Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 15

  • Cogito, ergo… memento mori“: this Descartes plaster bust incorporates a skull and detachable skull cap. It’s part of the collection of anatomical plasters of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and it was sculpted in 1913 by Paul Richer, professor of artistic anatomy born in Chartres. The real skull of Descartes has a rather peculiar story, which I wrote about years ago in this post (Italian only).
  • A jarring account of a condition which you probably haven’t heard of: aphantasia is the inability of imagining and visualizing objects, situations, persons or feelings with the “mind’s eye”. The article is in Italian, but there’s also an English Wiki page.
  • 15th Century: reliquaries containing the Holy Virgin’s milk are quite common. But Saint Bernardino is not buying it, and goes into a enjoyable tirade:
    Was the Virgin Mary a dairy cow, that she left behind her milk just like beasts let themselves get milked? I myself hold this opinion, that she had no more and no less milk than what fitted inside that blessed Jesus Christ’s little mouth.

  • In 1973 three women and five men feigned hallucinations to find out if psychiatrists would realize that they were actually mentally healthy. The result: they were admitted in 12 different hospitals. This is how the pioneering Rosenhan experiment shook the foundations of psychiatric practice.
  • Can’t find a present for your grandma? Ronit Baranga‘s tea sets may well be the perfect gift.

  • David Nebreda, born in 1952, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 19. Instead of going on medication, he retired as a hermit in a two-room apartment, without much contact with the outside world, practicing sexual abstinence and fasting for long periods of time. His only weapon to fight his demons is a camera: his self-portraits undoubtedly represent some kind of mental hell — but also a slash of light at the end of this abyss; they almost look like they capture an unfolding catharsis, and despite their extreme and disturbing nature, they seem to celebrate a true victory over the flesh. Nebreda takes his own pain back, and trascends it through art. You can see some of his photographs here and here.
  • The femme fatale, dressed in glamourous clothes and diabolically lethal, is a literary and cinematographic myth: in reality, female killers succeed in becoming invisible exactly by playing on cultural assumptions and keeping a low and sober profile.
  • Speaking of the female figure in the collective unconscious, there is a sci-fi cliché which is rarely addressed: women in test tubes. Does the obsessive recurrence of this image point to the objectification of the feminine, to a certain fetishism, to an unconscious male desire to constrict, seclude and dominate women? That’s a reasonable suspicion when you browse the hundred-something examples harvested on Sci-Fi Women in Tubes. (Thanks, Mauro!)

  • I have always maintained that fungi and molds are superior beings. For instance the slimy organisms in the pictures above, called Stemonitis fusca, almost seem to defy gravity. My first article for the magazine Illustrati, years ago, was  dedicated to the incredible Cordyceps unilateralis, a parasite which is able to control the mind and body of its host. And I have recently stumbled upon a photograph that shows what happens when a Cordyceps implants itself within the body of a tarantula. Never mind Cthulhu! Mushrooms, folks! Mushrooms are the real Lords of the Universe! Plus, they taste good on a pizza!

  • The latest entry in the list of candidates for my Museum of Failure is Adelir Antônio de Carli from Brazil, also known as Padre Baloeiro (“balloon priest”). Carli wished to raise funds to build a chapel for truckers in Paranaguá; so, as a publicity stunt, on April 20, 2008, he tied a chair to 1000 helium-filled balloons and took off before journalists and a curious crowd. After reaching an altitude of 6,000 metres (19,700 ft), he disappeared in the clouds.
    A month and a half passed before the lower part of his body was found some 100 km off the coast.

  • La passionata is a French song covered by Guy Marchand which enjoyed great success in 1966. And it proves two surprising truths: 1- Latin summer hits were already a thing; 2- they caused personality disorders, as they still do today. (Thanks, Gigio!)

  • Two neuroscientists build some sort of helmet which excites the temporal lobes of the person wearing it, with the intent of studying the effects of a light magnetic stimulation on creativity.  And test subjects start seeing angels, dead relatives, and talking to God. Is this a discovery that will explain mystical exstasy, paranormal experiences, the very meaning of the sacred? Will this allow communication with an invisible reality? Neither of the two, because the truth is a bit disappointing: in all attempts to replicate the experiment, no peculiar effects were detected. But it’s still a good idea for a novel. Here’s the God helmet Wiki page.
  • California Institute of Abnormalarts is a North Hollywood sideshow-themed nightclub featuring burlesque shows, underground musical groups, freak shows and film screenings. But if you’re afraid of clowns, you might want to steer clear of the place: one if its most famous attractions is the embalmed body of Achile Chatouilleu, a clown who asked to be buried in his stage costume and makeup.
    Sure enough, he seems a bit too well-preserved for a man who allegedly died in 1912 (wouldn’t it happen to be a sideshow gaff?). Anyways, the effect is quite unsettling and grotesque…

  • I shall leave you with a picture entitled The Crossing, taken by nature photographer Ryan Peruniak. All of his works are amazing, as you can see if you head out to his official website, but I find this photograph strikingly poetic.
    Here is his recollection of that moment:
    Early April in the Rocky Mountains, the majestic peaks are still snow-covered while the lower elevations, including the lakes and rivers have melted out. I was walking along the riverbank when I saw a dark form lying on the bottom of the river. My first thought was a deer had fallen through the ice so I wandered over to investigate…and that’s when I saw the long tail. It took me a few moments to comprehend what I was looking at…a full grown cougar lying peacefully on the riverbed, the victim of thin ice.

The Punished Suicide

This article originally appeared on Death & The Maiden, a website exploring the relationship between women and death.

Padova, Italy. 1863.

One ash-grey morning, a young girl jumped into the muddy waters of the river which ran just behind the city hospital. We do not know her name, only that she worked as a seamstress, that she was 18 years old, and that her act of suicide was in all probability provoked by “amorous delusion”.
A sad yet rather unremarkable event, one that history could have well forgotten – hadn’t it happened, so to speak, in the right place and time.

The city of Padova was home to one of the oldest Universities in history, and it was also recognized as the cradle of anatomy. Among others, the great Vesalius, Morgagni and Fallopius had taught medicine there; in 1595 Girolamo Fabrici d’Acquapendente had the first stable anatomical theater built inside the University’s main building, Palazzo del Bo.
In 1863, the chair of Anatomical Pathology at the University was occupied by Lodovico Brunetti (1813-1899) who, like many anatomists of his time, had come up with his own process for preserving anatomical specimens: tannization. His method consisted in drying the specimens and injecting them with tannic acid; it was a long and difficult procedure (and as such it would not go on to have much fortune) but nonetheless gave astounding results in terms of quality. I have had the opportunity of feeling the consistency of some of his preparations, and still today they maintain the natural dimensions, elasticity and softness of the original tissues.
But back to our story.

When Brunetti heard about the young girl’s suicide, he asked her body be brought to him, so he could carry out his experiments.
First he made a plaster cast of the her face and upper bust. Then he peeled away all of the skin from her head and neck, being especially careful as to preserve the girl’s beautiful golden hair. He then proceeded to treat the skin, scouring it with sulfuric ether and fixing it with his own tannic acid formula. Once the skin was saved from putrefaction, he laid it out over the plaster cast reproducing the girl’s features, then added glass eyes and plaster ears to his creation.

But something was wrong.
The anatomist noticed that in several places the skin was lacerated. Those were the gashes left by the hooks men had used to drag the body out of the water, unto the banks of the river.
Brunetti, who in all evidence must have been a perfectionist, came up with a clever idea to disguise those marks.

He placed some wooden branches beside her chest, then entwined them with tannised snakes, carefully mounting the reptiles as if they were devouring the girl’s face. He poured some red candle wax to serve as blood spurts, and there it was: a perfect allegory of the punishment reserved in Hell to those who committed the mortal sin of  suicide.

He called his piece The Punished Suicide.

Now, if this was all, Brunetti would look like some kind of psychopath, and his work would just be unacceptable and horrifying, from any kind of ethical perspective.
But the story doesn’t end here.
After completing this masterpiece, the first thing Brunetti did was showing it to the girl’s parents.
And this is where things take a really weird turn.
Because the dead girl’s parents, instead of being dismayed and horrified, actually praised him for the precision shown in reproducing their daughter’s features.
So perfectly did I preserve her physiognomy – Brunetti proudly noted, – that those who saw her did easily recognize her”.

But wait, there’s more.
Four years later, the Universal Exposition was opening in Paris, and Brunetti asked the University to grant him funds to take the Punished Suicide to France. You would expect some kind of embarrassment on the part of the university, instead they happily financed his trip to Paris.
At the Exposition, thousands of spectators swarmed in from all around the world to see the latest innovations in technology and science, and saw the Punished Suicide. What would you think happened to Brunetti then? Was he hit by scandal, was his work despised and criticized?
Not at all. He won the Grand Prix in the Arts and Professions.

If you feel kind of dizzy by now, well, you probably should.
Looking at this puzzling story, we are left with only two options: either everybody in the whole world, including Brunetti, was blatantly insane; or there must exist some kind of variance in perception between our views on mortality and those held by people at the time.
It always strikes me how one does not need to go very far back in time to feel this kind of vertigo: all this happened less than 150 years ago, yet we cannot even begin to understand what our great-great-grandfathers were thinking.
Of course, anthropologists tell us that the cultural removal of death and the medicalization of dead bodies are relatively recent processes, which started around the turn of the last century. But it’s not until we are faced with a difficult “object” like this, that we truly grasp the abysmal distance separating us from our ancestors, the intensity of this shift in sensibility.
The Punished Suicide is, in this regard, a complex and wonderful reminder of how society’s boundaries and taboos may vary over a short period of time.
A perfect example of intersection between art (whether or not it encounters our modern taste), anatomy (it was meant to illustrate a preserving method) and the sacred (as an allegory of the Afterlife), it is one of the most challenging displays still visible in the ‘Morgagni’ Museum of Anatomical Pathology in Padova.

This nameless young girl’s face, forever fixed in tormented agony inside her glass case, cannot help but elicit a strong emotional response. It presents us with many essential questions on our past, on our own relationship with death, on how we intend to treat our dead in the future, on the ethics of displaying human remains in Museums, and so on.
On the account of all these rich and fruitful dilemmas, I like to think her death was at least not entirely in vain.

The “Morgagni” Museum of Pathology in Padova is the focus of the latest entry in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection, His Anatomical Majesty. Photography by Carlo Vannini. The story of the ‘Punished Suicide’ was unearthed by F. Zampieri, A. Zanatta and M. Rippa Bonati on Physis, XLVIII(1-2):297-338, 2012.

Tassidermia e vegetarianismo

SideTour_Taxidermy

La tassidermia sembra conoscere, in questi ultimi anni, una sorta di nuova vita. Alimentata dall’interesse per l’epoca vittoriana e dal diffondersi dell’iconografia e l’estetica della sottocultura goth, l’antica arte tassidermica sta velocemente diventando addirittura una moda: innumerevoli sono gli artisti che hanno cominciato ad integrare parti autentiche di animali nei loro gioielli e accessori, come vi confermerà un giro su Etsy, la più grande piattaforma di e-commerce per prodotti artigianali.

taxidermy kitten mouse necklace-f50586

tumblr_lovkxjtwur1qbkjd0o1_400

il_570xN.311750603

il_570xN.530781784_rwry
A Londra e a New York conoscono un crescente successo i workshop che insegnano, nel giro di una giornata o due, i rudimenti del mestiere. Un tassidermista esperto guida i partecipanti passo passo nella preparazione del loro primo esemplare, normalmente un topolino acquistato in un negozio di animali e destinato all’alimentazione dei rettili; molti alunni portano addirittura con sé dei minuscoli abiti, per vestire il proprio topolino alla maniera di Walter Potter.

article-2107482-11F22C86000005DC-726_634x460
Su Bizzarro Bazar abbiamo regolarmente parlato di tassidermia, e sappiamo per esperienza che l’argomento è sensibile: alcuni dei nostri articoli (rimbalzati senza controllo da un social all’altro) hanno scatenato le ire di animalisti e vegetariani, dando vita ad appassionati flame. Ci sembra quindi particolarmente interessante un articolo apparso da poco sull’Huffington Post a cura di Margot Magpie, sui rapporti fra tassidermia e vegetarianesimo.

Margot Magpie è istruttrice tassidermica proprio a Londra, e sostiene che una gran parte dei suoi alunni sia costituita da vegetariani o vegani. Ma come si concilia questa scelta di rispetto per gli animali con l’arte di impagliarli?

article-2107482-11F22FDE000005DC-919_634x408

article-2107482-11F22D3C000005DC-29_634x460

article-2107482-11F22EC7000005DC-410_634x523
Ovviamente, tagliare e preparare il corpo di un animale non implica certo mangiarne la carne. E una gran parte degli artisti, vegetariani e non, che operano oggi nel settore ci tengono a precisare che i loro esemplari non vengono uccisi con lo scopo di creare l’opera tassidermica, ma sono già morti di cause naturali oppure – come nel caso dei topolini – allevati per un motivo più accettabile. (Certo, anche sul commercio dei rettili come animali da compagnia si potrebbe discutere, ma questo esula dal nostro tema). Si tratta in definitiva di materiale biologico che andrebbe sprecato e distrutto, quindi perché non usarlo?

article-2107482-11DCE7C2000005DC-704_634x505

article-2107482-11F230BC000005DC-859_634x449

article-2107482-11F231D9000005DC-824_634x483
Ma preparare un animale comporta comunque il superamento di un fattore di disgusto che sembrerebbe incompatibile con il vegetarianismo: significa entrare in contatto diretto con la carne e il sangue, sventrare, spellare, raschiare e via dicendo. A quanto dice Margot, però, i suoi allievi vegetariani colgono una differenza fondamentale fra l’allevamento degli animali a fini alimentari – con tutti i problemi etici che l’industrializzazione del mercato della carne porta con sé – e la tassidermia, che è vista invece come un rispettoso atto d’amore per l’animale stesso. “La tassidermia per me significa essere stupiti dall’anatomia e dalla biologia delle creature, e aiutarle a continuare a vivere anche dopo la morte, in modo che noi possiamo vederle ed apprezzarle”, dice un suo studente.

La passione per la tecnica tassidermica proviene spesso dall’interesse per la storia naturale. Visitare un museo e ammirare splendidi animali esotici (che normalmente non potremmo vedere) perfettamente conservati, può far nascere la curiosità sui processi utilizzati per prepararli. E questo amore per gli animali, dice Margot, è una costante riconoscibile in tutti i suoi alunni.

article-2107482-11F22AA9000005DC-736_634x455
“Combatto con questo dilemma da un po’. – racconta un’altra artista vegetariana – La gente mi dice che ‘non dovrebbe piacermi’, ma ci sono piccole cose nella vita che ci danno gioia, e non possiamo farne a meno. Mi sembra che sia come donare all’animale una vita interamente nuova, permettergli di vivere per sempre in un nuovo mondo d’amore, per essere attentamente rimesso in sesto, posizionato e decorato, ed è un’impresa premurosa e amorevole”.

article-2107482-11F235DE000005DC-79_634x454
L’altro problema è che non tutti i lavori tassidermici sono “naturalistici”, cioè mirati a riprodurre esattamente l’animale nelle pose e negli atteggiamenti che aveva in vita. Non a caso facevamo l’esempio della tassidermia antropomorfica, in cui l’animale viene vestito e fissato in pose umane, talvolta inserito in contesti e diorami di fantasia, oppure integrato come parte di un accessorio di vestiario, un pendaglio, un anello. Si tratta di una tassidermia più personale, che riflette il gusto creativo dell’artista. Per alcuni questa pratica è irrispettosa dell’animale, ma non tutti la pensano così: secondo Margot e alcuni dei suoi studenti la cosa non crea alcun conflitto, fintanto che il corpo proviene da ambiti controllati.

article-2107482-11F233AB000005DC-674_634x453

“Credo che utilizzare animali provenienti da fonti etiche per la tassidermia sia positivo e, per questo motivo, posso continuare felicemente con il vegetarianismo e con il mio interesse di lunga data per la tassidermia. Sento di molti tassidermisti moderni che usano esclusivamente animali morti per cause naturali o in incidenti, quindi credo che ci troviamo in una nuova era di tassidermia etica. Sono felice di farne parte”.

C’è chi invece il problema l’ha aggirato del tutto. L’artista americana Aimée Baldwin ha creato quella che chiama “tassidermia vegana”: i suoi uccelli sono in realtà sculture costruite con carta crespa. Il lavoro certosino e la conoscenza del materiale, con cui sperimenta da anni, le permettono di ottenere un risultato incredibilmente realistico.

Vegan Taxidermy  An Intersection of Art, Science, and Conservation

Raven-360x240

Kingfisher432

HeronCity432

AmericanAvocet-288x432

Ecco il link all’articolo di Margot Magpie. Gran parte delle fotografie nell’articolo provengono da questo articolo su un workshop tassidermico newyorkese. Ecco infine il sito ufficiale di Aimée Baldwin.

Animali liofilizzati

Ecco una domanda difficile per tutti i possessori di animali: quando il vostro cane o gatto morirà, cosa farete delle sue spoglie?

C’è chi decide di seppellire il proprio animale, chi opta per la cremazione – ma c’è anche chi non riesce mai ad uscire veramente dalla fase della negazione, e vorrebbe continuare ad avere il proprio cucciolo con sé, per sempre.

Fino a poco tempo fa l’unica altra soluzione possibile era la tassidermia: eppure gli imbalsamatori spesso non sono disposti a preparare gli animali da compagnia, e per un motivo evidente. Finché si tratta di preservare la testa di un cervo, il cliente non fa mai problemi, ma quando l’animale da impagliare è un gattino amato e conosciuto per anni, qualsiasi imperfezione nel risultato tassidermico salta subito all’occhio del padrone. Così questo tipo di clienti risulta essere difficile, se non quasi impossibile, da soddisfare.

Oggi però esiste una nuova tecnica di conservazione degli animali da compagnia che promette miracoli. Guardate l’immagine qui sotto: questo cane è morto, ed è stato liofilizzato.

Quando pensiamo alla liofilizzazione, ci vengono in mente subito alcuni alimenti ridotti in polvere, come ad esempio il caffè solubile. Il procedimento in realtà può essere applicato anche a qualsiasi sostanza organica, e consiste nell’essiccamento dei tessuti a temperature estremamente basse, alle quali vengono alternate fasi di riscaldamento in situazioni di pressione controllata, di modo che l’acqua contenuta nei tessuti passi direttamente dallo stato ghiacciato al vapore (sublimazione). In questo modo la struttura della sostanza viene intaccata il meno possibile e mantiene le proprie caratteristiche specifiche: ecco perché la liofilizzazione di un animale da compagnia dà questi risultati eccezionali.

article-2287653-186ACF89000005DC-569_634x415

freezedriedpets

freeze-dried-pets.jpeg4-1280x960

460x

2775_1freeze_dried_pets

Chiaramente i costi di un simile procedimento non sono indifferenti, e in America oscillano tra 850 e 2.500 dollari; inoltre la liofilizzazione di un animale, magari di grossa taglia, non è affatto un processo veloce, e tra liste d’attesa e tempi tecnici si può aspettare anche più di un anno prima che l’esemplare ritorni al suo padrone.

12JPSTUFFERS4-articleLarge

120302-PetPhoto1-hmed-0930a.grid-6x2

Cant bear bury dear departed Tiddles Eternally the freeze dried pets loving pet owners bear bury cremated 2

freeze-dried-gray-dog-120301

I responsabili delle ditte che offrono questo servizio descrivono una clientela meno eccentrica di quello che si potrebbe immaginare: chi si rivolge a loro è gente normale, che non sopporta l’idea della separazione definitiva, e che cerca nella preservazione dell’animale un aiuto per superare il dolore. Per alcuni di essi, l’animale era l’unica compagnia di una vita solitaria. Desiderano avere ancora una presenza fisica concreta, con cui relazionarsi e illudersi di interagire.

a31_02284006

tumblr_lkbm2mrkVR1qz8ill

p_014

Abbiamo parlato spesso dell’occultamento della morte operato nel tempo dalle società occidentali; il progressivo allontanarsi dell’esperienza del cadavere dalle nostre vite ha reso sempre più complicata l’elaborazione del lutto, e questo si riflette anche sulla morte degli animali da compagnia, dato che l’amore che portiamo verso di loro talvolta rende la separazione altrettanto traumatica che se si trattasse di una persona cara.

Così, se l’immagine di qualcuno che coccola un animale morto ci dovesse apparire patetica o peggio ancora ridicola, gli psicologi ricordano che gli esseri umani proiettano abitualmente attributi umani ad oggetti inanimati; e per quanto riguarda la morte, ovviamente, tutti noi abbiamo reso visita ad una tomba, e magari rivolto parole intime al defunto, come se potesse sentirci… come se fosse ancora vivo. E viene da domandarsi se questo “come se”, il desiderio e la capacità umana di rifiutare la realtà così com’è per costruirne una simbolica, non sia forse alla base di tutte le nostre grandezze, e di tutte le nostre miserie.

1_7_08_IMG_4925

La Pascualita

Nella cittadina di Chihuahua, capitale dell’omonimo stato in Messico, c’è un piccolo negozio di abiti da sposa; e in una vetrina di questo negozio potete ammirare un manichino del tutto particolare.


La gente del luogo la chiama La Pascualita. Fece la sua apparizione nella vetrina il 25 marzo del 1930, vestita di un leggero abito primaverile da sposa. Fin da subito le sue fattezze iperrealistiche stregarono i passanti: il suo sguardo vitreo sembrava fin troppo umano, la cura nei dettagli era estrema e l’illusione di trovarsi di fronte a una modella in carne ed ossa dava certamente i brividi.

Così iniziarono a nascere le leggende. Quel manichino, si cominciò a dire, assomigliava troppo a Pascuala Esparza de Perez, figlia dell’allora proprietaria: in poco tempo, la gente del posto si convinse che quello fosse in realtà il cadavere imbalsamato e perfettamente preservato della giovane ragazza, morta forse in gran segreto. Come spiegare altrimenti quella chioma autentica e quella pelle così perfetta?


La leggenda si arricchì di dettagli, e si sparse la voce che Pascuala fosse morta proprio il giorno delle sue nozze, in seguito al morso di una vedova nera. La ragazza, ovviamente ancora in perfetta salute, appena seppe di queste storie provò a convincere i suoi concittadini che era viva e vegeta… ma ormai nell’immaginario popolare il manichino era diventato “Pascualita”, la sfortunata sposa imbalsamata. Chi si trovava a passare di notte di fronte alla vetrina illuminata giurava di aver visto il manichino muoversi per seguirlo con lo sguardo. Secondo altri, Pascualita cambiava posizione da sola di tanto in tanto.


Fu così che i proprietari del negozio dovettero decidere che, dopotutto, essere al centro di questa storia fantastica e soprannaturale poteva anche funzionare come un’insperata pubblicità. Trasformata in attrazione turistica, ogni due settimane la Pascualita viene cambiata rigorosamente a tende chiuse, in modo che nessuno possa conoscere i suoi segreti, oltre alle commesse del negozio. Le quali dichiarano – non si sa se per contratto o per autentica superstizione: “Ogni volta che mi avvicino a Pascualita, le mie mani si mettono a sudare. Le sue mani sono così realistiche, e ha perfino le vene varicose sulle gambe. Io credo che sia una persona reale”.

A qualcuno di voi questa storia farà venire in mente la macabra vicenda di Elmer McCurdy. Ovviamente la Pascualita era, ed è, soltanto un manichino iperrealistico (se seguite un poco il nostro blog, sapete bene che preservare un corpo per 75 anni in queste condizioni non sarebbe possibile). Ma la statua della giovinetta vestita da sposa non è tanto interessante per la sua fattura, o per i presunti segreti che nasconderebbe; il suo fascino sta nella leggenda a cui ha dato vita, e che dimostra il nostro desiderio, il nostro bisogno di credere in questo tipo di storie – paranormali, macabre, fantastiche, che ci riportano ad una dimensione fuori dal tempo in cui bellezza e morte, orrore e poesia sono indissolubilmente fusi assieme.

F.A.Q. – Peggior Tassidermia

Caro Bizzarro Bazar, ho visto che nel tuo blog ti sei occupato spesso di tassidermia. A quale esemplare daresti il premio di “animale peggio impagliato al mondo”?

Caro lettore, la scelta è davvero ardua. Il sito Crappy Taxidermy raccoglie da anni i risultati delle peggiori tecniche tassidermiche. Ma se dovessimo scegliere, il nostro premio andrebbe senz’altro al famigerato leone di Federico I di Svezia, più per motivi storici che per effettiva bruttezza: c’è di peggio, certo, ma nessun esemplare ha alle spalle l’affascinante e umanissima vicenda che si narra a proposito di questo animale.

Regalato nel 1731 al Re svedese dal Governatore di Algeri, il leone fece andare Federico I in visibilio, tanto che lo volle conservare imbalsamato. E fin qui, niente di straordinario, se non che il tassidermista di corte, a quanto sembra, non aveva mai visto un leone. Pensate adesso all’ansia, alla pressione e all’angoscia di questo povero imbalsamatore, con il fiato del sovrano sul collo… immaginatelo mentre, a partire da quattro ossa e dalla pelle dell’animale, e magari prendendo spunto dalle raffigurazioni araldiche o da qualche vecchia pergamena naturalistica, cercava febbrilmente di risalire all’anatomia corretta del grande felino…  in lotta contro il tempo per soddisfare l’entusiasmo del Re.

Il risultato è scusabile, oppure no? Sta a voi decidere. Noi, intanto, gli assegniamo il nostro Grand Prix.

Sculture tassidermiche – III

Concludiamo qui la nostra serie di post sulla scultura tassidermica.

Partiamo subito da una delle artiste più controverse, Katinka Simonese, conosciuta con il nome d’arte di Tinkebell. Artista provocatoria, Katinka cerca di mettere davanti ai nostri occhi i punti ciechi della nostra società moderna. Per fare un esempio, milioni di polli maschi sono uccisi ogni giorno (spesso vengono gettati con forza contro un muro del pollaio); ma se Katinka replica la stessa azione in pubblico, viene arrestata. Allo stesso modo, l’artista ha trasformato il suo stesso gatto in una borsa in pelliccia double-face che può essere rivoltata per diventare un cagnolino. Per denunciare il fatto che il nostro “amore” per i cuccioli domestici è diventato uno status symbol, un commercio bell’e buono, più che un vero affetto per gli animali.

Nella stessa lunghezza d’onda, Tinkebell ha trasformato un cagnolino in carillon, suggerendo l’idea che nella nostra società consumistica gli animali rivestano il ruolo di oggetti, e che quindi possiamo modificarli a piacere, a seconda dei nostri bisogni. Senza dubbio le sue opere portano a riflettere sul ruolo che riserviamo oggi agli animali, utilizzati come veri e propri prodotti.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNsVZx_sC1M]

Cai Guo Qiang ha esposto il suo lavoro in una mostra, intitolata I Want to Believe, al Guggenheim Museum a New York: la mostra include il suo spettacolare pezzo chiamato Head On, che mostra 90 lupi imbalsamati sospesi in un arco che rovinano collassando contro un muro di vetro.

Ma Cai Guo ha anche esposto tigri seviziate, trafitte da mille frecce, per insinuare nello spettatore quella pietà che latita nella vita di ogni giorno, mostrando queste fiere come vittime sacrificali per le quali non possiamo che sentirci colpevoli.

Simile per concetto, Claire Morgan utilizza la tassidermia in maniera squisitamente astratta. Le sue belve sono un imponente memento mori che ci ricorda che ogni nostro piacere, anche quello più estetico, deriva dalla morte di qualche altro essere.

Passiamo ora a un artista differente, che modella ibridi fantastici a partire da tessuti organici. Si tratta di Juan Cabana, che riprendendo l’antica arte dell’imbalsamazione delle chimere crea straordinari esemplari di esseri mitologici, come ad esempio le sirene. È naturale, guardando le sue opere, ripensare alle Sirene delle Fiji ospitate dai musei di Phineas Barnum.

Sempre in tema di chimere, concludiamo questo excursus fra gli artisti tassidermici con Kate Clark, scultrice degna di nota, che ibrida tecniche tassidermiche con artifici scultorici più tradizionali. Le sue opere mostrano esemplari impagliati dotati di volti umani, quasi a farci riflettere sull’intima identità che ci lega al mondo animale. Possiamo così vederci, nelle sue sculture, come prede di caccia e vittime venatorie. Per ricordare che fra noi e gli animali non c’è poi tutta questa differenza.

Per finire, vorremmo segnalarvi alcuni siti di altri artisti tassidermici che, per motivi di spazio, non abbiamo potuto trattare.

Maurizio Cattelan – artista italiano controverso ed estremo, che ha utilizzato in alcune opere esemplari tassidermici.

Julia deVille – artista che unisce l’alta moda alla fascinazione per il memento mori.

Thomas Grunfeld – creatore di chimere.

The Idiots – collettivo artistico che ibrida la tecnologia con la tassidermia.

Sculture tassidermiche – II

Continuiamo la nostra panoramica (iniziata con questo articolo) sugli artisti contemporanei che utilizzano in modo creativo e non naturalistico le tecniche tassidermiche.

Jane Howarth, artista britannica, ha finora lavorato principalmente con uccelli imbalsamati. Avida collezionista di animali impagliati, sotto formalina e di altre bizzarrie, le sue esposizioni mostrano esemplari tassidermici adornati di perle, collane, tessuti pregiati e altre stoffe. Jane è particolarmente interessata a tutti quegli animali poveri e “sporchi” che la gente non degna di uno sguardo sulle aste online o per strada: la sua missione è manipolare questi resti “indesiderati” per trasformarli in strane e particolari opere da museo, che giocano sul binomio seduzione-repulsione. Si tratta di un’arte delicata, che tende a voler abbellire e rendere preziosi i piccoli cadaveri di animali. La Howarth ci rende sensibili alla splendida fragilità di questi corpi rinsecchiti, alla loro eleganza, e con impercepibili, discreti accorgimenti trasforma la materia morta in un’esibizione di raffinata bellezza. Bastano qualche piccolo lembo di stoffa, o qualche filo di perla, per riuscire a mostrarci la nobiltà di questi animali, anche nella morte.

Pascal Bernier è un artista poliedrico, che si è interessato alla tassidermia soltanto per alcune sue collezioni. In particolare troviamo interessante la sua Accidents de chasse (1994-2000, “Incidenti di caccia”), una serie di sculture in cui animali selvaggi (volpi, elefanti, tigri, caprioli) sono montati in posizioni naturali ma esibiscono bendaggi medici che ci fanno riflettere sul valore della caccia. Normalmente i trofei di caccia mostrano le prede in maniera naturalistica, in modo da occultare il dolore e la violenza che hanno dovuto subire. Bernier ci mette di fronte alla triste realtà: dietro all’esibizione di un semplice trofeo, c’è una vita spezzata, c’è dolore, morte. I suoi animali “handicappati”, zoppi, medicati, sono assolutamente surreali; poiché sappiamo che nella realtà, nessuno di questi animali è mai stato medicato o curato. Quelle bende suonano “false”, perché quando guardiamo un esemplare tassidermico, stiamo guardando qualcosa di già morto. Per questo i suoi animali, nonostante l’apparente serenità,  sembrano fissarci con sguardo accusatorio.

Lisa Black, neozelandese ma nata in Australia nel 1982, lavora invece sulla commistione di organico e meccanico. “Modificando” ed “adattando” i corpi degli animali secondo le regole di una tecnologia piuttosto steampunk, Lisa Black si pone il difficile obiettivo di farci ragionare sulla bellezza naturale confusa con la bellezza artificiale. Crea cioè dei pezzi unici, totalmente innaturali, ma innegabilmente affascinanti, che ci interrogano su quello che definiamo “bello”. Una tartaruga, un cerbiatto, un coccodrillo: di qualsiasi animale si tratti, ci viene istintivo trovarli armoniosi, esteticamente bilanciati e perfetti. La Black aggiunge a questi animali dei meccanismi a orologeria, degli ingranaggi, quasi si trattasse di macchine fuse con la carne, o di prototipi di animali meccanici del futuro. E la cosa sorprendente è che la parte meccanica nulla toglie alla bellezza dell’animale. Creando questi esemplari esteticamente raffinati, l’artista vuole porre il problema di questa falsa dicotomia: è davvero così scontata la “sacrosanta” bellezza del naturale rispetto alla “volgarità” dell’artificiale?

Restate sintonizzati: a breve la terza parte del nostro viaggio nel mondo della tassidermia artistica!

Sculture tassidermiche – I

In anni recenti, la tassidermia artistica (cioè non naturalistica) ha conosciuto un rinnovato interesse da parte di pubblico e critica. Come è noto, la tassidermia è l’antica arte di impagliare gli animali: della bestia viene conservata soltanto la pelle (ed eventuali unghie o corna), e a seconda delle dimensioni e della specie si seguono diversi procedimenti per ridare la forma più naturale possibile all’esemplare. La tassidermia ha conosciuto la sua fortuna con la nascita dei musei di storia naturale e, in un secondo tempo, con la diffusione nel ‘900 della caccia come sport. Ma in entrambi i casi quello che l’artista cercava di raggiungere era un risultato il più possibile vicino alla realtà, rendendo l’animale impagliato il più vivo possibile, replicando minuziosamente le pose che assume in natura, ecc. La tassidermia artistica utilizza invece le tecniche di imbalsamazione e preparazione per attingere a risultati non realistici – per creare insomma chimere, mostri e animali impossibili.


Questo tipo di tassidermia non è certo una novità: già il tassidermista tedesco Hermann Ploucquet aveva incantato i visitatori della Grande Mostra del 1851 con i suoi “animali comici”, animali impagliati in pose antropomorfe che si sfidavano in improbabili duelli. Ploucquet poteva contare fra i suoi “fan” più celebri la Regina Vittoria in persona.

Ploucquet è generalmente ritenuto la maggiore influenza per il tassidermista vittoriano Walter Potter, divenuto celebre per i suoi diorami di complessità e ricercatezza ineguagliate. Classi di scuola in cui gli studenti sono tutti coniglietti impagliati, rane imbalsamate che fanno esercizi di ginnastica (grazie a un meccanismo automatico nascosto che dona loro il movimento), cerimonie di nozze fra topolini, e altre situazioni surreali costituivano il fulcro del suo Museo delle Curiosità.

Ogni piccolo dettaglio, dai quaderni ai calamai, dai vestitini alle tazzine da tè era maniacalmente riprodotto, e ad ogni animaletto Potter regalava una diversa espressione facciale – una sfida con la quale si sarebbero dovuti confrontare tutti i tassidermisti a venire.

I diorami di Potter, per quanto complessi, sembrano comunque infantili e un tantino ingenui, soprattutto se confrontati alle opere dei moderni artisti di tassidermia creativa. Forse questo è il momento di ricordare che tutti gli artisti di cui parleremo sono propugnatori di una tassidermia “etica” e responsabile, vale a dire che per le loro composizioni utilizzano esclusivamente 1) animali trovati morti sulle strade 2) parti di scarto di macelli o di collezioni museali 3) animali domestici donati dai proprietari dopo una morte naturale. Molti di questi artisti sono attivi in programmi di protezione della natura, e collaborano spesso con le facoltà di biologia delle principali università.

Sarina Brewer, ad esempio, oltre che prendere parte a diversi progetti di storia naturale dell’Università del Minnesota, nel tempo libero si occupa anche di riabilitazione e cura degli animali selvatici feriti. Nonostante questa sua sensibilità verso gli animali, le sue doti di esperta tassidermista si esprimono spesso in modo macabro e grottesco: Sarina infatti costruisce chimere, esseri fantastici e immaginari nati dalla commistione di diverse morfologie animali.

Da più di 20 anni grifoni, arpie, gatti alati, strane e meravigliose creature prendono vita a partire da scarti di animali fra le abili mani della Brewer. Sarina crede che proprio in questo risieda la bellezza della sua arte: “io mi occupo della morte in maniera che i più reputano non convenzionale. Io non vedo un animale morto come disgustoso o offensivo. Penso che tutte le creature siano belle, nella morte così come nella vita, belle di fuori come di dentro. Il mio lavoro è un omaggio alla loro bellezza, perché quando le reincarno nelle mie opere, sto creando una nuova vita là dove prima c’era solo morte”.

Iris Schieferstein non lavora esclusivamente con la tassidermia, ma quando lo fa, i risultati sono sempre controversi e puntano il dito sul nostro concetto di realtà, di buon gusto, e sulla crudeltà esibita nel concetto di moda (un po’ come il britannico Reid Peppard di cui avevamo già parlato in questo famigerato articolo). I lavori della Schieferstein sono ibridazioni di forme, inaspettate sculture che confondono i piani di senso associando organico e meccanico.

Polly Morgan è londinese, classe 1980. Il suo lavoro è al tempo stesso disturbante e commovente: assolutamente spiazzante, persino scioccante a volte, ma sempre pervaso da uno strano e sottile senso di magia.

I suoi animali addormentati in speciali mausolei sembrano esseri fiabeschi, e ci pare di ravvedere un’evidente compassione, una vera e propria pietas nell’approccio che la Morgan adotta verso i suoi soggetti.

A breve la seconda parte del nostro viaggio nel mondo della tassidermia artistica.

The Whale Theatre

Every kid loves to think about Jonah in the belly of the big fish. Just like the Baron Münchhausen in the whale, or Pinocchio in the shark, living for some time inside one of these great sea animals is a fantastic idea which inspired artists and writers for centuries.

Well, you can probably guess what we are about to tell you. Yes, somebody actually lived inside a fish. Better yet, he built a theatre out of it.

This is Simon-Max, a French opera-bouffe tenor (1852-1923). He maily performed in Paris, but once he reached wide acclaim he managed to diversify his business, and in 1893 he already owned a casino in Villerville, a coastal city in Lower Normandy.

Just about at the time he opened his casino, news arrived that a whale was beached near the town. It was actually not so unusual for whales to end up beached on the coast of Normandy due to the low tide, as shown in this postcard published that same year (1893).

Simon-Max bought the whale from the local fishermen, and sold the oil and meat obtained from the animal. But then he decided that  he was going to try something unprecedented, using its skin. He built a theatre-museum inside the mounted cetacean.

The size of the animal in the original poster ads may be a little exaggerated, but they convey the idea of what the theatre might have looked like. The public entered through the whale’s mouth, watched the show in the interior room, which could host almost a hundred people, then exited through a small door in the tail. This attraction, called Théatre-Baleine (whale theatre), earned Simon-Max a huge amount of money, and made the city of Villerville quite famous for over a year. The tenor, inside his whale, performed an act called Jonas Revue (“Jonah Revisited”) which quickly became a hit.

The whale theatre was then transferred to the Paris Casino, but the following winter was completely destroyed by a fire.

Münchhausen