Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 7

Back with Bizzarro Bazar’s mix of exotic and quirky trouvailles, quite handy when it comes to entertaining your friends and acting like the one who’s always telling funny stories. Please grin knowingly when they ask you where in the world you find all this stuff.

  • We already talked about killer rabbits in the margins of medieval books. Now a funny video unveils the mystery of another great classic of illustrated manuscripts: snail-fighting knights. SPOILER: it’s those vicious Lumbards again.
  • As an expert on alternative sexualities, Ayzad has developed a certain aplomb when discussing the most extreme and absurd erotic practices — in Hunter Thompson’s words, “when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro“. Yet even a shrewd guy like him was baffled by the most deranged story in recent times: the Nazi furry scandal.
  • In 1973, Playboy asked Salvador Dali to collaborate with photographer Pompeo Posar for an exclusive nude photoshoot. The painter was given complete freedom and control over the project, so much so that he was on set directing the shooting. Dali then manipulated the shots produced during that session through collage. The result is a strange and highly enjoyable example of surrealism, eggs, masks, snakes and nude bunnies. The Master, in a letter to the magazine, calimed to be satisfied with the experience: “The meaning of my work is the motivation that is of the purest – money. What I did for Playboy is very good, and your payment is equal to the task.” (Grazie, Silvia!)

  • Speaking of photography, Robert Shults dedicated his series The Washing Away of Wrongs to the biggest center for the study of decomposition in the world, the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State University. Shot in stark, high-contrast black and white as they were shot in the near-infrared spectrum, these pictures are really powerful and exhibit an almost dream-like quality. They document the hard but necessary work of students and researchers, who set out to understand the modifications in human remains under the most disparate conditions: the ever more precise data they gather will become invaluable in the forensic field. You can find some more photos in this article, and here’s Robert Shults website.

  • One last photographic entry. Swedish photographer Erik Simander produced a series of portraits of his grandfather, after he just became a widower. The loneliness of a man who just found himself without his life’s companion is described through little details (the empty sink, with a single toothbrush) that suddenly become definitive, devastating symbols of loss; small, poetic and lacerating touches, delicate and painful at the same time. After all, grief is a different feeling for evry person, and Simander shows a commendable discretion in observing the limit, the threshold beyond which emotions become too personal to be shared. A sublime piece of work, heart-breaking and humane, and which has the merit of tackling an issue (the loss of a partner among the elderly) still pretty much taboo. This theme had already been brought to the big screen in 2012 by the ruthless and emotionally demanding Amour, directed by Michael Haneke.
  • Speaking of widowers, here’s a great article on another aspect we hear very little about: the sudden sex-appeal of grieving men, and the emotional distress it can cause.
  • To return to lighter subjects, here’s a spectacular pincushion seen in an antique store (spotted and photographed by Emma).

  • Are you looking for a secluded little place for your vacations, Arabian nights style? You’re welcome.
  • Would you prefer to stay home with your box of popcorn for a B-movies binge-watching session? Here’s one of the best lists you can find on the web. You have my word.
  • The inimitable Lindsey Fitzharris published on her Chirurgeon’s Apprentice a cute little post about surgical removal of bladder stones before the invention of anesthesia. Perfect read to squirm deliciously in your seat.
  • Death Expo was recently held in Amsterdam, sporting all the latest novelties in the funerary industry. Among the best designs: an IKEA-style, build-it-yourself coffin, but above all the coffin to play games on. (via DeathSalon)
  • I ignore how or why things re-surface at a certain time on the Net. And yet, for the last few days (at least in my whacky internet bubble) the story of Portuguese serial killer Diogo Alves has been popping out again and again. Not all of Diogo Alves, actually — just his head, which is kept in a jar at the Faculty of Medicine in Lisbon. But what really made me chuckle was discovering one of the “related images” suggested by Google algorythms:

Diogo’s head…


  • Remember the Tsavo Man-Eaters? There’s a very good Italian article on the whole story — or you can read the English Wiki entry. (Thanks, Bruno!)
  • And finally we get to the most succulent news: my old native town, Vicenza, proved to still have some surprises in store for me.
    On the hills near the city, in the Arcugnano district, a pre-Roman amphitheatre has just been discovered. It layed buried for thousands of years… it could accomodate up to 4300 spectators and 300 actors, musicians, dancers… and the original stage is still there, underwater beneath the small lake… and there’s even a cave which acted as a megaphone for the actors’ voices, amplifying sounds from 8 Hz to 432 Hz… and there’s even a nearby temple devoted to Janus… and that temple was the real birthplace of Juliet, of Shakespearean fame… and there are even traces of ancient canine Gods… and of the passage of Julius Cesar and Cleopatra…. and… and…
    And, pardon my rudeness, wouldn’t all this happen to be a hoax?

No, it’s not a mere hoax, it is an extraordinary hoax. A stunt that would deserve a slow, admired clap, if it wasn’t a plain fraud.
The creative spirit behind the amphitheatre is the property owner, Franco Malosso von Rosenfranz (the name says it all). Instead of settling for the traditional Italian-style unauthorized development  — the classic two or three small houses secretely and illegally built — he had the idea of faking an archeological find just to scam tourists. Taking advantage of a license to build a passageway between two parts of his property, so that the constant flow of trucks and bulldozers wouldn’t raise suspicions, Malosso von Rosenfranz allegedly excavated his “ancient” theatre, with the intention of opening it to the public at the price of 40 € per visitor, and to put it up for hire for big events.
Together with the initial enthusiasm and popularity on social networks, unfortunately came legal trouble. The evidence against Malosso was so blatant from the start, that he immediately ended up on trial without any preliminary hearing. He is charged with unauthorized building, unauthorized manufacturing and forgery.
Therefore, this wonderful example of Italian ingenuity will be dismanteled and torn down; but the amphitheatre website is fortunately still online, a funny fanta-history jumble devised to back up the real site. A messy mixtre of references to local figures, famous characters from the Roman Era, supermarket mythology and (needless to say) the omnipresent Templars.

The ultimate irony is that there are people in Arcugnano still supporting him because, well, “at least now we have a theatre“. After all, as the Wiki page on unauthorized building explains, “the perception of this phenomenon as illegal […] is so thin that such a crime does not entail social reprimand for a large percentage of the population. In Italy, this malpractice has damaged and keeps damaging the economy, the landscape and the culture of law and respect for regulations“.
And here resides the brilliance of old fox Malosso von Rosenfranz’s plan: to cash in on these times of post-truth, creating an unauthorized building which does not really degrade the territory, but rather increase — albeit falsely — its heritage.
Well, you might have got it by now. I am amused, in a sense. My secret chimeric desire is that it all turns out to be an incredible, unprecedented art installations.  Andthat Malosso one day might confess that yes, it was all a huge experiment to show how little we care abot our environment and landscape, how we leave our authenticarcheological wonders fall apart, and yet we are ready to stand up for the fake ones. (Thanks, Silvietta!)

His Anatomical Majesty

The fourth book in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection, published by Logos, is finally here.

While the first three books deal with those sacred places in Italy where a physical contact with the dead is still possible, this new work focuses on another kind of “temple” for human remains: the anatomical museum. A temple meant to celebrate the progress of knowledge, the functioning and the fabrica, the structure of the body — the investigation of our own substance.

The Morgagni Museum in Padova, which you will be able to explore thanks to Carlo Vannini‘s stunning photography, is not devoted to anatomy itself, but rather to anatomical pathology.
Forget the usual internal architectures of organs, bones and tissues: here the flesh has gone insane. In these specimens, dried, wet or tannized following Lodovico Brunetti’s method, the unconceivable vitality of disease becomes the real protagonist.







A true biological archive of illness, the collection of the Morgagni Museum is really a time machine allowing us to observe deformities and pathologies which are now eradicated; before the display cases and cabinets we gaze upon the countless, excruciating ways our bodies can fail.
A place of inestimable value for the amount of history it contains, that is the history of the victims, of those who fell along the path of discovery, as much as of those men who took on fighting the disease, the pioneers of medical science, the tale of their committment and persistence. Among its treasures are many extraordinary intersections between anatomy and art.






The path I undertook for His Anatomical Majesty was particularly intense on an emotional level, also on the account of some personal reasons; when I began working on the book, more than two years ago, the disease — which up until then had remained an abstract concept — had just reached me in all its destabilizing force. This is why the Museum, and my writing, became for me an initiatory voyage into the mysteries of the flesh, through its astonishments and uncertainties.
The subtitle’s oxymoron, that obscure splendour, is the most concise expression I could find to sum up the dual state of mind I lived in during my study of the collection.
Those limbs marked by suffering, those still expressive faces through the amber formaldehyde, those impossible fantasies of enraged cells: all this led me to confront the idea of an ambivalent disease. On one hand we are used to demonize sickness; but, with much the same surprise that comes with learning that biblical Satan is really a dialectical “adversary”, we might be amazed to find that disease is never just an enemy. Its value resides in the necessary questions it adresses. I therefore gave myself in to the enchantment of its terrible beauty, to the dizziness of its open meaning. I am sure the same fruitful uneasiness I felt is the unavoidable reaction for anyone crossing the threshold of this museum.


The book, created in strict collaboration with the University of Padova, is enriched by museology and history notes by Alberto Zanatta (anthropologist and curator of the Museum), Fabio Zampieri (history of medicine researcher), Maurizio Rippa Bonati (history of medicine associated professor) and Gaetano Thiene (anatomical pathology professor).


You can purchase His Anatomical Majesty in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection bookstore on

Il museo dei parassiti

20150509_104934 (600x800)

Il quartiere speciale di Meguro, a Tokyo, si trova al di fuori dalle classiche mete turistiche: più discreto del vicino rione di Shibuya, sprovvisto dei templi e della ricchezza storica di Asakusa o Ueno, distante dalle variopinte follie manga di Akihabara, Meguro è essenzialmente un sobborgo residenziale che ospita consolati, ambasciate e uffici aziendali.
È fra queste vie piuttosto anonime che sorge un museo unico al mondo, il Meguro Parasitological Museum, dedicato a tutte quelle specie animali che fanno di altri esseri viventi la loro dimora o la loro fonte di sostentamento.

20150509_112736 (800x600)

20150509_111027 (800x600)

20150509_111532 (800x600)

20150509_110005 (800x600)

20150509_105137 (600x800)

Fondato nel 1953 grazie ai fondi privati del dottor Satoru Kamegai (1902-2002), il Museo è una struttura scientifica dedicata allo studio dei parassiti, ed organizza attività educative, editoriali e di ricerca. Oltre ai 300 preparati in formalina visibili al pubblico, conserva anche 60.000 campioni parassitologici, e una biblioteca di 5.000 volumi e 50.000 saggi accademici. Arricchiscono la collezione le ceroplastiche di Jinkichi Numata (1884-1971).
Il Museo non è molto grande, e si sviluppa su due piani: al piano terra viene approfondita la biodiversità dei parassiti, mentre al primo vengono trattate le infestazioni che possono colpire uomo e mammiferi.

20150509_105823 (601x800)

20150509_105751 (600x800)

20150509_110557 (800x600)

20150509_111032 (800x600)

20150509_110543 (800x600)

20150509_110727 (771x800)

20150509_110757 (800x655)

20150509_110910 (800x600)

20150509_110850 (600x800)

I parassiti, per quanto sgradevoli possano sembrare a prima vista, sono in realtà organismi estremamente affascinanti, e per più di un motivo. L’evoluzione li ha portati, nel corso dei millenni, a modificare la propria struttura tramite adattamenti unici e inediti. Vivere all’interno del corpo di un altro animale, infatti, non è affatto un’impresa da poco: il parassita deve fare i conti con la temperatura corporea dell’ospite, la pressione osmotica, gli enzimi digestivi, le risposte immunitarie, l’assenza di luce e di ossigeno. Spesso questo significa sacrificare alcune capacità, come quelle sensoriali, nervose, di movimento oppure digestive.

20150509_105603 (473x800)

20150509_105621 (600x800)

20150509_105628 (600x800)

20150509_105643 (520x800)

20150509_105730 (542x800)

Il Museo Parassitologico di Meguro propone un approccio divertito, curioso e privo di preconcetti al mondo dei parassiti: “Provate a pensare ai parassiti senza lasciarvi influenzare dalla paura, e prendetevi il tempo di imparare il loro stupefacente e ingegnoso modo di vita. […] Ci sono alcuni parassiti che, durante il corso dell’evoluzione, perdono gli organi ormai superflui, sviluppando o mantenendo soltanto quelli riproduttivi per lasciare discendenti, e assumendo strane forme come quella delle tenie. Se questa forma può urtare la vostra sensibilità, per la tenia è quella ottimale“.
Per ridimensionare le comuni fobie, si ricorda anche che la maggioranza dei parassiti non arreca danni letali all’ospite, dato che ucciderlo andrebbe contro gli interessi del parassita stesso.

20150509_105150 (472x800)

20150509_105203 (590x800)

20150509_105236 (410x800)

20150509_105250 (539x800)

20150509_105336 (516x800)

20150509_105430 (800x600)

20150509_105452 (600x800)

Varcare la soglia del museo significa entrare in un mondo alieno, popolato di esseri microscopici oppure enormi (un verme solitario conservato qui raggiunge gli 8.8 metri di lunghezza), dalle sembianze di insetti, di minuscoli granchi o di anellidi, e dai cicli vitali sorprendentemente complessi. E’ la fantasia dell’evoluzione senza freno, eppure proprio in questi organismi risulta evidente quanto l’adattamento abbia affinato la loro morfologia: i corpi di questi animali si sono trasformati in maniera precisa per colpire un determinato ospite, e soltanto quello, e il ciclo vitale è specifico da specie a specie.

20150509_105459 (800x600)

20150509_105515 (800x600)

20150509_105808 (600x800)

20150509_105848 (401x800)

20150509_105859 (600x800)

20150509_105905 (401x800)

20150509_110020 (800x600)

20150509_110128 (600x800)

Il loro adattamento è talmente esclusivo che talvolta per arginare un’epidemia nell’uomo è sufficiente adottare una strategia altrettanto mirata: è successo, ad esempio, con lo Schistosoma japanicus, un parassita che infesta le vene intestinali dei mammiferi, e che è stato debellato in Giappone sterminando le lumache Oncomelania nosophora, che fungevano da ospite intermedio. Oggi sono le lumache ad essere a rischio estinzione.

20150509_110142 (800x600)

20150509_110231 (600x800)

20150509_110206 (445x800)

20150509_110240 (800x600)

20150509_110251 (800x521)

20150509_110258 (600x800)

20150509_110318 (600x800)

20150509_110423 (346x800)

20150509_110443 (800x600)

Dai protozoi responsabili della malaria, a quelli che provocano l’elefantiasi, il percorso non è privo di brividi e di visioni estreme.
Scopriamo così che le vittime di Dirofilaria immitis, un nematode che infesta l’arteria polmonare e il cuore, venivano un tempo operate chirurgicamente perché le lastre erano interpretate erroneamente come cancro o tubercolosi.
C’è poi il Diphyllobothrium nihonkaiense, un verme solitario di grandi dimensioni che si contrae mangiando trota cruda: conta fino a 3.000 segmenti (proglottidi), produce un milione di uova al giorno e, poiché non causa problemi evidenti, spesso ci si accorge della sua presenza quando lo si vede penzolare fuori dall’ano, durante la defecazione.
E infine capiamo che anche i parassiti, a volte, sbagliano. Si conoscono circa 200 specie che infettano l’uomo, ma per il 90% si tratta di parassiti che sono capitati nel corpo umano per errore: i loro ospiti definitivi sarebbero in realtà animali selvatici o uccelli. La qual cosa, purtroppo, non riduce in nulla la loro pericolosità.

20150509_111424 (800x600)

20150509_111214 (800x600)

20150509_111052 (600x800)

20150509_111109 (600x800)

20150509_111121 (600x800)

20150509_111957 (800x600)

20150509_111933 (800x600)

20150509_111804 (800x600)

Considerando che la visita è gratuita, il Museo Parassitologico di Meguro ha un solo punto debole: fatta esclusione per i nomi dei reperti, tutte le tavole esplicative sono scritte soltanto in giapponese. Eppure proprio questo dettaglio rende l’esplorazione, per chi è digiuno di lingua nipponica, ancora più straniante: di fronte ad alcune teche si rimane come ipnotizzati, nel vano tentativo di decifrare quale sia l’ospite e quale il parassita, fusi assieme nella stessa carne.
Una sintetica guida in inglese, acquistata allo shop del piano superiore (che vende anche T-shirt e portachiavi a tema per finanziare la struttura), può aiutare la comprensione del percorso; ma perché privarsi subito del sublime senso di disorientamento di fronte alle impensabili forme che la natura può assumere?

20150509_111624 (600x800)

20150509_111633 (600x800)

20150509_111700 (800x600)

20150509_111714 (800x600)

La vita fiorisce rigogliosa sempre e soltanto alle spese di altra vita; e ammirando i preparati esposti al Museo Parassitologico questa verità emerge ancora più evidente, fra organi che pullulano di vermi e pesci dalle branchie “abitate” da organismi estranei.
Le vittime sono mammiferi, piante, creature acquatiche, crostacei, insetti: ogni essere vivente sembra avere i propri inquilini indesiderati, nessuno è al riparo. Così come nessuno sa con precisione quante specie di parassiti esistano in natura. Secondo alcune stime, potrebbero addirittura superare in numero quelle degli altri animali.
Dopotutto, forse, questa Terra è il loro mondo.

20150509_110509 (800x341)

20150509_110532 (800x600)

20150509_111603 (800x600)

20150509_111550 (800x600)

Ecco il sito ufficiale del Meguro Parasitological Museum.

Museo dell’Arte Sanitaria

Del Museo Storico Nazionale dell’Arte Sanitaria avevamo già parlato molto brevemente nella nostra vecchia serie di articoli sui musei anatomici italiani; torniamo ad occuparcene, un po’ più approfonditamente, perché si tratta a nostro avviso di una piccola perla nascosta e in parte dimenticata, inspiegabilmente più famosa all’estero che da noi – tanto che la maggior parte dei visitatori sono stranieri.

Il museo, fondato nel 1933, si trova in un’ala dell’Ospedale Santo Spirito in Sassia, a Roma, e si propone di illustrare la lunga strada che la medicina, la farmacologia e la chirurgia hanno percorso dall’antichità ad oggi, tramite reperti e ricostruzioni straordinarie.

Entrando nella Sala Alessandrina, si possono ammirare le tavole anatomiche colorate di Paolo Mascagni, incluse alcune a grandezza naturale che mostrano i vari sistemi (linfatico, muscolare, circolatorio, osseo). Si salgono le scale, e ci si ritrova immediatamente in quella che è forse la stanza più spettacolare dell’intero museo, la sala Flajani.






Qui sono esposti alcuni impressionanti preparati anatomici, a secco e in formalina, di diverse malformazioni natali: dalle lesioni ossee provocate dalla sifilide, al fenomeno dei gemelli siamesi, dalla macrocefalia alla bicefalia, e via dicendo.








Scheletri fetali, feti mummificati o sotto liquido, sono presentati assieme a una magnifica collezione di cere anatomiche, tra la quali spiccano la serie di studi ostetrici sulle varie fasi dello sviluppo prenatale (anomalie incluse) e alcuni busti a grandezza naturale di rara bellezza.



La sala ospita anche una collezione di preparati anatomici più antichi, realizzati con tecniche desuete e dall’effetto finale curioso e straniante. In queste teche spiccano alcuni feti siamesi mummificati.







Nella sala sono anche presenti un antico mortaio per la preparazione del chinino (che sconfisse la malaria nel ‘700, importato dalle Americhe dai padri gesuiti), e una collezione di calcoli estratti chirurgicamente nell’800 all’Ospedale del Santo Spirito.

Dopo questa prima sala, comincia il vero e proprio viaggio nella storia della medicina; dai primi rimedi misteriosi, come il bezoario (palla calcarea che si forma nell’intestino dei ruminanti e al quale venivano attribuite virtù terapeutiche) o il corno dell’unicorno (che nella realtà era un raro dente di narvalo), agli ex voto romani ed etruschi, risulta evidente come la medicina degli albori fosse inscindibile dall’universo magico.



Il museo ospita anche una ricostruzione accurata di come si doveva presentare il laboratorio di un alchimista, sei o sette secoli fa: gli alambicchi, le storte, il forno, i matracci, le bocce, i mortai sono esposti in maniera estremamente scenografica. La sapienza alchemica univa il potere del simbolo alla conoscenza pratica delle virtù taumaturgiche degli elementi; una volta epurata dal mito, questa antica arte darà origine alla scienza farmacologica.

A fianco, ecco la ricostruzione di una farmacia del 1600, con il banco dello speziale che assomiglia a un imponente trono, e gli scaffali ricolmi di vasi che contenevano le differenti spezie che soltanto il farmacista sapeva dosare e mischiare efficacemente.



Le varie teche contenengono poi le collezioni di strumenti chirurgici o diagnostici: antichi trapani per craniotomie, lancette per i salassi, seghe da amputazione, forcipi, specula, e via dicendo; uno degli oggetti più curiosi è la “siringa battesimale”, che veniva riempita di acqua santa ed utilizzata per battezzare in utero quei feti che rischiavano di essere abortiti.







In quest’ultima sala, oltre a rarità come ad esempio un’antica poltrona per partorienti, o una “venere anatomica”, troviamo altri tre reperti eccezionali: due preparati a secco del sistema nervoso centrale e periferico a grandezza naturale, e la mano di una bambina “metallizzata” da Angelo Motta di Cremona nel 1881, con un procedimento tuttora segreto.

Ecco il sito ufficiale del Museo Storico dell’Arte Sanitaria.

Speciale: James G. Mundie

In esclusiva per Bizzarro Bazar vi proponiamo l’intervista da noi realizzata all’artista James G. Mundie, disegnatore, fotografo e incisore. I suoi lavori più noti sono due serie di opere: la prima, intitolata Prodigies, è un’iconoclasta rivisitazione di alcuni classici della pittura di ogni epoca, all’interno dei quali i soggetti originali sono stati rimpiazzati dai freaks più famosi. Quello che ne risulta è una sorta di ironica storia dell’arte “parallela” o “possibile”, in cui la deformità prende il posto del bello, e in cui per una volta gli emarginati divengono protagonisti.
Il suo altro lavoro molto noto è Cabinet of curiosities, una serie di fotografie, schizzi e incisioni riguardanti le maggiori collezioni anatomiche e teratologiche conservate nei musei di tutto il mondo.

Le fotografie fanno parte dei tuoi progetti tanto quanto i disegni. Ti ritieni più un fotografo o un illustratore?

Mi piace pensarmi come un creatore di immagini che utilizza qualsiasi strumento o mezzo sia appropriato. Questo significa talvolta disegnare, altre volte incidere su legno o fotografare. Comunque, ho cominciato ad considerare la fotografia come mezzo a sé solo da poco tempo. Ho sempre usato le fotografie come riferimenti, o come fossero dei bozzetti per altri progetti. Con il tempo, invece, ho cominciato ad apprezzare le foto che facevo nei loro propri termini estetici. Specialmente da quando sono diventato padre, la relativa immediatezza dell fotografia è stata un cambiamento benvenuto rispetto ai metodi più laboriosi che uso nei disegni e nelle incisioni, che possono prendere settimane o mesi (addirittura anni!) per emergere.

Riguardo alla serie Prodigies, come è nata l’idea di unire il mondo dei freakshow con quello dell’arte classica, e perché?

Ho sempre disegnato ritratti, e intorno al 1996-97 stavo cercando nuove ispirazioni. Ho cominciato a pensare alle fotografie di strane persone, come Jojo il Ragazzo dalla Faccia di Cane, che avevo visto decadi prima, e pensai che sarebbe stato divertente lavorarci. Cominciai a fare ricerche sui sideshow, e presto scoprii qualcosa di molto più bizzarro di quello che ricordavo dalla mia infanzia. Iniziai a trovare anche dettagli sulle vite di questi performer che li fecero risultare molto più veri ai miei occhi – cioè, più di qualcosa di semplicemente anomalo e strampalato. Prodigies è cominciato come una sfida, per vedere se sarei riuscito a mescolare questi inquietanti e affascinanti performer di sideshow ai miei quadri preferiti.
Mi resi conto che la presentazione circense dei freaks era spesso basata sull’esagerazione – ai nani venivano assegnati titoli militari come Generale o Ammiraglio, le persone molto alte venivano reinventate come giganti, ecc.; e nella storia dell’arte succedeva lo stesso, quello che vediamo nei quadri era, all’epoca, una commissione commerciale all’artista da parte di una persona benestante che voleva lasciare un ricordo di sé e del suo successo. In questo senso, un ritratto di Raffaello di un qualsiasi cardinale o poeta non è molto differente dalle cartoline di presentazione dei freaks vendute dal palcoscenico. Entrambe le cose cercano di proiettare e/o vendere un’identità. “Perché non portare il tutto a uno stadio successivo, e permettere ai freaks di abitare o rimodellare le storie raccontate nei dipinti classici?”, pensai. Ovviamente non volevo procedere a casaccio. Dovevo avere un buon motivo per collegare un performer con un certo quadro, che fosse una storia in comune, o un atteggiamento, o un elemento compositivo che mi ricordava la figura di un freak. Questo significa che sto ancora cercando l’accoppiata ideale per alcuni fra i miei performer preferiti, come ad esempio Grady Stiles l’Uomo Aragosta. Dall’altra parte, ci sono dipinti così iconici che risulta difficile utilizzarli senza apparire risaputi o pigri.

La serie Prodigies è percorsa da una vena di humor iconoclasta. Potrebbe essere letta come una “legittimazione” dei diversi, a cui viene data la possibilità di essere protagonisti della storia dell’arte; ma anche come una specie di sberleffo nei confronti del concetto storico e assodato di “bellezza”. Quale interpretazione ti sembra più corretta?

Sono entrambe corrette. Anche se è di moda oggi denigrare i freakshow come una reliquia culturale barbarica da dimenticare, credo che servissero una funzione necessaria nella società – e che non è ancora sparita. E vedo queste persone che lavoravano nei freakshow – anche se spesso sfruttate – come degli eroi, per aver affrontato le circostanze peggiori e averne tratto il maggiore successo possibile. Queste erano persone che non sarebbero mai state accettate nella società beneducata, eppure trovarono una comunità che si strinse attorno a loro e li celebrò. Invece di essere chiusi negli istituti, vissero bene la loro vita con la loro famiglia, recitando sul palcoscenico un ruolo creato ad arte. C’è un certo carattere di nobiltà, in questo. Sì, la gente guardava e di tanto in tanto li scherniva, ma almeno ora pagavano per il privilegio. Quindi, chi è che era veramente sfruttato? Anche ora vogliamo guardare, ma la maggior parte di noi non è abbastanza sincero da ammetterlo.
Molte delle presentazioni utilizzate nei freakshow erano intenzionalmente umoristiche, quasi ridicole. Credo che quello humor servisse perché il pubblico si sentisse meno a disagio, e anche per dare al performer una protezione emotiva. Una parte del fascino dei freakshow è di confrontarsi con le proprie paure. Vedi qualcuno sul palco a cui mancano degli arti oppure deforme, e naturalmente pensi “E se quello fossi io?”. Quindi ho spesso inserito dei piccoli tocchi scherzosi, per aiutarmi a metabolizzare queste domande, e per tirare un salvagente allo spettatore. Allo stesso tempo sto prendendo in giro alcuni dei pilastri della storia dell’arte. C’è un sacco di materiale esilarante con cui lavorare, se lo guardi con mente aperta. Per esempio alcune convenzioni formali che troviamo in antiche istoriazioni sugli altari: è piuttosto divertente, oggi, vedere come i santi sono raffigurati cinque volte più grandi dei meri mortali. È liberatorio camminare in un museo e permetterti di ridere, anche se per molte persone è puro sacrilegio.
Gran parte di ciò che oggi reputiamo “bello” è semplicemente regolare, uniforme. Le nostre idee moderne di bellezza ci vengono propinate dai giornali di moda, televisione e affini. Eppure, in queste strane persone che io disegno – con le loro proporzioni imperfette – andiamo oltre il bello per avvicinarci al sublime. Uno dei principi guida per me in questo progetto è quello che Sir Francis Bacon scrisse nel 1597: “non c’è beltà eccellente che non abbia in sé una qualche misura di stranezza”.

In uno dei tuoi disegni, ti autoritrai nei panni di un anatomista dilettante, e molti dei tuoi lavori raffigurano anomalie patologiche. Qual è il tuo rapporto con i tuoi soggetti? Ritieni di avere un occhio freddo e clinico oppure c’è un’empatia con la sofferenza che spesso implica l’anatomia patologica? E, ancora, cosa vorresti che provasse chi guarda i tuoi disegni?

Anche se un certo distacco è necessario per rimanere oggettivi, non posso impedirmi di immedesimarmi nei miei soggetti. Queste erano persone reali che affrontavano circostanze che non posso nemmeno immaginare. Quando attraverso una collezione anatomica, mi ritrovo a chiedermi chi fosse la persona da cui questa o quella parte è stata tolta e preservata. Oggi, i casi sono presentati in maniera anonima, ma negli scorsi secoli era comune accludere informazioni biografiche sul paziente. Credo che in questa fissazione di proteggere la privacy degli individui stiamo inavvertitamente negando la loro umanità, perché ora ciò che vediamo è una malattia invece che una persona. Anche se non è mia intenzione forzare nello spettatore alcuna emozione o idea (e spesso la gente trova nei miei lavori dei significati che non ho mai inteso esprimere), spero che almeno porti con sé il senso che i miei soggetti sono o erano persone vere, degne di considerazione.

Il tuo nuovo progetto, Cabinet of curiosities, è basato sulle tue visite ai musei anatomici americani ed europei. Cosa ti attrae nei reperti anatomici e teratologici?

Sono sempre stato interessato a come le cose funzionano, in particolare all’anatomia. Quello che mi interessa delle collezioni patologiche o teratologiche è che questi strani esemplari ci mostrano cosa sta succedendo a livello cellulare, genetico. Esaminando il sistema danneggiato, impariamo come funziona quello in salute. Sono anche affascinato dagli antichi sistemi usati per catalogare e organizzare il mondo naturale, e la teratologia – lo studio dei mostri – è un esempio particolarmente interessante. Anche l’idea del museo, nato come collezione personale per diventare istituzione pubblica è affascinante, e condivide molti aspetti con i freakshow. Alcuni di questi preparati sono strani e bellissimi, e presentati in maniera molto elaborata. Quindi Cabinet of Curiosities è un tentativo di documentare il punto in cui questi due mondi si intersecano.

Quale pensi sia il rapporto fra medicina ed arte, e più in generale fra scienza ed arte?

La medicina è stata considerata un’arte per molto più tempo di quanto non sia stata vista come scienza. La società non si libera da una simile associazione da un giorno all’altro, così ancora oggi continuiamo a  parlare dell’abilità di un chirurgo come fosse quella di uno scultore. Ma anche da un punto di vista strettamente pratico, i dottori hanno bisogno degli artisti perché le rappresentazioni artistiche sono da sempre una componente essenziale nell’educazione medica e nella sua comunicazione. Sin dal Rinascimento gli illustratori hanno insegnato l’anatomia a generazioni di medici, e in quel modo la pratica artistica dell’osservazione ha aiutato la medicina ad uscire dalla via puramente teorica. Penso che possiamo affermare che questo ruolo comunicativo valga anche per le scienze in generale, perché l’arte può aiutare a spiegare complesse teorie anche a persone che non masticano la materia. Un artista può fungere da legame tra lo scienziato e il pubblico, rendendo comprensibili le scoperte scientifiche – ma può anche servire come critico. In questo modo, l’arte può divenire una sorta di specchio morale per la scienza.

Nelle tue parole, “questi preparati anatomici rappresentano il punto di intersezione fra scienza, cultura, emozione e mito”. Credi che ci sia bisogno di miti moderni? Pensi che questi nuovi miti possano provenire dal mondo della scienza, invece che da quello magico-religioso come nel passato? Il tuo lavoro fotografico e di illustrazione può essere letto come un tentativo di dare una dimensione mitica ai tuoi soggetti? Sei religioso?

Penso che noi creiamo in continuazione nuovi miti, o che ne risvegliamo e reinventiamo di vecchi. Fa parte della natura umana.
La scienza per molte persone ha sostituito la religione come fondamentale via d’ispirazione, ma in realtà sappiamo ancora così poco dell’universo, che c’è ancora molto terreno fertile per la fantascienza. Con la nascita di Scientology abbiamo visto addirittura la fantascienza trasformarsi in religione! Io non sono assolutamente una persona religiosa, ma penso che spesso cerchiamo di riporre le nostre speranze in un potere che sta al di fuori di noi. Per alcuni, questo significa una divinità che è personalmente interessata a come ci vestiamo, o a cosa mangiamo il venerdì; per altri vuol dire l’idea che il genere umano troverà finalmente la cura per il cancro e imparerà i segreti per viaggiare nel tempo. Così nel mio lavoro mi ritrovo a raccontare storie, o quantomeno a predisporre il seme di una storia che ognuno può trasformare nel racconto che desidera.

Anche tua moglie Kate è un’artista, ma i suoi quadri sembrano essere completamente distanti dal tuo mondo – solari, impressionisti, colorati. Se non sono indiscreto, come vi rapportate l’uno con l’arte dell’altra?

Siamo i migliori critici l’uno dell’altra. Siccome i nostri lavori sono così differenti, non c’è competizione fra noi, e ci diamo costantemente dei pareri e delle idee.

Chi è appassionato di stranezze, corre il rischio di essere reputato egli stesso strano. Cosa pensano delle tue passioni gli amici e i parenti?

Alcune persone amano stare a guardare i treni, o ascoltare gli Abba. Io amo i freaks. Tutte le persone più interessanti sono strambe.

Ecco i siti ufficiali di Prodigies, e di Cabinet of Curiosities.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – II

Come resistere alla tentazione dello shopping a New York, quando la città si riveste di luci natalizie e le vetrine dei negozi divengono delle vere e proprie opere d’arte? In questo secondo, ed ultimo, post sulla Grande Mela ci occupiamo quindi di negozi – ma se vi aspettate che vi parliamo di Tiffany o di Macy’s, siete fuori strada.

Da quando Maxilla & Mandible ha chiuso i battenti (senza avvertire nessuno – sul sito nemmeno un cenno al fatto che il negozio è dismesso) sono poche le botteghe ancora aperte che possono offrire oggetti da collezione naturalistica: Evolution Store è però la punta di diamante di questo strano tipo di esercizio.

Uno scheletro sull’uscio ci avverte del tono generale del negozio, e la vetrina già lascia a bocca aperta: kapala istoriati, teschi di feti umani disposti secondo l’età raggiunta in utero, grandi pavoni impagliati. Non ci sono vie di mezzo – o alzate gli occhi al cielo e proseguite per la vostra strada, o vi fiondate oltre la porta d’ingresso.

All’interno, la cornucopia di oggetti assale i sensi. Ci sono scheletri e teschi di animali di ogni specie, tutti in vendita, esemplari tassidermici, altri sotto alcol, ninnoli e portachiavi ricavati da ossa autentiche. Insomma, troverete il regalo di Natale giusto per chiunque.

E per i vostri bambini più indisciplinati quest’anno, al posto del solito vecchio carbone, Babbo Natale potrebbe lasciare sotto l’albero una nuova sorpresa: leccalecca con scorpioni e altri insetti incorporati.

Al piano superiore i titolari espongono i pezzi di maggior valore della loro collezione. Spicca una serie di scheletri umani, di cui uno femminile che ospita nel grembo uno scheletro fetale fissato in posizione di gravidanza. E poi ancora maschere tribali, teste rimpicciolite, uova di dinosauro, pietre preziose, animali impagliati o essiccati, fossili, coralli, farfalle multicolori e insetti esotici.

I prezzi non sono sempre popolari, ma nemmeno esorbitanti, e variano considerevolmente a seconda delle vostre esigenze. Comunque, se non volete spendere troppo, gli impiegati e i gestori del negozio, tutti accomunati dalla classica gentilezza newyorkese, saranno più che felici di impacchettarvi uno squalo sotto alcol (solo $29) o l’osso del pene di qualche mammifero ($6).

Sbucando con la metro all’East Village si entra in una dimensione totalmente diversa. Le foglie in questa stagione si fanno gialle e risaltano sulle pareti in mattoni e fra le scale antincendio esterne, che abbiamo visto in innumerevoli film. Qui, dalle parti di Cooper Union, c’è St. Mark’s Place, una stradina dedicata ai tatuaggi, ai piercing e all’abbigliamento punk e glam. Residuati della no-future generation, ormai cinquantenni ma ancora orgogliosamente imborchiati e dai (radi) capelli dipinti, gestiscono piccoli negozi di oggettistica e fashion. Anche se non siete tipi da creste e catene, vi consigliamo comunque di farvi un giro all’interno del negozio di vintage e usato Search & Destroy – se non altro per dare un’occhiata al delirante allestimento del negozio.

Qui i vestiti sono quasi nascosti da un’accozzaglia di giocattoli, props e collectibles: e se all’entrata siete salutati da bambole con la maschera antigas, modellini anatomici e feti deformi in gomma, all’interno i toni si fanno ancora più splatter. Un finto maiale sgozzato a grandezza naturale è appeso al soffitto, dal quale penzola anche un manichino fetish in posizione di bondage. Un flipper sta vicino a maschere di carnevale di mostri iperrealistici e sanguinosi. Ovunque manichini in pose oscene e, particolare non trascurabile, dalle parti genitali correttamente rappresentate. Purtroppo i gestori orientali sono (giustamente) gelosi del loro arredamento e ci permettono di scattare soltanto qualche foto.

Poco più avanti, sempre qui all’East Village, sulla decima strada, si trova uno dei negozi più celebri: si tratta di Obscura Antiques & Oddities.

Da quando Obscura è al centro di una serie televisiva di Discovery Channel (di cui vi avevamo parlato in questo articolo), il piccolo spazio espositivo è perennemente affollato. E la gente compra, il giro di affari è in stabile crescita e di conseguenza la collezione è in continuo cambiamento.

Obscura è l’analogo newyorkese del nostro Nautilus, anche se gli manca quella maniacale e coreografica cura espositiva che Alessandro ha donato alla sua bottega delle meraviglie. D’altronde Mike ci racconta che stanno per trasferirsi in uno spazio più grande, dove finalmente la collezione potrà evitare di essere accatastata e un po’ disordinata com’è adesso. Comunque sia, i pezzi sono davvero straordinari e l’atmosfera unica.

Fra tutti spicca la testa mummificata divenuta un po’ il simbolo di Obscura, tanto da farne delle minuscole repliche per portachiavi.

Ma le sorprese sono tante, e fra scheletri umani, strani animali, oggetti di antiquariato medico e bizzarrie in tutto e per tutto ascrivibili alla tradizione denominata Americana, si potrebbe perdere una buona oretta a curiosare.

Mike ed Evan, la strana coppia di proprietari, sono fra le persone più gentili e disponibili del mondo, talmente colti e appassionati che è una goduria anche solo rimanere ad ascoltarli mentre rispondono alle domande più stravaganti dei clienti. Il giro di collezionismo legato ad Obscura è impressionante, ma di certo anche voi riuscirete a trovare almeno un regalino per chi, fra i vostri conoscenti, ha già davvero tutto.


Abbiamo già parlato di Stefano Bessoni nel nostro speciale dedicato al film Krokodyle (2010). Ritorniamo ad occuparci di lui e del suo universo macabro e sorprendente, più unico che raro in Italia, perché proprio domani esce in tutte le librerie, edito da Logos, un suo libro di illustrazioni incentrate sul tema dell’homunculus.

L’omuncolo è un essere “artificiale”, creato cioè secondo segreti rituali alchemici, e la sua leggenda  risale all’inizio del 1500. Sembra che il primo a parlare della possibilità di creare la vita a partire da un complesso procedimento, a metà strada fra scienza e magia, sia stato l’astrologo e alchimista Paracelso. La peculiarità degli omuncoli è quello di essere una sorta di uomini in miniatura – talvolta perfettamente formati, ma altre volte meno “riusciti”.

Prendendo spunto da queste antiche teorie, Stefano Bessoni in questa fiaba gotica ci racconta la storia di Zendak, un medico anatomista tassidermista che assieme alla figlia Rachel è diventato celebre per i suoi preparati anatomici, soprattutto di feti e bambini preservati in formalina; ma, impazzito a causa della morte di Rachel, Zendak si dedicherà alle arti oscure, cercando di dare vita a un omuncolo che possa riempire il vuoto lasciato dalla perdita della figlia adorata.

La storia è narrata con una filastrocca in rima, come accadeva nelle vecchie favole, e alle parole si accompagnano i cupi, malinconici, poetici e ironici disegni di Bessoni; inoltre impreziosisce il libriccino un’appendice finale che contiene delle ricette (alcune più classiche, altre più moderne, ma tutte rigorosamente testate e funzionanti!) per la preparazione e la creazione di un omuncolo.

Homunculus di Stefano Bessoni è acquistabile anche online a questo indirizzo.

Sculture tassidermiche – II

Continuiamo la nostra panoramica (iniziata con questo articolo) sugli artisti contemporanei che utilizzano in modo creativo e non naturalistico le tecniche tassidermiche.

Jane Howarth, artista britannica, ha finora lavorato principalmente con uccelli imbalsamati. Avida collezionista di animali impagliati, sotto formalina e di altre bizzarrie, le sue esposizioni mostrano esemplari tassidermici adornati di perle, collane, tessuti pregiati e altre stoffe. Jane è particolarmente interessata a tutti quegli animali poveri e “sporchi” che la gente non degna di uno sguardo sulle aste online o per strada: la sua missione è manipolare questi resti “indesiderati” per trasformarli in strane e particolari opere da museo, che giocano sul binomio seduzione-repulsione. Si tratta di un’arte delicata, che tende a voler abbellire e rendere preziosi i piccoli cadaveri di animali. La Howarth ci rende sensibili alla splendida fragilità di questi corpi rinsecchiti, alla loro eleganza, e con impercepibili, discreti accorgimenti trasforma la materia morta in un’esibizione di raffinata bellezza. Bastano qualche piccolo lembo di stoffa, o qualche filo di perla, per riuscire a mostrarci la nobiltà di questi animali, anche nella morte.

Pascal Bernier è un artista poliedrico, che si è interessato alla tassidermia soltanto per alcune sue collezioni. In particolare troviamo interessante la sua Accidents de chasse (1994-2000, “Incidenti di caccia”), una serie di sculture in cui animali selvaggi (volpi, elefanti, tigri, caprioli) sono montati in posizioni naturali ma esibiscono bendaggi medici che ci fanno riflettere sul valore della caccia. Normalmente i trofei di caccia mostrano le prede in maniera naturalistica, in modo da occultare il dolore e la violenza che hanno dovuto subire. Bernier ci mette di fronte alla triste realtà: dietro all’esibizione di un semplice trofeo, c’è una vita spezzata, c’è dolore, morte. I suoi animali “handicappati”, zoppi, medicati, sono assolutamente surreali; poiché sappiamo che nella realtà, nessuno di questi animali è mai stato medicato o curato. Quelle bende suonano “false”, perché quando guardiamo un esemplare tassidermico, stiamo guardando qualcosa di già morto. Per questo i suoi animali, nonostante l’apparente serenità,  sembrano fissarci con sguardo accusatorio.

Lisa Black, neozelandese ma nata in Australia nel 1982, lavora invece sulla commistione di organico e meccanico. “Modificando” ed “adattando” i corpi degli animali secondo le regole di una tecnologia piuttosto steampunk, Lisa Black si pone il difficile obiettivo di farci ragionare sulla bellezza naturale confusa con la bellezza artificiale. Crea cioè dei pezzi unici, totalmente innaturali, ma innegabilmente affascinanti, che ci interrogano su quello che definiamo “bello”. Una tartaruga, un cerbiatto, un coccodrillo: di qualsiasi animale si tratti, ci viene istintivo trovarli armoniosi, esteticamente bilanciati e perfetti. La Black aggiunge a questi animali dei meccanismi a orologeria, degli ingranaggi, quasi si trattasse di macchine fuse con la carne, o di prototipi di animali meccanici del futuro. E la cosa sorprendente è che la parte meccanica nulla toglie alla bellezza dell’animale. Creando questi esemplari esteticamente raffinati, l’artista vuole porre il problema di questa falsa dicotomia: è davvero così scontata la “sacrosanta” bellezza del naturale rispetto alla “volgarità” dell’artificiale?

Restate sintonizzati: a breve la terza parte del nostro viaggio nel mondo della tassidermia artistica!

Macabre collezioni

Abbiamo spesso parlato, su Bizzarro Bazar, di wunderkammer, esibizioni anatomiche, collezionisti del macabro e di oggetti conservati gelosamente nonostante il (o forse proprio a causa del) loro potenziale inquietante. È divertente notare come, nell’immaginario comune, chi si impegna in tale tipo di collezionismo sia normalmente associato alle tendenze dark o, peggio, sataniste; quando spesso si tratta di persone assolutamente comuni che mantengono intatto un quasi infantile senso della curiosità e della meraviglia.

Oggi, grazie a un articolo di Newsweek (segnalatoci da Materies Morbi) questo argomento poco battuto dalla stampa ci risolleva per un attimo dalla superficie di notizie e articoli insipidi quotidiani.

L’autrice dell’articolo, la scrittrice Caroline H. Dworin, si interroga sul perché certe persone provino attrazione verso reperti anatomici, feti sotto formalina, esemplari tassidermici deformi, strumenti chirurgici, o portafogli e antichi grimori rilegati in pelle umana. Alcune parti dell’articolo ci hanno toccato personalmente, visto che anche noi nel nostro piccolo collezioniamo da anni questo tipo di oggetti e reperti. E per una volta ci sembra che le ipotesi fornite dall’articolo siano condivisibili e soprattutto molto umane.

Nell’articolo, la simpatica Joanna Ebstein di Morbid Anatomy viene interpellata sulla sua esperienza come collezionista. Qualche tempo fa noi avevamo chiesto la stessa cosa anche al proprietario del favoloso Nautilus di Torino, e la sua risposta era stata analoga. Quello che attira in questi oggetti è il fatto che sono oggetti che parlano, hanno una storia, e ci interrogano. Sono cioè piccoli pezzi di vita fossilizzata che non possono lasciarci indifferenti. “C’è qualcosa di molto eccitante in simili oggetti, aprono così tante strade differenti: divengono oggetti con un significato”. Joanna sta anche portando avanti un progetto fotografico a lungo termine che documenta i “gabinetti delle meraviglie” privati e le collezioni segrete più incredibili attraverso il globo (Private Cabinets Photo Series).

“Le persone sono veramente attratte dalle cose che creano un ponte fra la vita e la morte”, dice Evan Michelson, proprietaria di Obscura, Antiques and Oddities, un piccolo negozio nell’East Village di New York specializzato in oggetti macabri vittoriani. “Se la tua personalità ha anche solo un’ombra di malinconia, finisci per trovare conforto in cose che altre persone trovano tristi”. Evan ha anche notato che le femmine sembrano essere attratte da questo tipo di collezione in proporzione largamente maggiore dei maschi. La sua collezione personale vanta molti oggetti “malinconici”, elementi di scene del crimine, strumenti medici, stampe di malattie e lesioni incurabili, preparati in barattolo, animali siamesi. “Ho alcuni cuccioli di maiale fusi assieme che sono davvero tristi – aggiunge – sembra che stiano danzando”.

Michelson fa anche collezione di bare per infanti. “Ho a casa mia una delle più piccole bare commerciali mai realizzate. Reca l’iscrizione Soffrite bambini per arrivare a Me. Ha le sue piccole cerniere, e i sostegni per i portatori, come se fossero stati realmente necessari dei portatori”.

Altri ancora trovano in questi oggetti una fonte di ispirazione artistica. Roald Dahl, l’autore di tante favole moderne per bambini, dopo un intervento chirurgico aveva conservato la testa del suo stesso femore, così come alcuni pezzi della sua spina dorsale in un barattolo. Lo aiutavano a meditare, e a scrivere.

“C’è molto poco, a questo mondo, che sia solo bianco o nero”. Così si esprime J. Bazzel, direttore delle comunicazioni del celebre Mütter Museum di Philadelphia, e racconta che nella immensa collezione anatomica del museo trovano posto diversi esemplari di cuoio umano. “Sentiamo parlare di cuoio umano, e subito pensiamo ai Nazisti – ma c’era un periodo in cui rilegare in pelle umana un testo scientifico o medico era un segno di rispetto. Magari un paziente aveva aiutato a scoprire una nuova conoscenza, a capire qualcosa di documentato in quel testo, e utilizzare la sua pelle era un modo di commemorarlo, onorarlo, e tributargli rispetto”. Seguendo questo ragionamento, lo stesso Bazzel, 38 anni, ha donato parte del suo corpo al museo: le sue ossa del bacino, rimosse chirurgicamente anni or sono a causa di uno sfibramento osseo dovuto alla reazione ad un farmaco utilizzato contro l’AIDS, di cui è affetto. Le ha donate al museo per testimoniare e insegnare ai visitatori quanto complessa e devastante la cura di questa sindrome possa risultare. “C’è molto poco a questo mondo, che sia bianco o nero… La paura di una persona è la gioia di un’altra; l’incubo di uno è la realtà di un altro”.

L’amore che non muore

La strana e incredibile storia di Carl Tanzler è divenuta nel tempo una sorta di macabra leggenda urbana, ma è accaduta realmente: è una storia di amore, devozione, ossessione maniacale e morte.

Carl Tanzler (soltanto uno dei suoi molti nomi, Conte Carl von Cosel essendo il secondo più celebre) nacque a Dresda nel 1877. Spostatosi a Zephryhills, Florida, nel 1927, divenne radiologo allo U.S. Marine Hospital a Key West. Sua moglie e le sue due figlie lo raggiunsero qualche anno più tardi.

Tanzler era stato affidato al reparto tubercolotici, che in quegli anni era davvero un brutto spettacolo. La maggior parte dei suoi nuovi amici americani erano pazienti, e Tanzler fu costretto a vederli morire uno ad uno a causa della terribile malattia. I medici che lavorano in reparti simili cercano di “desensibilizzarsi” al fine di mantenere la propria integrità mentale; Tanzler però era tenero di cuore, e pare che ogni volta che un paziente non ce la faceva, egli soffrisse duramente. Il medico tedesco non era inoltre propriamente stabile a livello psicologico. Sempre pronto a inventarsi nuove fantasiose cure, si fregiava di aver ricevuto fantomatici premi e onorificenze  – che portarono in seguito a dubitare che avesse perfino un’autentica laurea in medicina.

Carl sosteneva inoltre di essere spesso visitato in sogno da una sua ava defunta, la Contessa Anna Costantia von Cosel, che immancabilmente gli mostrava una bellissima, esotica donna, dicendogli che lei e nessun’altra sarebbe stata il suo grande amore.

Seppur sposato con figli, Tanzler finì nell’aprile del 1930 per incontrare quella splendida donna vista in sogno: si trattava di Elena Milagro “Helen” de Hoyos, 22 anni, una bellezza incomparabile, e gravemente malata. La tubercolosi le aveva portato via tutti i famigliari più stretti, e Tanzler decise che l’avrebbe salvata ad ogni costo. Con il consenso della famiglia, cominciò ad utilizzare metodi non ortodossi e non testati per curare la sua Elena, intrugli di erbe e terapie a raggi X. Nel frattempo, si era dichiarato a lei, manifestandole il suo amore, sommergendola di regali, ma la giovane Elena non ne voleva sapere. Malgrado tutto, Carl sperava che la giovane l’avrebbe amato se lui fosse riuscito a salvarle la vita.

Nel 1931, nonostante i suoi ossessivi sforzi, Elena, il suo unico grande amore, morì. Carl, sempre con il consenso della famiglia (al corrente della sua infatuazione), le costruì un mausoleo sopraelevato, per paura che l’umidità del terreno potesse intaccare il suo corpo. Ogni giorno si recava al cimitero a trovarla, e la famiglia di Elena era commossa dall’affetto dimostrato dal dottore per la giovane. Quello che non sapevano, però, è che l’ossessione di Tanzler stava prendendo una brutta piega.

Ogni notte Carl si introduceva nel mausoleo, e sottoponeva il cadavere della ragazza a ripetuti trattamenti di formaldeide per cercare di mantenere il corpo incorrotto. Si sdraiava di fianco a lei, parlava con lei per ore. Ad un certo punto installò perfino un telefono, per poterla chiamare durante il giorno e illudersi di comunicare con la sua Elena. Il fantasma della fanciulla lo visitava ogni notte, chiedendogli di portarla via da quella tomba.

Nel 1933 Carl fece appunto questo: trafugò la salma, e la portò a casa. Elena era morta da due anni a questo punto, e Tanzler lottò furiosamente contro il decadimento del suo corpo, utilizzando una marea di preservanti, vuotando una dopo l’altra bottiglie di profumo per nascondere l’odore della carne marcescente. Nonostante l’inevitabile putrefazione avanzasse veloce, Carl cercava di figurarsi un felice rapporto di coppia, parlando con il cadavere, improvvisando per lei romantiche canzoni d’amore all’organo (di cui era un dotato suonatore).

Mano a mano che la decomposizione progrediva, i suoi metodi divenivano più estremi. Cominciò ad usare corde di pianoforte per legare assieme le ossa che si staccavano. Quando gli occhi di Elena si decomposero, li sostituì con occhi di vetro. Quando la sua pelle si ruppe e cadde a pezzi, la rimpiazzò con una strana miscela di sua invenzione, seta imbevuta di cera e gesso. Gli organi interni collassarono, e lui riempì le cavità con stracci per mantenerne la forma. I capelli caddero, e lui ne fece una parrucca. Ad ogni stadio di decomposizione, Carl tentava di bloccare l’immagine di Elena, ma il risultato era che la ragazza stava divenendo sempre più una rozza e grottesca caricatura di ciò che era stata un tempo, una macabra bambola in putrefazione. Secondo alcune testimonianze, sembra che Tanzler avesse anche inserito un tubo di carta al posto delle parti intime, come sostituto della vagina durante i rapporti sessuali. In realtà, nei rapporti dell’epoca non si fa menzione di questo dettaglio, ed è plausibile pensare che il rapporto fra lui ed Elena fosse di tipo squisitamente (!) platonico.

Nel 1940, nove anni dopo la morte di Elena, la sorella di quest’ultima sentì delle voci riguardanti le strane abitudini di Tanzler. Si recò a casa sua, dove trovò quel che restava del cadavere di Elena, ancora vestita nei suoi abiti. Tanzler fu arrestato, ma i reati commessi erano già caduti in prescrizione e lui non fu mai punito per ciò che aveva fatto.

Tutti i giornali parlarono di questa storia, ma stranamente l’opinione pubblica si schierò dalla parte di Tanzler. La sua ostinata corsa contro l’inevitabile in qualche modo commosse e toccò il cuore degli americani; certo, egli era un maniaco ossessivo, illuso di poter preservare un amore che non era nemmeno mai esistito… ma la gente intuì che al di là degli aspetti più macabri e morbosi della notizia, vi era qualcosa di più. Sotto la patina di sordida necrofilia, la vicenda di Tanzler era fin troppo umana. Il medico tedesco si era aggrappato con le unghie e con i denti a ciò che amava di più al mondo, rifiutando di lasciare che sparisse nelle nebbie del tempo.

L’ossessione di Carl non finì quando gli portarono via i suoi affezionati resti. Ormai l’idea del suo amore aveva prevalso su qualsiasi realtà. Usò la maschera funebre della sua amata per costruire una bambola con le sue fattezze. Scrisse un’autobiografia, e passò i suoi ultimi anni mostrando il bambolotto ai curiosi e raccontando infinite volte la sua incredibile storia. Morì nel 1952, fu trovato accasciato dietro uno dei suoi organi.

Ma la leggenda esige un altro finale: secondo molti resoconti, il suo corpo fu trovato fra le braccia della sua bambola con il viso di Elena Hoyos.