Unearthing Gorini, The Petrifier

This post originally appeared on The Order of the Good Death

Many years ago, as I had just begun to explore the history of medicine and anatomical preparations, I became utterly fascinated with the so-called “petrifiers”: 19th and early 20th century anatomists who carried out obscure chemical procedures in order to give their specimens an almost stone-like, everlasting solidity.
Their purpose was to solve two problems at once: the constant shortage of corpses to dissect, and the issue of hygiene problems (yes, back in the time dissection was a messy deal).
Each petrifier perfected his own secret formula to achieve virtually incorruptible anatomical preparations: the art of petrifaction became an exquisitely Italian specialty, a branch of anatomy that flourished due to a series of cultural, scientific and political factors.

When I first encountered the figure of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881), I made the mistake of assuming his work was very similar to that of his fellow petrifiers.
But as soon as I stepped foot inside the wonderful Gorini Collection in Lodi, near Milan, I was surprised at how few scientifically-oriented preparations it contained: most specimens were actually whole, undissected human heads, feet, hands, infants, etc. It struck me that these were not meant as medical studies: they were attempts at preserving the body forever. Was Gorini looking for a way to have the deceased transformed into a genuine statue? Why?
I needed to know more.

A biographical research is a mighty strange experience: digging into the past in search of someone’s secret is always an enterprise doomed to failure. No matter how much you read about a person’s life, their deepest desires and dreams remain forever inaccessible.
And yet, the more I examined books, papers, documents about Paolo Gorini, the more I felt I could somehow relate to this man’s quest.
Yes, he was an eccentric genius. Yes, he lived alone in his ghoulish laboratory, surrounded by “the bodies of men and beasts, human limbs and organs, heads with their hair preserved […], items made from animal substances for use as chess or draughts pieces; petrified livers and brain tissue, hardened skin and hides, nerve tissue from oxen, etc.”. And yes, he somehow enjoyed incarnating the mad scientist character, especially among his bohemian friends – writers and intellectuals who venerated him. But there was more.

It was necessary to strip away the legend from the man. So, as one of Gorini’s greatest passions was geology, I approached him as if he was a planet: progressing deeper and deeper, through the different layers of crust that make up his stratified enigma.
The outer layer was the one produced by mythmaking folklore, nourished by whispered tales, by fleeting glimpses of horrific visions and by popular rumors. “The Magician”, they called him. The man who could turn bodies into stone, who could create mountains from molten lava (as he actually did in his “experimental geology” public demonstrations).
The layer immediately beneath that unveiled the image of an “anomalous” scientist who was, however, well rooted in the Zeitgeist of his times, its spirit and its disputes, with all the vices and virtues derived therefrom.
The most intimate layer – the man himself – will perhaps always be a matter of speculation. And yet certain anecdotes are so colorful that they allowed me to get a glimpse of his fears and hopes.

Still, I didn’t know why I felt so strangely close to Gorini.

His preparations sure look grotesque and macabre from our point of view. He had access to unclaimed bodies at the morgue, and could experiment on an inconceivable number of corpses (“For most of my life I have substituted – without much discomfort – the company of the dead for the company of the living…”), and many of the faces that we can see in the Museum are those of peasants and poor people. This is the reason why so many visitors might find the Collection in Lodi quite unsettling, as opposed to a more “classic” anatomical display.
And yet, here is what looks like a macroscopic incongruity: near the end of his life, Gorini patented the first really efficient crematory. His model was so good it was implemented all over the world, from London to India. One could wonder why this man, who had devoted his entire life to making corpses eternal, suddenly sought to destroy them through fire.
Evidently, Gorini wasn’t fighting death; his crusade was against putrefaction.

When Paolo was only 12 years old, he saw his own father die in a horrific carriage accident. He later wrote: “That day was the black point of my life that marked the separation between light and darkness, the end of all joy, the beginning of an unending procession of disasters. From that day onwards I felt myself to be a stranger in this world…
The thought of his beloved father’s body, rotting inside the grave, probably haunted him ever since. “To realize what happens to the corpse once it has been closed inside its underground prison is a truly horrific thing. If we were somehow able to look down and see inside it, any other way of treating the dead would be judged as less cruel, and the practice of burial would be irreversibly condemned”.

That’s when it hit me.


This was exactly what made his work so relevant: all Gorini was really trying to do was elaborate a new way of dealing with the “scandal” of dead bodies.
He was tirelessly seeking a more suitable relationship with the remains of missing loved ones. For a time, he truly believed petrifaction could be the answer. Who would ever resort to a portrait – he thought – when a loved one could be directly immortalized for all eternity?
Gorini even suggested that his petrified heads be used to adorn the gravestones of Lodi’s cemetery – an unfortunate but candid proposal, made with the most genuine conviction and a personal sense of pietas. (Needless to say this idea was not received with much enthusiasm).

Gorini was surely eccentric and weird but, far from being a madman, he was also cherished by his fellow citizens in Lodi, on the account of his incredible kindness and generosity. He was a well-loved teacher and a passionate patriot, always worried that his inventions might be useful to the community.
Therefore, as soon as he realized that petrifaction might well have its advantages in the scientific field, but it was neither a practical nor a welcome way of dealing with the deceased, he turned to cremation.

Redefining the way we as a society interact with the departed, bringing attention to the way we treat bodies, focusing on new technologies in the death field – all these modern concerns were already at the core of his research.
He was a man of his time, but also far ahead of it. Gorini the scientist and engineer, devoted to the destiny of the dead, would paradoxically encounter more fertile conditions today than in the 20th century. It’s not hard to imagine him enthusiastically experimenting with alkaline hydrolysis or other futuristic techniques of treating human remains. And even if some of his solutions, such as his petrifaction procedures, are now inevitably dated and detached from contemporary attitudes, they do seem to have been the beginning of a still pertinent urge and of a research that continues today.

The Petrifier is the fifth volume of the Bizzarro Bazar Collection. Text (both in Italian and English) by Ivan Cenzi, photographs by Carlo Vannini.

 

The Petrifier: The Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection

 

The fifth volume in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection will come out on February 16th: The Petrifier is dedicated to the Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection in Lodi.

Published by Logos and featuring Carlo Vannini‘s wonderful photographs, the book explores the life and work of Paolo Gorini, one of the most famous “petrifiers” of human remains, and places this astounding collection in its cultural, social and political context.

I will soon write something more exhaustive on the reason why I believe Gorini is still so relevant today, and so peculiar when compared to his fellow petrifiers. For now, here’s the description from the book sheet:

Whole bodies, heads, babies, young ladies, peasants, their skin turned into stone, immune to putrescence: they are the “Gorini’s dead”, locked in a lapidary eternity that saves them from the ravenous destruction of the Conquering Worm.
They can be admired in a small museum in Lodi, where, under the XVI century vault with grotesque frescoes, a unique collection is preserved: the marvellous legacy of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881). Eccentric figure, characterised by a clashing duality, Gorini devoted himself to mathematics, volcanology, experimental geology, corpse preservation (he embalmed the prestigious bodies of Giuseppe Mazzini and Giuseppe Rovani); however, he was also involved in the design of one of the first Italian crematory ovens.
Introverted recluse in his laboratory obtained from an old deconsecrated church, but at the same time women’s lover and man of science able to establish close relationships with the literary men of his era, Gorini is depicted in the collective imagination as a figure poised between the necromant and the romantic cliché of the “crazy scientist”, both loved and feared. Because of his mysterious procedures and top-secret formulas that could “petrify” the corpses, Paolo Gorini’s life has been surrounded by an air of legend.
Thanks to the contributions of the museum curator Alberto Carli and the anthropologist Dario Piombino-Mascali, this book retraces the curious historic period during which the petrifaction process obtained a certain success, as well as the value and interest conferred to the collection in Lodi nowadays.
These preparations, in fact, are not silent witnesses: they speak about the history of the long-dated human obsession for the preserving of dead bodies, documenting a moment in which the Westerners relationship with death was beginning to change. And, ultimately, they solve Paolo Gorini’s enigma: a “wizard”, man and scientist, who, traumatised at a young age by his father’s death, spent his whole life probing the secrets of Nature and attempting to defeat the decay.

The Petrifier is available for pre-order at this link.

Il pietrificatore di pazzi

Abbiamo già parlato dei più famosi pietrificatori in questo articolo. Ritorniamo sull’argomento per esaminare la figura del torinese Giuseppe Paravicini (1871-1927), e la peculiare storia dei suoi preparati.

Paravicini ricoprì la carica di anatomista presso l’Istituto di Anatomia Patologica del più grande manicomio d’Italia, a Mombello di Limbiate, dal 1901 al 1917, e dal 1910 al 1917 fu appuntato direttore del suddetto nosocomio. Avendo accesso diretto ai cadaveri dei pazienti deceduti da poco all’interno dell’istituto, Paravicini sperimentò su di essi alcune tecniche conservative, costituendo una notevole collezione di preparati.

Fra i reperti perfettamente conservati, si contavano (nelle parole del Paravicini stesso), “una bella serie di encefali di idioti, epilettici, paralitici, dementi precoci, dementi senili, alcoolisti […] intestini con ulcere tifose e tubercolari […] polmoni […] con vaste caverne, fegati affetti da cirrosi atrofica, ipertrofica, da sarcomi e noduli cancerigni, una milza sarcomatosa di eccezionali dimensioni, reni con neoplasmi, cisti, ecc.“; i cervelli, in particolare, erano tutti suddivisi lombrosianamente secondo la malattia mentale che li aveva afflitti. Vi erano anche uno scheletro deforme affetto da nanismo e delle preparazioni in liquido di teste e feti.

momb7

momb9

momb4

momb18

momb17

momb22

momb24

Ma i pezzi più straordinari erano i busti interi, che ancora mostravano perfette espressioni del volto. Fra di essi, anche il busto di un acromegalico e quello di alcune donne.

image5

image5b

image5c

image4a

image4b

image4c

image7

image7b

image8

image8b

E, infine, i due corpi interi pietrificati dal Paravicini: quello di Angela Bonette, morta il 3 giugno del 1914 e affetta da demenza senile, e Evelina Gobbo, un’epilettica morta di polmonite il 16 novembre 1917.

momb1

momb2

momb3

momb12

Giuseppe Paravicini pare fosse gelosissimo del suo metodo segreto, e come altri pietrificatori ne portò le formule nella tomba.
Quello che si può dedurre dai documenti e dalle testimonianze oculari è che per la conservazione dei corpi interi egli utilizzasse una pompa a pressione costante per iniettare, mediante un’incisione sull’inguine del defunto, soluzioni a caldo di cera, solventi e paraffina (secondo altri, olii balsamici e qualche tipo di fissante). Il liquido entrava dall’arteria femorale, attraversava tutti gli organi, il derma e lo strato sottocutaneo per poi uscire dalla vena.
Per quanto riguarda le parti anatomiche più piccole, invece, egli si affidava all’uso di formolo, alcol e glicerina. Si trattava di metodi complessi e non certo rapidi, molto simili per alcuni versi a quelli utilizzati dal suo ben più celebre predecessore Paolo Gorini.

image6

image6b

image6c

image3c

image3b

image3

image

image2

image2b

Il risultato era, se possibile, ancora più incredibile delle pietrificazioni del Gorini. Scrive infatti Alberto Carli: “le opere di Paravicini appaiono al tatto più morbide e umide di quelle goriniane, che dimostrano, invece, un eccezionale stato di secchezza lignea.” Le sue preparazioni mantenevano un aspetto talmente realistico che, immancabile, si diffuse la leggenda che egli eseguisse le sue mummificazioni mentre il soggetto era ancora in vita, essendo in grado di sperimentare in corpore vili (cioè su corpi di persone di scarsa importanza). Certo è che la sua collezione, proprio per il fatto d’esser stata realizzata sui cadaveri di degenti del manicomio, aveva un elemento disturbante ed eticamente imbarazzante che spinse i responsabili a tenerla sempre nascosta negli scantinati dell’istituto.

momb23

momb15

momb14

momb11

I reperti vennero in seguito trasferiti all’Ospedale Psichiatrico Paolo Pini, il cui direttore prof. Antonio Allegranza fece installare delle teche a protezione dei corpi interi, e dei supporti in legno per i busti. Sempre Allegranza sostiene di aver visto la pompa con cui presumibilmente Paravicini iniettava la sua formula, prima che andasse persa nel trasloco da Mombello al Paolo Pini.
Dal Paolo Pini, la collezione venne spostata brevemente al Brefiotrofio di Milano, poi nella Facoltà di Scienza Veterinaria.
In tutti questi decenni, gli straordinari preparati rimasero dietro porte chiuse, visibili soltanto agli studiosi.
Infine, l’Università di Milano li affidò in deposito gratuito alla Collezione Anatomica Paolo Gorini per poterli degnamente esporre. Oggi sono finalmente visibili all’interno dell’Ospedale Vecchio di Lodi, nelle sale adiacenti alla collezione Gorini.

momb10

I volti di questi anonimi pazienti del manicomio di Mombello rimangono, al di là dell’interesse anatomico, una drammatica testimonianza di un’epoca: ombre di vite spezzate, spese in condizioni impensabili oggi.
L’ex-manicomio di Mombello è tutt’ora un’enorme struttura abbandonata: i lunghissimi corridoi ricoperti di murales, le scalinate fatiscenti, i cortili divorati dalla vegetazione, i padiglioni dove arrugginiscono i letti e le sedie d’epoca sono ormai esplorati soltanto da fotografi in cerca di location suggestive.

Mombello

Mombello

NOTA: le foto a colori presenti nell’articolo ci sono state gentilmente offerte dal nostro lettore Eros, che ha visitato la collezione quando era ancora in stato di abbandono nei sotterranei di una palazzina della Provincia di Milano; le foto in bianco e nero (precedenti di almeno una decina d’anni) sono opera di Attilio Mina. Le foto del manicomio sono invece di Emma Cacciatori.

(Grazie, Eros!)

I pietrificatori

Fra tutte le varie forme di conservazione di resti anatomici, quella che ancora oggi suscita stupore e incredulità è la cosiddetta “pietrificazione”. Alcuni grandi scienziati hanno portato questa tecnica ad impensabili livelli, e si tratta principalmente di una tradizione tutta italiana.

Il primo e il più importante nome di questa famiglia di pietrificatori è senza dubbio Girolamo Segato (1792-1836). Nativo del bellunese, fin da ragazzo iniziò a costruire una sua personale collezione di oggetti naturalistici: semplici vestigia di animali raccolte durante le sue camminate sulle Dolomiti, che però risvegliarono nel giovane Segato la passione per la natura e le sue forme. Imbarcatosi più tardi per l’Egitto, si trovò ad esaminare e studiare numerose mummie, arrivando ad elaborare alcune personali teorie sul processo di mummificazione a cui erano state sottoposte. Così, una volta tornato in Italia, cominciò a sperimentare diverse tecniche per fissare nel tempo le forme corporee.

Mediante la sua “mineralizzazione” Segato riusciva a conservare in modo pressoché perfetto i suoi preparati, preservando in alcuni casi anche il colore naturale e l’elasticità dei tessuti. Gran parte delle sue pietrificazioni sono giunte intatte fino ai giorni nostri, e sono conservate all’interno dell’Università di Firenze (ne avevamo già parlato all’interno della nostra serie di articoli sui musei anatomici italiani).

Purtroppo Girolamo Segato portò nella tomba il segreto del suo metodo straordinario. Al di fuori della comunità scientifica, infatti, pochi si resero conto dell’importanza del suo lavoro: accusato di stregoneria, si vide negata ogni richiesta di finanziamento per la sua ricerca. Segato costruì un incredibile tavolo “di carne”, che conteneva alcune decine di preparati pietrificati e incastonati nel legno, e lo offrì al Granduca di Toscana per impressionarlo. Quando anche quest’ultimo rifiutò di sostenerlo economicamente, l’anatomista bruciò tutti i suoi appunti e le sue carte.

Fu sepolto nella Basilica di Santa Croce a Firenze. Sulla sua lapide sono incise queste tristi parole: “Qui giace disfatto Girolamo Segato, che vedrebbesi intero pietrificato, se l’arte sua non periva con lui. Fu gloria insolita dell’umana sapienza, esempio d’infelicità non insolito”.

Di poco più giovane di Segato, Giovan Battista Rini (1795-1856), originario di Salò, utilizzò una miscela di mercurio ed altri minerali (potassio, ferro, bario e arsenico) per preservare il sistema sanguigno e i tessuti dei cadaveri: queste mummie sono oggi oggetto di studi da parte di un team italo-tedesco capitanato dall’antropologo forense Dario Piombino-Mascali, ricercatore dell’Accademia Europea di Bolzano (EURAC).

Sottoponendo le mummie a TAC e altre analisi, gli scienziati stanno cominciando a penetrare i segreti di quest’arte un tempo importantissima: i preparati anatomici avevano una funzione didattica e di studio essenziale in un’epoca in cui non esistevano celle frigorifere e in cui i cadaveri si decomponevano velocemente.

Del pietrificatore, anatomista e scienziato Paolo Gorini (1813-1881), invece, conosciamo per fortuna alcuni dei procedimenti, scoperti nell’archivio delle sue carte: per i suoi preparati utilizzava tecniche diverse, ma la formula di base consisteva in un’iniezione di bicloruro di mercurio e muriato di calce direttamente nell’arteria e vena femorale; dato il numero delle successive iniezioni e delle “disinfezioni”, il processo era lungo, costoso ed estremamente tossico per chi lo praticava.

Efisio Marini (1835-1900) riusciva a pietrificare addirittura il sangue: è curioso l’aneddoto che racconta come, venuto in possesso del sangue di Giuseppe Garibaldi raccolto sull’Aspromonte, lo solidificò e lo plasmò facendone un medaglione che poi regalò a Garibaldi stesso, il quale lo ringraziò con lettera ufficiale. Pur essendo divenuto celebre grazie alle sue pietrificazioni (ci resta in particolare una mano di giovane fanciulla perfettamente conservata all’Università di Sassari), Marini era ossessionato dal mantenere segrete le sue formule, e finì la sua vita in povertà, circondato dalla sua collezione anatomica, evitato da tutti per via della sua sinistra paranoia.

Un caso singolare fra i pietrificatori fu quello di Oreste Maggio (1875-1937): palermitano, medico, oftalmologo, ostetrico, tisiologo, psichiatra e pediatra, ma anche farmacista, chimico, medico condotto e imbalsamatore “di famiglia” (era nipote di quel Salafia di cui abbiamo già parlato in questo articolo), anche Maggio mise a punto una sua tecnica di iniezione di sali minerali per conservare i reperti anatomici. Eppure, ad un certo punto, decise di interrompere bruscamente le sperimentazioni e distruggere la sua formula per dedicarsi esclusivamente ai vivi. All’origine di questa drastica inversione di rotta ci sarebbe stata una vera e propria crisi mistica: cattolico praticante, Maggio era rimasto impressionato dal celebre verso della Genesi “polvere tu sei e in polvere ritornerai”, ed era arrivato alla conclusione che impedire il disfacimento della carne andava contro i naturali precetti divini.

Francesco Spirito (1885-1962) è l’ultimo dei grandi pietrificatori. Medico e presidente dell’Accademia dei Fisiocritici di Siena, che tutt’oggi conserva la collezione dei suoi preparati, ha potuto fornire i dettagli della sua tecnica complessa e delicata in occasione di una lettura accademica. Il suo segreto è la soluzione di silicato di potassio, grazie alla quale “la massa assume un aspetto ed una consistenza lapidea che con l’evaporazione diventa una massa vetrosa trasparente”. Durante la procedura, il pezzo è sostenuto da fili opportunamente sistemati, tesi tra sostegni di legno o metallo, in modo che le singole parti del preparato rimangano nella posizione voluta.

Con le tecniche sviluppate in età contemporanea, come ad esempio la plastinazione di Von Hagens, la pietrificazione risulta ormai obsoleta; ma rimane testimonianza di un’epoca stupefacente in cui erano i singoli sperimentatori che, rinchiusi nei loro studi assieme ai cadaveri, come degli strani alchimisti, mettevano a punto queste formule segretissime e circonfuse di un alone di mistero.

(Grazie, Giacomo!)