Victorian Hairwork: Interview with Courtney Lane

Part of the pleasure of collecting curiosities lies in discovering the reactions they cause in various people: seeing the wonder arise on the face of onlookers always moves me, and gives meaning to the collection itself. Among the objects that, at least in my experience, evoke the strongest emotional response there are without doubt mourning-related accessories, and in particular those extraordinary XIX Century decorative works made by braiding a deceased person’s hair.

Be it a small brooch containing a simple lock of hair, a framed picture or a larger wreath, there is something powerful and touching in these hairworks, and the feeling they convey is surprisingly universal. You could say that anyone, regardless of their culture, experience or provenance, is “equipped” to recognize the archetypical value of hair: to use them in embroidery, jewelry and decoration is therefore an eminently magical act.

I decided to discuss this peculiar tradition with an expert, who was so kind as to answer my questions.
Courtney Lane is a real authority on the subject, not just its history but also its practical side: she studied the original techniques with the intent of bringing them back to life, as she is convinced that this ancient craft could accomplish its function of preserving memory still today.

Can you tell us a bit about yourself?

I am a Victorian hair artist, historian, and self-proclaimed professional weirdo based in Kansas City. My business is called Never Forgotten where, as an artist, I create modern works of Victorian style sentimental hairwork for clients on a custom basis as well as making my own pieces using braids and locks of antique human hair that I find in places such as estate sales at old homes. As an academic, I study the history of hairwork and educate others through lectures as well as online video, and I also travel to teach workshops on how to do hairwork techniques.

Hairwork by Courtney Lane.

Where does your interest for Victorian hairwork come from?

I’ve always had a deep love for history and finding beauty in places that many consider to be dark or macabre. At the young age of 5, I fell in love with the beauty of 18th and 19th century mausoleums in the cemeteries near the French Quarter of New Orleans. Even as a child, I adored the grand gesture of these elaborate tombs for memorializing the dead. This lead me to developing a particular fondness for the Victorian era and the funerary customs of the time.
Somewhere along the line in studying Victorian mourning, I encountered the idea of hairwork. A romantic at heart, I’d already known of the romantic value a lock of hair from your loved one could hold, so I very naturally accepted that it would also be a perfect relic to keep of a deceased loved one. I found the artwork to be stunning and the sentiment to be of even greater beauty. I wondered why it was that we no longer practiced hairwork widely, and I needed to know why.
I studied for years trying to find the answers and eventually I learned how to do the artwork myself. I thoroughly believed that the power of sentimental hairwork could help society reclaim a healthier relationship with death and mourning, and so I decided to begin my business to create modern works, educate the public on the often misunderstood history of the artform, and ensure that this sentimental tradition is “Never Forgotten”.

How did hairwork become a popular mourning practice historically? Was the hair collected before or post mortem? Was it always related to grieving?

Hairwork has taken on a variety of purposes, most of which have been inherently sentimental, but it has not always been related to grieving. With the death of her husband, Queen Victoria fell into a deep mourning which lasted the remaining 40 years of her life. This, in turn, created a certain fashionability, and almost a fetishism, of mourning in the Victorian era. Most people today believe all hairwork had the purpose of elaborating a loss, but between the 1500s and early 1900s, hairwork included romantic keepsakes from a loved one or family mementos, and sometimes served as memorabilia from an important time in one’s life. As an example, many of the large three-dimensional wreaths you can still see actually served as a form of family history. Hair was often collected from several (often living) members of the family and woven together to create a genealogy. I’ve seen other examples of hairwork simply commemorating a major life event such as a first communion or a wedding. Long before hairwork became an art form, humans had already been exchanging locks of hair; so it’s only natural that there were instances of couples wearing jewelry that contained the hair of their living lovers.

As far as mourning hairwork is concerned, the hair was sometimes collected post mortem, and sometimes the hair was saved from an earlier time in their life. As hair was such an important part of culture, it was often saved when it was cut whether or not there was an immediate plan for making art or jewelry with it.
The idea of using hair as a mourning practice largely stems from Catholicism in the Middle Ages and the power of saintly relics in the church. The relic of a saint is more than just the physical remains of their body, rather it provides a spiritual connection to the holy person, creating a link between life and death. This belief that a relic can be a substitute for the person easily transitioned from public, religious mourning to private, personal mourning.
Of the types of relics (bone, flesh, etc), hair is by far the most accessible to the average person, as it does not need any sort of preservation to avoid decomposition, much as the rest of the body does; collecting from the body is as simple as using a pair of scissors. Hair is also one of the most identifiable parts of person, so even though pieces of bone might just be as much of a relic, hair is part of your loved one that you see everyday in life, and can continue to recognize after death.

Was hairwork strictly a high-class practice?

Hairwork was not strictly high-class. Although hairwork was kept by some members of upper class, it was predominantly a middle-class practice. Some hairwork was done by professional hairworkers, and of course, anyone commissioning them would need the means to do so; but a lot of hairwork was done in the home usually by the women of the family. With this being the case, the only expenses would be the crafting tools (which many middle-class women would already likely have around the home), and the jewelry findings, frames, or domes to place the finished hairwork in.

How many people worked at a single wreath, and for how long? Was it a feminine occupation, like embroidery?

Hairwork was usually, but not exclusively done by women and was even considered a subgenre of ladies’ fancy work. Fancy work consisted of embroidery, beadwork, featherwork, and more. There are even instances of women using hair to embroider and sew. It was thought to be a very feminine trait to be able to patiently and meticulously craft something beautiful.
As far as wreaths are concerned, it varied in the number of people who would work together to create one. Only a few are well documented enough to know for sure.
I’ve also observed dozens of different techniques used to craft flowers in wreaths and some techniques are more time consuming than others. One of the best examples I’ve seen is an incredibly well documented piece that indicates that the whole wreath consists of 1000 flowers (larger than the average wreath) and was constructed entirely by one woman over the span of a year. The documentation also specifies that the 1000 flowers were made with the hair of 264 people.

  

Why did it fall out of fashion during the XX Century?

Hairwork started to decline in popularity in the early 1900’s. There were several reasons.
The first reason was the growth of hairwork as an industry. Several large companies and catalogues started advertising custom hairwork, and many people feared that sending out for the hairwork rather than making it in the home would take away from the sentiment. Among these companies was Sears, Roebuck and Company, and in one of their catalogues in 1908, they even warned, “We do not do this braiding ourselves. We send it out; therefore we cannot guarantee same hair being used that is sent to us; you must assume all risk.” This, of course, deterred people from using professional hairworkers.
Another reason lies with the development and acceptance of germ theory in the Victorian era. The more people learned about germs and the more sanitary products were being sold, the more people began to view the human body and all its parts as a filthy thing. Along with this came the thought that hair, too, was unclean and people began to second guess using it as a medium for art and jewelry.
World War I also had a lot to do with the decline of hairwork. Not only was there a general depletion in resources for involved countries, but more and more women began to work outside of the home and no longer had the time to create fancy work daily. During war time when everybody was coming together to help the war effort, citizens began to turn away from frivolous expenses and focus only on necessities. Hair at this time was seen for the practical purposes it could serve. For example, in Germany there were propaganda posters encouraging women to cut their long hair and donate it to the war effort when other fibrous materials became scarce. The hair that women donated was used to make practical items such as transmission belts.
With all of these reasons working together, sentimental hairwork was almost completely out of practice by the year 1925; no major companies continued to create or repair hairwork, and making hairwork at home was no longer a regular part of daily life for women.

19th century hairworks have become trendy collectors items; this is due in part to a fascination with Victorian mourning practices, but it also seems to me that these pieces hold a special value, as opposed to other items like regular brooches or jewelry, because of – well, the presence of human hair. Do you think we might still be attaching some kind of “magical”, symbolic power to hair? Or is it just an expression of morbid curiosity for human remains, albeit in a mild and not-so-shocking form?

I absolutely believe that all of these are true. Especially amongst people less familiar with these practices, there is a real shock value to seeing something made out of hair. When I first introduce the concept of hairwork to people, some find the idea to be disgusting, but most are just fascinated that the hair does not decompose. People today are so out of touch with death, that they immediately equate hair as a part of the body and don’t understand how it can still be perfectly pristine over a hundred years later. For those who don’t often ponder their own mortality, thinking about the fact that hair can physically live on long after they’ve died can be a completely staggering realization.
Once the initial surprise and morbid curiosity have faded, many people recognize a special value in the hair itself. Amongst serious collectors of hair, there seems to be a touching sense of fulfillment in the opportunity to preserve the memory of somebody who once was loved enough to be memorialized this way – even if they remain nameless today. Some may say it is a spiritual calling, but I would say at the very least it is a shared sense of mortal empathy.

What kind of research did you have to do in order to learn the basics of Victorian hairworks? After all, this could be described as a kind of “folk art”, which was meant for a specific, often personal purpose; so were there any books at the time holding detailed instructions on how to do it? Or did you have to study original hairworks to understand how it was done?

Learning hairwork was a journey for me. First, I should say that there are several different types of hairwork and some techniques are better documented than others. Wire work is the type of hairwork you see in wreaths and other three-dimensional flowers. I was not able to find any good resources on how to do these techniques, so in order to learn, I began by studying countless wreaths. I took every opportunity I could to study wreaths that were out of their frame or damaged so I could try to put them back together and see how everything connected. I spent hours staring at old pieces and playing with practice hair through trial and error.
Other techniques are palette work and table work. Palette work includes flat pictures of hair which you may see in a frame or under glass in jewelry, and table work includes the elaborate braids that make up a jewelry chain such as a necklace or a watch fob.
The Lock of Hair
by Alexanna Speight and Art of Hair Work: Hair Braiding and Jewelry of Sentiment by Mark Campbell teach palette work and table work, respectively. Unfortunately, being so old, these books use archaic English and also reference tools and materials that are no longer made or not as easy to come by. Even after reading these books, it takes quite a bit of time to find modern equivalents and practice with a few substitutions to find the best alternative. For these reasons, I would love to write an instructional book explaining all three of these core techniques in an easy to understand way using modern materials, so hairwork as a craft can be more accessible to a wider audience.

Why do you think this technique could be still relevant today?

The act and tradition of saving hair is still present in our society. Parents often save a lock of their child’s first haircut, but unfortunately that lock of hair will stay hidden away in an envelope or a book and rarely seen again. I’ve also gained several clients just from meeting someone who has never heard of hairwork, but they still felt compelled cut a lock of hair from their deceased loved one to keep. Their eyes consistently light up when they learn that they can wear it in jewelry or display it in artwork. Time and again, these people ask me if it’s weird that they saved this hair. Often, they don’t even know why they did. It’s a compulsion that many of us feel, but we don’t talk about it or celebrate it in our modern culture, so they think they’re strange or morbid even though it’s an incredibly natural thing to do.
Another example is saving your own hair when it’s cut. Especially in instances of cutting hair that’s been grown very long or hair that has been locked, I very often encounter people who have felt so much of a personal investment in their own hair that they don’t feel right throwing it out. These individuals may keep their hair in a bag for years, not knowing what to do with it, only knowing that it felt right to keep. This makes perfect sense to me, because hair throughout history has always been a very personal thing. Even today, people identify each other by hair whether it be length, texture, color, or style. Different cultures may wear their hair in a certain way to convey something about their heritage, or individuals will use their own creativity or sense of self to decide how to wear their hair. Whether it be for religion, culture, romance, or mourning, the desire to attach sentimental value to hair and the impulse to keep the hair of your loved one are inherently human.
I truly believe that being able to proudly display our hair relics can help us process some of our most intimate emotions and live our best lives.

You can visit Courtney Lane’s website Never Forgotten, and follow her on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube. If you’re interested in the symbolic and magical value of human hair, here is my post on the subject.

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 4

As I am quite absorbed in the Academy of Enchantment, which we just launched, so you will forgive me if I fall back on a new batch of top-notch oddities.

  • Remember my article on smoked mummies? Ulla Lohmann documented, for the first time ever, the mummification process being carried out on one of the village elders, a man the photographer knew when he was still alive. The story of Lohmann’s respectful stubbornness in getting accepted by the tribe, and the spectacular pictures she took, are now on National Geographic.

  • Collective pyres burning for days in an unbearable stench, teeth pulled out from corpses to make dentures, bones used as fertilizers: welcome to the savage world of those who had to clean up Napoleonic battlefields.
  • Three miles off the Miami coast there is a real underwater cemetery. Not many of your relatives will take scuba lessons just to pay their last respects, but on the other hand, your grave will become part of the beautiful coral reef.

  • This one is for those of you acquainted with the worst Italian TV shows. In one example of anaesthetic television — comforting and dull, offering the mirage of an effortless win, a fortune that comes out of nowhere — the host randomly calls a phone number, and if the call is picked up before the fifth ring then a golden watch is awarded to the receiver. But here’s where the subversive force of memento mori comes in: in one of the latest episodes, an awkward surprise awaited the host. “Is this Mrs. Anna?” “No, Mrs. Anna just died.“, a voice replies.
    For such a mindless show, this is the ultimate ironic defeat: the embarassed host cannot help mumbling, “At this point, our watch seems useless…

  • How can we be sure that a dead body is actually dead? In the Nineteenth Century this was a major concern. That is why some unlucky workers had to pull cadaver tongues, while others tried to stick dead fingers into their own ears; there were those who even administered tobacco enemas to the dead… by blowing through a pipe.
  • What if Monty Python were actually close to the truth, in their Philosphers Song portraying the giants of thought as terminal drunkards? An interesting long read on the relationship between Western philosophy and the use of psychoactive substances.
  • If you haven’t seen it, there is a cruel radiography shattering the self-consolatory I-am-just-big-boned mantra.

  • Man will soon land on Mars, likely. But in addition to bringing life on the Red Planet, we will also bring another novelty: death. What would happen to a dead body in a Martian atmosphere, where there are no insects, no scavengers or bacteria? Should we bury our dead, cremate them or compost them? Sarah Laskow on AtlasObscura.
  • In closing, here is a splendid series of photographs entitled Wilder Mann. All across Europe, French photographer Charles Fréger documented dozens of rural masquerades. Creepy and evocative, these pagan figures stood the test of time, and for centuries now have been annoucing the coming of winter.

This Way Up

La quotidiana routine di due operatori funebri – sconvolta da una serie di improbabili eventi – non è mai stata così divertente come nel cortometraggio This Way Up (2008) diretto da Alan Smith e Adam Foulkes e vincitore di numerosi premi, fra cui la nomination agli Oscar 2009 come miglior corto di animazione. In questa folle e imprevedibile corsa contro il tempo, i toni macabri sono stemperati da un irresistibile umorismo nero, estremamente british.

[vimeo https://vimeo.com/102605293]

I soldi dei morti

Per i cinesi, ogni uomo è composto da diversi spiriti: fra tutti, i due più importanti sono quello materiale, chiamato po, con sede nel fegato e nutrito dal cibo, che al momento della morte rimane nella tomba; e l’anima spirituale, chiamata hun, con sede nei polmoni e nutrita dal respiro, che al trapasso si stacca invece dal corpo e va incontro al suo destino.
Un destino che è ovviamente conseguenza delle azioni terrene, della virtù e delle qualità del morto. Così, nell’oltretomba, esiste una gamma di possibili mutamenti che attendono lo hun del defunto: il più difficile e prestigioso è ovviamente divenire uno xiandao, un Immortale taoista – oppure raggiungere Jing-tu, la Terra Pura, se si è buddhisti. Ma, qualora in vita le azioni del morto non siano state per nulla virtuose, l’anima può finire per incrementare le fila degli egui, “spiriti affamati” che arrecano danni e problemi ai viventi a causa della fame e della sete insaziabili che li divorano.
Tutti coloro che stanno nel mezzo – né spiriti eccelsi, né peccatori senza speranza – vengono destinati alla “Via dell’Uomo” (rendao), vale a dire a reincarnarsi fino a che non saranno finalmente degni di lasciare questo mondo. Queste anime, però, prima di potersi reincarnare dovranno passare per una sorta di regno di mezzo chiamato diyu, assimilabile al nostro purgatorio.

Il diyu non è altro che una terribile “prigione sotterranea” che in qualche modo riflette specularmente la burocrazia del nostro mondo. Qui le anime vengono imputate in un vero e proprio processo in dieci differenti stadi, i Dieci Tribunali dell’Inferno: alla fine del lungo dibattimento giudiziario, il defunto viene assegnato ad un supplizio specifico a seconda delle sue colpe e mancanze. Si tratta di pene e torture dantesche sia nella crudeltà che nel contrappasso, che l’anima patisce provando dolori atroci, proprio come se avesse ancora un corpo. Fra lame che mozzano la lingua ai bugiardi, seghe che tagliano in due gli uomini d’affari scorretti, stupratori e ladri gettati in calderoni d’olio bollente o cotti al vapore, gente macinata e ridotta in polvere con mole di pietra, il diyu è una fiera degli orrori senza fine. Le anime, una volta subìto il supplizio, vengono ricomposte e la pena ricomincia.

Una volta scontato il periodo di “carcere duro” previsto dai giudici, all’anima è somministrata una pozione che le fa dimenticare quanto ha visto, e infine viene rispedita sulla terra… spesso con un bel calcio nel sedere (il che spiega le voglie violacee all’altezza delle natiche che a volte mostrano i neonati).

Dicevamo però che il diyu è una sorta di versione ribaltata del nostro mondo. Non crediate quindi che le delibere del Tribunale dell’Inferno siano infallibili: proprio come accade nei Palazzi di Giustizia terreni, nell’oltretomba cinese possono verificarsi degli errori giudiziari; c’è una mole impressionante di pratiche burocratiche da sbrigare, e anche fra i demoni esistono corruzione e nepotismo.
Ecco perché i cinesi hanno sviluppato uno dei rituali sacrificali più particolari e bizzarri: quello delle qian zhi, le “banconote di carta”.

Si tratta di imitazioni di banconote su cui è impresso il volto del sovrano dell’Aldilà, simili ai soldi finti dei giochi in scatola, stampate su carta di riso ed emesse dalla Banca degli Inferi, Yantong Yinhang. I tagli variano (anche a seconda dell’inflazione!) da diecimila a centinaia di miliardi di yuan – anche se ovviamente il prezzo d’acquisto è infinitamente inferiore a quello nominale. Si possono comprare in svariati empori e negozi.

400685506_fe1e803396_z

Le banconote vengono bruciate in falò rituali accesi vicino alle tombe, così che il fuoco le “trasporti” oltre il confine fra vivi e morti, recapitandole al caro estinto. L’anima del defunto potrà quindi usare i soldi inviatigli dalla famiglia per acquistare beni di consumo, per “comprare” i favori delle guardie, oppure per guadagnarsi rispetto e status sociale, o magari addirittura per corrompere un giudice e ottenere così uno sconto di pena.

Vi sono regole strette e tabù collegati al modo in cui le banconote vanno bruciate, così come ad esempio regalarne una ad una persona ancora in vita è altamente offensivo: insomma, i soldi dei morti sono un affare serio per molti cinesi.
Il defunto è in definitiva considerato come un parente vivo e vegeto, che si trova in un luogo lontano e sta attraversando un periodo di difficoltà. Quale famiglia amorevole non gli manderebbe un po’ di soldi?

Se questo approccio, tipico della pratica e concreta mentalità cinese, ci sembra strano ad un primo sguardo, si tratta in realtà di una pratica non molto distante dal nostro atteggiamento verso i cari estinti: compriamo una bella lapide, raccomandiamo a Dio la loro anima, in modo da ottenere la loro benevolenza; in cambio, li preghiamo per avere intercessioni, protezione e favori.
Il culto degli antenati è pressoché universale, e la versione cinese delle qian zhi non fa che rendere evidente il meccanismo che lo sottende.
L’appartenenza alla società è di norma sancita dallo scambio (economico, di lavoro, di sostegno e di aiuto) fra i membri della società stessa: la barriera della morte, che in teoria dovrebbe interrompere questo commercio, non è affatto insormontabile, perché in tutte le culture lo scambio fra vivi e morti non viene mai meno, diventa semplicemente simbolico.

La peculiarità non sta quindi nel tentativo di regalare qualcosa ai morti, poiché è proprio questo il nocciolo del culto dei defunti, in ogni epoca e latitudine: vogliamo continuare a proteggere i nostri cari, e a dimostrare attraverso il dono sacrificale quanto forte sia ancora l’affetto che ci lega a loro. Il vero aspetto singolare di questa tradizione sta nella somiglianza quasi comica dell’Aldilà cinese con il nostro mondo.


Con il passare del tempo e con l’evolversi della tecnologia, ormai anche all’Inferno le semplici mazzette non bastano più. Forse i diavoli sono diventati più esigenti, o forse nell’Aldilà – dove comunque è indispensabile darsi un tono – le stesse anime dei defunti si fanno influenzare dalle mode consumistiche; fatto sta che nei negozi, accanto alle banconote, sono oggi esposte delle raffigurazioni cartacee di bottiglie di champagne (conquistare la simpatia del carceriere con un goccetto funziona sempre), prodotti di bellezza, completi in gessato, ciabatte contraffatte di Louis Vuitton con cui pavoneggiarsi, carte di credito, addirittura ville in miniatura, macchine di lusso, televisori al plasma, laptop, cellulari, iPhone e iPad taroccati con tanto di custodia. Tutto in carta, pronto da bruciare, in vendita per pochi euro.

Un oltretomba fin troppo familiare, che rispecchia vizi e problemi per i quali nemmeno la morte sembra essere un rimedio sicuro: non c’è da stupirsi quindi che, fra i vari gadget che si possono inviare nell’oltretomba, vi siano anche le repliche delle scatole di Viagra.

La maggior parte delle informazioni sono tratte dall’illuminante e consigliatissimo Tre uomini fanno una tigre. Viaggio nella cultura e nella lingua cinese (2014) di Nazzarena Fazzari.

Le esequie dei Toraja

Sulawesi è un’isola della Repubblica Indonesiana, situata ad est del Borneo e a sud delle Filippine. Nella provincia meridionale dell’isola, sulle montagne, vivono i Toraja, etnia indigena di circa 650.000 persone. I Toraja sono famosi per le loro abitazioni tradizionali a forma di palafitta e dal tetto allungato, chiamate tongkonan, e per le colorate fantasie geometriche con cui intagliano e decorano il legno.

Ma i Toraja sono noti anche per i loro complessi ed elaborati rituali funebri. Essi risalgono ad un’epoca remota, quando i Toraja seguivano ancora la loro religione politeistica tradizionale, chiamata aluk (“la Via”, un sistema di legge, fede e consuetudine); quest’ultima, con il tempo e a causa della lunga guerra contro i musulmani, è oggi divenuta un miscuglio di cristianesimo ed animismo.
Sebbene molti dei rituali “della vita”, cioè quelli propiziatori e purificatori, siano man mano stati abbandonati, le cerimonie “della morte” sono rimaste pressoché invariate.

Per i Toraja, la morte di un membro della famiglia è un evento di fondamentale importanza, e le celebrazioni funebri sono lunghe, complesse ed estremamente dispendiose, tanto da essere probabilmente il principale momento di aggregazione sociale per l’intera popolazione. Più il morto era potente o ricco, più le cerimonie sono fastose: se si tratta di un nobile, il funerale può contare migliaia di partecipanti. A spese della famiglia, in un campo prescelto per i rituali vengono costruite delle tettoie e dei gazebo per ospitare il pubblico, dei depositi per il riso, e altre strutture apposite; per diversi giorni ai pianti e alle lamentazioni si alternano la musica dei flauti e la recitazione di poemi e canzoni in onore del defunto.

Il momento culminante è il sacrificio degli animali – maiali, bufali, polli: ancora una volta, il numero varia a seconda dell’influenza sociale del morto. La lama del machete può abbattersi anche su un centinaio di animali. Particolarmente importanti sono però i bufali d’acqua: oltre ad essere le bestie più costose, sono quelle che assicureranno al morto l’arrivo più celere al Puya, la terra delle anime. Le loro carcasse vengono lasciate in fila sul prato, in attesa che il loro “proprietario” sia partito per il suo viaggio, alla conclusione dei funerali. In seguito, la loro carne verrà spartita fra gli ospiti, mangiata o venduta al mercato.

Viste le enormi spese da sostenere, la famiglia impiega spesso anche anni a cercare i fondi necessari per la cerimonia. Di conseguenza, i funerali si svolgono molto tempo dopo il decesso; in questo periodo di attesa, l’anima del morto è considerata ancora presente a tutti gli effetti e si aggira per il villaggio. Quando finalmente i funerali si sono compiuti, il suo corpo viene seppellito in un cimitero scavato all’interno di una parete di roccia, e un’effigie con le sue fattezze (chiamata tau tau) viene posta a guardia della tomba.

Se invece il morto era meno abbiente, la bara viene fissata proprio sul ciglio della parete, o in alcuni casi sospesa tramite delle funi. I sarcofagi rimarranno appesi fino a quando i sostegni non marciranno, facendoli crollare.

Anche i bambini vengono tumulati in questo modo, ma talvolta è riservato loro un posto in particolari loculi scavati all’interno di grandi tronchi d’albero.

Con questa prima sepoltura, però, il rapporto dei Toraja con i loro morti non è affatto finito. Ogni anno, in agosto, si svolge la cerimonia chiamata Ma’Nene, durante la quale i cadaveri dei defunti vengono riesumati.

I corpi mummificati vengono lavati, pettinati e vestiti in abiti nuovi dai familiari; nel caso fossero rimaste soltanto le ossa, invece, queste vengono comunque lavate e avvolte in stoffe pregiate.

Una volta che i rituali di cosmesi sul cadavere sono completati, i morti vengono fatti “camminare”, tenendoli ritti, e portati in giro per il villaggio. Questa parata, al di là delle valenze religiose, si colora del vero e proprio orgoglio di esibire i propri antenati: la gente li ammira, li tocca, e si scatta delle fotografie assieme a loro. Il Ma’Nene è il segno dell’amore dei parenti per il morto che, in effetti, non potrebbe essere più “vivo” di così.

Alla fine di questa processione d’onore, la salma viene seppellita per la seconda volta, nel suo luogo di ultimo riposo. Completato finalmente il passaggio del morto nell’aldilà, viene così sancita la sua appartenenza agli antenati, ogni sua ira è scongiurata, ed egli diviene una figura esclusivamente positiva, alla quale i discendenti potranno permettersi di chiedere protezione e consiglio.

Il rito del Ma’Nene può sembrare inusuale ed esotico ai nostri occhi odierni, abituati all’occultamento della morte e della salma, ma non è esattamente così: anche in Italia la riesumazione e l’affettuosa pulitura del cadavere fa parte della cultura tradizionale, come abbiamo spiegato in questo articolo.

Molte delle foto che trovate in questo post sono state scattate dall’amico Paul Koudounaris, il cui spettacolare libro fotografico Memento Mori dà conto dei suoi viaggi nei cinque continenti alla ricerca dei costumi funerari più particolari.

(Grazie, Gianluca!)

Holt Cemetery

6309487319_88b5621b9b_z

A New Orleans, se scavate due o tre metri nella terra, potreste trovare l’acqua. Questo è il motivo per cui, in tutto il Delta del Mississippi (e in gran parte della Louisiana, che per metà è occupata da una pianura alluvionale), di regola i cimiteri si sviluppano above ground, vale a dire in mausolei e loculi costruiti al di sopra del livello del suolo. Ma ci sono eccezioni, e una di queste è lo Holt Cemetery.

Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_Louisiana

Si tratta del “cimitero dei poveri”, ossia del luogo che ospita i cari estinti di coloro che non possono permettersi di far costruire una tomba sopraelevata. I costi funerari, negli Stati Uniti, sono esorbitanti e perfino famiglie in condizioni più o meno agiate devono talvolta aspettare mesi o anni prima di poter permettersi il lusso di una lapide. Lo Holt Cemetery è una delle “ultime spiagge”, riservate ai meno abbienti.

Sunken_Madonna,_Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_LA

Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_LA_Tilted_Angel

Non è raro trovarvi delle lapidi in legno o altri materiali, insegne di tipo artigianale, su cui sono stati iscritti con vernice e pennello le date di nascita e di morte del defunto.

Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_LA_Benjamin

holt1

2371028839_a52323026f_z

01

01l

In altri casi le tombe ospitano gli effetti personali del morto, perché la famiglia non aveva spazio o possibilità di metterli da parte – ma questa non è forse l’unica motivazione. New Orleans infatti è stata storicamente il crocevia di diverse etnie (neri, europei, isleños, creoli, cajun, filippini, ecc.), e ha raccolto un patrimonio culturale estremamente variegato e complesso. Questo si rispecchia anche nei rituali religiosi e funebri: alcuni di questi oggetti sono stati lasciati lì intenzionalmente, per accompagnare il parente nel suo viaggio nell’aldilà.

holt cemetery_38-L

nola-story-about-murder-capitol-holt-cemetery

Troy_Guitar_Holt_Cemetery

Ma il problema dello Holt Cemetery è che lo spazio non è mai abbastanza: quando una tomba è in stato di abbandono, i guardiani possono decidere di riutilizzarla. Non esiste un piano regolatore, non esistono posti assegnati, né un vero e proprio registro. I nuovi morti sono sepolti sopra a quelli vecchi, dei quali non rimane traccia alcuna. Così, per evitare che si salti a conclusioni affrettate, alcune famiglie continuano a lasciare nuovi oggetti, o a sistemare corone di fiori, a erigere recinti o semplicemente a modificare l’aspetto della lapide per segnalare che quel loculo è ancora “in uso”. Si racconta ad esempio di una tomba accanto alla quale qualche anno fa era stata posizionata una sedia di latta, e sulla sedia stava aperto un libro che cambiava ogni settimana.

4024479695_1ac45f9645

4470282845_fdb34381f5_o

6309459225_a2ce5f2522_z

6309982634_f703006dda_z

6309980896_3389a9b634_z

bright blue grave

29cemetary2

many materials used to surround this grave

interesting grave

p0138bk1

p0138bmp

I sepolcri più appariscenti, nel cimitero di Holt, sono quelli della famiglia Smith. Arthur Smith, infatti, è un artista locale che ha partecipato a diverse mostre di outsider art: ancora oggi lo si può vedere spingere il suo carrello per le discariche della città, alla ricerca di quei tesori con cui fabbricherà la sua arte povera. È proprio lui che mantiene in continua evoluzione le istallazioni che ha costruito attorno alle tombe di sua madre e di sua zia. (Potete trovare altre foto della sua produzione artistica qui).

3254043243_c6815fc375_o

3254043883_f74201d261_o

3440905589_00a15bd53f_o

3571256562_cb0564743a_o

Nonostante i recinti e le cure dei familiari, come dicevamo all’inizio, il grande problema di New Orleans è sempre stata l’acqua, e non solo quella violenta e brutale degli uragani: basta una piena del Mississippi per causare gravi fenomeni alluvionali. Un po’ di pioggia, perché cada anche l’ultimo tabù. Ecco allora che nel piccolo cimitero di Holt i morti tornano a galla. Dalla terra umida affiorano parti di teschi, ossa che sventolano ancora brandelli di vestiti, piccoli rimasugli sbiancati dal tempo e dalla natura.

holtcemeterygraves

07l

url

tumblr_m1oy338No81r8r4lto1_500

potters field 015

potters field 005

3068523301_498ccf225d

C’è chi, venendo a conoscenza della situazione allo Holt Cemetery, grida allo scandalo, al sacrilegio e allo svilimento della dignità umana; ed è ironico, e in un certo senso poetico, il fatto che un simile cimitero sorga proprio a ridosso di un quartiere particolarmente benestante della città.

Questo strano luogo in cui i morti non hanno lapide, né una sepoltura sicura, sembra simboleggiare lo scorrere delle cose del mondo più che un cimitero opulento, circondato da alte pareti di marmo, in cui si entra come in un austero santuario in cui il tempo si sia fermato. Holt è il cimitero dei poveri, è tenuto vivo dai poveri. Qui non ci si può permettere nemmeno l’illusione dell’eterno, e la memoria esiste solo finché vi è ancora qualcuno che ricordi.

7393363262_76f5bab25b_z

(Grazie, Marco!)

L’effigie di Sarah Hare

Stow Bardolph è piccolo villaggio del Norfolk, in Inghilterra, che conta 1000 abitanti, quasi tutti contadini. Un turista che per caso si trovasse a passare per quelle piatte campagne disseminate di pecore non troverebbe nulla di particolarmente interessante da visitare nel minuscolo borgo, e finirebbe a rintanarsi di fianco al focolare nell’unico pub di Stow Bardolph, chiamato Hare Arms, che più che un pub è una tenuta, attorniato com’è da giardini in cui beccheggiano pavoni e galline.

DSCF6533

8337081_123894258815
Anche una visita alla chiesetta del paese, dedicata alla Trinità, potrebbe ad una prima occhiata rivelarsi deludente, visto l’interno spoglio e “povero”. Eppure, in un angolo, c’è uno strano armadietto chiuso. Chi l’ha aperto, giura che non scorderà più quel momento.

Dscf6508

8337081_123894248333
“Avevo visto sue fotografie negli anni, da quando l’avevo scoperta a scuola, ma nulla mi avrebbe potuto preparare al brivido della porta dell’armadietto che si apriva. Allora ho capito il motivo di questa porta – lei è terrificante, il suo volto tozzo, verrucoso, lo sguardo sprezzante”, riporta un visitatore.

Dscf6510
Ma chi è la donna ritratta nella scultura?
La macabra effigie in cera contenuta nell’armadietto è quella di Sarah Hare, morta nel 1744 all’età di 55 anni dopo che, secondo la leggenda, aveva osato cucire di domenica, nel giorno di riposo dedicato al Signore; si era quindi punta un dito, forse per punizione divina, soccombendo in seguito alla setticemia. A parte questo episodio, la sua vita non era stata per nulla eccezionale. Eppure il suo testamento, se da un lato ostentava una carità e una generosità notevoli, dall’altra includeva una strana disposizione: “Desidero che sei uomini poveri della parrocchia di Stow o Wimbotsham mi sotterrino, e ricevano cinque scellini per il servizio. Desidero che tutti i poveri di Alms Row abbiano due scellini e una moneta da sei penny ciascuno davanti alla mia tomba, prima che mi calino giù. […] Desidero che la mia faccia e le mie mani siano modellati in cera, con un pezzo di velluto color porpora quale ornamento sulla mia testa, e messi in una cassa di mogano con un vetro antestante, e che siano fissati a questo modo vicino al luogo dove riposa il mio cadavere; sul contenitore potranno essere incisi il mio nome e la data della mia morte nel modo che più si desidera. Se non riuscirò ad eseguire tutto questo mentre sono ancora in vita, potrà essere fatto dopo la mia morte”.

8337081_123894253992
Non sappiamo se i calchi del volto e delle mani vennero eseguiti mentre Sarah Hare era ancora viva, oppure post-mortem: quello che è chiaro è che il suo testamento venne rispettato alla lettera. Possiamo immaginarci la solenne processione con cui il busto venne portato, nell’armadio di legno, fino alla cappella di famiglia che l’avrebbe infine ospitato per i secoli a venire.

Di sculture funebri in marmo che ritraggono il defunto è pieno il mondo, ma la statua in cera di Sarah Hare è l’unica di questo tipo in Inghilterra, se si escludono le effigi presenti nell’abbazia di Westminster. La cosa più straordinaria è l’ordinarietà del soggetto – una donna non celebre, né nobile, di certo non bella, che nella sua vita non diede alcun contributo particolare alla Storia.

DSCF6510 0
Nel 1987 la statua venne restaurata da alcuni esperti che lavoravano anche per Madame Tussauds, assieme all’armadio che negli anni era stato attaccato dai roditori, e all’antica stoffa di velluto rosso ormai quasi distrutta. Oggi quindi l’immagine di cera resiste ancora, quasi 270 anni dopo la sua morte.

In questi 270 anni si sono avvicendati re e regine, l’impero Britannico è sorto e crollato, sono state combattute sanguinose guerre di dimensioni inaudite, il mondo e la vita sono cambiati radicalmente. Ma, in uno sperduto paesino di campagna, dietro un’anta di mogano, ancora non è finita la lunga, immobile e silenziosa veglia che Sarah Hare si è scelta come propria personale forma di immortalità.

2382602226_ab0d8f3851_z

Dakhma

tumblr_mb03366zO61r86b9lo8_r1_1280

Anche le religioni muoiono. Un tempo il mazdeismo o zoroastrismo, fondato sugli insegnamenti di Zarathustra, il profeta che nacque ridendo, era la religione più diffusa al mondo, la principale nell’area mediorientale prima che vi si affermasse l’Islam. Oggi invece i seguaci sono meno di 200.000, e il numero continua a diminuire anche a causa della chiusura dell’ortodossia verso i non-credenti, tanto che nei prossimi decenni questa fede potrebbe addirittura scomparire. Attualmente sono i Parsi, emigrati secoli fa dall’Iran  verso l’India, a mantenerne vivi i precetti.

Religione eminentemente monoteistica, il mazdeismo fa del dualismo fra bene e male la sua principale caratteristica: all’uomo è chiesto di scegliere fra la via della Verità e quella della Menzogna, tra la giustizia e l’ingiustizia, tra la luce e le tenebre, tra l’ordine e il disordine. Il puro, dunque, dovrà essere attento a non essere contaminato in nulla da azioni, oggetti o pensieri malvagi. Proprio per questo gli zoroastriani hanno elaborato un particolare rito funebre, volto a limitare e tenere distanti gli effetti nefasti della morte sui viventi.

rito_parsi
Il cadavere è, infatti, impuro, perché appena dopo la morte viene invaso da demoni e spiriti che rischiano di contaminare non soltanto gli uomini retti, ma anche gli elementi. Non è possibile dunque cremare il corpo di un defunto, perché il fuoco – che è elemento sacro – ne sarebbe infettato; sotterrarlo, d’altra parte, porterebbe a un inquinamento della terra.

BombayTempleOfSilenceEngraving

bourne1880s

tumblr_lzgj77xKjl1qi8q6uo1_r1_500
Così gli zoroastriani costruiscono da secoli un tipo speciale di struttura, chiamata dakhma, o “torre del silenzio”. Si tratta di una impalcatura di legno e argilla, talvolta simile a una vera e propria torretta, alta fino a 10 metri circa. La piattaforma superiore, dalla circonferenza rialzata e inclinata verso l’interno, è suddivisa in tre cerchi concentrici, talvolta suddivisi in celle, e ha al suo centro un’apertura o un pozzo.

tour_silence2

Tower_of_Silence_(Yazd)_006
Qui i cadaveri vengono disposti da speciali addetti, i Nâsâsâlar (letteralmente, “coloro che si prendono cura di ciò che è impuro”), gli unici che hanno la facoltà di toccare i morti: gli uomini vengono sistemati nel cerchio esterno, le donne in quello mediano e i bambini in quello più interno.

tower

tumblr_mdf30g7RdQ1qhxm2vo1_1280

Lì vengono lasciati in pasto agli avvoltoi e ai corvi (che normalmente li divorano nel giro di tre o quattro ore) e rimangono sulla dakhma anche per un anno, finché le loro ossa non siano state completamente ripulite e sbiancate dagli uccelli, dal sole e dalla pioggia. Le ossa vengono infine gettate nel pozzo centrale, dove la pioggia e il fango le disintegreranno a poco a poco, facendo filtrare attraverso strati di carbone e sabbia quello che resta del corpo, prima di restituirlo alla terra e, ove possibile, al mare, tramite un acquedotto sotterraneo.

PAR100418

PAR254219

tumblr_m9wqmczkWc1r1kbga

tumblr_m9wqm4hGiM1r1kbga
Il rituale delle torri del silenzio è oggi sempre più a rischio a causa di due enormi problemi: la sovrappopolazione e la scarsità di avvoltoi. Il numero sempre maggiore di cadaveri costringe a gettare nel pozzo centrale anche i corpi non ancora interamente decomposti, causando un intasamento che comporta evidenti problemi igienici, soprattutto se si pensa che a Mumbai il parco funebre sta sulla collina residenziale di Malabar Hill, a meno di trecento metri dai primi caseggiati. Nonostante la comunità Parsi abbia stanziato 200.000 euro l’anno per l’acquisto e l’allevamento di avvoltoi specificamente addestrati, sono sempre più numerosi i fedeli che optano per il cimitero o la cremazione.

torri_malabar

tumblr_lz17cmdIxN1qjzpg0o1_1280

Towers-of-Silence2
Attualmente esistono all’incirca sessanta dakhma attive, a Mumbai, Pune, Calcutta, Bangalore e nello stato del Gujarat. Ma questa antica tradizione potrebbe presto scomparire: troppo lunga e troppo poco pratica.

(Grazie, Francesco!)

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – VII

Immagine

Concita De Gregorio

COSÌ È LA VITA – Imparare a dirsi addio

(2011, Einaudi)

Ancora un libro sulla morte, ma questa volta è una piccola gemma del tutto particolare. Una reazione, una ribellione etica e morale quella che anima Concita De Gregorio in questo libro a tratti doloroso, a tratti dolcissimo: la rivolta contro la scomparsa della vecchiaia e della morte dalle nostre quotidianità. La voglia, anzi, la necessità di essere in grado di rispondere alle domande dei nostri bambini: “a quanti anni si muore?”, “ma si muore per sempre?”, “mamma, per favore, potrei morire io prima di te?”. Perché molto spesso sono gli adulti, ad essere impreparati. E così la De Gregorio cerca di trovare un senso sul filo dei ricordi, di vari funerali sorprendenti che hanno trasformato il momento del dolore in occasione di vita e di meraviglia. Di fronte ad un mondo che predica l’estetica dell’eterna giovinezza, avere la possibilità di invecchiare è divenuta ormai una questione di dignità: e così lo è anche imparare il senso della perdita, accettare la possibile sconfitta, e insegnare anche questo ai bambini.

“Penso a Stefania Sandrelli morente che, ne La prima cosa bella, chiede a suo figlio se ha bisogno di mutande, calzini. Poi sospira: “Però ci siamo tanto divertiti”. È una fatica, raccontarsela tutta, ma una grande soddisfazione, un sollievo e una cura. Un’avventura magnifica. Ci siamo tanto divertiti, si dice sempre alla fine”.

Immagine

Christian Uva

IL TERRORE CORRE SUL VIDEO

(2008, Rubbettino Editore)

Il sottotiolo del libro di Christian Uva è Estetica della violenza dalle BR ad Al Quaeda. È l’immaginario del terrore che quotidianamente si riversa nelle nostre case attraverso TV, internet, telefonini: il crollo dell’11 Settembre, le minacce dei jihadisti, le esecuzioni sommarie, le decapitazioni degli ostaggi, l’impiccagione di Saddam Hussein ripresa con un videofonino, i video-messaggi di Bin Laden, le foto delle torture di Abu Ghraib, e via dicendo. Un fiume di immagini feroci che costellano e modificano il nostro stesso modo di vedere e interpretare il mondo. Christian Uva analizza il mutare nel tempo di questo genere di audiovisivi iperrealisti, e ne scandaglia l’estetica e la composizione semiotica. Scopriamo così i messaggi nascosti, inaspettati, che quelle immagini elettroniche contengono; capiamo come agiscono a livello visivo, qual è l’idea registica che sta alla base; e comprendiamo quanto l’utilizzo di questi filmati sia paragonabile a un’arma vera e propria, che si infiltra nelle più piccole crepe del nostro immaginario.

Le doppie esequie

Facendo riferimento al nostro articolo sulla meditazione orientale asubha, un lettore di Bizzarro Bazar ci ha segnalato un luogo particolarmente interessante: il cosiddetto cimitero delle Monache a Napoli, nella cripta del Castello Aragonese ad Ischia. In questo ipogeo fin dal 1575 le suore dell’ordine delle Clarisse deponevano le consorelle defunte su alcuni appositi sedili ricavati nella pietra, e dotati di un vaso. I cadaveri venivano quindi fatti “scolare” su questi seggioloni, e gli umori della decomposizione raccolti nel vaso sottostante. Lo scopo di questi sedili-scolatoi (chiamati anche cantarelle in area campana) era proprio quello di liberare ed essiccare le ossa tramite il deflusso dei liquidi cadaverici e talvolta raggiungere una parziale mummificazione, prima che i resti venissero effettivamente sepolti o conservati in un ossario; ma durante il disgustoso e macabro processo le monache spesso si recavano in meditazione e in preghiera proprio in quella cripta, per esperire da vicino in modo inequivocabile la caducità della carne e la vanità dell’esistenza terrena. Nonostante si trattasse comunque di un’epoca in cui il contatto con la morte era molto più quotidiano ed ordinario di quanto non lo sia oggi, ciò non toglie che essere rinchiuse in un sotterraneo ad “ammirare” la decadenza e i liquami mefitici della putrefazione per ore non dev’essere stato facile per le coraggiose monache.

Questa pratica della scolatura, per quanto possa sembrare strana, era diffusa un tempo in tutto il Mezzogiorno, e si ricollega alla peculiare tradizione della doppia sepoltura.
L’elaborazione del lutto, si sa, è uno dei momenti più codificati e importanti del vivere sociale. Noi tutti sappiamo cosa significhi perdere una persona cara, a livello personale, ma spesso dimentichiamo che le esequie sono un fatto eminentemente sociale, prima che individuale: si tratta di quello che in antropologia viene definito “rito di passaggio”, così come le nascite, le iniziazioni (che fanno uscire il ragazzo dall’infanzia per essere accettato nella comunità degli adulti) e i matrimoni. La morte è intesa come una rottura nello status sociale – un passaggio da una categoria ad un’altra. È l’assegnazione dell’ultima denominazione, il nostro cartellino identificativo finale, il “fu”.

Tra il momento della morte e quello della sepoltura c’è un periodo in cui il defunto è ancora in uno stato di passaggio; il funerale deve sancire la sua uscita dal mondo dei vivi e la sua nuova appartenenza a quello dei morti, nel quale potrà essere ricordato, pregato, e così via. Ma finché il morto resta in bilico fra i due mondi, è visto come pericoloso.

Così, per tracciare in maniera definitiva questo limite, nel Sud Italia e più specificamente a Napoli era in uso fino a pochi decenni fa la cosiddetta doppia sepoltura: il cadavere veniva seppellito per un periodo di tempo (da sei mesi a ben più di un anno) e in seguito riesumato.
“Dopo la riesumazione, la bara viene aperta dagli addetti e si controlla che le ossa siano completamente disseccate. In questo caso lo scheletro viene deposto su un tavolo apposito e i parenti, se vogliono, danno una mano a liberarlo dai brandelli di abiti e da eventuali residui della putrefazione; viene lavato prima con acqua e sapone e poi “disinfettato” con stracci imbevuti di alcool che i parenti, “per essere sicuri che la pulizia venga fatta accuratamente”, hanno pensato a procurare assieme alla naftalina con cui si cosparge il cadavere e al lenzuolo che verrà periodicamente cambiato e che fa da involucro al corpo del morto nella sua nuova condizione. Quando lo scheletro è pulito lo si può più facilmente trattare come un oggetto sacro e può quindi essere avviato alla sua nuova casa – che in genere si trova in un luogo lontano da quello della prima sepoltura – con un rito di passaggio che in scala ridotta […] riproduce quello del corteo funebre che accompagnò il morto alla tomba” (Robert Hertz, Contributo alla rappresentazione collettiva della morte, 1907).

Le doppie esequie servivano a sancire definitivamente il passaggio all’aldilà, e a porre fine al periodo di lutto. Con la seconda sepoltura il morto smetteva di restare in una pericolosa posizione liminale, era morto veramente, il suo passaggio era completo.

Scrive Francesco Pezzini: “la riesumazione dei resti e la loro definitiva collocazione sono in stretta relazione metaforica con il cammino dell’anima: la realtà fisica del cadavere è specchio significante della natura immateriale dell’anima; per questo motivo la salma deve presentarsi completamente scheletrizzata, asciutta, ripulita dalle parte molli. Quando la metamorfosi cadaverica, con il potere contaminante della morte significato dalle carni in disfacimento, si sarà risolta nella completa liberazione delle ossa, simbolo di purezza e durata, allora l’anima potrà dirsi definitivamente approdata nell’aldilà: solo allora l’impurità del cadavere prenderà la forma del ‹‹caro estinto›› e un morto pericoloso e contaminante i vivi si sarà trasformato in un’anima pacificata da pregare in altarini domestici . Viceversa, di defunti che riesumati presentassero ancora ampie porzioni di tessuti molli o ossa giudicate non sufficientemente nette, di questi si dovrà rimandare il rito di aggregazione al regno dei morti e presumere che si tratti di ‹‹male morti››, anime che ancora vagano inquiete su questo mondo e per la cui liberazione si può sperare reiterando il lavoro rituale che ne accompagni il transito. La riesumazione-ricognizione delle ossa è la fase conclusiva del lungo periodo di transizione del defunto: i suoi esiti non sono scontati e l’atmosfera è carica di ‹‹significati angoscianti››; ora si decide – in relazione allo stato in cui si presentano i suoi resti – se il morto è divenuto un’anima vicina a Dio, nella cui intercessione sarà possibile sperare e che accanto ai santi troverà spazio nell’universo sacro popolare”.

Gli scolatoi (non soltanto in forma di sedili, ma anche orizzontali o molto spesso verticali) sono inoltre collegati ad un’altra antica tradizione del meridione, ossia quella delle terresante. Situate comunemente sotto alcune chiese e talvolta negli stessi ipogei dove si trovavano gli scolatoi, erano delle vasche o delle stanze senza pavimentazione in cui venivano seppelliti i cadaveri, ricoperti di pochi centimetri di terra lasciata smossa. Era d’uso, fino al ‘700, officiare anche particolari messe nei luoghi che ospitavano le terresante, e non di rado i fedeli passavano le mani sulla terra in segno di contatto con il defunto.
Anche in questo caso le ossa venivano recuperate dopo un certo periodo di tempo: se una qualche mummificazione aveva avuto luogo, e le parti molli erano tutte o in parte incorrotte, le spoglie erano ritenute in un certo senso sacre o miracolose. Le terresante, nonostante si trovassero nei sotterranei all’interno delle chiese, erano comunemente gestite dalle confraternite laiche.

La cosa curiosa è che la doppia sepoltura non è appannaggio esclusivo del Sud Italia, ma si ritrova diffusa (con qualche ovvia variazione) ai quattro angoli del pianeta: in gran parte del Sud Est asiatico, nell’antico Messico (come dimostrano recenti ritrovamenti) e soprattutto in Oceania, dove è praticata tutt’oggi. Le modalità sono pressoché le medesime delle doppie esequie campane – sono i parenti stretti che hanno il compito di ripulire le ossa del caro estinto, e la seconda sepoltura avviene in luogo differente da quello della prima, proprio per marcare il carattere definitivo di questa inumazione.

Se volete approfondire ecco un eccellente studio di Francesco Pezzini sulle doppie esequie e la scolatura nell’Italia meridionale; un altro studio di A. Fornaciari, V. Giuffra e F. Pezzini si concentra più in particolare sui processi di tanametamorfosi e mummificazione in Sicilia. Buona parte delle fotografie contenute in questo articolo provengono da quest’ultima pubblicazione.

(Grazie, Massimiliano!)