomé, capitale del Togo, ospita uno dei mercati più particolari al mondo: si chiama Akodessewa, ed è conosciuto anche come “il mercato dei feticci”.

Il mercato è una specie di “farmacia” tradizionale, dove i guaritori e gli sciamani del luogo possono trovare tutto quello che serve per le loro pozioni voodoo. Stiamo parlando del voodoo originario, sviluppatosi nell’Africa occidentale ben prima che gli schiavi lo trapiantassero anche in America.

Mentre vi aggirate per i banchetti, vedrete in esposizione decine e decine di teste essiccate di coccodrilli, cani, gatti, scimmie… ma anche camaleonti, cobra, pesci palla… civette, avvoltoi, pappagalli e altri uccelli, corna di antilope o cervo, e addirittura qualche rarissimo “pezzo” di elefante o leopardo.

Secondo la ricetta tradizionale, le teste vengono macinate assieme alle erbe medicinali e poste sul fuoco finché il tutto non si riduce a una polvere nera. Dopo aver tagliato per tre volte il petto o la schiena della persona malata, il guaritore sparge la polvere curativa sulla pelle e la spinge all’interno delle ferite.

Ci sono rimedi per tutti i tipi di problemi: coppie che non riescono ad avere un figlio, vecchi con problemi alle articolazioni, donne possedute dai demoni, sportivi e atleti che cercano una “marcia in più”. Triturando insieme una mano di scimpanzé e una di gorilla, ad esempio, si ottiene una polvere che garantisce ai portieri di calcio una presa di ferro. Se si vuole correre una maratona, invece, è consigliabile utilizzare testa, cuore e gambe di un cavallo: la sua potenza, resistenza e velocità passeranno, per mezzo di uno scrupoloso rituale, al corpo dell’atleta. Le ossa più grandi, invece, sono perfette per difendere la propria casa dai demoni e dalla cattiva sorte. Ogni anno gli sciamani girano di villaggio in villaggio preparando questi feticci di protezione.

La medicina tradizionale non si impara da un giorno all’altro. È una conoscenza che si tramanda di padre in figlio, e ci vogliono dagli 8 ai 10 anni di studio ed esperienza per poter dominare tutti i segreti di questa arte.

Quello di Akodessewa è forse il mercato di feticci più grande del mondo. Le parti di animali provengono da tutta l’Africa occidentale, Ghana, Costa d’Avorio, Burkina Faso e Nigeria. A sentire i venditori, il governo del Togo ne è perfettamente a conoscenza e controlla accuratamente questo macabro commercio. “Non uccidiamo nessun animale con le nostre mani, è tutto regolare”, si premurano di far sapere, anche se più di qualche dubbio resta.

Questa strana farmacia voodoo, ormai famosa, attira non soltanto africani di tutte le regioni, ma anche turisti. “Ai turisti vendiamo quelle piccole statuine là”, dicono con un bel sorriso i commercianti, semisepolti fra teste in decomposizione, code appese che sventolano e ossa impolverate. In fondo, sono lì soltanto per aiutare chiunque abbia bisogno di loro.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlinRaK4j10]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MvjXBzPtWcs&feature=related]

Tutte le splendide fotografie presenti nell’articolo sono state realizzate da Grete Howard, che ci ha gentilmente concesso in esclusiva l’autorizzazione a pubblicarle.

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – III

FREAKS – LA COLLEZIONE AKIMITSU NARUYAMA

(2000, Logos)

Ovvero “Lo Sfruttamento Delle Anomalie Fisiche Nei Circhi E Negli Spettacoli Itineranti”.

L’impressionante collezione fotografica di meraviglie umane di Naruyama è un vero tesoro. Immagini storiche, di un’importanza eccezionale, raccolte in un libricino che, pur non offrendo un approfondito background storico, ha il potere di stregare il lettore grazie alla bellezza delle illustrazioni. Dai Lillipuziani alla Meraviglia Senza Braccia, dai Bambini Aztechi ai ragazzi-leone, tutti i più famosi freaks vissuti a cavallo fra diciannovesimo e ventesimo secolo sono presenti nella raccolta; molte delle fotografie sono infatti relative agli spettacoli circensi e alle fiere itineranti americane in cui questi artisti si esibivano. Dopo lo show, un’ulteriore fonte di profitto erano proprio le fotografie che venivano vendute al pubblico, autografate. Per quanto l’esibizione della deformità all’interno dei carnivals americani sia un capitolo affascinante della storia dello spettacolo moderno, questo prezioso libro però, così focalizzato com’è sui ritratti, offre qualcosa di diverso.

La raccolta documenta un’epoca e una società attraverso i suoi corpi meno fortunati, e allo stesso tempo nello scorrere le pagine avvertiamo l’atemporalità di queste anomalie: nell’antichità come nell’epoca moderna, certi uomini hanno dovuto sopportare il fardello di fattezze eccezionali, spesso temuti ed emarginati. Eppure, se è vero che ogni uomo è specchio per il suo prossimo, fissando gli occhi di questi nostri fratelli dai corpi stupefacenti ci accorgiamo che il loro sguardo rimanda il riflesso più puro e vero.

Alex Boese

ELEFANTI IN ACIDO E ALTRI BIZZARRI ESPERIMENTI

(2009, Baldini Castoldi Dalai)

Una buona parte degli articoli di Bizzarro Bazar contenuti nella sezione “Scienza anomala” nasconde un debito verso questo splendido libro. Boese raccoglie, in forma divulgativa e spesso scanzonata, gli esperimenti scientifici più improbabili, sconcertanti, risibili – e, talvolta, illuminanti. Chi pensa che gli scienziati siano persone serie e compite, sempre nascosti dietro provette o lavagne piene di equazioni impossibili, farebbe meglio a ricredersi: l’immagine della scienza che esce dalle pagine di Elefanti in acido è quella di una disciplina viva, fantasiosa, sempre pronta a prendere le strade meno battute, anche a costo di errori madornali e vergognosi fallimenti. In definitiva, una disciplina molto più umana (nel bene o nel male) di come viene normalmente rappresentata.

Molti di questi esperimenti sono spassosi in quanto, a una prima occhiata, totalmente inconcludenti. Dai ricercatori del titolo, che somministrano a un elefante una potentissima dose di LSD, fino allo psicologo che in automobile resta fermo quando scatta il semaforo verde soltanto per cronometrare quanto ci mette l’autista dietro di lui a suonare il clacson, per finire con gli scienziati che costruiscono uno stadio per le corse degli scarafaggi, il tempo perso dagli studiosi in progetti dagli esiti comici può sconcertare. Eppure, come ricorda l’autore, non sempre la scienza ricerca soltanto le risposte alle nobili e grandi domande. Ogni tassello, per quanto insignificante possa sembrare, contribuisce a comprendere qualcosa di più del mondo in cui viviamo. È vero che gli uomini preferiscono le donne difficili da conquistare? Se cadessimo in un pozzo, il nostro cane verrebbe a salvarci? Perché non riusciamo a farci il solletico da soli?

I ricercatori le cui vicende sono narrate in Elefanti in acido hanno una fiducia smisurata nel metodo scientifico, e non esitano ad applicarlo a quesiti di questo tenore. Anche se, come nel caso dello scienziato che si incaponisce a contare tutti i peli pubici dei suoi colleghi, questa fiducia sembra talvolta divenire talmente cieca da non accorgersi dell’assurdità della ricerca stessa. E anche questo è molto umano.