Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 6

Step right up! A new batch of weird news from around the world, amazing stories and curious facts to get wise with your friends! Guaranteed to break the ice at parties!

  • Have you seen those adorable and lovely fruit bats? How would you like to own a pet bat, making all those funny expressions as you feed him a piece of watermelon or banana?
    In this eye-opening article a bat expert explains all the reasons why keeping these mammals as domestic pets is actually a terrible idea.
    There are not just ethical reasons (you would practically ruin their existence) or economic reasons (keeping them healthy would cost you way more than you can imagine); the big surprise here is that, despite those charming OMG-it’s-so-cuuute little faces, bats — how should I put it — are not exactly good-mannered.
    As they hang upside down, they rub their own urine all over their body, in order to stink appropriately. They defecate constantly. And most of all, they engage in sex all the time — straight, homosexual, vaginal, oral and anal sex, you name it. If you keep them alone, males will engage in stubborn auto-fellatio. They will try and hump you, too.
    And if you still think ‘Well, now, how bad can that be’, let me remind you that we’re talking about this.
    Next time your friend posts a video of cuddly bats, go ahead and link this pic. You’re welcome.
  • Sex + animals, always good fun. Take for example the spider Latrodectus: after mating, the male voluntarily offers himself in sacrifice to be eaten by his female partner, to benefit their offspring. And he’s not the only animal to understand the evolutionary advantages of cannibalism.
  • From cannibals to zombies: the man picture below is Clairvius Narcisse. He is sitting on his own grave, from which he rose transformed into a real living dead.
    You can find his story on Wikipedia, in a famous Haitian etnology book, in the fantasy horror film Wes Craven adapted from it, and in this in-depth article.
  • Since we’re talking books, have you already invested your $3 for The Illustrati Archives 2012-2016? Thirty Bizzarro Bazar articles in kindle format, and the satisfaction of supporting this blog, keeping it free as it is and always will be. Ok, end of the commercial break.
  • Under a monastery in Rennes, France, more than 1.380 bodies have been found, dating from 14th to 18th Century. One of them belonged to noblewoman Louise de Quengo, Lady of Brefeillac; along with her corpse, in the casket, was found her husband’s heart, sealed in a lead lock box. The research on these burials, recently published, could revolutionize all we know about mummification during the Renaissance.

  • While we’re on the subject, here’s a great article on some of the least known mummies in Italy: the Mosampolo mummies (Italian language).
  • Regarding a part of the Italian patrimony that seldom comes under the spotlight, BBC Culture issued a good post on the Catacombs of Saint Gaudiosus in Naples, where frescoes show a sort of danse macabre but with an unsettling ‘twist’: the holes that can be seen where a figure’s face should be, originally harbored essicated heads and real skulls.

  • Now for a change of scenario. Imagine a sort of Blade Runner future: a huge billboard, the incredible size of 1 km², is orbiting around the Earth, brightening the night with its eletric colored lights, like a second moon, advertising some carbonated drink or the last shampoo. We managed to avoid all this for the time being, but that isn’t to say that someone hasn’t already thought of doing it. Here’s the Wiki page on space advertising.
  • Since we are talking about space, a wonderful piece The Coming Amnesia speculates about a future in which the galaxies will be so far from each other that they will no longer be visible through any kind of telescope. This means that the inhabitants of the future will think the only existing galaxy is their own, and will never come to theorize something like the Big Bang. But wait a second: what if something like that had already happened? What if some fundamental detail, essential to the understanding of the nature of cosmos, had already, forever disappeared, preventing us from seeing the whole picture?
  • To intuitively teach what counterpoint is, Berkeley programmer Stephen Malinowski creates graphics where distinct melodic lines have different colors. And even without knowing anything about music, the astounding complexity of a Bach organ fugue becomes suddenly clear:

  • In closing, I advise you to take 10 minutes off to immerse yourself in the fantastic and poetic atmosphere of Goutte d’Or, a French-Danish stop-motion short directed by Christophe Peladan. The director of this ironic story of undead pirates, well aware he cannot compete with Caribbean blockbusters, makes a virtue of necessity and allows himself some very French, risqué malice.

The elephants’ graveyard

Run_Cubbies

In The Lion King (1994), the famous Disney animated film, young lion Simba is tricked by the villain, Scar, and finds himself with his friend Nala in the unsettling elephants’ graveyard: hundreds of immense pachyderm skeletons reach the horizon. In this evocative location, the little cub will endure the ambush of three ravenous hyenas.

The setting of this action-packed scene, in fact, does not come from the screenwriters’ imagination. An elephants’ graveyard had already been shown in Trader Horn (1931), and in some Tarzan flicks, featuring the iconic Johnny Weissmuller.
And the most curious fact is that the existence of a mysterious and gigantic collective cemetery, where for thousands of years the elephants have been retiring to die, had been debated since the middle of XIX Century.

viajes-cementerio-elph-tarzan

This legendary place, described as some sort of secret sanctuary, hidden in the deepest recesses of Black Africa, is one of the most enduring myths of the golden age of explorations and big-game hunting. It was a true African Eldorado, where the courageous adventurer could find an unspeakable treasure: besides the elephants’ skeletons, the cave (or the inaccessible valley) would hold such an immense quantity of ivory that anyone finding it would have become insanely rich.

But finding a similar place, as every respectable legend demands, was no easy task. Those who saw it, either never came back from it… or were not able to locate the entrance anymore. Tales were told about searchers who found the tracks of an old and sick elephant, who had departed from the herd, and followed them for days in hope that the animal would bring them to the hidden graveyard; but they then realized they had been led in a huge circle by the deceptive elephant, and found themselves right where they started.

According to other versions, the elusive ossuary was regarded as a sacred place by indigenous people. Anyone who approached it, even accidentally, would have been attacked by the dreadful guardians of the cemetery, a pack of warriors lead by a shaman who protected the entrance to the sanctuary.

The elephants’ graveyard legend, which was mentioned even by Livingstone and circulated in Europe until the first decades of the XX Century, is indeed a legend. But where does it come from? Is it possible that this myth is somewhat grounded in reality?

First of all, there really are some places where high concentrations of elephant bones can be found, as if several animals had traveled there, to a single, precise spot to let themselves die.

The most plausible explanation can be found, surprisingly enough, in dentition. Elephants actually have only two sets of teeth: molars and incisors. Tusks are nothing more than modified incisors, slowly and incessantly growing, whose length is regulated by constant wear. On the contrary, molars are cyclically replaced: during the animal’s lifespan, reaching fifty or sixty years of age in a natural environment, new teeth grow on the back of the mandible and push forward the older ones.

jaw_of_a_deceased_loxodonta_africana_juvenile_individual_found_within_the_voyager_ziwani_safari_camp_on_the_edge_of_the_tsavo_west_national_park_near_ziwani_kenya_3_edited

An elephant can have up to a maximum of six molar cycles during its whole existence.
But if the animal lives long enough, which is to say several years after the last cycle occurred, there is no replacement and its wore-down dentition ceases to be functional. These old elephants then find it difficult to feed on shrubs and harder plants, and therefore move to areas where the presence of a water spring guarantees softer and more nutrient herbs. The weariness of old age brings them to prefer regions featuring higher vegetation density, where they need less to struggle to find food. According to some researchers, the muddy waters of a spring could bring relief to the suffering and dental decay of these aging pachyderms; the malnourished animals would then begin to drink more and more water, and this could actually lead to a worsening of their health by diluting the glucose in their blood.
Anyways, the search for water and a more suitable vegetation could draw several sick elephants towards the same spring. This hypothesis could explain the findings of bone stacks in relatively circumscribed areas.

elephant-skeleton

A second explanation for the legend, if a sadder one, could be connected to ivory commerce and smuggling. It’s not rare, still nowadays, for some “elephants’ graveyards” to be found — except they turn out to be massacre sites, where the animals were hunted and mutilated of their precious tusks by poachers. Similar findings, back in the days, could have suggested the idea that the herd had collected there on purpose, to wait for the end to come.

But the stories about a hidden cemetery could also have risen from the observation of elephants’ behavior when facing the death of a counterpart.
These animals are in fact thought to be among the most “intelligent” mammals, in that they show quite complex social relations within the group, elaborate behavioral characteristics, and often display surprising altruistic conduct even towards other species. An emblematic example is that of one domestic indian elephant, employed in following a truck which was carrying logs; at the master’s sign, the animal lifted one of the logs from the trailer and placed it in the appropriate hole, excavated earlier on. When the elephant came to a specific hole, it refused to follow the order; the master came down to investigate, and he found a dog sleeping at the bottom of the hole. Only when the dog was taken out of the hole did the elephant drive the log into it (reported by C. Holdrege in Elephantine Intelligence).

When an elephant dies — especially if it’s the matriarch — the other members of the herd remain around the carcass, standing in silence for days. They gently touch it with their trunks, as if staging an actual mourning ritual; they take turns to leave the body to find water and food, then get back to the place, always keeping guard of the body. They sometimes carry out a sort of rudimentary burial practice, hiding and covering the carcass with dry twigs and torn branches. Even when encountering the bones of an unknown deceased elephant, they can spend hours touching and scattering the remains.

Ethologists obviously debate over these behaviors: the animals could be attracted and confused by the ivory in the remains, as ivory is used as a socially fundamental communication device; according to some researches, they show sometimes the same “stupor” for birds’ remains or even simple pieces of wood. But they seem to be undoubtedly fascinated by their counterparts, wounded or dead.

Being the only animals, other than men and some primate species, who show this kind of participation in death and dying, elephants have always been associated with human emotions — particularly by those indigenous people who live in strict contact with them. There has always been an important symbolic bond between man and elephant: thus unfolds the last, and deepest level of the story.

The hidden graveyard legend, besides its undeniable charm, is also a powerful allegory of voluntary death, the path the elder takes in order to die in solitude and dignity. Releasing his community from the weight of old age, and leaving behind a courageous and strong image, he proceeds towards the sacred place where he will be in contact with his ancestors’ spirits, who are now ready to honorably welcome him as one of their own.70

Post inspired by this article.

Nim Chimpsky

È possibile insegnare alle scimmie a comunicare con noi attraverso il linguaggio dei segni? È quello che voleva scoprire il dottor Herbert Terrace della Columbia University di New York quando, all’inizio degli anni ’70, diede avvio al suo rivoluzionario”progetto Nim”.

Nim Chimpsky era uno scimpanzé di due settimane, chiamato così per parodiare il nome di Noam Chomsky, linguista e intellettuale fra i più influenti del XX Secolo (chimp in inglese significa appunto scimpanzé).
Nato in cattività presso l’Institute of Primate Studies di Norman (Oklahoma), nel dicembre del 1973 Nim venne sottratto alle cure di sua madre, e affidato da Terrace a una famiglia umana: quella di Stephanie LaFarge, sua ex-allieva. L’intento era quello di crescere il cucciolo in tutto e per tutto come un essere umano, vestirlo come un bambino, trattarlo come un bambino, insegnargli le buone maniere, ma soprattutto cercare di fargli apprendere il linguaggio dei sordomuti.

L’idea di Terrace potrà sembrare un po’ folle e temeraria, ma va inserita in un contesto scientifico peculiare: la linguistica era agli albori, e da poco veniva associata all’etologia per comprendere se si potesse parlare di linguaggio vero e proprio anche nel caso degli animali. Lo stesso Chomsky faceva parte di quella fazione che sosteneva che il linguaggio fosse una caratteristica specifica e assolutamente unica dell’essere umano; secondo questa tesi, gli animali certamente comunicano fra di loro – e si fanno capire bene anche da noi! – ma non possono utilizzare una vera e propria sintassi, che sarebbe prerogativa della nostra struttura neurologica.
Se Nim fosse riuscito ad imparare il linguaggio dei segni, sarebbe stato un vero e proprio terremoto per la comunità scientifica.

Il professor Terrace però commise da subito un grave errore.
La famiglia a cui aveva affidato Nim non era effettivamente la più adatta per l’esperimento: nessuno dei figli della LaFarge era fluente nel linguaggio dei segni, e quindi nella prima fase della sua vita, quella più delicata per l’apprendimento, Nim non imparò granché; inoltre, la madre adottiva era un’ex-hippie con un’idea piuttosto liberale nell’educare i figli.
Nim finì per essere lasciato libero di scorrazzare per il parco, di mettere la casa sottosopra, e addirittura di fumarsi qualche spinello assieme ai “genitori”.
Quando Terrace si rese conto che non stava arrivando alcun questionario compilato, che certificasse i progressi del suo scimpanzé, comprese che l’esperimento era seriamente a rischio. Il clima indisciplinato e caotico di casa LaFarge metteva in pericolo l’intero studio.


Terrace decise quindi di incaricare una studentessa ventenne, Laura-Ann Petitto, dell’educazione di Nim.
Strappato per una seconda volta alla figura materna, lo scimpanzé venne trasferito in una residenza di proprietà della Columbia University, dove la Petitto cominciò un più rigido e intensivo programma di addestramento.
In poco tempo Nim imparò oltre 120 segni, e i suoi progressi cominciarono a fare scalpore. Conversava con i suoi maestri in maniera che sembrava prodigiosa, e in generale faceva mostra di un’intelligenza acuta, tanto da arrivare addirittura a mentire.

Ma ormai Nim non era già più un cucciolo, e con la giovane età cominciò a crescere di mole e soprattutto di forza. I suoi muscoli erano potenti come quelli di due maschi umani messi assieme, e spesso Nim non era in grado di misurare la violenza di un suo gesto: gli stessi giochi che qualche mese prima erano spensierati, diventavano per gli addestratori sempre più pericolosi perché lo scimpanzé non si rendeva conto della sua forza.
Con lo sviluppo sessuale e la maturazione verso l’età adulta, inoltre, crebbe anche la sua aggressività: la Petitto venne attaccata diverse volte, due delle quali in maniera molto grave. I morsi di Nim in un’occasione le lacerarono la faccia, costringendola a 37 punti di sutura, e in un’altra le recisero un tendine.

La tensione psicologica era insopportabile, e la Petitto decise di lasciare l’esperimento… e di lasciare Terrace, con il quale aveva cominciato una relazione sentimentale.
Joyce Butler, una studentessa di vent’anni, entrò a sostituire la Petitto come terza madre adottiva di Nim. Anche lei fu più volte attaccata dalla scimmia, e la difficoltà di reperire fondi fece infine decidere a Terrace di dichiarare concluso l’esperimento, e smantellare il progetto dopo solo quattro anni.

Qui cominciò un vero e proprio calvario per il povero Nim. Egli non aveva infatto mai avuto contatti con altri primati, essendo sempre vissuto con gli umani: quando gli scienziati lo riportarono all’Institute of Primate Studies, Nim era completamente terrorizzato dai suoi simili e ci vollero diversi uomini per staccarlo da Joyce Butler, alla quale si era avvinghiato, per essere rinchiuso nella gabbia.
Per “lo scimpanzé che sapeva parlare”, abituato a mangiare a tavola in compagnia degli esseri umani e a correre libero nel parco, la prigionia fu uno shock terribile. Ma le cose erano destinate a peggiorare, perché l’istituto decise di trasferirlo in un centro di ricerca scientifico in cui si faceva sperimentazione sugli animali.

Rinchiuso in una gabbia ancora più angusta, di fianco a decine di altre scimmie terrorizzate in attesa di essere inoculate con virus e antibiotici, il futuro di Nim era tutt’altro che roseo. Terrace non muoveva un dito per salvarlo da quel destino, e così ci pensarono alcuni degli assistenti che avevano preso parte al progetto: organizzarono un battage mediatico denunciando le condizioni inumane in cui Nim era tenuto, diedero avvio a un’azione legale e infine riuscirono a farlo trasferire in un ranch di recupero per animali selvatici, liberando anche le altre scimmie destinate agli esperimenti.

Nonostante fosse al sicuro in questa riserva naturale, Nim era ormai provato, abbattuto e depresso; restava immobile e senza mangiare anche per giorni. Quando dopo anni la sua prima madre adottiva, Stephanie LaFarge, gli fece visita e volle entrare nella gabbia, Nim la riconobbe immediatamente e, come se la ritenesse responsabile per averlo abbandonato, la attaccò quando lei provò ad entrare nella gabbia.

Eppure arrivò per Nim almeno un’ultima, insperata, dolce sorpresa: dopo un lungo periodo di solitudine, un altro scimpanzé, femmina, venne introdotto nella sua gabbia e per la prima volta Nim riuscì a socializzare con la nuova arrivata.
Potè così passare gli ultimi anni della sua vita in compagnia di una nuova amica, forse più sincera e fidata di quanto non fossero stati gli uomini. Nim morì nel 2000 per un attacco di cuore.

Il professor Terrace, dopo aver cercato e ottenuto la fama grazie a questo ambizioso progetto, tornò sui suoi passi e dichiarò che il progetto era stato fallimentare; dichiarò che Nim non aveva mai veramente imparato a formulare delle frasi di senso compiuto, ma che era soltanto divenuto abile ad associare certi segni alla ricompensa, e aveva capito quali sequenze usare per ottenere del cibo. La voglia dei ricercatori di vedere in un animale un’intelligenza simile alla nostra aveva insomma viziato i risultati, che andavano grandemente ridimensionati.
Ancora oggi però c’è chi è convinto del contrario: gli assistenti e i collaboratori che hanno conosciuto Nim e si sono presi cura di lui continuano anche oggi a sostenere che Nim sapesse davvero parlare in maniera chiara e precisa, e che se Terrace si fosse degnato di stare un po’ di più con lo scimpanzé, invece di relazionarsi con lui soltanto al momento di farsi bello davanti ai fotografi, l’avrebbe certamente capito.

La ricerca, per la metodologia confusionaria con cui venne condotta, ha effettivamente un valore scientifico relativo, e i dati raccolti si prestano a interpretazioni troppo volubili.
D’altronde un esperimento come il progetto Nim è figlio del suo tempo, e sarebbe impensabile replicarlo oggi; lo strano destino di Nim, questo essere speciale che ha vissuto due vite in una, la prima come “umano” e la seconda come animale da laboratorio, continua però a sollevare altre questioni, forse ancora più fondamentali. Ci interroga sui confini (reali? inventati?) che separano l’uomo dalla bestia, e soprattutto sui limiti etici della ricerca.

Nel 2010 James Marsh (già regista di Man On Wire) ha diretto uno splendido documentario, Project Nim, costituito in larga parte di materiale d’archivio inedito, che ripercorre in maniera commovente e appassionante l’intera vicenda.

Amore materno

Sorry, this entry is only available in Italian.

Capre sugli alberi

In Marocco, le capre hanno imparato a scalare gli alberi.

Le capre sono ghiotte dei frutti dell’argania, una varietà di albero endemica del Marocco. Dai frutti vengono ricavati due tipi di olio, uno per uso cosmetico e uno per uso alimentare. I guardiani devono tenerle a distanza fino alla completa maturità del frutto, nel mese di luglio.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oQev3UoGp2M]

Anatomie fantastiche

Walmor Corrêa è un artista brasiliano che dipinge tavole anatomiche di esseri immaginari di sua invenzione. Le tavole, dagli splendidi colori, si rifanno alle vere illustrazioni dei libri di biologia, e spesso descrivono dettagliatamente l’anatomia interna di questi ibridi fantasiosi. Ondine, mostri, commistioni di umano e animale sono dipinti come fossero stati ritratti durante una dissezione. Accurate descrizioni etologiche rendono conto dei particolari comportamenti di questi animali. Corrêa ha anche creato diorami, orologi a cucù e carillon a partire da scheletri animali modificati. Se volete conoscere l’anatomia di una sirena, Corrêa è l’uomo giusto a cui chiederlo.

Il sito ufficiale di Walmor Corrêa.