Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 9

In the 9th episode of Bizzarro Bazar: the incredible history of tonic water; a touching funerary artifact; the mysterious “singing sand” of the desert. [Be sure to turn on English captions.]

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Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

Pestilence, Sacred Trees And A Glass of Tonic Water

I have a soft spot for tonic water. Maybe because it’s the only soda beverage with a taste I never fully understood, impossible to describe: an ambiguous aroma, a strange contrast between that pinch of sugar and a sour vein that makes your palate dry.
Every now and then, during summer evenings, I happen to take a sip on my balcony while I watch the Alban Hills, where the Roman Castles cling to a long-dead volcano. And as I bring the glass to my lips, I can’t help thinking about how strange history of mankind can be.

Kings, wars, crusades, invasions, revolutions and so on. What is the most powerful cause for change? What agent produced the most dramatic long-term modification of human society?
The answer is: epidemics.
According to some historians, no other element has had such a profound impact on our culture, so much so that without the Plague, social and scientific progress as we know it might not have been possible (I wrote about this some time ago). With each stroke of epidemic, the survivors were left less numerous and much richer, so the arts and sciences could develop and flourish; but the plague also changed the history of medicine and its methods.

“Plague” is actually a very generic word, just like “disease”: it was used throughout history to define different kinds of epidemic. Among these, one of the most ancient and probably the worst that ever hit mankind, was malaria.

It is believed that malaria killed more people than all other causes of death put together throughout the entire human history.
In spite of an impressive reduction of the disease burden in the last decade, the World Health Organization estimates that as many as 300 million people are infected by the disease every year. That’s about the size of the entire US population. Of those who fall sick, more than 400,000 die every year, mostly children: malaria claims the life of one child every two minutes.

Malaria takes its name from the Italian words “mala aria”, the bad air one could breathe in the marshes and swamps that surrounded the city of Rome. It was believed that the filthy, smelly air was the cause of the ague. (Giovanni Maria Lancisi suggested in 1712 that mosquitoes might have something to do with the epidemic, but only at the end of the Nineteenth century Sir Ronald Ross, an English Nobel-awarded gentleman, proved that malaria is transmitted by the Anopheles mosquito.)

Back in Medieval Rome, every summer brought back the scourge, and people died by the hundreds. The plague hit indistinctively: it killed aristocrats, warriors, peasants, cardinals, even Popes. As Goffredo da Viterbo wrote in 1167, “When unable to defend herself by the sword, Rome could defend herself by means of the fever”.

Malaria was widespread throughout Europe, Asia, and Africa. Yet, no one knew exactly what it was, nor did they know how to treat it. There was no cure, no remedy.

Well, this is the part that really blows my mind. I cannot shake the feeling that someone was playing a bad joke on us humans. Because, actually, there was a remedy. But the mocking Gods had placed it in a land which had never been attained by malaria. Worse: it was in a land that no one had discovered yet.

As Europe continued to be ravaged by the terrible marsh fevers, the solution was lying hidden in the jungles of Peru.

Enter the Jesuits.
Their first mission in Peru was founded in 1609. Jesuits could not perform medicine: the instructions left by the founder of the order, St Ignatius of Loyola, forbade his followers to become doctors, for they should only focus on the souls of men. Despite being expressly forbidden to practice medicine, Jesuit priests often turned their attention to the study of herbs and plants. Father Agustino Salumbrino was a Jesuit, and a pharmacist. He was among the firsts missionaries in Peru, and he lived in the College of San Pablo in Lima, putting his knowledge of pharmacy to good use as he built what would become the best and biggest pharmacy in the whole New World. Jesuits wanted to convert the natives to Catholicism, but understood that it couldn’t be done by means of force: first they needed to understand the indios and their culture. The native healers, of course, knew all sorts of plant remedies, and the priests took good notice of all this knowledge, picking never-before-seen plants and herbs, recording and detailing their effects.
That’s when they noted that the Indians who lived in the Andes sometimes drank infusions of a particular bark to stop from shivering. The Jesuits made the connection: maybe that bark could be effective in the treatment of marsh fevers.

By the early 1630s Father Salumbrino (possibly with the help of another Jesuit, Bernabé Cobo) decided to send a small bundle of this dried bark back to Rome, to see if it could help with malaria.
In Rome, at the time, there was another extraordinary character: Cardinal Juan De Lugo, director of the pharmacy of the Hospital Santo Spirito. He was the one responsible for turning the pharmacy from an artisan studio to something approaching an industrial production line: under his direction, the apothecary resembled nothing that had gone before it, either in scale or vision. Thousands of jars and bottles. shelves filled with recipes for preparations of medicines, prescriptions for their use and descriptions of illnesses and symptoms. De Lugo would cure the poor, distributing free medicine. When the Peruvian bark arrived in Rome, De Lugo understood its potential and decided to publicize the medicine as much as he could: this was the first remedy that actually worked against the fever.

Peru handing Science a cinchona branch (XVII C. etching).

The bark of the cinchona tree contains 4 different alkaloids that act against the malaria parasite, the most important of which is quinine. Quinine’s secret is that it calms the fever and shivering but also kills the parasite that causes malaria, so it can be used both as a cure and a preventive treatment.

But not everyone was happy with the arrival of this new, miraculous bark powder.

First of all, it had been discovered by Jesuits. Therefore, all Protestants immediately refused to take the medicine. They just could not accept that the cure for the most ancient and deadly of diseases came from their religious rivals. So, in Holland, Germany and England pretty much everybody rejected the cure.
Secondly, the bark was awfully bitter. “We knew it, those Jesuits are trying to poison us!

But maybe the most violent refusal came from the world of medicine itself.
This might not come as a surprise, once you know how doctors treated malaria before quinine. Many medieval cures involved transferring the disease onto animals or objects: a sheep was brought into the bedroom of a fever patient, and holy chants were recited to displace the ailment from the human to the beast. One cure that was still popular in the seventeenth century involved a sweet apple and an incantation to the three kings who followed the star to Bethlehem: “Cut the apple into three parts. In the first part, write the words Ave Gaspari. In the second write Ave Balthasar, in the third Ave Melchior. Then eat each segment early on three consecutive mornings, and recite three Our Fathers and three Hail Marys”.

Even after the Middle Ages, the medical orthodoxy still blindly believed in Galen‘s teachings. Traditionalists who wanted to preserve the ancient doctrine of Galenic medicine at any cost felt the cinchona bark would overturn their view of the human body – and it was actually going to. According to Galen, fever was a bile-caused disorder: it was not a symptom but a disease in itself. A patient with a high fever was said to be suffering from “fermentation” of the blood. When fermented, blood behaved a little like boiling milk, producing a thick residue that to be got rid of before the patient could recover. For this reason the preferred treatments for fever were bleeding, purging, or both.
But Peruvian bark seemed to be curing the fever without producing any residue. How could it be possible?

The years passed, and the success of the cure came from those who tried it: no one knew why, but it worked. In time, cinchona bark would change the way doctors approached diseases: it would provide one of decisive blows against Galen’s doctrine, and open the door to modern medicine.

A big breakthrough for the acceptance of Jesuits Bark came from a guy named Robert Tabor. Talbor was not a doctor: he had no proper training, he was just a quack. But he managed to become quite famous and fashionable, and when summoned to cure Charles II of England of malaria, he used a secret remedy which he had been experimenting with. It worked, and of course it turned out to be the Jesuits powder, mixed with wine. Charles appointed Talbor as his personal physician much to the fury of the English medical establishment and sent him over to France where he proceeded to cure the King’s son too. Without really realizing it, Talbor had discovered the right way to administrate cinchona bark: the most potent mixtures were made by dissolving the powder into wine — not water — as the cinchona alkaloids were highly soluble in alcohol.

By the end of the 18th century, nearly three hundred ships were arriving in Spanish ports from the Americas every year — almost one each day. One out of three came from Peru, none of which ever failed to carry cinchona bark.

Caventou & Pelletier.

And in 1820, quinine was officially born: two scientists, Pelletier and Caventou, succeeded in isolating the chemical quinine and worked out how to extract the alkaloid from the wood. They named their drug from the original Inca word for the cinchona tree bark, quina or quina-quina, which means “bark of barks” or “holy bark”.

Many other battles were fought for quinine, lives were risked and lost. In the 1840s and 1850s British soldiers and colonials in India were using more than 700 tons of bark every year, but the Spanish had the monopoly on quinine. English and Dutch explorers began to smuggle seeds, and it was the Dutch who finally succeded in establishing plantations in Java, soon controlling the world’s supplies.

During WWII the Japanese occupied Java, and once more men wnt to war over tree bark extract; but fortunately this time a synthetic version of quinine was developed, and for the first time pharmaceutical companies were able to produce the drugs without the need for big plantations.

Troops based in the Colonies all consumed anti-fever, quinine-based pharmaceuticals, like for instance Warburg’s Tincture. This led to the creation, through the addition of soda, of several  QuinineTonic Waters; in 1870 Schweppe’s “Indian Tonic Water” was commercialized, based on the famous carbonated mineral water invented around 1790 by Swiss watchmaker Jacob Schweppe. Indian Tonic Water was specifically aimed at British colonials who started each day with a strong dose of bitter quinine sulphate. It contained citric acid, to dissolve the quinine, and a touch of sugar.

So here I am, now, looking at the Alban Hills. The place where I live is precisely where the dreaded ancient swamps once began; the deadly “bad air” originated from these very lands.
Of course, malaria was eradicated in the 1950s throughout the Italian peninsula. Yet every time I pour myself a glass of tonic water, and taste its bitter quinine flavor, I can’t help thinking about the strange history of mankind — in which a holy tree from across the ocean might prove more valuable than all the kings, wars and crusades in the world.

Most of the info in this post are taken from Fiammetta Rocco, The Miraculous Fever-Tree. Malaria, medicine and the cure that changed the world (2003 Harper-Collins).

Il più misterioso dei libri

Immaginate di trovare, sepolto fra gli innumerevoli tomi custoditi gelosamente all’interno di una biblioteca gesuita, un misterioso manoscritto antico. Immaginate che questo manoscritto sia redatto in una lingua incomprensibile, o forse crittografato affinché soltanto gli iniziati siano in grado di leggerlo. Immaginate che sia corredato da fantastiche illustrazioni a colori di piante che non esistono, diagrammi di pianeti sconosciuti, strani marchingegni e strutture a vasche comunicanti in cui esseri femminili stanno immersi in liquidi scuri… e poi diagrammi intricati, agglomerati di petali, tubi, bizzarre ampolle, simboli raffiguranti cellule o esseri proteiformi…

Questo non è l’inizio di un film o di un romanzo. Questo è quello che accadde veramente a Wilfrid Voynich, mercante di libri rari, nel 1912, quando acquistò dal Collegio gesuita di Mondragone un lotto di libri antichi. Da quasi un secolo il cosiddetto “manoscritto Voynich” sconcerta gli esperti, impenetrabile a qualsiasi tentativo di decifrazione, e il dibattito sulla sua autenticità non è ancora giunto a conclusione.

Il libro sembra una sorta di compendio o catalogo biologico-naturalistico. I lunghi elenchi e indici numerati fanno riferimento alle illustrazioni ed evidentemente le analizzano con descrizioni meticolose. Il problema, se davvero si tratta di un’enciclopedia naturalistica, è che non sappiamo a quale natura si riferisca, visto che le piante disegnate a vividi colori non sono note ad alcun botanico. Anche i diagrammi che sembrano riferirsi all’astronomia (sarebbero riconoscibili alcuni segni zodiacali) lasciano interdetti gli studiosi. Ora, crittografare una lingua è possibile, ma crittografare un’immagine è davvero un’opera inaudita. Forse potremmo capire qualcosa in più se sapessimo chi è l’autore del manoscritto…

Un’analisi agli infrarossi avrebbe evidenziato una firma, in seguito cancellata: “Jacobi a Tepenece”. Questa firma sarebbe dunque quella di Jacobus Horcicki, alchimista del 1600 alla corte dell’imperatore Rodolfo II. Questo controverso sovrano, personaggio malinconico e schivo, interessato più all’occultismo e all’arte che alla politica, costruì la più grande wunderkammer del suo tempo, ammassando e catalogando oggetti meravigliosi da tutto il mondo, testi esoterici e dipinti dal valore inestimabile. Secondo molti studiosi era talmente ossessionato dalle arti oscure che il manoscritto Voynich potrebbe essere il risultato di una complessa truffa ai suoi danni. L’imperatore, come in molti sapevano, era disposto a sborsare somme enormi per acquistare testi magici ed alchemici. E allora perché non fabbricarne uno, dalla lingua incomprensibile, dalle immagini fantastiche, per impressionarlo e spillargli un bel po’ di quattrini? Forse gli anonimi truffatori avevano inizialmente firmato la loro opera con il nome dell’alchimista più famoso, Jacobus Horcicki appunto, per poi ritornare sui loro passi e cancellarlo, considerandolo un azzardo troppo rischioso?

La tesi del falso è supportata in gran parte dagli studi crittografici: nonostante non sia mai stato decifrato, nel linguaggio utilizzato nel manoscritto ci sono alcuni indizi che “puzzano” di bufala. La struttura sintattica, ad esempio, sembrerebbe semplicissima, fin troppo elementare; alcune parole, poi, vengono spesso ripetute consecutivamente, in alcuni casi addirittura per quattro volte. Eppure nessun esperto è riuscito a scoprire quale sia il metodo con cui il libro è stato composto, visto che non vi è utilizzato nessuno dei sistemi crittografici che sappiamo essere noti all’epoca.

All’inizio del 2011 è stata finalmente condotta un’analisi al carbonio-14 per datare il manoscritto. E, come c’era da aspettarsi, ecco l’ennesima sorpresa! Il manoscritto risale a un periodo compreso fra il 1404 e il 1438, e quindi è ben più antico di quanto finora ritenuto. Purtroppo questa scoperta non mette il punto finale alle discussioni…

Infatti le analisi al radiocarbonio non possono essere effettuate sugli inchiostri, ma soltanto sulle pagine. Se gli anonimi truffatori seicenteschi fossero riusciti a procurarsi un po’ di carta originale del 1400 su cui scrivere, allora la loro burla metterebbe nel sacco anche le nostre tecnologie.

Il mistero del manoscritto Voynich resiste dunque al passare del tempo. Ma da oggi anche voi, crittografi dilettanti, potrete cimentarvi nella decifrazione, perché il libro è stato finalmente pubblicato online per la consultazione gratuita. E se proprio non ambite ad essere i primi a svelare l’enigma, vi consigliamo ugualmente di sfogliarlo, anche soltanto per lasciarvi conquistare dal fascino che queste pagine emanano. Perché, diciamocelo sinceramente, gran parte dei cosiddetti “misteri” valgono soprattutto per le emozioni e la poesia che ci regalano finché restano insondabili e imperscrutabili… simboli mitici di ciò che sta al di là della nostra comprensione. E il manoscritto Voynich, che sia un falso oppure no, è capace di gettarci nell’incanto dell’ignoto.

Le scansioni delle pagine dell’intero manoscritto si trovano su questo sito. Questa invece è la pagina di Wikipedia, che riassume bene le varie ipotesi, teorie e ricerche nate attorno al libro.