Wunderkammer Reborn – Part II

(Second and last part – you can find the first one here.)

In the Nineteenth Century, wunderkammern disappeared.
The collections ended up disassembled, sold to private citizens or integrated in the newly born modern museums. Scientists, whose discipline was already defined, lost interest for the ancient kind of baroque wonder, perhaps deemed child-like in respect to the more serious postitivism.
This type of collecting continued in sporadic and marginal ways during the first decades of the Twetieth Century. Some rare antique dealer, especially in Belgium, the Netherlands or Paris, still sold some occasional mirabilia, but the golden age of the trade was long gone.
Of the few collectors of this first half of the century the most famous is André Breton, whose cabinet of curiosities is now on permanent exhibit at the Centre Pompidou.

The interest of wunderkammern began to reawaken during the Eighties from two distinct fronts: academics and artists.
On one hand, museology scholars began to recognize the role of wunderkammern as precursors of today’s museal collections; on the other, some artists fell in love with the concept of the chamber of wonders and started using it in their work as a metaphor of Man’s relationship with objects.
But the real upswing came with the internet. The neo-wunderkammer “movement” developed via the web, which opened new possibilities not only for sharing the knowledge but also to revitalize the commerce of curiosities.

Let’s take a look, as we did for the classical collections, to some conceptual elements of neo-wunderkammern.

A Democratic Wunderkammer

The first macroscopic difference with the past is that collecting curiosities is no more an exclusive of wealthy billionaires. Sure, a very-high-profile market exists, one that the majority of enthusiasts will never access; but the good news is that today, anybody who can afford an internet conection already has the means to begin a little collection. Thanks to the web, even a teenager can create his/her own shelf of wonders. All that’s needed is good will and a little patience to comb through the many natural history collectibles websites or online auctions for some real bargain.

There are now children’s books, school activities and specific courses encouraging kids to start this form of exploration of natural wonders.

The result of all this is a more democratic wunderkammer, within the reach of almost any wallet.

Reinventing Exotica

We talked about the classic category of exotica, those objects that arrived from distant colonies and from mysterious cultures.
But today, what is really exotic – etymologically, “coming from the outside, from far away”? After all we live in a world where distances don’t matter any more, and we can travel without even moving: in a bunch of seconds and a few clicks, we can virtually explore any place, from a mule track on the Andes to the jungles of Borneo.

This is a fundamental issue for the collectors, because globalization runs the risk of annihilating an important part of the very concept of wonder. Their strategies, conscious or not, are numerous.
Some collectors have turned their eyes towards the only real “external space” that is left — the cosmos; they started looking for memorabilia from the heroic times of the Space Race. Spacesuits, gear and instruments from various space missions, and even fragments of the Moon.

Others push in the opposite direction, towards the most distant past; consequently the demand for dinosaur fossils is in constant growth.

But there are other kinds of new exotica that are closer to us – indeed, they pertain directly to our own society.
Internal exoticism: not really an oxymoron, if we consider that anthropologists have long turned the instruments of ethnology towards the modern Western worold (take for instance Marc Augé). To seek what is exotic within our own cultre is to investigate liminal zones, fringe realities of our time or of the recent past.

Thus we find a recent fascination for some “taboo” areas, related for example to crime (murder weapons, investigative items, serial killer memorabilia) or death (funerary objecs and Victorian mourning apparel); the medicalia sub-category of quack remedies, as for example electric shock terapies or radioactive pharamecutical products.

Jessika M. collection – photo Brian Powell, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Funerary collectibles.

Violet wand kit; its low-voltage electric shock was marketed as the cure for everything.

Even curiosa, vintage or ancient erotic objects, are an example of exotica coming from a recent past which is now transfigured.

A Dialogue Between The Objects

Building a wunderkammer today is an eminently artistic endeavour. The scientific or anthropological interest, no matter how relevant, cannot help but be strictly connected to aesthetics.
There is a greater general attention to the interplay between the objects than in the past. A painting can interact with an object placed in front of it; a tribal mask can be made to “dialogue” with an other similar item from a completely different tradition. There is undoubtedly a certain dose of postmodern irreverence in this approach; for when pop culture collectibles are allowed entrance to the wunderkammer, ending up exhibited along with precious and refined antiques, the self-righteous art critic is bound to shudder (see for instance Victor Wynd‘s peculiar iconoclasm).

An example I find paradigmatic of this search for a deeper interaction are the “adventurous” juxtapositions experimented by friend Luca Cableri (the man who brought to Moon to Italy); you can read the interview he gave me if you wish to know more about him.

Wearing A Wunderkammer

Fashion is always aware of new trends, and it intercepted some aspects of the world of wunerkammern. Thanks mainly to the goth and dark subcultures, one can find jewelry and necklaces made from naturalistic specimens: on Etsy, eBay or Craigslist, countless shops specialize in hand-crafted brooches, hair clips or other fashion accessories sporting skulls, small wearable taxidermies and so on.

Conceptual Art and Rogue Taxidermists

As we said, the renewed interest also came from the art world, which found in wunderkammern an effective theoretical frame to reflect about modernity.
The first name that comes to mind is of course Damien Hirst, who took advantage of the concept both in his iconic fluid-preserved animals and in his kaleidoscopic compositions of lepidoptera and butterflies; but even his For The Love of God, the well-known skull covered in diamonds, is an excessively precious curiosity that would not have been out of place in a Sixteenth Century treasure chamber.

Hirst is not the only artist taking inspiration from the wunderkammer aesthetics. Mark Dion, for instance, creates proper cabinets of wonders for the modern era: in his work, it’s not natural specimens that are put under formaldeyde, but rather their plastic replicas or even everyday objects, from push brooms to rubber dildos. Dion builds a sort of museum of consumerism in which – yet again – Nature and Culture collide and even at times fuse together, giving us no hope of telling them apart.

In 2013 Rosamund Purcell’s installation recreated a 3D version of the Seventeenth Century Ole Worm Museum: reinvention/replica, postmodern doppelgänger and hyperreal simulachrum which allows the public to step into one of the most famous etchings in the history of wunderkammern.

Besides the “high” art world – auction houses and prestigious galleries – we are also witnessing a rejuvenation of more artisanal sectors.
This is the case with the art of taxidermy, which is enjoying a new youth: today taxidermy courses and workshops are multiplying.

Remember that in the first post I talked about taxidermy as a domestication of the scariest aspects of Nature? Well, according to the participants, these workshops offer a way to exorcise their fear of death on a comfortably small scale, through direct contact and a creative activity. (We shall return on this tactile element.)
A further push towards innovation has come from yet another digital movement, called Rogue Taxidermy.

Artistic, non-traditional taxidermy has always existed, from fake mirabilia and gaffs such as mummified sirens and Jenny Hanivers to Walter Potter‘s antropomorphic dioramas. But rogue taxidermists bring all this to a whole new level.

Initially born as a consortium of three artists – Sarina Brewer, Scott Bibus e Robert Marbury – who were interested in taxidermy in the broadest sense (Marbury does not even use real animals for his creations, but plush toys), rogue taxidermy quickly became an international movement thanks to the web.

The fantastic chimeras produced by these artists are actually meta-taxidermies: by exhibiting their medium in such a manifest way, they seem to question our own relationship with animals. A relationship that has undergone profound changes and is now moving towards a greater respect and care for the environment. One of the tenets of rogue taxidermy is in fact the use of ethically sourced materials, and the animals used in preparations all died of natural causes. (Here’s a great book tracing the evolution and work of major rogue taxidermy artists.)

Wunderkammer Reborn

So we are left with the fundamental question: why are wunderkammern enjoying such a huge success right now, after five centuries? Is it just a retro, nostalgic trend, a vintage frivolous fashion like we find in many subcultures (yes I’m looking at you, my dear hipster friends) or does its attractiveness lie in deeper urgencies?

It is perhaps too soon to put forward a hypothesis, but I shall go out on a limb anyway: it is my belief that the rebirth of wunderkammern is to be sought in a dual necessity. On one hand the need to rethink death, and on the other the need to rethink art and narratives.

Rethinking Death
(And While We’re At It, Why Not Domesticate It)

Swiss anthropologist Bernard Crettaz was among the first to voice the ever more widespread need to break the “tyrannical secrecy” regarding death, typical of the Twentieth Century: in 2004 he organized in Neuchâtel the first Café mortel, a free event in which participants could talk about grief, and discuss their fears but also their curiosities on the subject. Inspired by Crettaz’s works and ideas, Jon Underwood launched the first British Death Café in 2011. His model received an enthusiastic response, and today almost 5000 events have been held in 50 countries across the world.

Meanwhile, in the US, a real Death-Positive Movement was born.
Originated from the will to drastically change the American funeral industry, criticized by founder Caitlin Doughty, the movement aims at lifting the taboo regarding the subject of death, and promotes an open reflection on related topics and end-of-life issues. (You probably know my personal engagement in the project, to which I contributed now and then: you can read my interview to Caitlin and my report from the Death Salon in Philadelphia).

What has the taboo of death got to do with collecting wonders?
Over the years, I have had the opportunity of talking to many a collector. Almost all of them recall, “as if it were yesterday“, the emotion they felt while holding in their hands the first piece of their collection, that one piece that gave way to their obsession. And for the large majority of them it was a naturalistic specimen – an animal skeleton, a taxidermy, etc.: as a friend collector says, “you never forget your first skull“.

The tactile element is as essential today as it was in classical wunderkammern, where the public was invited to study, examine, touch the specimens firsthand.

Owning an animal skull (or even a human one) is a safe and harmless way to become familiar with the concreteness of death. This might be the reason why the macabre element of wunderkammern, which was marginal centuries ago, often becomes a prevalent aspect today.

Ryan Matthew Cohn collection – photo Dan Howell & Steve Prue, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Rethinking Art: The Aesthetics Of Wonder

After the decline of figurative arts, after the industrial reproducibility of pop art, after the advent of ready-made art, conceptual art reached its outer limit, giving a coup the grace to meaning.  Many contemporary artists have de facto released art not just from manual skill, from artistry, but also from the old-fashioned idea that art should always deliver a message.
Pure form, pure signifier, the new conceptual artworks are problematic because they aspire to put a full stop to art history as we know it. They look impossible to understand, precisely because they are designed to escape any discourse.
It is therefore hard to imagine in what way artistic research will overcome this emptiness made of cold appearance, polished brilliance but mere surface nonetheless; hard to tell what new horizon might open up, beyond multi-million auctions, artistars and financial hikes planned beforehand by mega-dealers and mega-collectors.

To me, it seems that the passion for wunderkammern might be a way to go back to narratives, to meaning. An antidote to the overwhelming surface. Because an object is worth its place inside a chamber of marvels only by virtue of the story it tells, the awe it arises, the vertigo it entails.
I believe I recognize in this genre of collecting a profound desire to give back reality to its lost enchantment.
Lost? No, reality never ceased to be wonderous, it is our gaze that needs to be reeducated.

From Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – photo C. Fleurant

Eventually, a  wunderkammer is just a collection of objects, and we already live submerged in an ocean of objects.
But it is also an instrument (as it once was, as it has always been) – a magnifying glass to inspect the world and ourselves. In these bizarre and strange items, the collector seeks a magical-narrative dimension against the homologation and seriality of mass production. Whether he knows it or not, by being sensitive to the stories concealed within the objects, the emotions they convey, their unicity, the wunderkammer collector is carrying out an act of resistence: because placing value in the exception, in the exotic, is a way to seek new perspectives in spite of the Unanimous Vision.

Da Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – foto C. Fleurant

Tassidermia e vegetarianismo

SideTour_Taxidermy

La tassidermia sembra conoscere, in questi ultimi anni, una sorta di nuova vita. Alimentata dall’interesse per l’epoca vittoriana e dal diffondersi dell’iconografia e l’estetica della sottocultura goth, l’antica arte tassidermica sta velocemente diventando addirittura una moda: innumerevoli sono gli artisti che hanno cominciato ad integrare parti autentiche di animali nei loro gioielli e accessori, come vi confermerà un giro su Etsy, la più grande piattaforma di e-commerce per prodotti artigianali.

taxidermy kitten mouse necklace-f50586

tumblr_lovkxjtwur1qbkjd0o1_400

il_570xN.311750603

il_570xN.530781784_rwry
A Londra e a New York conoscono un crescente successo i workshop che insegnano, nel giro di una giornata o due, i rudimenti del mestiere. Un tassidermista esperto guida i partecipanti passo passo nella preparazione del loro primo esemplare, normalmente un topolino acquistato in un negozio di animali e destinato all’alimentazione dei rettili; molti alunni portano addirittura con sé dei minuscoli abiti, per vestire il proprio topolino alla maniera di Walter Potter.

article-2107482-11F22C86000005DC-726_634x460
Su Bizzarro Bazar abbiamo regolarmente parlato di tassidermia, e sappiamo per esperienza che l’argomento è sensibile: alcuni dei nostri articoli (rimbalzati senza controllo da un social all’altro) hanno scatenato le ire di animalisti e vegetariani, dando vita ad appassionati flame. Ci sembra quindi particolarmente interessante un articolo apparso da poco sull’Huffington Post a cura di Margot Magpie, sui rapporti fra tassidermia e vegetarianesimo.

Margot Magpie è istruttrice tassidermica proprio a Londra, e sostiene che una gran parte dei suoi alunni sia costituita da vegetariani o vegani. Ma come si concilia questa scelta di rispetto per gli animali con l’arte di impagliarli?

article-2107482-11F22FDE000005DC-919_634x408

article-2107482-11F22D3C000005DC-29_634x460

article-2107482-11F22EC7000005DC-410_634x523
Ovviamente, tagliare e preparare il corpo di un animale non implica certo mangiarne la carne. E una gran parte degli artisti, vegetariani e non, che operano oggi nel settore ci tengono a precisare che i loro esemplari non vengono uccisi con lo scopo di creare l’opera tassidermica, ma sono già morti di cause naturali oppure – come nel caso dei topolini – allevati per un motivo più accettabile. (Certo, anche sul commercio dei rettili come animali da compagnia si potrebbe discutere, ma questo esula dal nostro tema). Si tratta in definitiva di materiale biologico che andrebbe sprecato e distrutto, quindi perché non usarlo?

article-2107482-11DCE7C2000005DC-704_634x505

article-2107482-11F230BC000005DC-859_634x449

article-2107482-11F231D9000005DC-824_634x483
Ma preparare un animale comporta comunque il superamento di un fattore di disgusto che sembrerebbe incompatibile con il vegetarianismo: significa entrare in contatto diretto con la carne e il sangue, sventrare, spellare, raschiare e via dicendo. A quanto dice Margot, però, i suoi allievi vegetariani colgono una differenza fondamentale fra l’allevamento degli animali a fini alimentari – con tutti i problemi etici che l’industrializzazione del mercato della carne porta con sé – e la tassidermia, che è vista invece come un rispettoso atto d’amore per l’animale stesso. “La tassidermia per me significa essere stupiti dall’anatomia e dalla biologia delle creature, e aiutarle a continuare a vivere anche dopo la morte, in modo che noi possiamo vederle ed apprezzarle”, dice un suo studente.

La passione per la tecnica tassidermica proviene spesso dall’interesse per la storia naturale. Visitare un museo e ammirare splendidi animali esotici (che normalmente non potremmo vedere) perfettamente conservati, può far nascere la curiosità sui processi utilizzati per prepararli. E questo amore per gli animali, dice Margot, è una costante riconoscibile in tutti i suoi alunni.

article-2107482-11F22AA9000005DC-736_634x455
“Combatto con questo dilemma da un po’. – racconta un’altra artista vegetariana – La gente mi dice che ‘non dovrebbe piacermi’, ma ci sono piccole cose nella vita che ci danno gioia, e non possiamo farne a meno. Mi sembra che sia come donare all’animale una vita interamente nuova, permettergli di vivere per sempre in un nuovo mondo d’amore, per essere attentamente rimesso in sesto, posizionato e decorato, ed è un’impresa premurosa e amorevole”.

article-2107482-11F235DE000005DC-79_634x454
L’altro problema è che non tutti i lavori tassidermici sono “naturalistici”, cioè mirati a riprodurre esattamente l’animale nelle pose e negli atteggiamenti che aveva in vita. Non a caso facevamo l’esempio della tassidermia antropomorfica, in cui l’animale viene vestito e fissato in pose umane, talvolta inserito in contesti e diorami di fantasia, oppure integrato come parte di un accessorio di vestiario, un pendaglio, un anello. Si tratta di una tassidermia più personale, che riflette il gusto creativo dell’artista. Per alcuni questa pratica è irrispettosa dell’animale, ma non tutti la pensano così: secondo Margot e alcuni dei suoi studenti la cosa non crea alcun conflitto, fintanto che il corpo proviene da ambiti controllati.

article-2107482-11F233AB000005DC-674_634x453

“Credo che utilizzare animali provenienti da fonti etiche per la tassidermia sia positivo e, per questo motivo, posso continuare felicemente con il vegetarianismo e con il mio interesse di lunga data per la tassidermia. Sento di molti tassidermisti moderni che usano esclusivamente animali morti per cause naturali o in incidenti, quindi credo che ci troviamo in una nuova era di tassidermia etica. Sono felice di farne parte”.

C’è chi invece il problema l’ha aggirato del tutto. L’artista americana Aimée Baldwin ha creato quella che chiama “tassidermia vegana”: i suoi uccelli sono in realtà sculture costruite con carta crespa. Il lavoro certosino e la conoscenza del materiale, con cui sperimenta da anni, le permettono di ottenere un risultato incredibilmente realistico.

Vegan Taxidermy  An Intersection of Art, Science, and Conservation

Raven-360x240

Kingfisher432

HeronCity432

AmericanAvocet-288x432

Ecco il link all’articolo di Margot Magpie. Gran parte delle fotografie nell’articolo provengono da questo articolo su un workshop tassidermico newyorkese. Ecco infine il sito ufficiale di Aimée Baldwin.

Necromance

20131107_160124

Los Angeles, California. I turisti, come sempre, cercano le star su Sunset Boulevard, ridiventano bambini nei parchi di attrazioni degli studios, oppure sognano di essere soccorsi da Pamela Anderson sulle immense spiagge di Santa Monica.

Ma nel cuore dell’assolata metropoli, fra le boutique e i locali notturni della celeberrima Melrose Avenue (e a un paio di isolati dalla Melrose Place della soap opera), sorge una piccola bottega che offre un tipo di shopping un po’ più particolare.

20131107_160235

Si tratta di Necromance, negozio aperto nel 1991, specializzato in esemplari naturalistici e in un vasto assortimento di stranezze. Certo non si tratta di un paradiso come possono essere Obscura di New York o il nostro ex-Nautilus (ora reincarnatosi nell’Obsoleto Store di Modena), e i più snob storceranno il naso vedendo che le giovani proprietarie non fanno segreto della loro inclinazione goth. Ma il mondo è bello perché è vario, e quando si incontrano esercizi simili andrebbero sempre salutati con entusiasmo.

20131107_165328

20131107_164456

20131107_164603

20131107_160316

Necromance è composto di due stanze a tema distinto, tanto che per un periodo il negozio è stato fisicamente diviso in due; la prima sala è quella dedicata alle collezioni naturalistiche. Vi potete trovare conchiglie, teschi e ossa di ogni tipo di animale, scheletri posati, innumerevoli insetti, stampe e illustrazioni, esemplari imbalsamati e preparazioni in liquido.

20131107_160324

20131107_164357

20131107_164416

20131107_164437

20131107_164447

Gli esemplari conservati sotto glicerina e preparati con il metodo clearing and staining sono ottenuti grazie a bagni enzimatici che rendono la carne traslucida; la struttura ossea è quindi colorata in rosso e le cartilagini in blu, in modo da consentirne uno studio approfondito (Nota: se volete divertirvi a giocare al piccolo chimico, qui trovate le istruzioni per rendere un pesce trasparente).

20131107_164655

20131107_164706

20131107_164714

20131107_164728

In questa sezione trovano posto anche molti materiali “a consumo”: cassette piene di ossicini più o meno grandi, piume e penne, zampe di alligatore o di pollo, code e teste di serpenti a sonagli, e via dicendo. Più che servire per qualche rito voodoo, è chiaro che si tratta di rifornimenti per artisti, stilisti fai-da-te e altri clienti interessati a decorare i propri abiti o la propria casa con fantasie macabre.

20131107_164339

20131107_164552

20131107_164523

20131107_164744

20131107_164828

20131107_164756

La seconda stanza del negozio, invece, è dedicata ad altri tipi di collezionismo e di esigenze di mercato. Qui troverete anticaglie di ogni tipo, strumenti medici, fotografie di epoca vittoriana, addobbi funerari, cartoline originali dei freakshow, vecchie macchine fotografiche. Uno scuro armadio svetta in un angolo, colmo di repliche in resina di teschi umani. È anche la stanza dedicata alla gioielleria, tutta ovviamente a tema gotico; alcuni degli ornamenti in esposizione contengono autentiche parti di animali, come i pendagli con testa di pipistrello, gli orecchini con osso di pene di visone, o le spille con feto di topo. È fin troppo facile il sospetto che Necromance sopravviva proprio grazie al commercio di questo tipo di bigiotteria, piuttosto che con i pezzi più “seri” come ad esempio i calchi anatomici in gesso di fine ‘800.

20131107_164955

20131107_164910

20131107_164939

20131107_164927

20131107_165005

20131107_165014

20131107_165042

20131107_165052

20131107_165135

20131107_165309

20131107_165344

Nonostante un negozio simile non possa certo vantare la popolarità dei suoi concorrenti su Melrose Avenue che vendono scintillanti abiti alla moda, riesce comunque a mantenere i prezzi notevolmente bassi per il genere di oggetti da collezione che propone, e senza dubbio questo è il suo maggiore punto di forza.

20131107_165358

20131107_160304

20131107_160350

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Necromance.

Lenore, la piccola e carina bambina morta

Articolo a cura della nostra guestblogger Veronica Pagnani

lenore_and_her_puppet_by_kurosama_76-d38t6qw

Lenore è una piccola e tenera bambina morta di polmonite, all’età di 10 anni, all’inizio del XX secolo.

Lenore, non si sa bene come, è anche riuscita a tornare nel mondo dei vivi dopo un giretto all’inferno.

lenore_fairyprincess

Lenore ora vive felicemente in una villa (ovviamente bellissima e tetra, giusto per restare in tema), nella città di Nevermore, coi suoi amici. Anche loro per la maggior parte morti.

Ragamuffin, ad esempio, è un vampiro trasformato in pupazzo da una strega cattiva, che passa le sue giornate perdendo bottoni e filo; Mr. Gosh invece, è il corteggiatore romantico e dal volto decomposto (che copre decorosamente con una busta di carta), e che Lenore regolarmente percuote ed offende.

LENORE VOL II I

Lenore_1_ic1

In realtà Lenore non è nient’altro che un fumetto, scritto da Roman Dirge, e pubblicato nel 1992 per la prima volta nella rivista americana indipendente Xenophobe. Il successo dei primi piccoli sketch è stato tale da portare, in seguito, anche alla creazione di cortometraggi animati per la Sony’s ScreenBlast.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ku-vdR_zZhM]

Ma come è riuscito Lenore, fumetto goth tra i tanti, a rimanere così impresso nei cuori di innumerevoli appassionati? Sicuramente la crudeltà mai gratuita, il velo d’ingenuità di cui si copre ogni assassinio della nostra eroina che, non dimentichiamoci, alla fine rimane pur sempre una bambina curiosa come tante altre.

O quasi.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cyt5NnSq6XI]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2V_dtnkkxIE]

Liz McGrath

Pittrice, animatrice, stilista, punk rocker e scultrice: Liz McGrath è la bad girl della nuova scena artistica pop-surrealista californiana.

Essendo precocemente ribelle, i suoi genitori ultra-cattolici decisero di usare il pugno di ferro con la piccola Elizabeth; è proprio a quegli anni, fatti di imposizioni, minacce di inferno e altri terrori, che la McGrath attribuisce la sua fascinazione con il lato oscuro della propria fantasia. Eppure c’è sempre una delicatezza, un’eleganza rétro nelle sue creazioni. Liz McGrath non è mai cresciuta, e ci invita  a conoscere i suoi amici immaginari.

Si tratta di sculture anomale, piccoli personaggi di un mondo infantile distorto. Animali freak antropomorfizzati, spesso inseriti in bacheche che ricordano le insegne dei sideshow degli anni ’40. Un bestiario contemporaneamente macabro e raffinato, che unisce bellezza e malattia, ironia ed elementi gotici.

Certo, c’è sempre quella ingenua e forse “facile” estetica un po’ dark che contraddistingue molti surrealisti pop, quello stile vagamente alla Tim Burton, per intenderci; eppure le sculture di Liz ci sembrano più gioiose, più scanzonate e irriverenti. Forse, come la loro autrice, sotto la patina leziosa e ricercata sono davvero delle sculture punk.

E poi ammettiamolo: quanti di noi, da bambini, non sarebbero impazziti per dei pupazzetti simili?

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Elizabeth McGrath.