The premature babies of Coney Island

Once upon a time on the circus or carnival midway, among the smell of hot dogs and the barkers’ cries, spectators could witness some amazing side attractions, from fire-eaters to bearded ladies, from electric dancers to the most exotic monstrosities (see f.i. some previous posts here and here).
Beyond our fascination for a time of naive wonder, there is another less-known reason for which we should be grateful to old traveling fairs: among the readers who are looking at this page right now, almost one out of ten is alive thanks to the sideshows.

This is the strange story of how amusement parks, and a visionary doctor’s stubbornness, contributed to save millions of human lives.

Until the end of XIX Century, premature babies had little or no chance of survival. Hospitals did not have neonatal units to provide efficient solutions to the problem, so the preemies were given back to their parents to be taken home — practically, to die. In all evidence, God had decided that those babies were not destined to survive.
In 1878 a famous Parisian obstetrician, Dr. Étienne Stéphane Tarnier, visited an exhibition called Jardin d’Acclimatation which featured, among other displays, a new method for hatching poultry in a controlled, hydraulic heated environment, invented by a Paris Zoo keeper; immediately the doctor thought he could test that same system on premature babies and commissioned a similar box, which allowed control of the temperature of the newborn’s environment.
After the first positive experimentations at the Maternity Hospital in Paris, the incubator was soon equipped with a bell that rang whenever the temperature went too high.
The doctor’s assistant, Pierre Budin, further developed the Tarnier incubator, on one hand studying how to isolate and protect the frail newborn babies from infectious disease, and on the other the correct quantities and methods of alimentation.

Despite the encouraging results, the medical community still failed to recognize the usefulness of incubators. This skepticism mainly stemmed from a widespread mentality: as mentioned before, the common attitude towards premature babies was quite fatalist, and the death of weaker infants was considered inevitable since the most ancient times.

Thus Budin decided to send his collaborator, Dr. Martin Couney, to the 1896 World Exhibition in Berlin. Couney, our story’s true hero, was an uncommon character: besides his knowledge as an obstetrician, he had a strong charisma and true showmanship; these virtues would prove fundamental for the success of his mission, as we shall see.
Couney, with the intent of creating a bit of a fuss in order to better spread the news, had the idea of exhibiting live premature babies inside his incubators. He had the nerve to ask Empress Augusta Victoria herself for permission to use some infants from the Charity Hospital in Berlin. He was granted the favor, as the newborn babies were destined to a certain death anyway.
But none of the infants lodged inside the incubators died, and Couney’s exhibition, called Kinderbrutanstalt (“child hatchery”) immediately became the talk of the town.

This success was repeated the following year in London, at Earl’s Court Exhibition (scoring 3600 visitors each day), and in 1898 at the Trans-Mississippi Exhibition in Omaha, Nebraska. In 1900 he came back to Paris for the World Exhibition, and in 1901 he attended the Pan-American Exhibition in Buffalo, NY.

L'edificio costruito per gli incubatori a Buffalo.

The incubators building in Buffalo.

The incubators at the Buffalo Exhibition.

But in the States Couney met an even stronger resistence to accept this innovation, let alone implementing it in hospitals.
It must be stressed that although he was exhibiting a medical device, inside the various fairs his incubator stand was invariably (and much to his disappointment) confined to the entertainment section rather than the scientific section.
Maybe this was the reason why in 1903 Couney took a courageous decision.

If Americans thought incubators were just some sort of sideshow stunt, well then, he would give them the entertainment they wanted. But they would have to pay for it.

Infant-Incubators-building-at-1901-Pan-American-Exposition

Baby_incubator_exhibit,_A-Y-P,_1909

Couney definitively moved to New York, and opened a new attraction at Coney Island amusement park. For the next 40 years, every summer, the doctor exhibited premature babies in his incubators, for a quarter dollar. Spectators flowed in to contemplate those extremely underweight babies, looking so vulnerable and delicate as they slept in their temperate glass boxes. “Oh my, look how tiny!“, you could hear the crowd uttering, as people rolled along the railing separating them from the aisle where the incubators were lined up.

 

In order to accentuate the minuscule size of his preemies, Couney began resorting to some tricks: if the baby wasn’t small enough, he would add more blankets around his little body, to make him look tinier. Madame Louise Recht, a nurse who had been by Couney’s side since the very first exhibitions in Paris, from time to time would slip her ring over the babies’ hands, to demonstrate how thin their wrists were: but in reality the ring was oversized even for the nurse’s fingers.

Madame Louise Recht con uno dei neonati.

Madame Louise Recht with a newborn baby.

Preemie wearing on his wrist the nurse’s sparkler.

Couney’s enterprise, which soon grew into two separate incubation centers (one in Luna Park and the other in Dreamland), could seem quite cynical today. But it actually was not.
All the babies hosted in his attractions had been turned down by city hospitals, and given back to the parents who had no hope of saving them; the “Doctor Incubator” promised families that he would treat the babies without any expense on their part, as long as he could exhibit the preemies in public. The 25 cents people paid to see the newborn babies completely covered the high incubation and feeding expenses, even granting a modest profit to Couney and his collaborators. This way, parents had a chance to see their baby survive without paying a cent, and Couney could keep on raising awareness about the importance and effectiveness of his method.
Couney did not make any race distinction either, exhibiting colored babies along with white babies — an attitude that was quite rare at the beginning of the century in America. Among the “guests” displayed in his incubators, was at one point Couney’s own premature daughter, Hildegarde, who later became a nurse and worked with her father on the attraction.

Nurses with babies at Flushing World Fair, NY. At the center is Couney’s daughter, Hildegarde.

Besides his two establishments in Coney Island (one of which was destroyed during the 1911 terrible Dreamland fire), Couney continued touring the US with his incubators, from Chicago to St. Louis, to San Francisco.
In forty years, he treated around 8000 babies, and saved at least 6500; but his endless persistence in popularizing the incubator had much lager effects. His efforts, on the long run, contributed to the opening of the first neonatal intensive care units, which are now common in hospitals all around the world.

After a peak in popularity during the first decades of the XX Century, at the end of the 30s the success of Couney’s incubators began to decrease. It had become an old and trite attraction.
When the first premature infant station opened at Cornell’s New York Hospital in 1943, Couney told his nephew: “my work is done“. After 40 years of what he had always considered propaganda for a good cause, he definitively shut down his Coney Island enterprise.

Martin Arthur Couney (1870–1950).

The majority of information in this post comes from the most accurate study on the subject, by Dr. William A. Silverman (Incubator-Baby Side Shows, Pediatrics, 1979).

(Thanks, Claudia!)

Battesimi pericolosi

74852771

Castrillo de Murcia è un piccolo borgo di 500 anime nella provincia di Burgos, nella Spagna del Nord. Il paesino è sonnacchioso, e non vi succede nulla di eclatante; ma per un giorno all’anno, Castrillo si guadagna l’attenzione dei media e di un manipolo di turisti incuriositi dalla strana tradizione che vi si svolge da quasi 400 anni.

Nata nel 1620, la festa di El Colacho si svolge nel giorno del Corpus Domini (in Maggio o in Giugno), ed è curata dalla Confraternita del Santísimo Sacramento de Minerva. Un prescelto si veste con un abito tradizionale dai colori sgargianti che ricordano le fiamme dell’Inferno: si tratta infatti di una vera e propria personificazione del Diavolo, che indossa una minacciosa maschera di sapore carnevalesco. El Colacho si aggira per le vie paesane, accompagnato in processione dai membri della Confraternita, e rincorre di tanto in tanto i passanti e i bambini, frustandoli giocosamente con una sorta di gatto a nove code.

A man dressed in a red and yellow costume representing the devil runs through the streets chasing a boy during traditional Corpus Christi celebrations, in Castrillo de Murcia

large_dsc03223

large_dsc03228

large_dsc03251

large_dsc03331

Ma è la seconda parte della processione che è la più impressionante. Giunto nella piazza cittadina, El Colacho si appresta al rituale tradizionale che ha reso celebre la festività. Vengono preparati dei materassi, su cui sono adagiati dei bambini, tutti rigorosamente nati nei dodici mesi precedenti: alcuni degli infanti piangono, altri ridono, altri ancora dormono di gusto.

large_dsc03367

large_dsc03361-1

large_dsc03334

Ed ecco che, una volta pronti questi affollati lettini, El Colacho prende la rincorsa e comincia a saltarli, uno dopo l’altro, atterrando a pochi centimetri di distanza dalle testoline dei piccoli. Un passo falso potrebbe essere davvero pericoloso: ma, a quanto si dice, fino ad ora non si è mai verificato alcun incidente.

El-Colacho-baby-jumping-Spain-2-450x250

El Colacho Baby Jumping Fiesta

El-Colacho-baby-jumping-Spain-3

Perché una madre dovrebbe voler posizionare il proprio figlioletto di pochi mesi sul materassino, affinché un uomo vestito da diavolo vi salti sopra, di fronte a una folla plaudente? Il rito, secondo la credenza popolare, è salvifico e benefico: il passaggio di El Colacho rimuove il Peccato Originale, e porta con sé ogni male, proteggendo i neonati dalle malattie.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zheUrV2Bn-Y]

Ovviamente, la Chiesa non si limita a storcere il naso di fronte a questo tipo di tradizioni, ma le condanna apertamente, poiché secondo la dottrina ufficiale soltanto il sacramento del battesimo può sollevare il peso del Peccato Originale. Ma gli abitanti di Castrillo de Murcia, per quanto devoti, non rinuncerebbero per niente al mondo alla loro tradizione: si è sempre fatto così, e tutti coloro che battezzano i propri figli in questo strano modo sono stati a loro tempo sottoposti al salto del Colacho.

large_dsc03344

large_dsc03337

070615_spain_0

Se il salto del Colacho può sembrare estremo e pericoloso, non è nulla in confronto al battesimo che si celebra in alcune parti dell’India, in particolare negli stati di Karnataka e Maharashtra; si tratta di un rito praticato indistintamente da musulmani ed induisti.

Un uomo scala con una corda le mura del tempio, mentre sulla sua schiena penzola un secchio. Una volta arrivato in cima, il devoto mostra a tutti il contenuto del secchio – un bambino (di massimo due anni): dal tetto, alto una decina di metri, esibisce il neonato alla folla sottostante, tenendolo per le braccia e i piedini. Dopo aver invocato la protezione divina, di colpo lo lancia nel vuoto.

Nella piazza, una quindicina di uomini stanno aspettando l’atterraggio del bambino, tendendo una coperta per salvarlo. Il piccolo rimbalza sul telone, viene acchiappato al volo, rapidamente fatto passare di mano in mano e riconsegnato alla madre o al padre. Il tutto dura pochi secondi, anche se ci vogliono svariati minuti perché il bambino si riprenda dallo shock.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbOsEmHzq1c]

Il salto, ancora una volta, ha lo scopo di portare fortuna e salute al neonato; per la sua pericolosità, si tratta comunque di un rituale controverso, e diverse associazioni per i diritti umani hanno cercato di proibirlo. Nel 2011 queste proteste sono state ufficialmente ascoltate, ma la legge che mette al bando tale pratica è regolarmente ignorata dai fedeli, e perfino la polizia preferisce non interferire con i riti.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuqRYS0K3UU]

Visto anche il carattere sensibile della questione, è facile immaginare lo scandalo e la rabbia di chi è estraneo a questo tipo di tradizioni, e certamente si può (e si deve) discutere sull’opportunità che certi rituali rischiosi continuino ad essere riproposti al giorno d’oggi. Ma, per quanto il rito in questione sia stato tacciato di essere barbarico, “assurdo”, “senza logica né ragione”, per chi ha un minimo di dimestichezza con l’antropologia il suo senso è cristallino – in verità, esso mostra molte caratteristiche classiche di qualsiasi rito di passaggio.

Il bambino viene innanzitutto separato dai genitori; la guida lo conduce fino al confine, fino alla prova – eminentemente fisica – che egli dovrà affrontare da solo (il salto); infine, una volta completata l’essenziale fase di “transizione”, cioè il superamento della difficoltà, avviene la reintegrazione del bambino con il nucleo familiare e, più genericamente, con la società. Il bambino, com’è ovvio, è ora un individuo nuovo, e gode dei benefici del nuovo status (immunità dalle malattie).

Il salto del Colacho, così come il lancio dei bambini dalla moschea, sono “battesimi del fuoco” portatori di un senso profondo: i riti di passaggio sono talmente fondamentali per l’uomo da sopravvivere anche nelle nostre società industrializzate, cibernetiche e all’avanguardia. Non è tanto il valore di queste tradizioni che andrebbe messo in discussione, quindi, quanto piuttosto la modalità d’esecuzione. Forse, piuttosto che bandire e proibire, sarebbe più produttivo incentivare l’elaborazione di varianti ritualistiche meno cruente, come si è provveduto a fare in molti altri casi nel mondo.

Da 0 a 100

Il filmmaker olandese Jeroen Wolf ha avuto un’idea semplicissima: riassumere in 150 secondi 100 anni di vita. Ma, e qui sta l’originalità dell’idea, ogni anno è “rappresentato” da una persona differente. Così, oltre che una meditazione sul tempo, il suo video diviene anche il racconto di come l’età sia evidentemente relativa, ponendoci di fronte a diversi modi di crescere, vivere ed invecchiare.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoD4_xVTqrI]

Edward Gorey

Edward Gorey era un tipo strano. Un uomo schivo, amante del balletto classico e delle pellicce, spesso portate assieme alle scarpe da tennis, padrone di decine di gatti, capace di citare Robert Musil e allo stesso tempo non perdersi una puntata di Buffy l’ammazzavampiri. E, soprattutto, geniale illustratore e uno fra gli ultimi surrealisti.

Chi si imbatte per la prima volta nelle illustrazioni di Gorey fatica a credere che l’autore non sia britannico: il black humor, lo stile, le ambientazioni cupe e vittoriane sembrano provenire da un mondo che più british non si può. Eppure Gorey non si mosse mai dagli Stati Uniti, tranne che per una fugace visita alle Ebridi. Soltanto un’altra delle sue affascinanti bizzarrie.


Un’altra cosa che il lettore al primo “incontro” con le tavole di Gorey potrebbe provare è un piccolo brivido infantile, di quelli che ci percorrevano la sera quando, rannicchiati sotto le coperte, ascoltavamo una fiaba paurosa. Nonostante l’autore abbia sempre smentito di disegnare per i bambini (che peraltro non amava), è innegabile che molte delle sue illustrazioni sembrano fare riferimento al mondo dell’infanzia… salvo poi violentarla, con sottile crudeltà, e “mandarla a morte”, come nella sua celebre serie sull’alfabeto: concepito come una sorta di parodia di abbecedario, ogni lettera viene insegnata con l’ausilio di una vignetta che mostra la feroce e grottesca morte di un bambino.

Sperimentatore instancabile dei mezzi visivi e letterari, Gorey si è inventato mille trucchi affinché il suo lettore non si adagiasse mai nella consuetudine. Ha prodotto libri grandi come un francobollo, libri senza testo, libri animati, in un continuo tentativo di stupire e stimolare il lettore a non dare nulla per scontato.

Anche per questo la sua figura rimane inafferrabile e difficilmente etichettabile: le sue tavole sono umoristiche, poetiche, o tragiche? O tutte queste cose allo stesso tempo? Non le capiamo a fondo, e per questo ci lasciano spesso interdetti – come se non sapessimo che reazione ci si aspetti da noi. E in questo sta il surrealismo (in senso originario, brétoniano): Gorey ci parla delle nostre paure, quelle che ci portiamo dentro dall’infanzia, e che molto spesso ci terrorizzano ancora di più proprio perché sono vaghe, sfuggenti, indescrivibili. Fatti della “materia dei sogni”, i disegni di Gorey, al di là della bellezza del tratto o dell’atmosfera gotica, ci portano in contatto con quel mostro che, forse, non è mai veramente sparito da sotto il nostro letto.

Anche il più semplice degli schizzi di Gorey sembra nascondere un piccolo segreto. Forse è lo stesso che nascondeva lui, Edward, l’artista dalla sessualità incerta o addirittura, per sua ammissione, assente; un vecchio solitario, chiuso in una villetta appartata a Cape Cod, felice con le sue pellicce, i suoi gatti, le sue sporadiche uscite per passare la serata al balletto… e il suo mondo su carta fatto di lutti vittoriani, simbolismi sotterranei, bambini prede di orchi, e un inesauribile macabro umorismo. Sì, Edward Gorey era un tipo strano.

Happy Tree Friends

Con 12 anni e più di 160 episodi alle spalle, gli Happy Tree Friends sono ormai uno show classico, benché tuttora controverso, che ha segnato la storia di Internet e della televisione. Nati nel 1999 dalla fantasia di Kenn Navarro e Rhode Montijo, inizialmente erano stati pensati come dei piccoli corti realizzati in Flash, esclusivamente per la rete. I due animatori lavoravano per Mondo Mini Shows, ed erano entusiasti di avere ottenuto la loro prima serie; nessuno però si sarebbe aspettato il successo clamoroso che gli “amici dell’albero felice” avrebbero ottenuto.

L’idea era semplice: creare un mondo da libro animato per bambini, coloratissimo e pieno di allegri e teneri animaletti antropomorfi, sempre entusiasti e felici. E poi massacrarli tutti nei modi più violenti, fantasiosi ed efferati. Ma tranquilli, bambini… li ritroveremo nella puntata successiva sani ed integri, pronti a farsi macellare in una nuova sanguinosa circostanza.

Questo concept, politicamente scorretto ed esilarante, sarebbe rimasto soltanto una piccola burla se Navarro non avesse avuto un’immaginazione sfrenata e particolarmente weird: a distanza di tanti anni, le soluzioni visive adottate per far fuori l’uno dopo l’altro i simpatici personaggi sono ancora sorprendenti e spesso imprevedibili. Poco dopo il loro debutto sulla rete, nel 2000, fu chiaro che in brevissimo tempo questa serie si stava trasformando in un fenomeno di culto.

Ogni episodio raggiunse in poco tempo i 15 milioni di visualizzazioni, e ben presto la Happy Tree Friends mania raggiunse il suo apice. La serie venne acquistata dalle televisioni, cominciò a guadagnarsi premi nei festival specializzati, venne infine distribuita in cofanetti DVD. Tra i 22 personaggi di Happy Tree Friends, quelli ricorrenti (chiamiamoli le “star” principali) sono ormai diffusi anche come gadget di ogni tipo nei negozi di fumetti. L’affetto dei fan non accenna a diminuire nel tempo, tanto che uno degli amministratori della Mondo Media arriva a paragonare lo show ai grandi classici: “Penso che i bambini guarderanno gli Happy Tree Friends fra 20 o 30 anni nello stesso modo in cui guardano Tom & Jerry oggi”.

Ecco, appunto, i bambini. La serie evidentemente è pensata per un pubblico adulto, ma molti bambini hanno finito per diventare degli appassionati fruitori di questo show. La controversia in America si è scatenata quando alcuni preoccupati genitori hanno scoperto che i colorati cartoni animati che i figlioletti stavano guardando terminavano invariabilmente con una carneficina. In Canada si è rischiata la censura, nonostante lo show presenti la violenza in maniera comica ed eccessiva. Ma per una serie iconoclasta come gli Happy Tree Friends, ovviamente, ogni scandalo fa buon gioco.

Eccovi alcuni classici episodi, fra i più celebri.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmXL6-F3vZQ]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RO7Q1tMGE7g]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U05eK0vR0kI]

Miss Bambina

Una bizzarria assolutamente americana ed oggi molto controversa è quella dei Child Beauty Pageant, ossia dei concorsi di bellezza per bambine – qualcuno di voi se ne ricorderà per via dello splendido film Little Miss Sunshine (2006).

Nati negli anni ’20 ma esplosi negli anni ’60, i concorsi per bambine e teenager di cui stiamo parlando hanno ciascuno regole leggermente diverse, ma tutti prevedono determinate categorie di eventi e “numeri” di vario genere, sulla base dei quali la giuria assegnerà i premi. Proprio come in un regolare concorso di bellezza, ci sono quindi prove di canto o danza, interviste con le candidate, sfilate in abiti sportivi o da spiaggia, ma anche abbigliamento a tema, per esempio in stile “western”, e via dicendo. Di queste bambine si giudicano qualità come il portamento, la fiducia, l’individualità, l’abilità.

Ma il tipo di evento che maggiormente colpisce l’immaginario è quello che vede le bambine sfilare con l’abito da sera. Quello è il momento che tutti attendono, nel quale si deciderà la vera reginetta della serata: le partecipanti si sottopongono anche a diverse ore di preparazione in camerino con una truccatrice professionista. E, infine, salgono sul palco.

Messe in piega elaboratissime (e pacchiane), denti finti, make-up pesantissimo, abbronzature spray, perfette manicure, abiti su misura glamour e kitsch: gli occhi dei genitori brillano di orgoglio, ed è difficile scuotersi di dosso l’angosciante sensazione che queste bambine non siano altro che delle grottesche bamboline lanciate sulla scena proprio per il compiacimento ossessivo di mamma e papà.

Cosa può spingere due genitori a far partecipare la figlia in tenera età ad uno di questi concorsi? Certo, può essere l’ammirazione “cieca” per la propria bambina. Può essere anche che, come dichiarano molti genitori, spedirle sul palco sia un modo per educarle, per migliorare la loro autostima, per insegnare loro a parlare in pubblico… Eppure, c’è anche qualcos’altro.

Ogni anno negli Stati Uniti si svolgono 25.000 concorsi di bellezza per bambine. Le quote di iscrizione vanno da poche centinaia  fino a svariate migliaia di dollari. I vestiti su misura da soli possono costare anche più di 5000$, senza parlare degli accessori di trucco e dei compensi per parrucchiere e make-up artist professioniste. Visti le  spese altissime, le bambine che partecipano a un solo concorso di bellezza praticamente non esistono: se si fa l’investimento, tocca almeno rientrare della spesa.
Così, la maggioranza dei genitori accompagna le figlie da un concorso all’altro, spostandosi di stato in stato, seguendo un calendario serrato ed estenuante. Nonostante per la legge americana i concorsi di bellezza non possano essere considerati un lavoro (e non ricadano quindi nelle leggi sullo sfruttamento del lavoro minorile), per le piccole miss si tratta di un vero e proprio impegno a tempo pieno. I premi e i trofei — talvolta più alti delle vincitrici stesse! — implicano vincite in denaro, contratti con riviste di moda e sponsor, più tutta una galassia di beni di lusso come vestiti, elettronica, ecc.. È un’industria da un miliardo di dollari l’anno.

Per questo motivo la controversia riguardante questi concorsi è tutt’ora aspra. In particolare, si è molto discusso sulla sessualizzazione infantile messa in scena in questi eventi, anche in relazione alla pedofilia. In questo strano e assurdo contesto, infatti, i genitori possono trasformare le loro figliolette di cinque anni in vere e proprie femmes fatales, con rossetti di fuoco e ciglia lunghissime, tacchi alti e abiti da sera. Cercando di fare delle loro bambine proprio quello che terrorizza gli altri genitori: un oggetto del desiderio.

Tari Nakagawa

Le macabre e malinconiche necro-ninfe dell’artista giapponese Tari Nakagawa sono davvero il lato oscuro delle Barbie, tristi e scheletriche bambole anatomiche ormai perdute.

Fragili, eteree, malate e spesso in decomposizione: queste bambole create dallo scultore giapponese hanno qualcosa di indicibilmente triste e al tempo stesso poetico.

Nonostante i loro sguardi persi e drammatici, ormai irrimediabilmente segnati da una fine imminente, le bambole sembrano sospese in una dimensione di dolore e di nostalgia, come se si aggrappassero agli ultimi brandelli di vita che rimangono nei loro corpi sofferenti.

Le sensazioni e le emozioni che suscitano sono molteplici. Il loro stesso status di bambole rimanda all’infanzia, ai giochi spensierati e innocenti, eppure queste sculture conoscono il tempo, il disfacimento, la morte, e non ne fanno segreto. Sono bambole “adulte”, che sembrano avere davvero un’anima.

Il blog di Tari Nakagawa (in giapponese, diverse immagini).