A Macabre Monastery

Article by guestblogger Lady Decay

This is the account of a peculiar exploration, different from any other abandonded places I had the chance to visit: this place, besides being fascinating, also had a macabre and mysterious twist.

It was November, 2016. We were venturing — my father, my sister, two friends and I — towards an ex convent, which had been abandoned many years before.
The air was icy-cold. Our objective stood next to a public, still operational structure: the cemetery.
The thorny briers were dead and not very high, so it was simple for us to cut through the vegetation towards the side of the convent that had the only access route to the building, a window.
With a certain difficulty, one by one we all managed to enter the structure thanks to a crooked tree, which stood right next to the small window and which we used as ladder.

Once we caught our breath, and shook the dust off our coats, we realized we just got lost in time. That place seemed to have frozen right in the middle of its vital cycle.

The courtyard was almost entirely engulfed in vines and vegetation, and we had to be very careful around the porch, with its tired, unstable pillars.

Two 19th-Century hearses dominated one side of the courtyard, worn out but still keeping all their magnificence: the wood was dusty and rotten, but we could still see the cloth ornaments dangling from the corners of the carriage; once purple, or dark green, they now had an indefinable color, one that perhaps dosen’t even exist.

We went up a flight of stairs and headed towards a series of empty chambers, the cells where the Friars once lived; some still have their number carved in marble beside the door.

Climbing down again, we stumbled upon a sort of “office” where we were greeted by the real masters of the house – two statues of saints who seemed to welcome and admonish us at the same time.

As we were taking some pictures, we peeked inside the drawers filled with documents and papers going back to the last years of the 18th Century, so old that we were afraid of spoiling them just by looking.

We got back out in the courtyard to enjoy a thin November sun. We were still near the cemetery, which was open to the public, so we had to move carefully and most silently, when all of a sudden we came upon a macabre find: several coffins were lying on the wet grass, some partly open and others with their lid completely off. Just one of them was still sealed.

My friends prefer to step back, but me and my sister could not resist our curiosity and started snooping around. We noted some bags next to the coffins, on which a printed warning read: ‘exhumation organic material‘.

A vague stench lingered in the air, but not too annoying: from this, and from the coffins’ antiquated style, we speculated these exhumations could not be very recent. Those caskets looked like they had been lying there for quite a long time.

And today, a year later, I wonder if they’re still abandoned in the grass, next to that magical ghost convent…

Lady Decay is a Urban Explorer: you can follow her adventures in neglected and abandoned places on her YouTube channel and on her Facebook page.

Ghost Marriages

China, Shanxi province, on the nothern part of the Republic.
At the beginningof 2016, the Hongtong County police chief gave the warning: during the three previous years, at least a dozen thefts of corpses were recorded each year. All the exhumed and smuggled bodies were of young women, and the trend is incresing so fast that many families now prefer to bury their female relatives near their homes, rather than in secluded areas. Others resort to concrete graves, install surveillance cameras, hire security guards or plant gratings around the burial site, just like in body snatchers England. It looks like in some parts of the province, the body of a young dead girl is never safe enough.
What’s behind this unsettling trend?

These episodes of body theft are connected to a very ancient tradition which was thought to be long abandoned: the custom of “netherworld marriages”.
The death of a young unmarried male is considered bad lack for the entire family: the boy’s soul cannot find rest, without a mate.
For this reasons his relatives, in the effort of finding a spouse for the deceased man, turn to matchmakers who can put them in contact with other families having recently suffered the lost of a daughter. A marriage is therefore arranged for the two dead young persons, following a specific ritual, until they are finally buried together, much to the relief of both families.
This kind of marriages seem to date back to the Qin dinasty (221-206 a.C.) even if the main sources attest a more widespread existence of the practice starting from the Han dinasty (206 a.C.-220 d.C.).

The problem is that as the traffic becomes more and more profitable, some of these matchmakers have no qualms about exhuming the precious corpses in secret: to sell the bodies, they sometimes pretend to be relatives of the dead girl, but in other cases they simply find grieving families who are ready to pay in order to find a bride for their departed loved one, and willing to turn a blind eye on the cadaver’s provenance.

Until some years ago, “ghost marriages” were performed by using symbolic bamboo figurines, dressed in traditional clothes; today weath is increasing, and as much as 100,000 yan (around $15,000) can be spent on the fresh body of a young girl. Even older human remains, put back together with wire, can be worth up to $800. The village elders, after all, are the ones who warn new generations: to cast away bad luck nothing beats an authentic corpse.
Although the practice has been outlawed in 2006, the business is so lucrative that the number of arrests keep increasing, and at least two cases of murder have been reported in the news where the victim was killed in order to sell her body.

If at first glance this tradition may seem macabre or senseless, let us consider its possible motivations.
In the province where these episodes are more frequent, a large number of young men work in coal mines, where fatal accidents are sadly common. The majority of these boys are the sole children of their parents, because of the Chinese one-child policy, effective until 2013.
So, apart from reasons dictated by superstition, there is also an important psychological element: imagine the relief if, in the process of elaborating grief, you could still do something to make your dearly departed happy. Here’s how a “ghost wedding” acts as a compensation for the loss of a loved boy, who maybe died while working to support his family.

Marriages between two deceased persons, or between a living person and a dead one, are not even unique to China, for that matter. In France posthumous marriages (which usually take place when a woman prematurely loses her fiancé) are regularly requested to the President of the Republic, who has the power of issuing the authorization. The purpose is to acknowledge children who were conceived before the premature death, but there may also been purely emotional motivations. In fact there’s a relatively long list of countries that allowed for marriages in which one or both the newlywed were no longer alive.

In closing, here is a little curiosity.
In the well-known Tim Burton film Corpse Bride (2005), inspired by a centuries-old folk tale (the short story Die Todtenbraut by F. A. Schulze, found within the Fantasmagoriana anthology, is a Romantic take on that tale), the main character puts a ring on a small branch, unaware that this light-hearted move is actually sanctioning his netherworld engagement.
Quite similar to that harmless-looking twig is a “trick” used in Taiwan when a young girl dies unmarried: her relatives leave out on the streets a small red package containing Hell money, a lock of hair or some nails from the dead woman. The first man to pick up the package has to marry the deceased girl, if he wants to avoid misfortune. He will be allowed to marry again, but he shall forever revere the “ghost” bride as his first, real spouse.

These rituals become necessary when an individual enters the afterlife prematurely, without undergoing a fundamental rite of passage like marriage (therefore without completing the “correct” course of his life). As is often the case with funeral customs, the practice has a beneficial and apotropaic function both for the social group of the living and for the deceased himself.
On one hand all the bad luck that could harm the relatives of the dead is turned away; a bond is formed between two different families, which could not have existed without a proper marriage; and, at the same time, everybody can rest assured that the soul will leave this world at peace, and will not depart for the last voyage bearing the mark of an unfortunate loneliness.

Fumone, the invisible castle

If by “mystery”, even in its etymological root, we mean anything closed, incomprehensible and hidden, then the castrum (castle), being a locked and fortified place, has always played the role of its perfect frame; it is the ideal setting for supernatural stories, a treasure chest of unspeakable and terrible deeds, a wonderful screen onto which our fears and desires can be projected.

This is certainly the case with the castle of Fumone, which appears to be inseparable from myth, from the enigmatic aura surrounding it, mostly on the account of its particularly dramatic history.

Right from its very name, this village shows a dark and most ominous legacy: Fumone, which means “great smoke”, refers to the advance of invaders.
Since it was annexed to the Papal States in XI Century, Fumone had a strategic outpost function, as it was designated to warn nearby villages of the presence of enemy armies; when they were spotted, a big fire was lit in the highest tower, called Arx Fumonis. This signal was then repeated by other cities, where similar pillars of thick smoke rose in the sky, until the alert came to Rome. “Cum Fumo fumat, tota campania tremat”: when Fumone is smoking, all the countryside trembles.
The castle, with its 14 towers, proved to be an impregnable military fortress, overruling the armies of Frederick Barbarossa and Henry VI, but the bloodiest part of its history has to do with its use as a prison by the State of the Church.
Fumone became sadly well-known both for its brutal detention conditions and for the illustrous guests who unwillingly entered its walls. Among others, notable prisoners were the antipope Gregory VIII in 1124 and, more than a century later, Pope Celestine V, guilty of the “big refusal”, that is abdicating the Papal throne.

These two characters are already shrouded in legend.
Gregory VIII died incarcerated in Fumone, after he opposed the Popes Paschal II, Gelasius II and Callixtus II and was defeated by the last one. In a corridor inside the castle, a plaque commemorates the antipope, and the guides (as well as the official website) never forget to suggest that Gregory’s corpse could be walled-up behind the plaque, as his body was never found. Just the first of many thrills offered by the tour.
As for the gentle but inconvenient Celestine V, he probably died of an infected abscess, weakened by the hardship of detention, and the legend has it that a flaming cross appeared floating over his cell door the day before his death. On several websites it is reported that a recent study of Celestine’s skull showed a hole caused by a 4-inch nail, the unmistakable sign of a cruel execution ordered by his successor Boniface VIII; but when researching more carefully, it turns out this “recent” survey in fact refers to two different and not-so-modern investigations, conducted in 1313 and 1888, while a 2013 analysis proved that the hole was inflicted many years after the Saint’s death.
But, as I’ve said, when it comes to Fumone, myth permeates every inch of the castle, overriding reality.

Another example is the infamous “Well of the Virgin”, located on the edge of a staircase.
From the castle website:

Upon arriving at the main floor, you will be directly in front of the “Well of the Virgin”.  This cruel and medieval method of punishment was used by the Vassals of Fumone when exercising the “Right of the Lord” an assumed legal right allowing the lord of a medieval estate to be the first to take the virginity of his serfs’ maiden daughters. If the girl was found not to be a virgin, she was thrown into the well.

Several portals, otherwise trustworthy, add that the Well “was allegedly equipped with sharp blades“; and all seem to agree that the “Right of the Lord” (ius primae noctis) was a real and actual practice. Yet it should be clear, after decades of research, that this is just another legend, born during the passage from the Middle Ages to the modern era. Scholars have examined the legislations of Germanic monarchies, Longobards, Carolingians, Communes, Holy Roman Empire and later kingdoms, and found no trace of the elusive right. If something similar existed, as a maritagium, it was very likely a right over assets and not persons: the father of the bride had to pay a compensation to grant his daughter a dowry — basically, possessions and lands passed from father-in-law to son-in-law at the cost of a fee to the local landlord.
But again, why asking what’s real, when the idea of a well where young victims were thrown is so morbidly alluring?

3357124

I would rather specify at this point that I have no interest in debunking the information reported on the castle’s website, nor on other sites. Legends exist since time immemorial, and if they survive it means they are effective, important, even necessary narratives. I am willing to maintain both a disenchanted and amazed look, as I’m constantly fascinated by the power of stories, and this analysis only helps clarifying that we are dealing, indeed, with legends.
But let’s go back to visiting the castle.

Perhaps the most bizarre curiosity in the whole manor house is a small piece of wooden furniture in the archive room.
In this room ancient books and documents are kept, and nothing can prepare the visitor for the surprise when the unremarkable cabinet is opened: inside, in a crystal display case, lies the embalmed body of a child, surrounded by his favorite toys. The lower door shows the dead boy’s wardrobe.

The somber story is that of “Little Marquis” Francesco Longhi, the eight and last child of Marchioness Emilia Caetani Longhi, and brother of seven sisters. According to the legend, his sisters did not look kindly upon this untimely heir, and proceded to poison him or bring him to a slow demise by secretly putting glass shreds in his food. The kid started feeling excruciating pains in the stomach and died shortly after, leaving his mother in the utmost desperation. Blinded by the suffering, the Marchioness called a painter to remove any sign of happiness from the family portraits, had the little boy embalmed and went on dressing him, undressing him, speaking to him and crying on his deathbed until her own death.

This tragic tale could not go without some supernatural twist. So here comes the Marchioness’ ghost, now and then seen crying inside the castle, and even the child’s ghost, who apparently enjoys playing around and moving objects in the fortress’ large rooms.

A place like Fumone seems to function as a catalyst for funereal mysteries, and represents the quintessence of our craving for the paranormal. It is no cause for indignation if this has become part of the castle’s marketing and communication strategies, as it is ever more difficult in Italy to promote the incredible richness of our own heritage. And in the end people come for the ghosts, and leave having learned a bit of history.
We would rather ask: why do we so viscerally love ghost stories, tales of concealed bodies and secret atrocities?

Fabio Camilletti, in his brilliant introduction to the anthology Fantasmagoriana, writes about Étienne-Gaspard Robert, known by the stage name of Robertson, one of the first impresarios to use a magic lantern in an astounding sound & light show. At the end of his performance he used to remind the audience of their final destiny, as a skeleton suddenly appeared out of nowhere.

Camilletti compares this gimmick to the idea that, ultimately, we ourselves are ghosts:

Robertson said something similar, before turning the projector back on and showing a skeleton standing on a pedestal: this is you, this is the fate that awaits you. Thus telling ghost stories, as paradoxical as it may seem, is also a way to come to terms with the fear of death, forgetting — in the enchanted space created by the narration, or by the magic lantern — our ephemeral and fleeting nature.

Whether this is the real motivation behind the success of  spook stories, or it’s maybe the opposite — a more mundane denial of impermanence which finds relief in the idea of leaving a trace after death (better to come back as a ghost than not coming back at all) — it is unquestionably an extremely powerful symbolic projection. So much so that in time it becomes stratified and lingers over certain places like a shadow, making them elusive and almost imaginary. The same goes for macabre tales of torture and murder, which by turning the ultimate terror into a narrative may help metabolyzing it.

The Longhi-De Paolis castle is still shrouded in a thick smoke: no longer coming from the highest tower, it is now the smoke of myth, the multitude of legends woven over history’s ancient skin. It would be hard, perhaps even fruitless in a place like this, to persist in discerning truth from symbolic construction, facts fom interpretations, reality from fantasy.
Fumone remains an “invisible” castle that Calvino would have certainly liked, a fortification which is more a mental representation than a tangible location, the haven of the dreamer seeking comfort (because yes, they do offer comfort) in cruel fables.

Here is Castle of Fumone‘s official site.

Charlie No Face

Nell’area di Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, circola una leggenda metropolitana, quella del Green Man, chiamato anche Charlie No Face. Si tratta di una creatura mostruosa, un uomo senza faccia che si aggira di notte lungo le strade meno battute, alla ricerca di una vittima a cui rubare il volto che gli manca. È la classica storia che si racconta attorno al fuoco di un campeggio, o ai bambini per minacciarli se non fanno i bravi: “Se resti fuori dopo il tramonto, Charlie No Face verrà a prenderti”.
Come accade con tutte le leggende urbane, le declinazioni della favola sono molteplici: il Green Man, dalla pelle verdastra e fosforescente, è di volta in volta un fantasma, un orco, un povero operaio caduto in una vasca di acido, un elettricista colpito da un fulmine e dato per morto che vive nascosto in un vecchio capanno abbandonato… è stato avvistato in una mezza dozzina di posti diversi, come la strada fra Koppel e New Galilee, oppure un’area industriale deserta a New Castle, o ancora un tunnel dismesso della ferrovia a South Park, e via dicendo.

Certo, questa è la leggenda. Pochi sanno, però, che Charlie No Face non è affatto un personaggio di fantasia.

image125

Il 18 Giugno 1919 un gruppo di ragazzini stava andando a farsi una nuotata in un’ansa del fiume Beaver, quando arrivarono al ponte di Morado che si innalzava sopra alle acque del Wallace Run. Si trattava di un grande ponte in legno su cui passava una linea di tram elettrici che connettevano le cittadine di Beaver Falls e Big Beaver: la massiccia struttura del ponte era un’attrazione conosciuta per la gioventù del luogo, che spesso si avventurava a scalarlo. Quel giorno, i ragazzini avvistarono un nido che qualche uccello aveva costruito proprio fra le assi più alte del ponte.
Cominciarono a sfidarsi su chi avrebbe avuto il coraggio di andare a controllare quanti uccelli c’erano nel nido: fu un bambino di soli otto anni, Ray, che salì verso la cima del ponte.
Purtroppo, sul Morado Bridge passavano due linee elettriche, una della potenza di 1.200 volt continui, e l’altra di 22.000 volt di corrente alternata. Il bambino per salire si aggrappò ad un cavo, e restò folgorato dall’immensa scossa, mentre il suo corpo letteralmente bruciava prima di staccarsi infine dai cavi e precipitare giù.

Ponte di Morado, bambino di 8 anni folgorato da cavo scoperto, in punto di morte“, titolava la gazzetta di Beaver Falls il giorno dopo. In effetti non c’erano quasi speranze per il piccolo Ray; eppure, dopo un mese passato fra la vita e la morte, la sua salute cominciò a migliorare. Raymond Robinson sopravvisse, ma la sua faccia era stata completamente sciolta dalla corrente. Non aveva più occhi, né naso; le labbra erano completamente sfigurate, così come le orecchie. Il braccio con cui era rimasto attaccato al cavo aveva dovuto essere amputato sotto il gomito, e il petto era un’unica, enorme cicatrice.

image122

Ritornato a casa sua dopo i lunghi mesi d’ospedale a Pittsburgh, Ray non lasciò mai più Koppel. Con un’amorevole famiglia che si prendeva cura di lui, si apprestò a vivere una vita da recluso, conscio che il suo aspetto avrebbe terrorizzato la gente. Nonostante fosse cieco, dava una mano in casa costruendo cinture, portafogli e altri oggetti da vendere; aveva una grande collezione di rompicapi di metallo, fatti di ferri di cavallo, tubi e molle, che risolveva abilmente per stupire i nipotini. Amava passare una vecchia falciatrice sull’erba del giardino, di tanto in tanto, e anche se qualche punto del prato non era ben rasato, i familiari non correggevano mai i suoi errori. Il fatto è che Ray, a detta di tutti i suoi parenti, era una persona di una gentilezza unica; tutti coloro che lo conoscevano bene avvertivano l’istinto e il dovere di proteggerlo dal mondo esterno, che sapevano poter essere crudele nei suoi confronti.
Nelle rare occasioni in cui doveva proprio mostrarsi a qualche estraneo, Raymond indossava un naso prostetico collegato a un paio di occhiali da sole. “Non discuteva mai delle sue ferite o dei suoi problemi” – racconta il nipote di Ray – “Era soltanto una realtà, e non c’era nulla che ci potesse fare, perciò non ne parlava mai. Non si è mai lamentato di niente”.

Eppure evidentemente quella vita gli stava un po’ stretta, Raymond aveva bisogno di un suo spazio privato, di qualcosa che lo facesse sentire più autonomo e meno dipendente dalla famiglia. Fu così che cominciò a passeggiare di notte lungo la strada statale 351 fra Koppel e New Galilee. Aiutandosi con un bastone, metteva un piede sull’asfalto e uno sui sassi a bordo carreggiata: con questo metodo avanzava seguendo la strada.

Le passeggiate notturne di Ray Robinson divennero presto una routine. Verso le 10 di sera egli afferrava il suo bastone e usciva di casa nella notte, sordo alle proteste di sua madre e del patrigno. “Perché devi per forza andare?”, chiedevano, ma Ray si incamminava lo stesso. Era il suo momento di libertà.

Presto si sparse la voce che c’era un uomo mostruoso che camminava la notte, sempre lungo la stessa strada, e per i teenager locali una storia simile era ovviamente un’attrattiva irresistibile. Nelle calde sere d’estate in cui non c’era nulla da fare, i ragazzi cominciarono a guidare su e giù per il tratto di statale per riuscire a vederlo. Ogni tanto ci riuscivano, e la storia si ingigantiva.

image126

Raymond si nascondeva dietro gli alberi, appena sentiva una macchina avvicinarsi, e dava poca confidenza agli estranei. Spesso questi ultimi lo insultavano e beffeggiavano in modo sadico. Altre volte, invece, gli capitava di incontrare dei ragazzi che gli offrivano delle birre o delle sigarette per scambiare due parole, o per potersi fare una foto assieme a lui. Più di una volta tornò a casa ubriaco, sconvolgendo la madre perché in casa sua non si era mai consumata nemmeno una goccia di alcol.

image128

Le passeggiate notturne di Raymond divennero una vera e propria attrazione ad un certo punto, tanto che la fila di macchine sulla statale 351 alcune sere aveva addirittura richiesto l’intervento della polizia. Fu più o meno in questo periodo che vennero coniati i nomignoli Charlie No Face e Green Man. Diverse volte Ray venne investito dalle automobili, diverse volte finì talmente ubriaco da perdere la strada per tornare a casa – lo trovarono i familiari, riverso sul bordo della strada, sfinito dopo aver vagato per ore nei boschi.

image124

Raymond continuò a passeggiare quasi ogni notte, dagli anni ’50 fino alla fine degli anni ’70, incurante della leggenda che si stava creando attorno alla sua figura. Negli ultimi anni della sua vita venne trasferito al Beaver County Geriatric Center, e lì morì nel 1985 a 74 anni. Ma ancora oggi egli è a suo modo presente, vero e proprio mito popolare moderno, nelle storie e nei racconti tramandati di generazione in generazione.

41

(Grazie, Slago!)

Consonno

In Italia esistono decine di città fantasma, e quasi ogni regione vanta i suoi borghi abbandonati e in rovina. Ma nessuno ha alle spalle una storia tanto cupa e affascinante quanto quella di Consonno, frazione del comune di Olginate in provincia di Lecco. Sorto nel Medioevo, fino all’inizio degli anni ’60 Consonno era un piccolo borgo abitato da contadini, che si poteva raggiungere unicamente tramite una mulattiera. La vita dei paesani era quella, semplice e faticosa, che contraddistingue la Brianza del Novecento: una comunità principalmente agricola, in cui i giovani cominciano a lasciarsi tentare dalle nuove fabbriche che cominciano a spuntare come funghi nei dintorni. Ma a Consonno il tempo sembra essersi fermato, mentre il paesino resta isolato tra foreste di castagni e ampi pascoli.

Di colpo, però, l’8 gennaio 1962 il tempo ricomincia a scorrere, facendo un balzo in avanti che condannerà Consonno a una strana sorte. Tutte le case del borgo, infatti, non sono di proprietà dei contadini che le abitano, ma di una società immobiliare: in quella fatidica data l’intera Consonno viene venduta a un imprenditore, il cui nome non si è mai sentito da quelle parti. Gli abitanti impareranno ben presto a conoscerlo. Si tratta del “Grande Ufficiale Mario Bagno, Conte di Valle dell’Olmo”, più semplicemente chiamato Conte Mario Bagno.

Figlio del boom economico di inizio anni ’60, il conte Bagno è un facoltoso ed eccentrico imprenditore, e ha messo gli occhi su Consonno per un suo ambizioso progetto: costruire una sorta di Las Vegas brianzola, una città dei balocchi e dei divertimenti che attragga folle di turisti e vacanzieri. Il modo in cui decide di attuare questa sua visione è, però, assolutamente inedito e degno di un film di Herzog. All’epoca l’attenzione per le necessità ambientali non è ancora una priorità, e il conte Bagno comincia i suoi lavori senza un piano specifico. Spiana le colline a suon di ruspe e dinamite per allargare il panorama. Si sveglia una mattina e comincia a far costruire una parte della nuova cittadella dei divertimenti, solo per farla distruggere il giorno dopo quando ha cambiato idea. Le sue fantasie divengono sempre più sfrenate, mentre decide che la nuova Consonno dovrà avere un circuito per le macchine, campi da calcio, da tennis, da pallacanestro, poi un centro anziani, poi un luna park, poi un enorme zoo… ben presto risulta chiaro che per dar vita ai suoi sogni di grandezza il vecchio borgo risulta d’impiccio.

Così le ruspe del conte Bagno cominciano a spazzare via, una dopo l’altra, le case del villaggio. “Le ruspe attaccavano le case con ancora all’interno gli abitanti o gli animali nelle stalle – bisognava scappare fuori in fretta e furia”, ricordano i testimoni. Fatta piazza pulita dell’antico borgo, la barocca e pasticciata fantasia del conte non ha più freni. Fa erigere nuovi palazzi, sfingi egizie, pagode, colonne doriche e un centro commerciale sovrastato da un assurdo minareto (che rimane ad oggi il simbolo inquietante della nuova Consonno).

All’inizio l’affluenza dei visitatori, curiosi di scoprire la meravigliosa cittadina in cui “il cielo è più azzurro”, come recitava la pubblicità, sembra incoraggiante per il conte. Migliaia di persone varcano l’arco sorvegliato da statue di armigeri medievali, si svagano fra le gallerie di negozi in stile arabeggiante, le sale da ballo e da gioco. Ma ben presto, scemata la novità, i turisti diminuiscono e a poco a poco i fondi si esauriscono. Cominciano a fioccare le proteste delle associazioni ambientali, le denunce, le polemiche. I lavori si fermano a metà degli anni settanta, anche perché la sconsideratezza della speculazione ha minato l’equilibrio idrogeologico della zona: una frana distrugge l’unica via di accesso alla “città dei balocchi”.

Così Consonno diventa una città fantasma, abbandonata al degrado e alle rovine del tempo, ulteriormente danneggiata dagli immancabili rave party che saltuariamente si tengono fra i suoi palazzi decadenti.

Eppure, Consonno non è soltanto una cittadella disabitata: sembra quasi un emblema, la faccia oscura del boom economico e dell’imprenditoria rampante e aggressiva, un tacito, inquietante lascito di un’epoca in cui le manie di grandezza di un singolo uomo potevano portare alla distruzione di un intero villaggio, di un panorama. Ancora oggi Consonno sembra la proiezione di una distorta fantasia di conquista, simboleggiata da un cannone (proveniente da Cinecittà), posto su un arco cinese, e puntato contro la vallata.

Le informazioni riassunte in questo articolo provengono dall’affascinante e dettagliatissimo sito sulla storia di Consonno. Un grazie a Marco per l’ispirazione!

Soldati fantasma

La Seconda Guerra Mondiale era finita. Il 2 settembre 1945 entrò formalmente in vigore l’ordine di resa imposto dagli Alleati alle forze armate giapponesi. A tutte le truppe dislocate nei vari avamposti per il controllo del Pacifico vennero diramati dispacci che annunciavano la triste verità: il Giappone aveva perso la guerra, e i soldati avevano l’ordine di consegnare le armi al nemico. Ma, per quanto incredibile possa sembrare, alcuni di questi soldati “rimasero indietro”.

Shoichi Yokoi era stato spedito nell’arcipelago delle Marianne nel 1943. L’anno successivo gli Stati Uniti presero il controllo dell’isola di Guam, sconfiggendo la sua armata, ma Yokoi fuggì e si nascose nella giungla assieme ad altri nove soldati, deciso a resistere fino alla morte all’avanzata delle truppe americane. Passò il tempo, e sette dei suoi nove compagni decisero di separarsi: del gruppo originale, rimasero Yokoi e altri due irriducibili soldati. Alla fine, anche questi ultimi tre decisero di separarsi per motivi di sicurezza, ma continuarono a mantenere i contatti finché un giorno Yokoi scoprì che i suoi due compagni erano morti di fame e stenti. Ma neanche questo bastò a convincerlo a darsi per vinto. Anche una morte solitaria era preferibile alla resa.

Yokoi imparò a cacciare, durante la notte, per non essere avvistato dai nemici. Si preparò abiti con le piante locali, costruì letti di canne, mobili, utensili. Un giorno di gennaio due pescatori che stavano controllando le reti lo avvistarono nei pressi di un fiume. Riuscirono ad avere la meglio, e dopo un breve combattimento riuscirono a catturarlo e a trascinarlo fuori dalla foresta. Era l’anno 1972. Yokoi era rimasto nascosto nella giungla per 28 anni. “Con vergogna, ma sono tornato”, dichiarò al suo rientro in patria, dove venne accolto con i massimi onori. La fotografia del suo primo taglio di capelli in 28 anni apparve su tutti i giornali, e Yokoi divenne una personalità. L’esercito gli riconobbe la paga arretrata in un ammontare di circa 300$.

Ma Yokoi non fu il più tenace dei soldati fantasma giapponesi. Due anni più tardi, nel 1974, nell’isola filipina di Lubang, venne scoperto il rifugio segreto di Hiroo Onoda, ufficiale dell’Esercito imperiale giapponese che si trovava lì dal 1944.

Dopo essere sfuggito all’attacco statunitense nel 1945, Onoda ed altri tre commilitoni si erano nascosti nella giungla, decisi a frenare l’avanzata del nemico ad ogni costo. Il codice etico e guerriero del bushidō impediva loro anche solo di credere che la loro patria, il grande Giappone, si fosse potuto arrendere. Così, nonostante fossero arrivate notizie della fine della guerra, essi non vollero prestarci fede, e anche alcuni volantini furono reputati dei falsi di propaganda degli Alleati. Dopo che un compagno si era arreso e gli altri due erano rimasti uccisi, Onoda continuò da solo la “missione” per quasi trent’anni.

Nel 1974 un giapponese, Norio Suzuki, riuscì infine a scovarlo e a confermargli che la guerra era finita. Onoda si rifiutò di lasciare la sua posizione, dichiarando che avrebbe preso ordini soltanto da un suo superiore. Suzuki tornò in Giappone, con le foto che dimostravano che Onoda era ancora in vita, e riuscì a rintracciare il suo diretto superiore, che nel frattempo si era ritirato a fare il libraio. Così il vecchio maggiore intraprese il viaggio per Lubang, e una volta arrivato in contatto con Onoda lo informò “ufficialmente” della fine delle ostilità, avvenuta 29 anni prima, e gli ordinò di consegnare le armi. Finalmente Onoda si arrese, riconsegnando la divisa, la spada, il suo fucile ancora perfettamente funzionante, 500 munizioni e diverse granate. Ma al suo rientro in patria, la celebrità lo sorprese negativamente; per quanto si guardasse attorno, i valori antichi del Giappone secondo i quali aveva vissuto e per i quali aveva combattuto una personale guerra di trent’anni, ai suoi occhi erano scomparsi. Onoda vive oggi in Brasile, con la moglie e il fratello.

Sette mesi più tardi di Onoda, un ultimo soldato fantasma venne rintracciato a Morotai, in Indonesia. Si trattava di Teruo Nakamura, ma il suo destino sarebbe stato ben diverso da quello degli altri tenaci guerrieri solitari giapponesi. In effetti Nakamura era nato a Taiwan, e non in Giappone. Non parlava né cinese né giapponese; inoltre, non era un ufficiale come Onoda, ma un soldato semplice. Aveva vissuto per trent’anni in una capanna di pochi metri quadri, recintata, nella foresta. Già gravemente malato, visse soltanto quattro anni in seguito al suo ritrovamento. Taiwan e il Giappone si scontrarono a lungo sulla sua vicenda, su questioni di rimborsi e risarcimenti, e l’opinione pubblica si divise sul diverso trattamento riservato ai precedenti soldati fantasma.

Voci relative ad altri avvistamenti di soldati fantasma si sono spinte fino ai giorni nostri, ma spesso si sono rivelate dei falsi, e Nakamura rimane a tutt’oggi l’ultimo “soldato giapponese rimasto indietro” ufficialmente riconosciuto. Eppure, forse, da qualche parte nella giungla, c’è ancora qualche guerriero, ormai ultraottantenne, che scruta l’orizzonte per avvistare le truppe nemiche, e ingaggiare l’eroico combattimento che attende da una vita.

Ecco la pagina di Wikipedia che dettaglia tutti i ritrovamenti dei vari soldati fantasma giapponesi dal 1945 ad oggi.

La donna gorilla

La trasformazione a vista d’occhio di una donna in gorilla è uno dei trucchi storici che hanno avuto maggiore successo nei luna-park, nelle fiere itineranti, nei sideshow e nei circhi di tutto il mondo. Ultimamente sta un po’ passando di moda, dopo decenni di lustro e splendore, ma qualche circo (anche italiano) utilizza ancora questa attrazione per divertire e intrattenere il pubblico.

L’attrazione consiste in questo: voi (il pubblico) entrate in una piccola stanza oscura, e vedete sul palco una gabbia illuminata. All’interno della gabbia, una donna discinta. L’imbonitore sale sul palco, e comincia ad affabularvi con la sua storia. Il più delle volte vi racconterà del celebre “anello mancante”, quel primate che si troverebbe fra lo stadio di scimmia e quello umano, che Darwin non riuscì mai a individuare. Dopo avervi rassicurato della robustezza della gabbia, e avervi preparato allo show più elettrizzante dell’intero pianeta, vi annuncerà che la ragazza sta per mutare di forma sotto ai vostri occhi! Sì, proprio lei, quella bella prigioniera che scuote le sbarre della gabbia grugnendo, è l’anello mancante! Può passare indistintamente dallo stadio umano a quello di scimmia e viceversa! “Guardate i suoi denti divenire feroci fauci, signore e signori!”

Mentre, scettici, aspettate il momento clou, comincia davvero a succedere qualcosa: lentamente, come in un morphing cinematografico, alla ragazza spuntano dei peli, le braccia divengono nere e muscolose e per ultima la sua faccia assume i tratti di uno scimmione tropicale… e poco importa se capite benissimo che il gorilla è in realtà un tizio in un costume, siete colpiti e ipnotizzati dall’effetto della trasformazione, che è talmente vivida e reale… in quel momento sospeso, in quell’attimo di sorpresa, il gorilla con un colpo secco sfonda le sbarre della gabbia, e si avventa verso di voi urlando! Nelle grida di panico e nel fuggi fuggi generale (aiutato dai circensi che, con la scusa di salvarvi la pelle, vi indirizzano gesticolando verso l’uscita), senza sapere come, vi trovate fuori dall’attrazione, insicuri e un po’ frastornati da ciò che avete visto.

Cosa è successo? Si tratta in verità di un ingegnoso trucco ottico messo a punto nei lontani anni 1860 da due scienziati, Henry Dircks e John Henry Pepper (l’effetto prenderà il nome di quest’ultimo, data la sua celebrità nell’epoca vittoriana, nonostante egli avesse più volte cercato di dare il giusto credito al vero inventore, Dircks). Inizialmente studiato per il teatro, non prese mai piede sui grandi palcoscenici: fu invece “riciclato” per i luna-park e viene tutt’ora impiegato nei più grandi parchi a tema del mondo.

Il segreto sta in un pannello di vetro o uno specchio semitrasparente, camuffato e posto tra il pubblico e la scena. Il vetro è angolato (in verde nella figura) in modo da riflettere gli oggetti che vengono illuminati in una seconda camera (nascosta al pubblico, il quale vede soltanto il palco, delimitato dal quadratino rosso). Visto da una posizione più elevata, l’effetto sarebbe visibile in questo modo:

Le due camere (quella di scena e quella “segreta”) devono combaciare perfettamente nel riflesso sul vetro. Il fantasmino nascosto nella stanza di sinistra, quando è illuminato, è visibile nel riflesso come se fosse presente veramente sulla scena; se è illuminato fiocamente, appare come una presenza ectoplasmatica; e se resta al buio, rimane completamente invisibile.

Una volta preparate con cura le due camere e il vetro, il resto diviene semplice: la donna mantiene una posizione fissa in fondo alla stanza visibile, e mentre il gorilla (il fantasma, nello schema) viene gradatamente illuminato, il pubblico vedrà i suoi peli “comparire” a poco a poco, come in una dissolvenza incrociata, sul corpo della giovane fanciulla. Finché, ad un certo punto, resterà soltanto il gorilla, capace (grazie a un cambio di luci repentino e a un calcolato “sbalzo di tensione” che oscura la scena per un paio di secondi) di balzare fuori dalla sua stanza segreta e sfondare la gabbia per gettarsi sul pubblico.

L’effetto, come già detto, era stato pensato per il teatro. Gli attori avrebbero avuto la possibilità di fingere un combattimento o un dialogo con uno spettro realistico. Il vero problema erano però i soldi: sembrava una follia riadattare tutti i teatri soltanto perché Amleto avesse finalmente la possibilità di parlare con uno spettro del padre più “evanescente” del solito.

Oggi la tecnica del “fantasma di Pepper” è utilizzata invece, oltre che nei circhi, anche in molti musei scientifici e culturali, per movimentare la didattica di alcune esibizioni.

Pagina Wikipedia (in inglese) sul Pepper’s Ghost.

Valerio Carrubba

Valerio Carrubba è nato nel 1975 a Siracusa. Le sue opere sono davvero uniche, e per più di una ragione.

Si tratta di dipinti surreali che ritraggono i soggetti sezionati e “aperti” come nelle tavole anatomiche, “cadaveri viventi” che espongono la propria natura fisica e l’interno dei corpi con iperrealismo di dettagli.

Ma la peculiare tecnica pittorica di Carrubba consiste nel dipingere ogni quadro due volte. Dapprima crea quello che molti degli spettatori più comuni definirebbero “il quadro vero”, vale a dire il disegno più definito, più pittorico, più dettagliato. Dopodiché l’artista vi dipinge sopra una seconda stesura, più “automatica”, che va a nascondere la versione precedente. Così facendo, crea un fantasma invisibile ai nostri occhi, nega e nasconde l’anima prima della sua opera, che rimane evidente solamente nella stratificazione dei colori (esaltata dall’utilizzo dell’acciaio inox come supporto).

“Ed è proprio la morte del “quadro vero”, ovvero sommamente, irrimediabilmente, ritualmente falso che Carrubba celebra; dipingendolo e poi, nella quiete del suo studio, uccidendolo e mostrandocene l’ectoplasma.” (Luigi Spagnol)

A simboleggiare questa morte del linguaggio espressivo, e la duplicità delle sue opere, i suoi quadri hanno tutti titoli palindromi (leggibili sia da destra che da sinistra).