Wunderkammer Reborn – Part II

(Second and last part – you can find the first one here.)

In the Nineteenth Century, wunderkammern disappeared.
The collections ended up disassembled, sold to private citizens or integrated in the newly born modern museums. Scientists, whose discipline was already defined, lost interest for the ancient kind of baroque wonder, perhaps deemed child-like in respect to the more serious postitivism.
This type of collecting continued in sporadic and marginal ways during the first decades of the Twetieth Century. Some rare antique dealer, especially in Belgium, the Netherlands or Paris, still sold some occasional mirabilia, but the golden age of the trade was long gone.
Of the few collectors of this first half of the century the most famous is André Breton, whose cabinet of curiosities is now on permanent exhibit at the Centre Pompidou.

The interest of wunderkammern began to reawaken during the Eighties from two distinct fronts: academics and artists.
On one hand, museology scholars began to recognize the role of wunderkammern as precursors of today’s museal collections; on the other, some artists fell in love with the concept of the chamber of wonders and started using it in their work as a metaphor of Man’s relationship with objects.
But the real upswing came with the internet. The neo-wunderkammer “movement” developed via the web, which opened new possibilities not only for sharing the knowledge but also to revitalize the commerce of curiosities.

Let’s take a look, as we did for the classical collections, to some conceptual elements of neo-wunderkammern.

A Democratic Wunderkammer

The first macroscopic difference with the past is that collecting curiosities is no more an exclusive of wealthy billionaires. Sure, a very-high-profile market exists, one that the majority of enthusiasts will never access; but the good news is that today, anybody who can afford an internet conection already has the means to begin a little collection. Thanks to the web, even a teenager can create his/her own shelf of wonders. All that’s needed is good will and a little patience to comb through the many natural history collectibles websites or online auctions for some real bargain.

There are now children’s books, school activities and specific courses encouraging kids to start this form of exploration of natural wonders.

The result of all this is a more democratic wunderkammer, within the reach of almost any wallet.

Reinventing Exotica

We talked about the classic category of exotica, those objects that arrived from distant colonies and from mysterious cultures.
But today, what is really exotic – etymologically, “coming from the outside, from far away”? After all we live in a world where distances don’t matter any more, and we can travel without even moving: in a bunch of seconds and a few clicks, we can virtually explore any place, from a mule track on the Andes to the jungles of Borneo.

This is a fundamental issue for the collectors, because globalization runs the risk of annihilating an important part of the very concept of wonder. Their strategies, conscious or not, are numerous.
Some collectors have turned their eyes towards the only real “external space” that is left — the cosmos; they started looking for memorabilia from the heroic times of the Space Race. Spacesuits, gear and instruments from various space missions, and even fragments of the Moon.

Others push in the opposite direction, towards the most distant past; consequently the demand for dinosaur fossils is in constant growth.

But there are other kinds of new exotica that are closer to us – indeed, they pertain directly to our own society.
Internal exoticism: not really an oxymoron, if we consider that anthropologists have long turned the instruments of ethnology towards the modern Western worold (take for instance Marc Augé). To seek what is exotic within our own cultre is to investigate liminal zones, fringe realities of our time or of the recent past.

Thus we find a recent fascination for some “taboo” areas, related for example to crime (murder weapons, investigative items, serial killer memorabilia) or death (funerary objecs and Victorian mourning apparel); the medicalia sub-category of quack remedies, as for example electric shock terapies or radioactive pharamecutical products.

Jessika M. collection – photo Brian Powell, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Funerary collectibles.

Violet wand kit; its low-voltage electric shock was marketed as the cure for everything.

Even curiosa, vintage or ancient erotic objects, are an example of exotica coming from a recent past which is now transfigured.

A Dialogue Between The Objects

Building a wunderkammer today is an eminently artistic endeavour. The scientific or anthropological interest, no matter how relevant, cannot help but be strictly connected to aesthetics.
There is a greater general attention to the interplay between the objects than in the past. A painting can interact with an object placed in front of it; a tribal mask can be made to “dialogue” with an other similar item from a completely different tradition. There is undoubtedly a certain dose of postmodern irreverence in this approach; for when pop culture collectibles are allowed entrance to the wunderkammer, ending up exhibited along with precious and refined antiques, the self-righteous art critic is bound to shudder (see for instance Victor Wynd‘s peculiar iconoclasm).

An example I find paradigmatic of this search for a deeper interaction are the “adventurous” juxtapositions experimented by friend Luca Cableri (the man who brought to Moon to Italy); you can read the interview he gave me if you wish to know more about him.

Wearing A Wunderkammer

Fashion is always aware of new trends, and it intercepted some aspects of the world of wunerkammern. Thanks mainly to the goth and dark subcultures, one can find jewelry and necklaces made from naturalistic specimens: on Etsy, eBay or Craigslist, countless shops specialize in hand-crafted brooches, hair clips or other fashion accessories sporting skulls, small wearable taxidermies and so on.

Conceptual Art and Rogue Taxidermists

As we said, the renewed interest also came from the art world, which found in wunderkammern an effective theoretical frame to reflect about modernity.
The first name that comes to mind is of course Damien Hirst, who took advantage of the concept both in his iconic fluid-preserved animals and in his kaleidoscopic compositions of lepidoptera and butterflies; but even his For The Love of God, the well-known skull covered in diamonds, is an excessively precious curiosity that would not have been out of place in a Sixteenth Century treasure chamber.

Hirst is not the only artist taking inspiration from the wunderkammer aesthetics. Mark Dion, for instance, creates proper cabinets of wonders for the modern era: in his work, it’s not natural specimens that are put under formaldeyde, but rather their plastic replicas or even everyday objects, from push brooms to rubber dildos. Dion builds a sort of museum of consumerism in which – yet again – Nature and Culture collide and even at times fuse together, giving us no hope of telling them apart.

In 2013 Rosamund Purcell’s installation recreated a 3D version of the Seventeenth Century Ole Worm Museum: reinvention/replica, postmodern doppelgänger and hyperreal simulachrum which allows the public to step into one of the most famous etchings in the history of wunderkammern.

Besides the “high” art world – auction houses and prestigious galleries – we are also witnessing a rejuvenation of more artisanal sectors.
This is the case with the art of taxidermy, which is enjoying a new youth: today taxidermy courses and workshops are multiplying.

Remember that in the first post I talked about taxidermy as a domestication of the scariest aspects of Nature? Well, according to the participants, these workshops offer a way to exorcise their fear of death on a comfortably small scale, through direct contact and a creative activity. (We shall return on this tactile element.)
A further push towards innovation has come from yet another digital movement, called Rogue Taxidermy.

Artistic, non-traditional taxidermy has always existed, from fake mirabilia and gaffs such as mummified sirens and Jenny Hanivers to Walter Potter‘s antropomorphic dioramas. But rogue taxidermists bring all this to a whole new level.

Initially born as a consortium of three artists – Sarina Brewer, Scott Bibus e Robert Marbury – who were interested in taxidermy in the broadest sense (Marbury does not even use real animals for his creations, but plush toys), rogue taxidermy quickly became an international movement thanks to the web.

The fantastic chimeras produced by these artists are actually meta-taxidermies: by exhibiting their medium in such a manifest way, they seem to question our own relationship with animals. A relationship that has undergone profound changes and is now moving towards a greater respect and care for the environment. One of the tenets of rogue taxidermy is in fact the use of ethically sourced materials, and the animals used in preparations all died of natural causes. (Here’s a great book tracing the evolution and work of major rogue taxidermy artists.)

Wunderkammer Reborn

So we are left with the fundamental question: why are wunderkammern enjoying such a huge success right now, after five centuries? Is it just a retro, nostalgic trend, a vintage frivolous fashion like we find in many subcultures (yes I’m looking at you, my dear hipster friends) or does its attractiveness lie in deeper urgencies?

It is perhaps too soon to put forward a hypothesis, but I shall go out on a limb anyway: it is my belief that the rebirth of wunderkammern is to be sought in a dual necessity. On one hand the need to rethink death, and on the other the need to rethink art and narratives.

Rethinking Death
(And While We’re At It, Why Not Domesticate It)

Swiss anthropologist Bernard Crettaz was among the first to voice the ever more widespread need to break the “tyrannical secrecy” regarding death, typical of the Twentieth Century: in 2004 he organized in Neuchâtel the first Café mortel, a free event in which participants could talk about grief, and discuss their fears but also their curiosities on the subject. Inspired by Crettaz’s works and ideas, Jon Underwood launched the first British Death Café in 2011. His model received an enthusiastic response, and today almost 5000 events have been held in 50 countries across the world.

Meanwhile, in the US, a real Death-Positive Movement was born.
Originated from the will to drastically change the American funeral industry, criticized by founder Caitlin Doughty, the movement aims at lifting the taboo regarding the subject of death, and promotes an open reflection on related topics and end-of-life issues. (You probably know my personal engagement in the project, to which I contributed now and then: you can read my interview to Caitlin and my report from the Death Salon in Philadelphia).

What has the taboo of death got to do with collecting wonders?
Over the years, I have had the opportunity of talking to many a collector. Almost all of them recall, “as if it were yesterday“, the emotion they felt while holding in their hands the first piece of their collection, that one piece that gave way to their obsession. And for the large majority of them it was a naturalistic specimen – an animal skeleton, a taxidermy, etc.: as a friend collector says, “you never forget your first skull“.

The tactile element is as essential today as it was in classical wunderkammern, where the public was invited to study, examine, touch the specimens firsthand.

Owning an animal skull (or even a human one) is a safe and harmless way to become familiar with the concreteness of death. This might be the reason why the macabre element of wunderkammern, which was marginal centuries ago, often becomes a prevalent aspect today.

Ryan Matthew Cohn collection – photo Dan Howell & Steve Prue, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Rethinking Art: The Aesthetics Of Wonder

After the decline of figurative arts, after the industrial reproducibility of pop art, after the advent of ready-made art, conceptual art reached its outer limit, giving a coup the grace to meaning.  Many contemporary artists have de facto released art not just from manual skill, from artistry, but also from the old-fashioned idea that art should always deliver a message.
Pure form, pure signifier, the new conceptual artworks are problematic because they aspire to put a full stop to art history as we know it. They look impossible to understand, precisely because they are designed to escape any discourse.
It is therefore hard to imagine in what way artistic research will overcome this emptiness made of cold appearance, polished brilliance but mere surface nonetheless; hard to tell what new horizon might open up, beyond multi-million auctions, artistars and financial hikes planned beforehand by mega-dealers and mega-collectors.

To me, it seems that the passion for wunderkammern might be a way to go back to narratives, to meaning. An antidote to the overwhelming surface. Because an object is worth its place inside a chamber of marvels only by virtue of the story it tells, the awe it arises, the vertigo it entails.
I believe I recognize in this genre of collecting a profound desire to give back reality to its lost enchantment.
Lost? No, reality never ceased to be wonderous, it is our gaze that needs to be reeducated.

From Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – photo C. Fleurant

Eventually, a  wunderkammer is just a collection of objects, and we already live submerged in an ocean of objects.
But it is also an instrument (as it once was, as it has always been) – a magnifying glass to inspect the world and ourselves. In these bizarre and strange items, the collector seeks a magical-narrative dimension against the homologation and seriality of mass production. Whether he knows it or not, by being sensitive to the stories concealed within the objects, the emotions they convey, their unicity, the wunderkammer collector is carrying out an act of resistence: because placing value in the exception, in the exotic, is a way to seek new perspectives in spite of the Unanimous Vision.

Da Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – foto C. Fleurant

Wunderkammer Reborn – Part I

Why has the new millennium seen the awakening of a huge interest in “cabinets of wonder”? Why does such an ancient kind of collecting, typical of the period between the 1500s and the 1700s, still fascinate us in the internet era? And what are the differences between the classical wunderkammern and the contemporary neo-wunderkammern?

I have recently found myself tackling these subjects in two diametrically opposed contexts.
The first was dead serious conference on disciplines of knowledge in the Early Modern Period, at the University of PAdua; the second, a festival of magic and wonder created by a mentalist and a wonder injector. In this last occasion I prepared a small table with a micro-wunderkammer (really minimal, but that’s what I could fit into my suitcase!) so that after the talk the public could touch and see some curiosities first-hand.

Two traditionally quite separate scenarios – the academic milieu and the world of entertainment – both decided to dedicate some space to the discussion of this phenomenon, which strikes me as indicative of its relevance.
So I thought it might be interesting to resume, in very broad terms, my speech on the subject for the benefit of those who could not attend those meetings.

For practical purposes, I will divide the whole thing into two posts.
In this first one, I will trace what I believe are the key characteristics of historical wunderkammern – or, more precisely, the key concepts worth reflecting upon.
In the next post I will address XXI Century neo-wunderkammern, to try and pinpoint what might be the reasons of this peculiar “rebirth”.

Mirabilia

Evidently, the fundamental concept for a wunderkammer, beginning from the name itself, was the idea of wonder; from the aristocratic cabinets of Ferdinand II of Austria or Rudolf II to the more science-oriented ones like Aldrovandi‘s, Cospi‘s, or Kircher‘s, the purpose of all ancient collections was first and foremost to amaze the visitor.

It was a way for the rich person who assembled the wunderkammer to impress his court guests, showing off his opulence and lavish wealth: cabinets of curiosities were actually an evolution of treasure chambers (schatzkammern) and of the great collections of artworks of the 1400s (kunstkammer).

This predilection of rare and expensive objects generated a thriving international commerce of naturalistic and ethnological items cominc from the Colonies.

The Theatre of the World

But wunderkammern were also meant as a sort of microcosm: they were supposed to represent the entirety of the known universe, or at least to hint at the incredibly vast number of creatures and natural shapes that are present in the world. Samuel Quiccheberg, in his treatise on the arrangement of a utopian museum, was the first to use the word “theatre”, but in reality – as we shall see later on – the idea of theatrical representation is one of the cardinal concepts in classical collections.

Because of its ability to represent the world, the wunderkammer was also understood as a true instrument of research, an investigation tool for natural philosophers.

The System of Knowledge

The organization of a huge array of materials did not initially follow any specific order, but rather proceeded from the collector’s own whims and taste. Little by little, though, the idea of cataloguing began to emerge, which at first entailed the distinction between three macro-categories known as naturalia, artificialia and mirabilia, later to be refined and expanded in different other classes (medicalia, exotica, scientifica, etc.).

Naturalia

Artificialia

Artificialia

Mirabilia

Mirabilia

Medicalia, exotica, scientifica

This ever growing need to distinguish, label and catalogue eventually led to Linnaeus’ taxonomy, to his dispute with Buffon, all the way to Lamarck, Cuvier and the foundation of the Louvre, which marks the birth of the modern museum as we know it.

The Aesthetics of Accumulation

Perhaps the most iconic and well-known aspect of wunderkammern is the cramming of objects, the horror vacui that prevented even the tiniest space from being left empty in the exposition of curiosities and bizarre artifacts gathered around the world.
This excessive aesthetic was not just, as we said in the beginning, a display of wealth, but aimed at astounding and baffling the visitor. And this stunned condition was an essential moment: the wonder at the Universe, that feeling called thauma, proceeds certainly from awe but it is inseparable from a sense of unease. To access this state of consciousness, from which philosophy is born, we need to step outof our comfort zone.

To be suddenly confronted with the incredible imagination of natural shapes, visually “assaulted” by the unthinkable moltitude of objects, was a disturbing experience. Aesthetics of the Sublime, rather than Beauty; this encyclopedic vertigo is the reason why Umberto Eco places wunderkammern among his examples of  “visual lists”.

Conservation and Representation

One of the basic goals of collecting was (and still is) the preservation of specimens and objects for study purposes or for posterity. Yet any preservation is already a representation.

When we enter a museum, we cannot be fully aware of the upstream choices that have been made in regard to the exhibit; but these choices are what creates the narrative of the museum itself, the very “tale” we are told room after room.

Multiple options are involved: what specimens are to be preserved, which technique is to be used to preserve them (the result will vary if a biological specimen is dried, texidermied, or put in a preserving fluid), how to group them, how to arrange their exhibit?
It is just like casting the best actors, choosing the stage costumes, a particular set design, and the internal script of the museum.

The most illuminating example is without doubt taxidermy, the ultimate simulacrum: of the original animal nothing is left but the skin, stretched on a dummy which mimics the features and posture of the beast. Glass eyes are applied to make it more convincing. That is to say, stuffed animals are meant to play the part of living animals. And when you think about it, there is no more “reality” in them than in one of those modern animatronic props we see in Natural History Museums.

But why do we need all this theatre? The answer lies in the concept of domestication.

Domestication: Nature vs. Culture

Nature is opposed to Culture since the time of ancient Greeks. Western Man has always felt the urge to keep his distance from the part of himself he perceived as primordial, chaotic, uncontrollable, bestial. The walls of the polis locked Nature outside, keeping Culture inside; and it’s not by chance that barbarians – seen as half-men half-beasts – were etymologically “those who stutter”, who remained outside of the logos.

The theatre, an advanced form of representation, was born in Athens likely as a substitute for previous ancient human sacrifices (cf. Réné Girard), and it served the same sacred purposes: to sublimate the animal desire of cruelty and violence. The tragic hero takes on the role of the sacrificial victim, and in fact the evidence of the sacred value of tragedies is in the fact that originally attending the theatrical plays was mandatory by law for all citizens.

Theatre is therefore the first attempt to domesticate natural instincts, to bring them literally “inside one’s home” (domus), to comprehend them within the logos in order to defuse their antisocial power. Nature only becomes pleasant and harmless once we narrate it, when we turn it into a scenic design.

And here’s why a stuffed lion (which is a narrated lion, the “image” of a lion as told through the fiction of taxidermy) is something we can comfortably place in our living room without any worry. All study of Nature, as it was conceived in the wunderkammern, was essentially the study of its representation.

By staging it, it was possible to exert a kind of control over Nature that would have been impossible otherwise. Accordingly, the symbol of the wunderkammern, that piece that no collection could do without, was the chained crocodile — bound and incapable of causing harm thanks to the ties of Reason, of logos, of knowledge.

It is worth noting, in closing this first part, that the symbology of the crocodile was also borrowed from the world of the sacred. These reptiles in chains first made their apparition in churches, and several examples can still be seen in Europe: in that instance, of course, they were meant as a reminder of the power and glory of Christ defeating Satan (and at the same time they impressed the believers, who in all probability had never seen such a beast).
A perfect example of sacred taxidermy; domestication as a bulwark against the wild, sinful unconscious; barrier bewteen natural and social instincts.

(Continues in Part Two)

Se bella vuoi apparire…

Questo nostro caduco et fragil bene
ch’è vento et ombra et à nome beltate
(Francesco Petrarca, Canzoniere, Canto 350)

Oggi essere belli è diventato un dovere.
Forse però è troppo facile prendersela con il martellamento promozionale, che ripropone all’infinito sensuali e perfette nudità occhieggianti dai cartelloni pubblicitari, dalle riviste, dai cataloghi; facile criticare il degrado dei tempi quando perfino le moderne donne politiche parlano delle capatine dall’estetista come di un imperativo etico o ideologico; facile anche scagliarsi contro la superficialità dilagante, nel sentir parlare sempre più spesso di seni, glutei ed altri parti anatomiche che si debbono per forza “ringiovanire”, a meno di non voler sfigurare. Facile, insomma, associare la rincorsa alla pelle più tonica, alle sopracciglia meglio disegnate o all’ultima miracolosa crema antirughe ad una crisi di valori.

Ma è davvero soltanto la nostra epoca ad essere così ossessionata dall’eterna giovinezza e dalla bellezza a tutti i costi?

La cosmesi è in realtà vecchia quanto l’uomo, ed in ogni periodo storico sono sorti estremismi e fissazioni estetiche, così come qualsiasi epoca ha visto propagarsi le cure anti-età più bizzarre, spesso poco più di fugaci mode d’una stagione.
È dunque divertente e illuminante gettare uno sguardo ai trattamenti che erano all’ultimo grido nella prima metà del secolo scorso: pur di apparire giovani e belle, anche le nostre nonne o bisnonne erano pronte a sottoporsi ai tormenti più surreali.

0

Partiamo da Max Factor Sr., nome leggendario, vero e proprio innovatore che, grazie al suo lavoro per le prime grandi star del cinema, fu in grado di costruire un impero. A lui si deve lo sviluppo dell’industria cosmetica, oltre che il termine “make-up”. Gli si deve anche la straordinaria maschera con cubetti di plastica per il ghiaccio che vedete qui sotto: pensata originariamente per dare rinfresco alle attrici accaldate dalle luci del set, senza rovinare il trucco, questa invenzione ben presto divenne però celebre tra i festaioli di Hollywood per tutt’altro motivo… guadagnandosi il nomignolo di Hangover Heaven (“paradiso del doposbornia”).

1

Sempre Max Factor è l’artefice dell’infame beauty micrometer, inquietante apparecchio che avrebbe dovuto identificare le parti del viso di una persona che necessitavano d’essere ridotte o aumentate dal trucco. Stranamente, questo incrocio fra uno strumento di tortura e un craniometro frenologico non ebbe mai lo sperato successo.

2

  4

5

Similmente minacciosi ci appaiono oggi i primi caschi per la permanente, che modellavano i capelli ricciolo per ricciolo.

6

7

8

Per eliminare lentiggini e punti neri, negli anni ’30 si poteva ricorrere ad una macchina aspiratrice, le cui coppette di vetro erano collegate tramite tubi di gomma ad una pompa a vuoto.

9

L’alternativa era quella di congelare le lentiggini mediante applicazioni di anidride carbonica. Gli occhi della “paziente” erano protetti da gommini a tenuta stagna, le narici venivano tappate e per non inalare il gas nocivo era necessario respirare attraverso un tubo tenuto in bocca.
Non molto confortevole – e nemmeno efficace, a quanto si racconta.

10

Un altro metodo per ottenere una pelle sempre giovane e perfetta consisteva nello stimolare la circolazione sanguigna tramite una maschera che scaldasse il viso: lanciato nel 1940, questo caschetto si accendeva una volta attaccato alla presa elettrica.

11

Una bella camminata in montagna, si sa, è sempre salutare e tonificante. Ecco quindi apparire negli anni ’40 una macchina che, abbassando la pressione atmosferica attorno alla testa per simulare le condizioni d’alta quota, prometteva una carnagione rosata e florida.

12

Cosa c’è di più grazioso di due belle fossette agli angoli della bocca? Nel 1936 una certa Isabella Gilbert di Rochester, New York, brevettò questo apparecchio, da indossare ogni notte per crearle artificialmente: sfortunatamente, sembra che il dolore causato dalle molle fosse troppo intenso anche per le più fanatiche fra le aspiranti fotomodelle.

13

In soccorso delle pelli troppo sensibili, ecco due invenzioni degli anni ’40: gli occhiali da sole con proteggi-naso, e il “cappuccio a prova di lentiggini” (evidentemente, le efelidi erano nemiche giurate della bellezza).

14

15

Dalla stessa epoca proviene questa poltrona massaggiante per gambe sempre splendide.
E, immaginiamo, anche perfettamente depilate.

16

Questa carrellata di vecchie fotografie mostra come l’ossessione per l’aspetto fisico non sia certo una novità; d’altronde, la ricerca e la valorizzazione della bellezza estetica sono fra le caratteristiche più antiche della civiltà occidentale, a partire dalla kalokagathia greca. Oggi ci si spinge ancora oltre, quello odierno è un corpo fluido, flessibile, manipolabile e rimodellabile in un infinito lavoro di ricerca e di perfezione. L’unico ostacolo che si ritrova davanti è sempre lo stesso: l’antico, intollerabile e acerrimo nemico d’ogni avvenenza – il tempo.
La lotta per sconfiggere i segni che il tempo lascia sul corpo è senza quartiere, anche se l’esito della battaglia, purtroppo o per fortuna, è scontato. Ma demordere non è una peculiarità umana: e se pure qualcuno di questi trattamenti estetici d’altri tempi ci può far sorridere, non sono certo più ingenui o fantasiosi delle mode che nascono e muoiono anche oggi. Perché essere belli è diventato un dovere… ma rimane pur sempre un’illusione, fragile e a suo modo necessaria.

19

17

18

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

Supervenus

Supervenus (2013) è un cortometraggio di animazione diretto dal filmmaker sperimentale Fréderic Doazan.

Si tratta di una satira della moderna concezione della bellezza femminile, della chirurgia estetica e della odierna manipolazione del corpo per raggiungere gli ideali estetici imposti dalla società. L’ultima immagine del corto, che rimanda alla celeberrima Venere di Milo, è il perfetto finale per questo gioiellino di humor nero.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WQ6C34MuTk

Tassidermia e vegetarianismo

SideTour_Taxidermy

La tassidermia sembra conoscere, in questi ultimi anni, una sorta di nuova vita. Alimentata dall’interesse per l’epoca vittoriana e dal diffondersi dell’iconografia e l’estetica della sottocultura goth, l’antica arte tassidermica sta velocemente diventando addirittura una moda: innumerevoli sono gli artisti che hanno cominciato ad integrare parti autentiche di animali nei loro gioielli e accessori, come vi confermerà un giro su Etsy, la più grande piattaforma di e-commerce per prodotti artigianali.

taxidermy kitten mouse necklace-f50586

tumblr_lovkxjtwur1qbkjd0o1_400

il_570xN.311750603

il_570xN.530781784_rwry
A Londra e a New York conoscono un crescente successo i workshop che insegnano, nel giro di una giornata o due, i rudimenti del mestiere. Un tassidermista esperto guida i partecipanti passo passo nella preparazione del loro primo esemplare, normalmente un topolino acquistato in un negozio di animali e destinato all’alimentazione dei rettili; molti alunni portano addirittura con sé dei minuscoli abiti, per vestire il proprio topolino alla maniera di Walter Potter.

article-2107482-11F22C86000005DC-726_634x460
Su Bizzarro Bazar abbiamo regolarmente parlato di tassidermia, e sappiamo per esperienza che l’argomento è sensibile: alcuni dei nostri articoli (rimbalzati senza controllo da un social all’altro) hanno scatenato le ire di animalisti e vegetariani, dando vita ad appassionati flame. Ci sembra quindi particolarmente interessante un articolo apparso da poco sull’Huffington Post a cura di Margot Magpie, sui rapporti fra tassidermia e vegetarianesimo.

Margot Magpie è istruttrice tassidermica proprio a Londra, e sostiene che una gran parte dei suoi alunni sia costituita da vegetariani o vegani. Ma come si concilia questa scelta di rispetto per gli animali con l’arte di impagliarli?

article-2107482-11F22FDE000005DC-919_634x408

article-2107482-11F22D3C000005DC-29_634x460

article-2107482-11F22EC7000005DC-410_634x523
Ovviamente, tagliare e preparare il corpo di un animale non implica certo mangiarne la carne. E una gran parte degli artisti, vegetariani e non, che operano oggi nel settore ci tengono a precisare che i loro esemplari non vengono uccisi con lo scopo di creare l’opera tassidermica, ma sono già morti di cause naturali oppure – come nel caso dei topolini – allevati per un motivo più accettabile. (Certo, anche sul commercio dei rettili come animali da compagnia si potrebbe discutere, ma questo esula dal nostro tema). Si tratta in definitiva di materiale biologico che andrebbe sprecato e distrutto, quindi perché non usarlo?

article-2107482-11DCE7C2000005DC-704_634x505

article-2107482-11F230BC000005DC-859_634x449

article-2107482-11F231D9000005DC-824_634x483
Ma preparare un animale comporta comunque il superamento di un fattore di disgusto che sembrerebbe incompatibile con il vegetarianismo: significa entrare in contatto diretto con la carne e il sangue, sventrare, spellare, raschiare e via dicendo. A quanto dice Margot, però, i suoi allievi vegetariani colgono una differenza fondamentale fra l’allevamento degli animali a fini alimentari – con tutti i problemi etici che l’industrializzazione del mercato della carne porta con sé – e la tassidermia, che è vista invece come un rispettoso atto d’amore per l’animale stesso. “La tassidermia per me significa essere stupiti dall’anatomia e dalla biologia delle creature, e aiutarle a continuare a vivere anche dopo la morte, in modo che noi possiamo vederle ed apprezzarle”, dice un suo studente.

La passione per la tecnica tassidermica proviene spesso dall’interesse per la storia naturale. Visitare un museo e ammirare splendidi animali esotici (che normalmente non potremmo vedere) perfettamente conservati, può far nascere la curiosità sui processi utilizzati per prepararli. E questo amore per gli animali, dice Margot, è una costante riconoscibile in tutti i suoi alunni.

article-2107482-11F22AA9000005DC-736_634x455
“Combatto con questo dilemma da un po’. – racconta un’altra artista vegetariana – La gente mi dice che ‘non dovrebbe piacermi’, ma ci sono piccole cose nella vita che ci danno gioia, e non possiamo farne a meno. Mi sembra che sia come donare all’animale una vita interamente nuova, permettergli di vivere per sempre in un nuovo mondo d’amore, per essere attentamente rimesso in sesto, posizionato e decorato, ed è un’impresa premurosa e amorevole”.

article-2107482-11F235DE000005DC-79_634x454
L’altro problema è che non tutti i lavori tassidermici sono “naturalistici”, cioè mirati a riprodurre esattamente l’animale nelle pose e negli atteggiamenti che aveva in vita. Non a caso facevamo l’esempio della tassidermia antropomorfica, in cui l’animale viene vestito e fissato in pose umane, talvolta inserito in contesti e diorami di fantasia, oppure integrato come parte di un accessorio di vestiario, un pendaglio, un anello. Si tratta di una tassidermia più personale, che riflette il gusto creativo dell’artista. Per alcuni questa pratica è irrispettosa dell’animale, ma non tutti la pensano così: secondo Margot e alcuni dei suoi studenti la cosa non crea alcun conflitto, fintanto che il corpo proviene da ambiti controllati.

article-2107482-11F233AB000005DC-674_634x453

“Credo che utilizzare animali provenienti da fonti etiche per la tassidermia sia positivo e, per questo motivo, posso continuare felicemente con il vegetarianismo e con il mio interesse di lunga data per la tassidermia. Sento di molti tassidermisti moderni che usano esclusivamente animali morti per cause naturali o in incidenti, quindi credo che ci troviamo in una nuova era di tassidermia etica. Sono felice di farne parte”.

C’è chi invece il problema l’ha aggirato del tutto. L’artista americana Aimée Baldwin ha creato quella che chiama “tassidermia vegana”: i suoi uccelli sono in realtà sculture costruite con carta crespa. Il lavoro certosino e la conoscenza del materiale, con cui sperimenta da anni, le permettono di ottenere un risultato incredibilmente realistico.

Vegan Taxidermy  An Intersection of Art, Science, and Conservation

Raven-360x240

Kingfisher432

HeronCity432

AmericanAvocet-288x432

Ecco il link all’articolo di Margot Magpie. Gran parte delle fotografie nell’articolo provengono da questo articolo su un workshop tassidermico newyorkese. Ecco infine il sito ufficiale di Aimée Baldwin.

Speciale: James G. Mundie

In esclusiva per Bizzarro Bazar vi proponiamo l’intervista da noi realizzata all’artista James G. Mundie, disegnatore, fotografo e incisore. I suoi lavori più noti sono due serie di opere: la prima, intitolata Prodigies, è un’iconoclasta rivisitazione di alcuni classici della pittura di ogni epoca, all’interno dei quali i soggetti originali sono stati rimpiazzati dai freaks più famosi. Quello che ne risulta è una sorta di ironica storia dell’arte “parallela” o “possibile”, in cui la deformità prende il posto del bello, e in cui per una volta gli emarginati divengono protagonisti.
Il suo altro lavoro molto noto è Cabinet of curiosities, una serie di fotografie, schizzi e incisioni riguardanti le maggiori collezioni anatomiche e teratologiche conservate nei musei di tutto il mondo.

Le fotografie fanno parte dei tuoi progetti tanto quanto i disegni. Ti ritieni più un fotografo o un illustratore?

Mi piace pensarmi come un creatore di immagini che utilizza qualsiasi strumento o mezzo sia appropriato. Questo significa talvolta disegnare, altre volte incidere su legno o fotografare. Comunque, ho cominciato ad considerare la fotografia come mezzo a sé solo da poco tempo. Ho sempre usato le fotografie come riferimenti, o come fossero dei bozzetti per altri progetti. Con il tempo, invece, ho cominciato ad apprezzare le foto che facevo nei loro propri termini estetici. Specialmente da quando sono diventato padre, la relativa immediatezza dell fotografia è stata un cambiamento benvenuto rispetto ai metodi più laboriosi che uso nei disegni e nelle incisioni, che possono prendere settimane o mesi (addirittura anni!) per emergere.

Riguardo alla serie Prodigies, come è nata l’idea di unire il mondo dei freakshow con quello dell’arte classica, e perché?

Ho sempre disegnato ritratti, e intorno al 1996-97 stavo cercando nuove ispirazioni. Ho cominciato a pensare alle fotografie di strane persone, come Jojo il Ragazzo dalla Faccia di Cane, che avevo visto decadi prima, e pensai che sarebbe stato divertente lavorarci. Cominciai a fare ricerche sui sideshow, e presto scoprii qualcosa di molto più bizzarro di quello che ricordavo dalla mia infanzia. Iniziai a trovare anche dettagli sulle vite di questi performer che li fecero risultare molto più veri ai miei occhi – cioè, più di qualcosa di semplicemente anomalo e strampalato. Prodigies è cominciato come una sfida, per vedere se sarei riuscito a mescolare questi inquietanti e affascinanti performer di sideshow ai miei quadri preferiti.
Mi resi conto che la presentazione circense dei freaks era spesso basata sull’esagerazione – ai nani venivano assegnati titoli militari come Generale o Ammiraglio, le persone molto alte venivano reinventate come giganti, ecc.; e nella storia dell’arte succedeva lo stesso, quello che vediamo nei quadri era, all’epoca, una commissione commerciale all’artista da parte di una persona benestante che voleva lasciare un ricordo di sé e del suo successo. In questo senso, un ritratto di Raffaello di un qualsiasi cardinale o poeta non è molto differente dalle cartoline di presentazione dei freaks vendute dal palcoscenico. Entrambe le cose cercano di proiettare e/o vendere un’identità. “Perché non portare il tutto a uno stadio successivo, e permettere ai freaks di abitare o rimodellare le storie raccontate nei dipinti classici?”, pensai. Ovviamente non volevo procedere a casaccio. Dovevo avere un buon motivo per collegare un performer con un certo quadro, che fosse una storia in comune, o un atteggiamento, o un elemento compositivo che mi ricordava la figura di un freak. Questo significa che sto ancora cercando l’accoppiata ideale per alcuni fra i miei performer preferiti, come ad esempio Grady Stiles l’Uomo Aragosta. Dall’altra parte, ci sono dipinti così iconici che risulta difficile utilizzarli senza apparire risaputi o pigri.

La serie Prodigies è percorsa da una vena di humor iconoclasta. Potrebbe essere letta come una “legittimazione” dei diversi, a cui viene data la possibilità di essere protagonisti della storia dell’arte; ma anche come una specie di sberleffo nei confronti del concetto storico e assodato di “bellezza”. Quale interpretazione ti sembra più corretta?

Sono entrambe corrette. Anche se è di moda oggi denigrare i freakshow come una reliquia culturale barbarica da dimenticare, credo che servissero una funzione necessaria nella società – e che non è ancora sparita. E vedo queste persone che lavoravano nei freakshow – anche se spesso sfruttate – come degli eroi, per aver affrontato le circostanze peggiori e averne tratto il maggiore successo possibile. Queste erano persone che non sarebbero mai state accettate nella società beneducata, eppure trovarono una comunità che si strinse attorno a loro e li celebrò. Invece di essere chiusi negli istituti, vissero bene la loro vita con la loro famiglia, recitando sul palcoscenico un ruolo creato ad arte. C’è un certo carattere di nobiltà, in questo. Sì, la gente guardava e di tanto in tanto li scherniva, ma almeno ora pagavano per il privilegio. Quindi, chi è che era veramente sfruttato? Anche ora vogliamo guardare, ma la maggior parte di noi non è abbastanza sincero da ammetterlo.
Molte delle presentazioni utilizzate nei freakshow erano intenzionalmente umoristiche, quasi ridicole. Credo che quello humor servisse perché il pubblico si sentisse meno a disagio, e anche per dare al performer una protezione emotiva. Una parte del fascino dei freakshow è di confrontarsi con le proprie paure. Vedi qualcuno sul palco a cui mancano degli arti oppure deforme, e naturalmente pensi “E se quello fossi io?”. Quindi ho spesso inserito dei piccoli tocchi scherzosi, per aiutarmi a metabolizzare queste domande, e per tirare un salvagente allo spettatore. Allo stesso tempo sto prendendo in giro alcuni dei pilastri della storia dell’arte. C’è un sacco di materiale esilarante con cui lavorare, se lo guardi con mente aperta. Per esempio alcune convenzioni formali che troviamo in antiche istoriazioni sugli altari: è piuttosto divertente, oggi, vedere come i santi sono raffigurati cinque volte più grandi dei meri mortali. È liberatorio camminare in un museo e permetterti di ridere, anche se per molte persone è puro sacrilegio.
Gran parte di ciò che oggi reputiamo “bello” è semplicemente regolare, uniforme. Le nostre idee moderne di bellezza ci vengono propinate dai giornali di moda, televisione e affini. Eppure, in queste strane persone che io disegno – con le loro proporzioni imperfette – andiamo oltre il bello per avvicinarci al sublime. Uno dei principi guida per me in questo progetto è quello che Sir Francis Bacon scrisse nel 1597: “non c’è beltà eccellente che non abbia in sé una qualche misura di stranezza”.

In uno dei tuoi disegni, ti autoritrai nei panni di un anatomista dilettante, e molti dei tuoi lavori raffigurano anomalie patologiche. Qual è il tuo rapporto con i tuoi soggetti? Ritieni di avere un occhio freddo e clinico oppure c’è un’empatia con la sofferenza che spesso implica l’anatomia patologica? E, ancora, cosa vorresti che provasse chi guarda i tuoi disegni?

Anche se un certo distacco è necessario per rimanere oggettivi, non posso impedirmi di immedesimarmi nei miei soggetti. Queste erano persone reali che affrontavano circostanze che non posso nemmeno immaginare. Quando attraverso una collezione anatomica, mi ritrovo a chiedermi chi fosse la persona da cui questa o quella parte è stata tolta e preservata. Oggi, i casi sono presentati in maniera anonima, ma negli scorsi secoli era comune accludere informazioni biografiche sul paziente. Credo che in questa fissazione di proteggere la privacy degli individui stiamo inavvertitamente negando la loro umanità, perché ora ciò che vediamo è una malattia invece che una persona. Anche se non è mia intenzione forzare nello spettatore alcuna emozione o idea (e spesso la gente trova nei miei lavori dei significati che non ho mai inteso esprimere), spero che almeno porti con sé il senso che i miei soggetti sono o erano persone vere, degne di considerazione.

Il tuo nuovo progetto, Cabinet of curiosities, è basato sulle tue visite ai musei anatomici americani ed europei. Cosa ti attrae nei reperti anatomici e teratologici?

Sono sempre stato interessato a come le cose funzionano, in particolare all’anatomia. Quello che mi interessa delle collezioni patologiche o teratologiche è che questi strani esemplari ci mostrano cosa sta succedendo a livello cellulare, genetico. Esaminando il sistema danneggiato, impariamo come funziona quello in salute. Sono anche affascinato dagli antichi sistemi usati per catalogare e organizzare il mondo naturale, e la teratologia – lo studio dei mostri – è un esempio particolarmente interessante. Anche l’idea del museo, nato come collezione personale per diventare istituzione pubblica è affascinante, e condivide molti aspetti con i freakshow. Alcuni di questi preparati sono strani e bellissimi, e presentati in maniera molto elaborata. Quindi Cabinet of Curiosities è un tentativo di documentare il punto in cui questi due mondi si intersecano.

Quale pensi sia il rapporto fra medicina ed arte, e più in generale fra scienza ed arte?

La medicina è stata considerata un’arte per molto più tempo di quanto non sia stata vista come scienza. La società non si libera da una simile associazione da un giorno all’altro, così ancora oggi continuiamo a  parlare dell’abilità di un chirurgo come fosse quella di uno scultore. Ma anche da un punto di vista strettamente pratico, i dottori hanno bisogno degli artisti perché le rappresentazioni artistiche sono da sempre una componente essenziale nell’educazione medica e nella sua comunicazione. Sin dal Rinascimento gli illustratori hanno insegnato l’anatomia a generazioni di medici, e in quel modo la pratica artistica dell’osservazione ha aiutato la medicina ad uscire dalla via puramente teorica. Penso che possiamo affermare che questo ruolo comunicativo valga anche per le scienze in generale, perché l’arte può aiutare a spiegare complesse teorie anche a persone che non masticano la materia. Un artista può fungere da legame tra lo scienziato e il pubblico, rendendo comprensibili le scoperte scientifiche – ma può anche servire come critico. In questo modo, l’arte può divenire una sorta di specchio morale per la scienza.

Nelle tue parole, “questi preparati anatomici rappresentano il punto di intersezione fra scienza, cultura, emozione e mito”. Credi che ci sia bisogno di miti moderni? Pensi che questi nuovi miti possano provenire dal mondo della scienza, invece che da quello magico-religioso come nel passato? Il tuo lavoro fotografico e di illustrazione può essere letto come un tentativo di dare una dimensione mitica ai tuoi soggetti? Sei religioso?

Penso che noi creiamo in continuazione nuovi miti, o che ne risvegliamo e reinventiamo di vecchi. Fa parte della natura umana.
La scienza per molte persone ha sostituito la religione come fondamentale via d’ispirazione, ma in realtà sappiamo ancora così poco dell’universo, che c’è ancora molto terreno fertile per la fantascienza. Con la nascita di Scientology abbiamo visto addirittura la fantascienza trasformarsi in religione! Io non sono assolutamente una persona religiosa, ma penso che spesso cerchiamo di riporre le nostre speranze in un potere che sta al di fuori di noi. Per alcuni, questo significa una divinità che è personalmente interessata a come ci vestiamo, o a cosa mangiamo il venerdì; per altri vuol dire l’idea che il genere umano troverà finalmente la cura per il cancro e imparerà i segreti per viaggiare nel tempo. Così nel mio lavoro mi ritrovo a raccontare storie, o quantomeno a predisporre il seme di una storia che ognuno può trasformare nel racconto che desidera.

Anche tua moglie Kate è un’artista, ma i suoi quadri sembrano essere completamente distanti dal tuo mondo – solari, impressionisti, colorati. Se non sono indiscreto, come vi rapportate l’uno con l’arte dell’altra?

Siamo i migliori critici l’uno dell’altra. Siccome i nostri lavori sono così differenti, non c’è competizione fra noi, e ci diamo costantemente dei pareri e delle idee.

Chi è appassionato di stranezze, corre il rischio di essere reputato egli stesso strano. Cosa pensano delle tue passioni gli amici e i parenti?

Alcune persone amano stare a guardare i treni, o ascoltare gli Abba. Io amo i freaks. Tutte le persone più interessanti sono strambe.

Ecco i siti ufficiali di Prodigies, e di Cabinet of Curiosities.

La giostra della morte

Julijonas Urbonas è un artista, designer e ingegnere lituano trapiantato in Inghilterra. Ha lavorato per tre anni come direttore di un parco di divertimenti, ed è lì che ha cominciato a interessarsi alle potenzialità tecnologiche e artistiche legate alla forza di gravità.

Così, battezzando il suo campo di ricerca “estetica della gravità”, ha cominciato ad occuparsi delle relazioni fra l’uomo e la forza che lo tiene a terra; i progetti artistici di Urbonas cercano una nuova prospettiva su questa storia di amore/odio fra corpo umano e gravità. Una delle sue più controverse opere è senza dubbio un rollercoaster futuristico progettato appositamente per essere una vera e propria macchina di eutanasia.

L’ultima, euforica e adrenalinica corsa in ottovolante si compone di due fasi: come prima cosa, attaccati a una serie di dispositivi per il monitoraggio del cervello, venite trasportati fino alla cima di una una torre di 500 metri di altezza, per poi precipitare in caduta libera. Questo garantisce la necessaria forza cinetica per esporre il corpo a una forza di 10 g per 1 minuto, attraverso una serie di “giri della morte” posizionati nella seconda parte della corsa.

Il sangue viene sparato verso le estremità basse, causando una completa mancanza di afflusso di ossigeno al cervello: la velocità garantisce uno stato di ipossia e ischemia cerebrale con conseguente perdita di coscienza già dal primo anello… alla fine della serie di giri, i sistemi di monitoraggio constateranno l’avvenuta morte cerebrale e si assicureranno che non abbiate bisogno di un’altra corsa.

Questo progetto, volutamente provocatorio, è comunque stato studiato in modo scientifico e non è una semplice trovata per stupire. Si basa sui dati reali degli esperimenti e addestramenti in cui i corpi dei piloti vengono sottoposti a simili forze per pochi secondi. La macchina per l’eutanasia in forma di ottovolante, nelle intenzioni dell’autore, è insieme uno studio sugli effetti della gravità sul corpo umano e una possibile, futura variazione degli apparecchi per la morte assistita, che potrebbe inoltre garantire l’efficace dipartita di più soggetti contemporaneamente. Tutti assieme sul trenino, cinture allacciate, pronti per l’ultimo, estremo sballo.

È evidente l’umorismo provocatorio che sta alla base del progetto, l’iconoclasta sovrapposizione di temi opposti come l’eutanasia e l’industria del divertimento; con il suo ottovolante suicida, che provoca assieme ilarità e repulsione, Urbonas riesce a stimolare una riflessione profonda su un’incredibile varietà di temi: sul futuro, sull’etica, su quale sia il nostro concetto di morte, su come possa evolversi, sulla ricerca odierna del divertimento estremo… e, forse, si propone anche come una ironica, macabra variazione del vecchio detto “la vita è soltanto un giro di giostra”.

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/23040442]

Ecco la pagina web dell’artista dedicata al progetto Euthanasia-Coaster, contenente una descrizione in inglese (esilarante e angosciante al tempo stesso) dell’esperienza che si proverebbe salendo sulla macchina.

F.A.Q. – Bellezza e tonicità

Caro Bizzarro Bazar, l’età avanza. Come posso mantenermi sempre giovane e bella?

Ti consigliamo le tre fasi del Trattamento Bellezza di Bizzarro Bazar®:

Fase 1 – Scrubbing. Ridona elasticità e vigore alla pelle immergendoti nella vasca dei Garra Rufa! Questi piccoli pesci elimineranno tutte le cellule morte dal tuo corpo (e forse qualcuna di quelle vive, ma bisogna pur soffrire, per essere belle).

Fase 2 – Hair conditioning. Restituisci lucentezza ai tuoi capelli secchi e danneggiati, proteggendoli e nutrendoli con un apporto naturale di proteine. Oggi, grazie al nuovo Concentrato Attivo di Sperma di Toro, i capelli si trasformano: più forti dall’interno, brilleranno di una nuova luce!

Fase 3 – Facial Flex. Per finire, ecco uno strumento indispensabile per la tonicità dei tuoi muscoli facciali. Niente più rughe, niente più pelle flaccida. Con Facial Flex, il lifting facciale non-invasivo e clinicamente testato, nessuno potrà più indovinare la tua età.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etU_wtP5Pck]

Ma ricordati, se aprirai bocca per parlare, potrebbero sempre indovinare la tua intelligenza.

Gueules cassées

La Prima Guerra Mondiale fu un vero e proprio massacro. Ma il peggio non venne per chi restò sotto il fuoco delle prime mitragliatrici, o per chi rimase vittima dei gas o delle bombe. Molti furono così fortunati da salvarsi, e così sfortunati da tornare a casa con ferite assolutamente agghiaccianti. I ritardi nei soccorsi non fecero che peggiorare la situazione dei feriti, che spesso non si ripresero più integralmente.

Una categoria particolare di reduci con ferite di guerra è costituito dalle cosiddette gueules cassées, termine francese che significa pressappoco “facce fracassate”. Erano i militari che avevano riportato estese ferite al volto, e che erano per così dire “impresentabili” e dunque difficilmente reintegrabili nella società. Per la prima volta nella storia, però, la medicina aveva i mezzi per cercare di ovviare a questi incidenti. Stiamo parlando, qui, degli esordi pionieristici della chirurgia plastica ricostruttiva del maxillo-facciale. Sulla base di queste prime esperienze i chirurghi furono in grado di sviluppare un’esperienza che, affinatasi nel tempo, permette oggi di restituire una vita quasi normale a persone sfigurate. (È triste ammetterlo, ma questi soldati fecero anche inconsapevolmente da cavia per quelle tecniche che successivamente portarono alla chirurgia estetica vera e propria, quella delle labbra al silicone, del lifting o dei seni rifatti).

In questo blog abbiamo già parlato di terapie piuttosto crudeli relative agli albori della medicina. Quello che colpisce sempre nel riesaminare a distanza di quasi un secolo queste tecniche mediche primitive, è la scarsa considerazione che i medici sembravano avere della sofferenza del paziente. Confrontate i tentativi odierni di essere sempre meno invasivi, delicati, poco intrusivi, con queste tecniche antiquate: il dolore era qualcosa che andava sopportato, punto e basta, mentre i dottori cercavano di salvarti la pelle o migliorarti la vita.

Prendiamo ad esempio i sistemi per aprire la bocca del paziente. Molto spesso, dopo un trauma facciale, i muscoli della mascella rimanevano tirati e in tensione e aprire la bocca risultava impossibile. A seconda del grado di gravità, venivano utilizzati diversi sistemi. L’apri-bocca più comune era questo:

Si trattava di una sorta di morsa “al contrario” che veniva aperta gradualmente per allentare la tensione dei muscoli. Aveva effetti poco rilevanti nel tempo. Altri metodi, però, erano ancora più drastici e dolorosi.

Il “procedimento del sacco”, esposto dal dottor Pitsch nel 1916, è un esempio di terapia davvero brutale. Una volta trovato un interstizio tra i denti, due assicelle venivano inserite nella mascella del paziente.

Appena dischiuse le due pareti dentarie, un uncino veniva attaccato alla mascella inferiore e a questo veniva attaccato un sacco pieno di sassi o carbone il cui peso veniva velocemente aumentato per consentire l’apertura della bocca.

Il procedimento era dolorosissimo e non aveva effetti notevoli a lungo termine, perché i muscoli, troppo bruscamente e violentemente stirati, si ricontraevano poco dopo. Anche se la trazione veniva bilanciata da una banda che tratteneva il capo del paziente, le vertebre della nuca risentivano comunque dello stress.

Più complesso ancora era il caso dei volti sottoposti a un vero e proprio trauma che li aveva lasciati a brandelli e con ferite aperte. La protesi immediata veniva effettuata mediante maschere di contenimento che riportassero assieme i vari frammenti di volto, in modo che non si allontanassero ma anzi si fondessero assieme. L’idea era quella di cicatrizzare l’area più grande possibile, favorendo il consolidamento in buona posizione delle fratture, per permettere in seguito la riparazione delle parti lese. Il casco di Darcissac teneva insieme i diversi “pezzi” di faccia finché non si fossero riattaccati e cicatrizzati. L’intera procedura durava due o tre settimane, di immobilizzazione assoluta.

Passarono alcuni anni, prima che nel 1918 si arrivasse alla rivoluzionaria tecnica di Dufourmentel. Egli scoprì infatti che la pelle del cuoio capelluto reagiva meglio ed era più solida rispetto a quella del braccio. Tagliando quindi ampi lembi di pelle dal cranio dei pazienti, Dufourmentel riuscì a ricostruire elementi fino ad allora inapprocciabili della ricostruizione facciale. Ecco una mandibola “rimodellata” a partire dal cuio capelluto.

Anche gli italiani ebbero una parte in questa “corsa” alla ricostruzione dei volti dei reduci. I medici, infatti, provarono anche a ricorrere a una metodologia già inventata e spiegata addirittura nel XVI secolo dal chirurgo italiano Tagliacozzi, modificando qua e là il procedimento e le indicazioni di questo storico precursore. Questa tecnica si applicava soprattutto alle perdite moderate di tessuto nell’area nasale e del mento.

L’idea era quella di “rialzare” un lembo di pelle dal braccio, connetterlo al tessuto mancante del volto e lasciare che la pelle facesse il suo lavoro, “ricucendosi” con le parti mancanti. Ovviamente bisognava assicurarsi che il braccio fosse immobilizzato, per due o tre settimane, al fine di permettere la vascolarizzazione dei nuovi tessuti. Questa tecnica era stata, nei secoli precedenti, violentemente ostracizzata dalla Chiesa, a motivo della presunta interferenza con i piani del Creatore, e la Santa Sede dispose addirittura la riesumazione del Tagliacozzi e la sua sepoltura in terra non consacrata.

Infine la tecnica di ricostruzione prevedeva degli esperti dentisti che, a partire dai calchi del volto dei pazienti, progettavano e scolpivano protesi che potessero ridare loro la fisionomia perduta.

Le protesi alle volte includevano occhiali per dissimulare l’artificio.

Infine, ecco un raro filmato della Croce Rossa, datato 1918, in cui alcuni dottori e infermiere posizionano e controllano l’efficacia delle protesi facciali su alcuni reduci.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8epVBKiMmns]

Le tecnologie di ricostruzione del maxillo-facciale hanno da allora fatto un passo in avanti decisivo, e ad oggi costituiscono la fortuna di chirurghi plastici proprietari di atolli e isolotti, così come di onesti medici che cercano di ridare il sorriso e un’integrazione maggiore alle vittime di incidenti terribili.

Per ironia della sorte, la chirurgia estetica è nata proprio da uno dei più grandi e sanguinosi confilitti che il mondo abbia mai conosciuto.