Unearthing Gorini, The Petrifier

This post originally appeared on The Order of the Good Death

Many years ago, as I had just begun to explore the history of medicine and anatomical preparations, I became utterly fascinated with the so-called “petrifiers”: 19th and early 20th century anatomists who carried out obscure chemical procedures in order to give their specimens an almost stone-like, everlasting solidity.
Their purpose was to solve two problems at once: the constant shortage of corpses to dissect, and the issue of hygiene problems (yes, back in the time dissection was a messy deal).
Each petrifier perfected his own secret formula to achieve virtually incorruptible anatomical preparations: the art of petrifaction became an exquisitely Italian specialty, a branch of anatomy that flourished due to a series of cultural, scientific and political factors.

When I first encountered the figure of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881), I made the mistake of assuming his work was very similar to that of his fellow petrifiers.
But as soon as I stepped foot inside the wonderful Gorini Collection in Lodi, near Milan, I was surprised at how few scientifically-oriented preparations it contained: most specimens were actually whole, undissected human heads, feet, hands, infants, etc. It struck me that these were not meant as medical studies: they were attempts at preserving the body forever. Was Gorini looking for a way to have the deceased transformed into a genuine statue? Why?
I needed to know more.

A biographical research is a mighty strange experience: digging into the past in search of someone’s secret is always an enterprise doomed to failure. No matter how much you read about a person’s life, their deepest desires and dreams remain forever inaccessible.
And yet, the more I examined books, papers, documents about Paolo Gorini, the more I felt I could somehow relate to this man’s quest.
Yes, he was an eccentric genius. Yes, he lived alone in his ghoulish laboratory, surrounded by “the bodies of men and beasts, human limbs and organs, heads with their hair preserved […], items made from animal substances for use as chess or draughts pieces; petrified livers and brain tissue, hardened skin and hides, nerve tissue from oxen, etc.”. And yes, he somehow enjoyed incarnating the mad scientist character, especially among his bohemian friends – writers and intellectuals who venerated him. But there was more.

It was necessary to strip away the legend from the man. So, as one of Gorini’s greatest passions was geology, I approached him as if he was a planet: progressing deeper and deeper, through the different layers of crust that make up his stratified enigma.
The outer layer was the one produced by mythmaking folklore, nourished by whispered tales, by fleeting glimpses of horrific visions and by popular rumors. “The Magician”, they called him. The man who could turn bodies into stone, who could create mountains from molten lava (as he actually did in his “experimental geology” public demonstrations).
The layer immediately beneath that unveiled the image of an “anomalous” scientist who was, however, well rooted in the Zeitgeist of his times, its spirit and its disputes, with all the vices and virtues derived therefrom.
The most intimate layer – the man himself – will perhaps always be a matter of speculation. And yet certain anecdotes are so colorful that they allowed me to get a glimpse of his fears and hopes.

Still, I didn’t know why I felt so strangely close to Gorini.

His preparations sure look grotesque and macabre from our point of view. He had access to unclaimed bodies at the morgue, and could experiment on an inconceivable number of corpses (“For most of my life I have substituted – without much discomfort – the company of the dead for the company of the living…”), and many of the faces that we can see in the Museum are those of peasants and poor people. This is the reason why so many visitors might find the Collection in Lodi quite unsettling, as opposed to a more “classic” anatomical display.
And yet, here is what looks like a macroscopic incongruity: near the end of his life, Gorini patented the first really efficient crematory. His model was so good it was implemented all over the world, from London to India. One could wonder why this man, who had devoted his entire life to making corpses eternal, suddenly sought to destroy them through fire.
Evidently, Gorini wasn’t fighting death; his crusade was against putrefaction.

When Paolo was only 12 years old, he saw his own father die in a horrific carriage accident. He later wrote: “That day was the black point of my life that marked the separation between light and darkness, the end of all joy, the beginning of an unending procession of disasters. From that day onwards I felt myself to be a stranger in this world…
The thought of his beloved father’s body, rotting inside the grave, probably haunted him ever since. “To realize what happens to the corpse once it has been closed inside its underground prison is a truly horrific thing. If we were somehow able to look down and see inside it, any other way of treating the dead would be judged as less cruel, and the practice of burial would be irreversibly condemned”.

That’s when it hit me.


This was exactly what made his work so relevant: all Gorini was really trying to do was elaborate a new way of dealing with the “scandal” of dead bodies.
He was tirelessly seeking a more suitable relationship with the remains of missing loved ones. For a time, he truly believed petrifaction could be the answer. Who would ever resort to a portrait – he thought – when a loved one could be directly immortalized for all eternity?
Gorini even suggested that his petrified heads be used to adorn the gravestones of Lodi’s cemetery – an unfortunate but candid proposal, made with the most genuine conviction and a personal sense of pietas. (Needless to say this idea was not received with much enthusiasm).

Gorini was surely eccentric and weird but, far from being a madman, he was also cherished by his fellow citizens in Lodi, on the account of his incredible kindness and generosity. He was a well-loved teacher and a passionate patriot, always worried that his inventions might be useful to the community.
Therefore, as soon as he realized that petrifaction might well have its advantages in the scientific field, but it was neither a practical nor a welcome way of dealing with the deceased, he turned to cremation.

Redefining the way we as a society interact with the departed, bringing attention to the way we treat bodies, focusing on new technologies in the death field – all these modern concerns were already at the core of his research.
He was a man of his time, but also far ahead of it. Gorini the scientist and engineer, devoted to the destiny of the dead, would paradoxically encounter more fertile conditions today than in the 20th century. It’s not hard to imagine him enthusiastically experimenting with alkaline hydrolysis or other futuristic techniques of treating human remains. And even if some of his solutions, such as his petrifaction procedures, are now inevitably dated and detached from contemporary attitudes, they do seem to have been the beginning of a still pertinent urge and of a research that continues today.

The Petrifier is the fifth volume of the Bizzarro Bazar Collection. Text (both in Italian and English) by Ivan Cenzi, photographs by Carlo Vannini.

 

The Petrifier: The Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection

 

The fifth volume in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection will come out on February 16th: The Petrifier is dedicated to the Paolo Gorini Anatomical Collection in Lodi.

Published by Logos and featuring Carlo Vannini‘s wonderful photographs, the book explores the life and work of Paolo Gorini, one of the most famous “petrifiers” of human remains, and places this astounding collection in its cultural, social and political context.

I will soon write something more exhaustive on the reason why I believe Gorini is still so relevant today, and so peculiar when compared to his fellow petrifiers. For now, here’s the description from the book sheet:

Whole bodies, heads, babies, young ladies, peasants, their skin turned into stone, immune to putrescence: they are the “Gorini’s dead”, locked in a lapidary eternity that saves them from the ravenous destruction of the Conquering Worm.
They can be admired in a small museum in Lodi, where, under the XVI century vault with grotesque frescoes, a unique collection is preserved: the marvellous legacy of Paolo Gorini (1813-1881). Eccentric figure, characterised by a clashing duality, Gorini devoted himself to mathematics, volcanology, experimental geology, corpse preservation (he embalmed the prestigious bodies of Giuseppe Mazzini and Giuseppe Rovani); however, he was also involved in the design of one of the first Italian crematory ovens.
Introverted recluse in his laboratory obtained from an old deconsecrated church, but at the same time women’s lover and man of science able to establish close relationships with the literary men of his era, Gorini is depicted in the collective imagination as a figure poised between the necromant and the romantic cliché of the “crazy scientist”, both loved and feared. Because of his mysterious procedures and top-secret formulas that could “petrify” the corpses, Paolo Gorini’s life has been surrounded by an air of legend.
Thanks to the contributions of the museum curator Alberto Carli and the anthropologist Dario Piombino-Mascali, this book retraces the curious historic period during which the petrifaction process obtained a certain success, as well as the value and interest conferred to the collection in Lodi nowadays.
These preparations, in fact, are not silent witnesses: they speak about the history of the long-dated human obsession for the preserving of dead bodies, documenting a moment in which the Westerners relationship with death was beginning to change. And, ultimately, they solve Paolo Gorini’s enigma: a “wizard”, man and scientist, who, traumatised at a young age by his father’s death, spent his whole life probing the secrets of Nature and attempting to defeat the decay.

The Petrifier is available for pre-order at this link.

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 10

Here’s another plate of fresh links and random weirdness to swallow in one bite, like the above frog did with a little snake.

  • In Madagascar there is a kind of double burial called famadihana: somewhat similar to the more famous Sulawesi traditionfamadihana consists in exhuming the bodies of the departed, equipping them with a new and clean shroud, and then burying them again. But not before having enjoyed one last, happy dance with the dead relative.

  • Whining about your writer’s block? Francis van Helmont, alchemist and close friend of  famed philosopher Leibniz, was imprisoned by the Inquisition and wrote a book in between torture sessions. Besides obviously being a tough guy, he also had quite original ideas: according to his theory, ancient Hebrew letters were actually diagrams showing how lips and mouth should be positioned in order to pronounce the same letters. God, in other words, might have “printed” the Hebrew alphabet inside our very anatomy.

  • Reason #4178 to love Japan: giant rice straw sculptures.
  • At the beginning of the last century, it was legal to send babies through the mail in the US. (Do we have a picture? Of course we do.)

  • In France, on the other hand, around the year 1657 children were eager to play a nice little game called Fart-In-The-Face (“Back in my day, we had one toy, and it was our…“).

  • James Ballard was passionate for what he called “invisible literature”: sales recepits, grocery lists, autopsy reports, assembly instructions, and so on. I find a similar thrill in seeking 19th-century embalming handbooks: such technical, professional publications, if read today, always have a certain surreal je ne sais quoi. And sometimes they also come with exceptional photographs, like these taken from a 1897 book.

  • In closing, I would like to remind you of two forthcoming appointments: on October 29, at 7pm, I will be in Rome at Giufà Libreria Caffe’ to present Tabula Esmeraldina, the latest visionary work by my Chilean friend Claudio Romo.
    On November 3-5, you will find me at Lucca Comics & Games, stand NAP201, signing copies of Paris Mirabilia and chatting with readers of Bizzarro Bazar. See you there!

 

Inanimus, Monsters & Chimeras of the Present

I look above me, towards the movable hooks once used to hang the meat, and I visualize the blood and pain that these walls had to contain – sustain – for many long years. Death and pain are the instruments life has to proceed, I tell myself.

I’m standing inside Padua’s former slaughterhouse: a space specifically devised for massacre, where now animals are living a second, bizarre life thanks to Alberto Michelon’s artworks.
When I meet him, he immediately infects me with the feverish enthusiasm of someone who is lucky (and brave) enough to be following his own vocation. What comes out of his mouth must clearly be a fifth of what goes through his mind. As John Waters put it, “without obsession, life is nothing“.
Animals and taxidermy are Alberto’s obsession.

Taxidermy is traditionally employed in two main fields: hunting trophies, and didactical museum installations.
In both context, the demand for taxidermic preparations is declining. On one hand we are witnessing a drop in hunting activities, which find less and less space in European culture as opposed to ecological preoccupations and the evolution of the ethical sensitiviy towards animals. On the other hand, even great Natural History Museums already have their well-established collections and seldom acquire new specimens: often a taxidermist is only called when restoration is required on already prepared animals.

This is why – Alberto explains – I mainly work for private customers who want to preserve their domestic pets. It is more difficult, because you have to faithfully recreate the cat or dog’s expressiveness based on their photographs; preparing a much-loved and familiar pet requires the greatest care. But I get a huge satisfaction when the job turns out well. Customers often burst into tears, they talk to the animal – when I present them with the finished work, I always step aside and leave them a bit of intimacy. It’s something that helps them coming to terms with their loss.”

What he says doesn’t surprise me: in a post on wunderkammern I associated taxidermy’s second youth (after a time in which it looked like this art had become obsolete) to the social need of reconfiguring our relationship with death.
But the reason I came here is Alberto is not just an ordinary taxidermist: he is Italy’s only real exponent of artistic taxiermy.

Until November 5, here at the ex-slaughterhouse, you can visit his exhibition Inanimus – A Contemporary Bestiary, a collection of his main works.
To a casual observer, artistic non-naturalist taxidermy could seem not fully respectful towards the animal. In realuty, most artists who use animal organic material as a medium do so just to reflect on our own relationship with other species, creating their works from ethical sources (animals who died of natural causes, collected in the wild, etc.).

Alberto too follows such professional ethics, as he began his experiment using leftovers from his workshop. “I was sorry to have to throw away pieces of skin, or specimens that wouldn’t find an arrangement“, he tells me. “It began almost like a diversion, in a very impulsive way, following a deep urge“.
He candidly confesses that he doesn’t know much about the American Rogue Taxidermy scene, nor about modern art galleries. And it’s clear that Alberto is somewhat alien to the contemporary art universe, so often haughty and pretentious: he keeps talking about instinct, about playing, but must of all – oh, the horror! – he takes the liberty of doing what no “serious” artist would ever dream of doing: he explains the message of his own works, one by one.

His installations really have much to say: rather than carrying messages, though, they are food for thought, a continuous and many-sided elaboration of the modernity, an attempt to use these animal remains as a mirror to investigate our own face.
Some of his works immediately strike me for the openness with which they take on current events: from the tragedy of migrants to GMOs, from euthanasia to the present-day fear of terrorist attacks.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen any other artist using taxidermy to confront the present in such a direct way.
A roe deer head covered in snake skin, wearing an orange uniform reminiscent of Islamic extremists’ prisoners, is chained to the wall. The reference is obvious: the heads of decapitated infidels are assimilated to hunting trophies.
To be honest, I find this explicit allusion to current events imagery (which, like it or not, has gained a “pop” quality) pretty unsettling, and I’m not even sure that I like it – but if something pulls the rug out from under my feet, I bless it anyways. This is what the best art is supposed to do.

Other installations are meant to illustrate Western contradictions, halfway through satire and open criticism to a capitalistic system ever harder to sustain.
A tortoise, represented as an old bejeweled lady with saggy breasts, is the emblem of a conservative society based on economic privilege: a “prehistoric” concept that, just like the reptile, has refused to evolve in any way.

A conqueror horse, fierce and rampant, exhibits a luxurious checked fur composed from several equines.
A social climber horse: to be where he stands, he must have done away with many other horses“, Alberto tells me with a smile.

An installation shows the internal organs of a tiger, preserved in jars that are arranged following the animal’s anatomy: the eyes, tomgue and brain are placed at the extremity where the head should be, and so on. Some chimeras seem to be in the middle of a bondage session: an allusion to poaching for aphrodisiac elixirs such as the rhino horn, and to the fil rouge linking us to those massacres.

A boar, sitting on a toilet, is busy reading a magazine and searching for a pair of glass eyes to fill his empty eye sockets.
The importance of freedom of choice regarding the end of life is incarnated by two minks who hanged themselves – rather than ending up in a fur coat.
The skulls of three livestock animals are hanged like trophies, and plastic flowers come out of the hole bored by the slaughterhouse firearm (“I picked up the flowers from the graves at the cemetery, replacing them with new flowers“, Michelon tells me).

As you might have understood by now, the most interesting aspect of the Inanimus works is the neverending formal experimentation.
Every installation is extremely different from the other, and Alberto Michelon always finds new and surprising ways of using the animal matter: there are abstract paintings whose canvas is made of snake or fish skin; entomological compositions; anthropomorphic taxidermies; a crucifix entirely built by patiently gluing together bone fragments; tribal masks, phallic snakes mocking branded underwear, skeletal chandeliers, Braille texts etracted from lizard skin.

Ma gli altri tassidermisti, diciamo i “puristi”, non storcono il naso?
Certamente alcuni non la ritengono vera tassidermia, forse pensano che io mi sia montato la testa. Non mi importa. Cosa vuoi farci? Questo progetto sta prendendo sempre più importanza, mi diverte e mi entusiasma.

On closer inspection, there’s not a huge difference between classic and artistic taxidermy. The stuffed animals we find in natural science museums, as well as Alberto’s, are but representations, interpretations, simulachra.
Every taxidermist uses the skin, and shape, of the animal to convey a specific vision of the world; and the museum narrative (although so conventional as to be “invisible” to our eyes) is maybe no more legit than a personal perspective.

Although Alberto keeps repeating that he feels he’s a novice, still unripe artist, the Inanimus works show a very precise artistic direction. As I approach the exit, I feel I have witnessed something unique, at least in the Italian panorama. I cannot therefore back away from the ritual prosaic last question: future projects?
I want to keep on getting better, learning, experimenting new things“, Alberto replies as his gaze wanders all around, lost in the crowd of his transfigured animals.

Inanimus – un bestiario contemporaneo
Padova, Cattedrale Ex-macello, Via Cornaro 1
Until October 17, 2017 [Extended to November 5, 2017]
FacebookInstagram

Il pietrificatore di pazzi

Abbiamo già parlato dei più famosi pietrificatori in questo articolo. Ritorniamo sull’argomento per esaminare la figura del torinese Giuseppe Paravicini (1871-1927), e la peculiare storia dei suoi preparati.

Paravicini ricoprì la carica di anatomista presso l’Istituto di Anatomia Patologica del più grande manicomio d’Italia, a Mombello di Limbiate, dal 1901 al 1917, e dal 1910 al 1917 fu appuntato direttore del suddetto nosocomio. Avendo accesso diretto ai cadaveri dei pazienti deceduti da poco all’interno dell’istituto, Paravicini sperimentò su di essi alcune tecniche conservative, costituendo una notevole collezione di preparati.

Fra i reperti perfettamente conservati, si contavano (nelle parole del Paravicini stesso), “una bella serie di encefali di idioti, epilettici, paralitici, dementi precoci, dementi senili, alcoolisti […] intestini con ulcere tifose e tubercolari […] polmoni […] con vaste caverne, fegati affetti da cirrosi atrofica, ipertrofica, da sarcomi e noduli cancerigni, una milza sarcomatosa di eccezionali dimensioni, reni con neoplasmi, cisti, ecc.“; i cervelli, in particolare, erano tutti suddivisi lombrosianamente secondo la malattia mentale che li aveva afflitti. Vi erano anche uno scheletro deforme affetto da nanismo e delle preparazioni in liquido di teste e feti.

momb7

momb9

momb4

momb18

momb17

momb22

momb24

Ma i pezzi più straordinari erano i busti interi, che ancora mostravano perfette espressioni del volto. Fra di essi, anche il busto di un acromegalico e quello di alcune donne.

image5

image5b

image5c

image4a

image4b

image4c

image7

image7b

image8

image8b

E, infine, i due corpi interi pietrificati dal Paravicini: quello di Angela Bonette, morta il 3 giugno del 1914 e affetta da demenza senile, e Evelina Gobbo, un’epilettica morta di polmonite il 16 novembre 1917.

momb1

momb2

momb3

momb12

Giuseppe Paravicini pare fosse gelosissimo del suo metodo segreto, e come altri pietrificatori ne portò le formule nella tomba.
Quello che si può dedurre dai documenti e dalle testimonianze oculari è che per la conservazione dei corpi interi egli utilizzasse una pompa a pressione costante per iniettare, mediante un’incisione sull’inguine del defunto, soluzioni a caldo di cera, solventi e paraffina (secondo altri, olii balsamici e qualche tipo di fissante). Il liquido entrava dall’arteria femorale, attraversava tutti gli organi, il derma e lo strato sottocutaneo per poi uscire dalla vena.
Per quanto riguarda le parti anatomiche più piccole, invece, egli si affidava all’uso di formolo, alcol e glicerina. Si trattava di metodi complessi e non certo rapidi, molto simili per alcuni versi a quelli utilizzati dal suo ben più celebre predecessore Paolo Gorini.

image6

image6b

image6c

image3c

image3b

image3

image

image2

image2b

Il risultato era, se possibile, ancora più incredibile delle pietrificazioni del Gorini. Scrive infatti Alberto Carli: “le opere di Paravicini appaiono al tatto più morbide e umide di quelle goriniane, che dimostrano, invece, un eccezionale stato di secchezza lignea.” Le sue preparazioni mantenevano un aspetto talmente realistico che, immancabile, si diffuse la leggenda che egli eseguisse le sue mummificazioni mentre il soggetto era ancora in vita, essendo in grado di sperimentare in corpore vili (cioè su corpi di persone di scarsa importanza). Certo è che la sua collezione, proprio per il fatto d’esser stata realizzata sui cadaveri di degenti del manicomio, aveva un elemento disturbante ed eticamente imbarazzante che spinse i responsabili a tenerla sempre nascosta negli scantinati dell’istituto.

momb23

momb15

momb14

momb11

I reperti vennero in seguito trasferiti all’Ospedale Psichiatrico Paolo Pini, il cui direttore prof. Antonio Allegranza fece installare delle teche a protezione dei corpi interi, e dei supporti in legno per i busti. Sempre Allegranza sostiene di aver visto la pompa con cui presumibilmente Paravicini iniettava la sua formula, prima che andasse persa nel trasloco da Mombello al Paolo Pini.
Dal Paolo Pini, la collezione venne spostata brevemente al Brefiotrofio di Milano, poi nella Facoltà di Scienza Veterinaria.
In tutti questi decenni, gli straordinari preparati rimasero dietro porte chiuse, visibili soltanto agli studiosi.
Infine, l’Università di Milano li affidò in deposito gratuito alla Collezione Anatomica Paolo Gorini per poterli degnamente esporre. Oggi sono finalmente visibili all’interno dell’Ospedale Vecchio di Lodi, nelle sale adiacenti alla collezione Gorini.

momb10

I volti di questi anonimi pazienti del manicomio di Mombello rimangono, al di là dell’interesse anatomico, una drammatica testimonianza di un’epoca: ombre di vite spezzate, spese in condizioni impensabili oggi.
L’ex-manicomio di Mombello è tutt’ora un’enorme struttura abbandonata: i lunghissimi corridoi ricoperti di murales, le scalinate fatiscenti, i cortili divorati dalla vegetazione, i padiglioni dove arrugginiscono i letti e le sedie d’epoca sono ormai esplorati soltanto da fotografi in cerca di location suggestive.

Mombello

Mombello

NOTA: le foto a colori presenti nell’articolo ci sono state gentilmente offerte dal nostro lettore Eros, che ha visitato la collezione quando era ancora in stato di abbandono nei sotterranei di una palazzina della Provincia di Milano; le foto in bianco e nero (precedenti di almeno una decina d’anni) sono opera di Attilio Mina. Le foto del manicomio sono invece di Emma Cacciatori.

(Grazie, Eros!)

Animali liofilizzati

Ecco una domanda difficile per tutti i possessori di animali: quando il vostro cane o gatto morirà, cosa farete delle sue spoglie?

C’è chi decide di seppellire il proprio animale, chi opta per la cremazione – ma c’è anche chi non riesce mai ad uscire veramente dalla fase della negazione, e vorrebbe continuare ad avere il proprio cucciolo con sé, per sempre.

Fino a poco tempo fa l’unica altra soluzione possibile era la tassidermia: eppure gli imbalsamatori spesso non sono disposti a preparare gli animali da compagnia, e per un motivo evidente. Finché si tratta di preservare la testa di un cervo, il cliente non fa mai problemi, ma quando l’animale da impagliare è un gattino amato e conosciuto per anni, qualsiasi imperfezione nel risultato tassidermico salta subito all’occhio del padrone. Così questo tipo di clienti risulta essere difficile, se non quasi impossibile, da soddisfare.

Oggi però esiste una nuova tecnica di conservazione degli animali da compagnia che promette miracoli. Guardate l’immagine qui sotto: questo cane è morto, ed è stato liofilizzato.

Quando pensiamo alla liofilizzazione, ci vengono in mente subito alcuni alimenti ridotti in polvere, come ad esempio il caffè solubile. Il procedimento in realtà può essere applicato anche a qualsiasi sostanza organica, e consiste nell’essiccamento dei tessuti a temperature estremamente basse, alle quali vengono alternate fasi di riscaldamento in situazioni di pressione controllata, di modo che l’acqua contenuta nei tessuti passi direttamente dallo stato ghiacciato al vapore (sublimazione). In questo modo la struttura della sostanza viene intaccata il meno possibile e mantiene le proprie caratteristiche specifiche: ecco perché la liofilizzazione di un animale da compagnia dà questi risultati eccezionali.

article-2287653-186ACF89000005DC-569_634x415

freezedriedpets

freeze-dried-pets.jpeg4-1280x960

460x

2775_1freeze_dried_pets

Chiaramente i costi di un simile procedimento non sono indifferenti, e in America oscillano tra 850 e 2.500 dollari; inoltre la liofilizzazione di un animale, magari di grossa taglia, non è affatto un processo veloce, e tra liste d’attesa e tempi tecnici si può aspettare anche più di un anno prima che l’esemplare ritorni al suo padrone.

12JPSTUFFERS4-articleLarge

120302-PetPhoto1-hmed-0930a.grid-6x2

Cant bear bury dear departed Tiddles Eternally the freeze dried pets loving pet owners bear bury cremated 2

freeze-dried-gray-dog-120301

I responsabili delle ditte che offrono questo servizio descrivono una clientela meno eccentrica di quello che si potrebbe immaginare: chi si rivolge a loro è gente normale, che non sopporta l’idea della separazione definitiva, e che cerca nella preservazione dell’animale un aiuto per superare il dolore. Per alcuni di essi, l’animale era l’unica compagnia di una vita solitaria. Desiderano avere ancora una presenza fisica concreta, con cui relazionarsi e illudersi di interagire.

a31_02284006

tumblr_lkbm2mrkVR1qz8ill

p_014

Abbiamo parlato spesso dell’occultamento della morte operato nel tempo dalle società occidentali; il progressivo allontanarsi dell’esperienza del cadavere dalle nostre vite ha reso sempre più complicata l’elaborazione del lutto, e questo si riflette anche sulla morte degli animali da compagnia, dato che l’amore che portiamo verso di loro talvolta rende la separazione altrettanto traumatica che se si trattasse di una persona cara.

Così, se l’immagine di qualcuno che coccola un animale morto ci dovesse apparire patetica o peggio ancora ridicola, gli psicologi ricordano che gli esseri umani proiettano abitualmente attributi umani ad oggetti inanimati; e per quanto riguarda la morte, ovviamente, tutti noi abbiamo reso visita ad una tomba, e magari rivolto parole intime al defunto, come se potesse sentirci… come se fosse ancora vivo. E viene da domandarsi se questo “come se”, il desiderio e la capacità umana di rifiutare la realtà così com’è per costruirne una simbolica, non sia forse alla base di tutte le nostre grandezze, e di tutte le nostre miserie.

1_7_08_IMG_4925

Infinity Burial Project

Ognuno di noi è intimamente connesso con l’ambiente, e sappiamo bene che le nostre azioni influenzano l’ecosistema in cui viviamo; non sempre riflettiamo però sul fatto che i nostri corpi avranno un impatto sull’ambiente anche dopo che saremo morti. Partendo da questa idea, l’artista statunitense Jae Rhim Lee ha fondato l’Infinity Burial Project (Progetto di sepoltura infinita).

A causa dei conservanti presenti nel cibo che mangiamo, dei metalli nelle otturazioni dentali, dei prodotti cosmetici con cui si preparano le salme e dei metodi di imbalsamazione (che in America includono preservanti altamente tossici come la formaldeide), un cadavere è in sostanza una piccola bomba chimica: che venga seppellito, o cremato, l’effetto è inevitabilmente quello di liberare nell’ambiente un alto numero di tossine pericolose. Jae Rhim Lee ha deciso di proporre un’alternativa sostenibile ed ecologica a questo stato di cose.

Come prima cosa, ha cominciato a coltivare dei funghi. I funghi saprofiti infatti sono dei filtranti naturali per moltissime delle scorie tossiche presenti nei nostri corpi, sono in grado di decomporle, “digerirle” e renderle innocue. Jae in seguito ha iniziato a raccogliere le cellule di scarto del suo stesso corpo – capelli, pelle secca, unghie – e ad utilizzarle come alimento per i suoi funghetti. Ha potuto così selezionare quelli che rispondevano meglio a questa particolare e ferrea dieta, e scartare quelli dal palato troppo “raffinato”. Oggi Jae possiede un esercito di funghi pronti a divorarla in qualsiasi momento.

Va bene, direte voi, ma anche se ognuno di noi si coltivasse i propri funghi “personalizzati”, come si farebbe poi a utilizzarli? Ecco che entra in scena la Mushroom Death Suit, la tuta progettata da Jae Rhim Lee per decomporre un cadavere con i funghi. Le fantasie che arabescano e percorrono la tuta, e che ricordano proprio il micelio, sono create con uno speciale filo imbevuto di spore fungine; anche il fluido di imbalsamazione, e il make-up del defunto, contengono spore.

Se lasciare questo mondo vestiti da ninja non è nel vostro stile, potete sempre optare per qualcosa di più sobrio e discreto: il Decompiculture Kit. Costituito da un gel nutritivo trasparente che si adatta come una seconda pelle al corpo, contiene delle capsule riempite di spore che permetteranno la crescita uniforme dei funghi.

Anche se l’Infinity Burial Project può sembrare eccentrico, ha fondamentalmente due meriti: in primo luogo Jae Rhim Lee intende diffondere una maggiore consapevolezza e accettazione della morte e della decomposizione come fatti naturali, e combattere il tabù nei confronti di un processo che è parte fondamentale del ciclo della vita. Il secondo aspetto che il progetto sottolinea è l’importanza di avere la possibilità di scegliere nuove opzioni, di riappropriarci insomma del destino del nostro corpo: dobbiamo essere liberi di decidere che fine faranno le nostre spoglie.

A riprova dell’interesse suscitato da Jae Rhim Lee, ci sono già alcuni volontari pronti a donare il loro corpo all’Infinity Burial Project per la sperimentazione; sapere che il proprio cadavere darà vita a una moltitudine di organismi a loro volta commestibili ha evidentemente le sue attrattive, siano esse l’amore per l’ecologia, un ideale romantico di fusione con la natura, o anche solo la prospettiva di schifare i parenti.

Ecco il sito ufficiale dell’Infinity Burial Project.

L’archiatra corrotto

ovvero, L’uomo che fece esplodere il Papa.

Papa Pio XII (Papa Pacelli) ebbe in sorte un pontificato particolarmente duro che coincise con gli anni della Seconda Guerra Mondiale; alcune delle sue scelte sono tutt’oggi controverse, e per gli storici rimangono ancora dibattuti il suo presunto collaborazionismo con il Terzo Reich così come il mancato riconoscimento dell’Olocausto. Ma ciò che ci interessa qui è l’incredibile scandalo che lo riguardò, non certo per sua colpa, proprio sul letto di morte.

Con l’aggravarsi delle sue condizioni di salute, all’inizio del mese di ottobre del 1958, a Castel Gandolfo i dottori erano in subbuglio. Il Sacro Pontefice viene seguito, come tutti sanno, da una folta ed efficiente équipe di medici; il capomedico di questa squadra è chiamato archiatra, ed è una figura di grande spicco, esperienza ed autorità all’interno della comunità medico-scientifica. O, almeno, così dovrebbe essere.

L’archiatra pontificio di Pio XII (all’estrema destra nella foto precedente) si chiamava Riccardo Galeazzi Lisi, oculista, membro onorario della Pontificia Accademia delle Scienze, e fratello di un celebre e rispettato architetto. Ma Galeazzi Lisi sarebbe stato ricordato come l’ “archiatra corrotto”, per la sua assenza di scrupoli e per il grottesco spettacolo che causò ai funerali del pontefice.

La voglia di servirsi della sua posizione per far soldi (e far parlare di sé) era già risultata evidente fin dai primi problemi di salute di Pio XII, quando  il dottore cominciò a vendere abusivamente notizie riservate sulla salute del pontefice, e sui consulti medici che faceva, ai giornali.

Appena Papa Pacelli lo venne a sapere, non rivolse più la parola all’archiatra. Non volle cacciarlo con disonore dal Palazzo Apostolico unicamente per rispetto del fratello architetto, così lo dispensò da qualsiasi servizio sanitario – anche se di fatto non si serviva di lui già da mesi. Il Papa non lo privò ufficialmente del titolo di archiatra perché, disse, “non voglio affamare né svergognare nessuno… se vuole stare in Vaticano che stia, ma faccia in modo che io non lo veda”.

L’errore di tenere Galeazzi Lisi in Vaticano si rivela sempre più madornale man mano che la malattia si aggrava: quando il Papa è ormai agonizzante, l’archiatra, utilizzando una piccola Polaroid nascosta nella giacca, scatta due foto al pontefice. Nella prima si distingue il Papa su un lettino adattato per l’occasione e messo di traverso. Nella seconda, un impietoso primo piano, è visibile anche la cannuccia per l’ossigeno che arriva alla sua bocca. Le fotografie, definite vergognose e irrispettose, vengono vendute a Paris Match dal medico senza scrupoli. Ma è solo l’inizio dello scandalo.

Alle 3:52 del 9 ottobre 1958 a causa di un’ischemia circolatoria e di collasso polmonare, all’età di 82 anni, Pio XII muore a Castel Gandolfo. Qui comincia il vero e proprio calvario del suo corpo, affidato alle mani, manifestamente incompetenti, di Galeazzi Lisi.

Incaricato dell’imbalsamazione delle spoglie del pontefice, il medico si era inventato un metodo nuovissimo e, a sua detta, rivoluzionario, che avrebbe permesso una perfetta conservazione della salma. A quanto sosteneva, ne aveva parlato con Pacelli quando quest’ultimo era ancora in vita: siccome il Papa era restio all’idea dell’imbalsamazione, e desiderava mantenere tutti gli organi interni così come Dio li aveva voluti, Galeazzi Lisi l’aveva convinto vantandosi di aver studiato il suo metodo sperimentale a partire dagli oli e dalle resine utilizzati, udite udite, addirittura sul cadavere di Gesù Cristo.

Quando però lui e il suo collega, il professor Oreste Nuzzi, si trovarono a lavorare sulle spoglie di Pio XII, non tutto – anzi, per meglio dire, niente – andò per il verso giusto. Il “geniale” procedimento del medico consisteva nell’avvolgere il corpo dentro una serie di strati di cellophane, insieme a erbe e prodotti naturali. Così, invece di cercare di tenerlo fresco, i due innalzarono la temperatura del cadavere e accelerarono irreversibilmente il processo di putrefazione grazie a questo impacco di nylon.

Appena fu vestito ed esposto nella Sala degli Svizzeri, a Castel Gandolfo, il volto di Pio XII si ricoprì di migliaia di piccole rughe. Nessuno vi fece caso sul momento, ma da lì a pochi minuti sarebbe iniziata la “più veloce e ributtante decomposizione in diretta che la storia della medicina legale ricordi”.

Racconta il dottor Antonio Margheriti a proposito della foto qui sopra: “È iniziato un furioso succedersi di fenomeni cadaverici trasformativi: è la decomposizione in diretta sotto gli occhi inorriditi degli astanti, in seguito all’aberrante “imbalsamazione” brevettata e praticata dall’archiatra Galeazzi Lisi. In questa foto il cadavere del papa si è gonfiato nella zona del ventre in seguito ai gas putrefattivi che son venutisi creando da subito; per la stessa ragione è diventato grigio in viso, e dagli orifizi, specie dalla bocca, versa liquame scuro che gli scorre lungo il volto e si deposita nelle orbite degli occhi. È visibile sul volto delle guardie nobili l’enorme  sforzo di resistere all’odore nauseabondo che esala dal cadavere del Papa: l’alternarsi dei turni di guardia saranno da questo momento sempre più frequenti, per evitare una eccessiva esposizione ai gas mefitici, e perché molte guardie nobili regolarmente svengono sfinite da quell’odore di morte. Ma il peggio deve ancora venire”.

Il peggio arriva proprio nel momento meno opportuno, cioè quando la salma sta per essere esposta ai fedeli. Durante il trasporto da Castel Gandolfo alle porte di Roma, di colpo il cadavere del Papa, già enormemente gonfio, emette un grosso e sinistro scoppio che provoca l’esplosione del torace e lo squarciarsi del petto. Una volta arrivati al Laterano, si deve, in fretta e furia e sfidando orribili miasmi, riparare alla bell’e meglio la devastazione del papa esploso – affinché il trasporto all’interno della Basilica risulti il meno osceno possibile per l’oceanica folla assiepata a San Pietro.

Il problema è che, secondo il rito, il corpo di un Papa deve essere sempre visibile durante tutte le esequie; così, riguardo al trasporto all’interno della basilica petrina, riporta ancora Margheriti: “molti presenti all’evento ricordano ancora, lungo la navata della basilica, le zaffate tremende che si riversavano sulla folla al passaggio del cataletto nonché l’aspetto mostruoso del papa: diventato nerastro, gli cadde il setto nasale ed i muscoli facciali, orribilmente ritratti, facevano risaltare la chiostra dei denti in una risata agghiacciante”.

Nella notte fra il primo e il secondo giorno di esposizione del Papa in San Pietro, qualcuno ricorda che a porte chiuse il corpo venne tirato giù dal catafalco e sdraiato nudo sul pavimento della chiesa. Qui si procedette a una nuova imbalsamazione, che in realtà era più che altro un tentativo di limitare i danni ormai incontenibili. Per dissimulare l’aspetto eccessivamente rivoltante del cadavere, al volto venne applicata una maschera di lattice.

Dopo questi rovinosi e grotteschi funerali, cosa successe al nostro Riccardo Galeazzi Lisi? Il dottore oculista, considerato un ciarlatano e un traditore, venne licenziato in tronco, radiato dall’Ordine dei Medici e bandito a vita dal Vaticano. Per fortuna aveva scattato un’altra ventina di foto al cadavere del Papa mentre lo imbalsamava; vendette gli scatti a qualche rivista francese, e nel 1960 provò a dare la sua versione dei fatti in un libro, Dans l’ombre et dans la lumière de Pie XII … che, guardacaso, riproponeva le fotografie di Papa Pacelli durante l’agonia e l’imbalsamazione. Morì nel 1968, dieci anni dopo quei fatidici giorni in cui era passato dal nobile titolo di “archiatra pontificio” a quello, molto meno ambìto, di “archiatra corrotto”.

Gran parte delle info provengono da La Morte del Papa – Riti, cerimonie e tradizioni dal Medio Evo all’età contemporanea, di Antonio Margheriti, consultabile a questa pagina. Altre testimonianze qui.

(Grazie, TanoM e Diego!)

I pietrificatori

Fra tutte le varie forme di conservazione di resti anatomici, quella che ancora oggi suscita stupore e incredulità è la cosiddetta “pietrificazione”. Alcuni grandi scienziati hanno portato questa tecnica ad impensabili livelli, e si tratta principalmente di una tradizione tutta italiana.

Il primo e il più importante nome di questa famiglia di pietrificatori è senza dubbio Girolamo Segato (1792-1836). Nativo del bellunese, fin da ragazzo iniziò a costruire una sua personale collezione di oggetti naturalistici: semplici vestigia di animali raccolte durante le sue camminate sulle Dolomiti, che però risvegliarono nel giovane Segato la passione per la natura e le sue forme. Imbarcatosi più tardi per l’Egitto, si trovò ad esaminare e studiare numerose mummie, arrivando ad elaborare alcune personali teorie sul processo di mummificazione a cui erano state sottoposte. Così, una volta tornato in Italia, cominciò a sperimentare diverse tecniche per fissare nel tempo le forme corporee.

Mediante la sua “mineralizzazione” Segato riusciva a conservare in modo pressoché perfetto i suoi preparati, preservando in alcuni casi anche il colore naturale e l’elasticità dei tessuti. Gran parte delle sue pietrificazioni sono giunte intatte fino ai giorni nostri, e sono conservate all’interno dell’Università di Firenze (ne avevamo già parlato all’interno della nostra serie di articoli sui musei anatomici italiani).

Purtroppo Girolamo Segato portò nella tomba il segreto del suo metodo straordinario. Al di fuori della comunità scientifica, infatti, pochi si resero conto dell’importanza del suo lavoro: accusato di stregoneria, si vide negata ogni richiesta di finanziamento per la sua ricerca. Segato costruì un incredibile tavolo “di carne”, che conteneva alcune decine di preparati pietrificati e incastonati nel legno, e lo offrì al Granduca di Toscana per impressionarlo. Quando anche quest’ultimo rifiutò di sostenerlo economicamente, l’anatomista bruciò tutti i suoi appunti e le sue carte.

Fu sepolto nella Basilica di Santa Croce a Firenze. Sulla sua lapide sono incise queste tristi parole: “Qui giace disfatto Girolamo Segato, che vedrebbesi intero pietrificato, se l’arte sua non periva con lui. Fu gloria insolita dell’umana sapienza, esempio d’infelicità non insolito”.

Di poco più giovane di Segato, Giovan Battista Rini (1795-1856), originario di Salò, utilizzò una miscela di mercurio ed altri minerali (potassio, ferro, bario e arsenico) per preservare il sistema sanguigno e i tessuti dei cadaveri: queste mummie sono oggi oggetto di studi da parte di un team italo-tedesco capitanato dall’antropologo forense Dario Piombino-Mascali, ricercatore dell’Accademia Europea di Bolzano (EURAC).

Sottoponendo le mummie a TAC e altre analisi, gli scienziati stanno cominciando a penetrare i segreti di quest’arte un tempo importantissima: i preparati anatomici avevano una funzione didattica e di studio essenziale in un’epoca in cui non esistevano celle frigorifere e in cui i cadaveri si decomponevano velocemente.

Del pietrificatore, anatomista e scienziato Paolo Gorini (1813-1881), invece, conosciamo per fortuna alcuni dei procedimenti, scoperti nell’archivio delle sue carte: per i suoi preparati utilizzava tecniche diverse, ma la formula di base consisteva in un’iniezione di bicloruro di mercurio e muriato di calce direttamente nell’arteria e vena femorale; dato il numero delle successive iniezioni e delle “disinfezioni”, il processo era lungo, costoso ed estremamente tossico per chi lo praticava.

Efisio Marini (1835-1900) riusciva a pietrificare addirittura il sangue: è curioso l’aneddoto che racconta come, venuto in possesso del sangue di Giuseppe Garibaldi raccolto sull’Aspromonte, lo solidificò e lo plasmò facendone un medaglione che poi regalò a Garibaldi stesso, il quale lo ringraziò con lettera ufficiale. Pur essendo divenuto celebre grazie alle sue pietrificazioni (ci resta in particolare una mano di giovane fanciulla perfettamente conservata all’Università di Sassari), Marini era ossessionato dal mantenere segrete le sue formule, e finì la sua vita in povertà, circondato dalla sua collezione anatomica, evitato da tutti per via della sua sinistra paranoia.

Un caso singolare fra i pietrificatori fu quello di Oreste Maggio (1875-1937): palermitano, medico, oftalmologo, ostetrico, tisiologo, psichiatra e pediatra, ma anche farmacista, chimico, medico condotto e imbalsamatore “di famiglia” (era nipote di quel Salafia di cui abbiamo già parlato in questo articolo), anche Maggio mise a punto una sua tecnica di iniezione di sali minerali per conservare i reperti anatomici. Eppure, ad un certo punto, decise di interrompere bruscamente le sperimentazioni e distruggere la sua formula per dedicarsi esclusivamente ai vivi. All’origine di questa drastica inversione di rotta ci sarebbe stata una vera e propria crisi mistica: cattolico praticante, Maggio era rimasto impressionato dal celebre verso della Genesi “polvere tu sei e in polvere ritornerai”, ed era arrivato alla conclusione che impedire il disfacimento della carne andava contro i naturali precetti divini.

Francesco Spirito (1885-1962) è l’ultimo dei grandi pietrificatori. Medico e presidente dell’Accademia dei Fisiocritici di Siena, che tutt’oggi conserva la collezione dei suoi preparati, ha potuto fornire i dettagli della sua tecnica complessa e delicata in occasione di una lettura accademica. Il suo segreto è la soluzione di silicato di potassio, grazie alla quale “la massa assume un aspetto ed una consistenza lapidea che con l’evaporazione diventa una massa vetrosa trasparente”. Durante la procedura, il pezzo è sostenuto da fili opportunamente sistemati, tesi tra sostegni di legno o metallo, in modo che le singole parti del preparato rimangano nella posizione voluta.

Con le tecniche sviluppate in età contemporanea, come ad esempio la plastinazione di Von Hagens, la pietrificazione risulta ormai obsoleta; ma rimane testimonianza di un’epoca stupefacente in cui erano i singoli sperimentatori che, rinchiusi nei loro studi assieme ai cadaveri, come degli strani alchimisti, mettevano a punto queste formule segretissime e circonfuse di un alone di mistero.

(Grazie, Giacomo!)

La mummia più bella del mondo

All’interno delle suggestive Catacombe dei Cappuccini a Palermo, rinomate in tutto il mondo, sono conservate circa 8.000 salme mummificate. Fin dalla fine del Cinquecento, infatti, il convento cominciò ad imbalsamare ed esporre i cadaveri (principalmente provenienti da ceti abbienti, che potevano permettersi i costi di questa particolare sepoltura).

Forse queste immagini vi ricorderanno la Cripta dei Cappuccini a Roma, di cui abbiamo già parlato in un nostro articolo. La finalità filosofica di queste macabre esibizioni di cadaveri è in effetti la medesima: ricordare ai visitatori la transitorietà della vita, la decadenza della carne e l’effimero passaggio di ricchezze e onori. In una frase, memento mori – ricorda che morirai.

Le prime, antiche procedure prevedevano la “scolatura” delle salme, che venivano private degli organi interni e appese sopra a speciali vasche per un anno intero, in modo che perdessero ogni liquido e umore, e rinsecchissero. In seguito venivano lavate e cosparse con diversi olii essenziali e aceto, poi impagliate, rivestite ed esposte.

Ma fra le tante mummie contenute nelle Catacombe (così tante che nessuno le ha mai contate con precisione), ce n’è una che non cessa di stupire e commuovere chiunque si rechi in visita nel famoso santuario. Nella Cappella di Santa Rosalia, in fondo al primo corridoio, riposa “la mummia più bella del mondo”, quella di Rosalia Lombardo, una bambina di due anni morta nel 1920.

La piccola, morta per una broncopolmonite, dopo tutti questi anni sembra ancora che dorma, dolcemente adagiata nella sua minuscola bara. Il suo volto è sereno, la pelle appare morbida e distesa, e le sue lunghe ciocche di capelli biondi raccolte in un fiocco giallo le donano un’incredibile sensazione di vita. Com’è possibile che sia ancora così perfettamente conservata?

Il segreto della sua imbalsamazione è rimasto per quasi cento anni irrisolto, fino a quando nel 2009 un paleopatologo messinese, Dario Piombino Mascali, ha concluso una lunga e complessa ricerca per svelare il mistero. La minuziosa preparazione della salma di Rosalia è stata attribuita all’imbalsamatore palermitano Alfredo Salafia, che alla fine dell’Ottocento aveva messo a punto una sua procedura di conservazione dei tessuti mediante iniezione di composti chimici segretissimi. Salafia aveva restaurato la salma di Francesco Crispi (ormai in precarie condizioni), meritandosi il plauso della stampa e delle autorità ecclesiastiche; aveva perfino portato le sue ricerche in America, dove aveva dato dimostrazioni del suo metodo presso l’Eclectic Medical College di New York , riscuotendo un clamoroso successo.

Fino a pochissimi anni fa si pensava che Salafia avesse portato il segreto del suo portentoso processo di imbalsamazione nella tomba. Il suo lavoro sulla mummia di Rosalia Lombardo è tanto più sorprendente se pensiamo che alcune sofisticate radiografie hanno mostrato che anche gli organi interni, in particolare cervello, fegato e polmoni, sono rimasti perfettamente conservati. Piombino, nel suo studio delle carte di Salafia, ha finalmente scoperto la tanto ricercata formula:  si tratta di una sola iniezione intravascolare di formalina, glicerina, sali di zinco, alcool e acido salicilico, a cui Salafia spesso aggiungeva un trattamento di paraffina disciolta in etere per mantenere un aspetto vivo e rotondeggiante del volto. Anche Rosalia, infatti, ha il viso paffuto e l’epidermide apparentemente morbida come se non fosse trascorso un solo giorno dalla sua morte.

Salafia era già celebre quando nel 1920 effettuò l’imbalsamazione della piccola Rosalia e, come favore alla famiglia Lombardo, grazie alla sua influenza riuscì a far seppellire la bambina nelle Catacombe quando non era più permesso. Così ancora oggi possiamo ammirare Rosalia Lombardo, abbandonata al sonno che la culla da quasi un secolo: la “Bella Addormentata”, come è stata chiamata, è sicuramente una delle mummie più importanti e famose del ventesimo secolo.

E l’imbalsamatore? Dopo tanti anni passati a combattere i segni del disfacimento e della morte, senza ottenere mai una laurea in medicina, Alfredo Salafia si spense infine nel 1933. Nel 2000, allo spurgo della tomba, i familiari non vennero avvisati. Così, come ultima beffa, nessuno sa più dove siano finiti gli ultimi resti di quell’uomo straordinario che aveva dedicato la sua vita a preservare i corpi per l’eternità.