A Most Unfortunate Execution

The volume Celebrated trials of all countries, and remarkable cases of criminal jurisprudence (1835) is a collection of 88 accounts of murders and curious proceedings.
Several of these anecdotes are quite interesting, but a double hanging which took place in 1807 is particularly astonishing for the collateral effects it entailed.

On November 6, 1802, John Cole Steele, owner of a lavander water deposit, was travelling from Bedfont, on the outskirts of London, to his home on Strand. It was deep in the night, and the merchant was walking alone, as he couldn’t find a coach.
The moon had just come up when Steele was surrounded by three men who were hiding in the bushes. They were John Holloway and Owen Haggerty — two small-time crooks always in trouble with the law; with them was their accomplice Benjamin Hanfield, whom they had recruited some hours earlier at an inn.
Hanfield himself would prove to be the weak link. Four years later, under the promise of a full pardon for unrelated offences, he would vividly recount in court the scene he had witnessed that night:

We presently saw a man coming towards us, and, on approaching him, we ordered him to stop, which he immediately did. Holloway went round him, and told him to deliver. He said we should have his money,
and hoped we would not ill-use him. [Steele] put his hand in his pocket, and gave Haggerty his money. I demanded his pocket-book. He replied that he had none. Holloway insisted that he had a book, and if he
did not deliver it, he would knock him down. I then laid hold of his legs. Holloway stood at his head, and swore if he cried out he would knock out his brains. [Steele] again said, he hoped we would not ill-use him. Haggerty proceeded to search him, when [Steele] made some resistance, and struggled so much that we got across the road. He cried out severely, and as a carriage was coming up, Holloway said, “Take care, I’ll silence the b—–r,” and immediately struck him several violent blows on the head and body. [Steele] heaved a heavy groan, and stretched himself out lifeless. I felt alarmed, and said, “John, you have killed the man”. Holloway replied, that it was a lie, for he was only stunned. I said I would stay no longer, and immediately set off towards London, leaving Holloway and Haggerty with the body. I came to Hounslow, and stopped at the end of the town nearly an hour. Holloway and Haggerty then came up, and said they had done the trick, and, as a token, put the deceased’s hat into my hand. […] I told Holloway it was a cruel piece of business, and that I was sorry I had any hand in it. We all turned down a lane, and returned to London. As we came along, I asked Holloway if he had got the pocketbook. He replied it was no matter, for as I had refused to share the danger, I should not share the booty. We came to the Black Horse in Dyot-street, had half a pint of gin, and parted.

A robbery gone wrong, like many others. Holloway and Haggerty would have gotten away with it: investigations did not lead to anything for four years, until Hanfield revealed what he knew.
The two were arrested on the account of Hanfield’s testimony, and although they claimed to be innocent they were both sentenced to death: Holloway and Haggerty would hang on a Monday, February 22, 1807.
During all Sunday night, the convicts kept on shouting out they had nothing to do with the murder, their cries tearing the “awful stillness of midnight“.

On the fatal morning, the two were brought at the Newgate gallows. Another person was to be hanged with them,  Elizabeth Godfrey, guilty of stabbing her neighbor Richard Prince.
Three simultaneous executions: that was a rare spectacle, not to be missed. For this reason around 40.000 perople gathered to witness the event, covering every inch of space outside Newgate and before the Old Bailey.

Haggertywas the first to walk up, silent and resigned. The hangman, William Brunskill, covered his head with a white hood. Then came Holloway’s turn, but the man lost his cold blood, and started yelling “I am innocent, innocent, by God!“, as his face was covered with a similar cloth. Lastly a shaking Elizabeth Godfrey was brought beside the other two.
When he finished with his prayers, the priest gestured for the executioner to carry on.
Around 8.15 the trapdoors opened under the convicts’ feet. Haggerty and Holloway died on the instant, while the woman convulsively wrestled for some time before expiring. “Dying hard“, it was called at the time.

But the three hanged persons were not the only victims on that cold, deadly morning: suddenly the crowd started to move out of control like an immense tide.

The pressure of the crowd was such, that before the malefactors appeared, numbers of persons were crying out in vain to escape from it: the attempt only tended to increase the confusion. Several females of low stature, who had been so imprudent as to venture amongst the mob, were in a dismal situation: their cries were dreadful. Some who could be no longer supported by the men were suffered to fall, and were trampled to death. This was also the case with several men and boys. In all parts there were continued cries “Murder! Murder!” particularly from the female part of the spectators and children, some of whom were seen expiring without the possibility of obtaining the least assistance, every one being employed in endeavouring to preserve his own life. The most affecting scene was witnessed at Green-Arbour Lane,
nearly opposite the debtors’ door. The lamentable catastrophe which took place near this spot, was attributed to the circumstance of two pie-men attending there to dispose of their pies, and one of them having his basket overthrown, some of the mob not being aware of what had happened, and at the
same time severely pressed, fell over the basket and the man at the moment he was picking it up, together with its contents. Those who once fell were never more enabled to rise, such was the pressure of the crowd. At this fatal place, a man of the name of Herrington was thrown down, who had in his hand his younger son, a fine boy about twelve years of age. The youth was soon trampled to death; the father recovered, though much bruised, and was amongst the wounded in St. Bartholomew’s Hospital.

The following passage is especially dreadful:

A woman, who was so imprudent as to bring with her a child at the breast, was one of the number killed: whilst in the act of falling, she forced the child into the arms of the man nearest to her, requesting him, for God’s sake, to save its life; the man, finding it required all his exertion to preserve himself, threw the infant from him, but it was fortunately caught at a distance by anotner man, who finding it difficult to ensure its safety or his own, disposed of it in a similar way. The child was again caught by a person, who contrived to struggle with it to a cart, under which he deposited it until the danger was over, and the mob had dispersed.

Others managed to have a narrow escape, as reported by the 1807 Annual Register:

A young man […] fell down […], but kept his head uncovered, and forced his way over the dead bodies, which lay in a pile as high as the people, until he was enabled to creep over the heads of the crowd to a lamp-iron, from whence he got into the first floor window of Mr. Hazel, tallow-chandler, in the Old Bailey; he was much bruised, and must have suffered the fate of his companion, if he had not been possessed of great strength.

The maddened crowd left a scene of apocalyptic devastation.

After the bodies were cut down, and the gallows was removed to the Old Bailey yard, the marshals and constables cleared the streets where the catastrophe had occurred, when nearly one hundred persons, dead or in a state of insensibility, were found in the street. […] A mother was seen to carry away the body of her dead son; […] a sailor boy was killed opposite Newgate, by suffocation; in a small bag which he carried was a quantity of bread and cheese, and it is supposed he came some distance to witness the execution. […] Until four o’clock in the afternoon, most of the surrounding houses contained some person in a wounded state, who were afterwards taken away by their friends on shutters or in hackney coaches. At Bartholomew’s Hospital, after the bodies of the dead were stripped and washed, they were ranged round a ward, with sheets over them, and their clothes put as pillows under their heads; their faces were uncovered, and there was a rail along the centre of the room; the persons who were admitted to see the shocking spectacle, and identified many, went up on one side and returned on the other. Until two o’clock, the entrances to the hospital were beset with mothers weeping for their sons! wives for their husbands! and sisters for their brothers! and various individuals for their relatives and friends!

There is however one last dramatic twist in this story: in all probability, Hollow and Haggerty were really innocent after all.
Hanfield, the key witness, might have lied to have his charges condoned.

Solicitor James Harmer (the same Harmer who incidentally inspired Charles Dickens for Great Expectations), even though convinced of their culpability in the beginning, kept on investigating after the convicts death and eventually changed his mind; he even published a pamphlet on his own expenses to denounce the mistake made by the Jury. Among other things, he discovered that Hanfield had tried the same trick before, when charged with desertion in 1805: he had attempted to confess to a robbery in order to avoid military punishment.
The Court itself was aware that the real criminals had not been punished, for in 1820, 13 years after the disastrous hanging, a John Ward was accused of the murder of Steele, then acquitted for lack of evidence (see Linda Stratmann in Middlesex Murders).

In one single day, Justice had caused the death of dozens of innocent people — including the convicts.
Really one of the most unfortunate executions London had ever seen.

___________________

I wrote about capital punsihment gone wrong in the past, in this article about Jack Ketch; on the same topic you can also find this post on ‘Bloody Murders’ pamphlets from Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (both articles in Italian only, sorry!).

My week of English wonders – II

(Continued from the previous post)

The Viktor Wynd Museum of Curiosities, Fine Art & Natural History still resides in its original location, in Mare Street, Hackney, East London (some years ago I sent over a trusted correspondant and published his ironic reportage).
Many things have changed since then: in 2014, the owner launched a 1-month Kickstarter campaign which earned him £ 16,000, allowing him to turn his eclectic collection into a proper museum, complete with a small cocktail bar, an art gallery and an underground dinining room. Just a couple of tables, to be precise; but it’s hard to think of another place where guests can dine around an authentic 19th century skeleton.

LTS1

The outrageous bad taste of placing human remains inside a dinner table is a good example of the sacrilegious vein that runs through the whole disposition of objects collected by Viktor: here the very idea of the museum as a high-culture institution is deconstructed and openly mocked. Refined works of art lay beside pornographic paperbacks, rare and precious ancient artifacts are on display next to McDonald’s Happy Meal toy surprises.

But this is not a meaningless jumble — it goes back to the original idea of a Museum being the domain of the Muses, a place of inspiration, of mysterious and unexpected connections, of a real attack to the senses. And this wunderkammer could infuriate wunderkammern purists.

LTS2

LTS4

LTS8

When I met up with him, Viktor Wynd didn’t even need to talk about himself. Among dodo bones, giant crabs, anatomical models, skulls and unique books, unmatched from their very titles — for instance Group Sex: A How-To Guide, or If You Want Closure in Your Relationship, Start with Your Legs — the museum owner was immersed in the objectification of his boundless imagination. As he moved along the display cases in his immense collection (insured for 1 million pounds), he looked like he was wandering through the rooms of his own mind.
Artist, surrealist and intellectual dandy, his life story as fascinating as his projects, Viktor always talks about the Museum as an inevitable necessity: “I need beauty and the uncanny, the funny and the silly, the odd and the rare. Rare and beautiful things are the barrier between me and a bottomless pit of misery and despair“.

And this strange bistro of wonders, where he holds conferences, cocktail parties, masqued balls, exhibitions, dinners, is certainly a rare and beautiful thing.

LTS3

LTS5

LTS7

I then moved to the London Bridge area. In front of Borough Market is St. Thomas Street, where old St. Thomas church stands embedded between modern buildings. It was not the church itself I was interested in, but rather its garret.
The attic under the church’s roof hosts a little known museum with a peculiar history.

OOTHB1

OOTHB8

OOTHB6

OOTHB2

The Old Operating Theatre Museum and Herb Garret is located in the space where all pharmaceuticals were prepared and stored, to be used in the annexed St. Thomas Hospital. A first section of the museum is dedicated to medicinal plants and antique therapeutic instruments. On display are several devices no longer in use, such as tools for cupping, bleeding and trepanation, and other quite menacing contraptions. But, together with its unique location, what gives this part of the museum its almost fantastic dimension is the sharp fragrance of dried flowers, herbs and spices (typical of other ancient pharmacies).

OOTHB3

OOTHB4

OOTHB5

OOTHB7

OOTHB9

OOTHB10

OOTHB11

OOTHB12

If the pharmacy is thought to have been active since the 18th Century, only in 1822 a part of the garret was transformed into operating theatre — one of the oldest in Europe.
Here the patients from the female ward were operated. They were mostly poor women, who agreed to go under the knife before a crowd of medicine students, but in return were treated by the best surgeons available at the time, a privilege they could not have afforded otherwise.
Operations were usually the last resort, when all other remedies had failed. Without anestetics, unaware of the importance of hygiene measures, surgeons had to rely solely on their own swiftness and precision (see for instance my post about Robert Liston). The results were predictable: despite all efforts, given the often already critical conditions of the patients, intraoperative and postoperative mortality was very high.

OOTHB13

OOTHB14

OOTHB15

OOTHB16

OOTHB17

OOTHB18

The last two places awaiting me in London turned out to be the only ones where photographs were not allowed. And this is a particularly interesting detail.

The first was of course the Hunterian Museum.
Over two floors are displayed thousands of veterinary and human anatomical specimens collected by famed Scottish surgeon John Hunter (in Leicester Square you can see his sculpted bust).
Among them, the preparations acquired by John Evelyn in Padua stand out as the oldest in Europe, and illustrate the vascular and nervous systems. The other “star” of the Museum is the skeleton of Charles Byrne, the “Irish giant” who died in 1783. Byrne was so terrified of ending up in an anatomical museum that he hired some fishermen to throw his corpse offshore. This unfortunately didn’t stop John Hunter who, determined to take possession of that extraordinary body, bribed the fishermen and paid a huge amount of money to get hold of his trophy.

The specimens, some of which pathological, are extremely interesting and yet everything seemed a bit cold if compared to the charm of old Italian anatomy museums, or even to the garret I had just visited in St. Thomas Church. What I felt was missing was the atmosphere, the narrative: the human body, especially the pathological body, in my view is a true theatrical play, a tragic spectacle, but here the dramatic dimension was carefully avoided. Upon reading the museum labels, I could actually perceive a certain urgency to stress the value and expressly scientific purpose of the collection. This is probably a response to the debate on ethical implications of displaying human remains in museums, a topic which gained much attention in the past few years. The Hunterian Museum is, after all, the place where the bones of the Irish giant, unscrupulously stolen to the ocean waves, are still displayed in a big glass case and might seem “helpless” under the visitors’ gaze.

My last place of wonder, and one of London’s best-kept secrets, is the Wildgoose Memorial Library.
The work of one single person, artist Jane Wildgoose, this library is part of her private home, can be visited by appointment and reached through a series of directions which make the trip look like a tresure hunt.
And a tresure it is indeed.

Jane is a kind and gentle spirit, the incarnation of serene hospitality.
Before disappearing to make some coffee, she whispered: “take your time to skim the titles, or to leaf through a couple of pages… and to read the objects“.
The objects she was referring to are really the heart of her library, which besides the books also houses plaster casts, sculptures, Victorian mourning hair wreaths, old fans and fashion items, daguerrotypes, engravings, seashells, urns, death masks, animal skulls. Yet, compared to so many other collections of wonders I have seen over the years, this one struck me for its compositional grace, for the evident, painstaking attention accorded to the objects’ disposition. But there was something else, which eluded me at that moment.

As Jane came back into the room holding the coffee tray, I noticed her smile looked slightly tense. In her eyes I could guess a mixture of expectation and faint embarassement. I was, after all, an outsider she had intentionally let into the cosiness of her home. If the miracle of a mutual harmony was to happen, this could turn out to be one of those rare moments of actual contact between strangers; but the stakes were high. This woman was presenting me with everything she held most sacred — “a poet is a naked person“, Bob Dylan once wrote — and now it all came down to my sensibility.

We began to talk, and she told me of her life spent safeguarding objects, trying to understand them, to recognize their hidden relationships: from the time when, as a child, she collected seashells on the southern shores of England, up to her latest art installations. Little by little, I started to realize what was that specific trait in her collection which at first I could not clearly pinpoint: the empathy, the humanity.
The Wildgoose Memorial Library is not meant to explore the concept of death, but rather the concept of grief. Jane is interested in the traces of our passage, in the signs that sorrow inevitably leaves behind, in the absence, in the longing and loss. This is what lies at the core of her works, commissioned by the most prestigious institutions, in which I feel she is attempting to process unresolved, unknown bereavements. That’s why she patiently fathoms the archives searching for traces of life and sorrow; that’s why her attention for the soul of things enabled her to see, for instance, how a cold catalogue accompanying the 1786 sale of Margaret Cavendish’s goods after her death could actually be the Duchess’s most intimate portrait, a key to unearthing her passions and her friendships.

This living room, I realized, is where Jane tries to mend heartaches — not just her own, but also those of her fellow human beings, and even those of the deceased.

And suddenly the Hunterian Museum came to my mind.
There, as in this living room, human remains were present.
There, as in this living room, the objects on display spoke about suffering and death.
There, as in this living room, pictures were not allowed, for the sake of respect and discretion.

Yet the two collections could not be more distant from each other, placed at opposite extremes of the spectrum.
On one hand, the aseptic showcases, the modern setting from which all emotion is removed, where the Obscene Body (in order to be explained, and accepted by the public) must be filtered through a detached, scientific gaze. The same Museum which, ironically, has to deal with the lack of ethics of its founders, who lived in a time when collecting anatomical specimens posed very little moral dilemmas.
On the other, this oasis of meditation, a personal vision of human beings and their impermanence enclosed in the warm, dark wood of Jane Wildgoose’s old library; a place where compassion is not only tangible, it gets under your skin; a place which can only exist because of its creator’s ethical concerns. And, ultimately, a research facility addressing death as an essential experience we should not be afraid of: it’s no accident the library is dedicated to Persephone because, as Jane pointed out, there’s “no winter without summer“.

Perhaps we need both opposites, as we would with two different medicines. To study the body without forgetting about the soul, and viceversa.
On the express train back to the airport, I stared at a clear sky between the passing trees. Not a single cloud in sight. No rain without sun, I told myself. And so much for the preconceptions I held at the beginning of my journey.

My week of English wonders – I

England, despite the sweetness of its mild hills standing out, or its pleasantly green countryside, always had a funereal quality to my eye.

I am well aware that such an impression, indistinct and irrational as it is, is but an indefensible generalization; yet I cannot help this feeling deep inside of me every time I go back across the Channel.
It may be because of the many convent ruins characterizing the landscape since Reformation, or because of the infamously leaden sky, or the lingering memory of Victorian mournings; but I suspect the idea that this whole country could have an affinity with death was actually suggested to me by the British I happened to know throughout the years, who seemed to be fighting against a sort of innate, philosophical resignation with the weapons of irony.
In his sketches, John Cleese often made fun of the deferential British austerity, that fear of hurting or being hurt if feelings are given free rein — the same bottled up behaviour which finds its counterpart in the cruelty of British humour, in Blake’s dazzling ecstatic explosions, in the dandies’ iconoclasm or in punk nihilism. Thus, as hard as I have tried, I cannot get rid of the sensation that the English people think more than others, or maybe with less distractions, about vanitas, and are able to transform this awareness of futility (even in respect to social conventions) into a subversive undercurrent.

This is why heading to England to talk about memento mori felt somehow natural right from the start.
At the University of Winchester was gathered a heterogeneous crowd of academics (medievalists, medical historians, anatomists, paleopathologists, experts in literature and painting) and artists, all interested in the relationship between death, art and anatomy.

20160605_171453

2016-06-04 13.01.17

2016-06-04 13.01.55

20160603_153516

20160603_153057

These three days of memorable intellectual stimulation really fueled my mind, by nature already overexcited.
Therefore I arrived in London in a state of augmented perception, as the town greeted me with a bright sun and crystal blue skies over its buildings, as if eager to deny all the aforementioned stereotypes. And yet, in retrospect, the days I spent in the capital proved to be a protraction and a follow-up to the meditations initiated in Winchester.

My first, inevitable visit was obviously paid to the Wellcome Collection. This Museum, founded in 2007, is particularly dear to me because it addresses, like I often do on these pages, the intersections between science, art and the sacred. Its permanent collections feature anatomical dolls, memento mori, human remains (for instance a Peruvian 5 to 7 centuries-old mummy); but also fakirs sandals, shrunken heads, chastity belts and religious objects.

WC1

WC2

WC3

  WC5

WC6

WC7

WC8

WC9

WC11

WC12

WC14

WC15

WC16

WC17

WC18

WC19

WC20

WC10

A fascinating temporary exhibition entitled States of mind: Tracing the edges of consciousness introduces the visitor to the mysteries of the Self, of what we call “consciousness”, through the liminal territories of nightmare, somnambulism and its opposite — hypnagogic paralysis —, all the way to the uncharted realms of vegetative state. In the last room I learned with a shiver how recent studies suggest that patients suspended between life and death might be much more aware than we thought.


The Grant Museum of Zoology, just a five-minute walk from the Wellcome Collection, is the only remaining University zoological museum in the capital. The space open to the public is not very big, but it is packed to the ceiling with thousands of specimens covering the entire spectrum of animal kingdom. Skeletons, wet and taxidermied specimens are a silent — yet meaningful — reminder of the vortex of biodiversity.

MoZ4

MoZ7

MoZ2

MoZ3

MoZ5

MoZ1

MoZ8

MoZ9

MoZ10

Another ten-minute walk, and I reached 1 Scala Street, the location for what is probably one of the most peculiar and evocative museums in London: Pollock’s Toy Museum.

PTM1

PTM2
The visitor must proceed by climbing steep narrow stairs, passing through corridors and small rooms, in a sort of maze unfolding on multiple levels across two different houses, one built in the 1880s and the other dating back to the previous century. Ancient toys are stacked everywhere: dolls, tin soldiers, train models, stuffed animals, rocking horses, puppets, kaleidoscopes.
Coming from the Zoology Museum, I can’t help but think of how play is a fundamental activity for the human mammal. But what could appear just as a curious excursus in the history and diverse typologies of toys soon turns into something different.

PTM4

PTM10

PTM5

PTM7

PTM8

PTM13

PTM19

PTM11

PTM3

Standing before the display cases crowded with hundreds of time-worn puppets, overwhelmed by the incredible quantity of details, one could easily fall prey to a vague malaise. But this is not that sort of phobia some people have for old dolls and their vitreous gaze; it is a subtle, ancient melancholia.

What happened to the children who held those teddy bears, who played out fantastic stories on tiny cardboard theaters, who opened their eyes wide in front of a magic lantern?

PTM18

PTM22

PTM21

PTM6

PTM12

PTM9

PTM17

PTM14

PTM15

PTM16

PTM24

PTM23

PTM25

It might have been just another suggestion caused by previous days spent in heartfelt discussions on the symbols and simulacra of death; or, once more, my preconceptions were to blame.
But to me, even a museum dedicated to child entertainment somehow looked like a triumph of impermanence.

PTM20
(This article continues here)

Il Cacciatore di Streghe

The_Obscene_Kiss

Di tutti i secoli passati, il Seicento è sicuramente fra i più bizzarri, rispetto alla sensibilità moderna.
Epidemie di vampirismo, masticatori di sudari, santi prodigiosi le cui spoglie operavano miracoli, ed infine loro, le streghe, quelle donne malvagie che stringevano alleanze con il Diavolo. Il soprannaturale era parte integrante della quotidianità, e dubitare delle sue influenze sulla vita di tutti i giorni era, secondo alcuni pensatori come ad esempio Joseph Glanvill, una vera e propria eresia: tanto abbietta quanto la negazione dell’esistenza degli angeli. Il demonio, in quegli anni, si aggirava davvero per le campagne alla ricerca di anime da catturare e dannare per l’eternità, era cioè una figura concreta, che la gente credeva di riconoscere dietro ad ogni evento peculiare.

Le streghe avevano un posto centrale nell’immaginario popolare, e chiunque poteva essere sospettato di stregoneria: una lite con una vicina di casa, seguita dalla comparsa di vaghi dolori o di una malattia del bestiame, era chiaro segnale che la donna aveva immensi poteri di provenienza diabolica. In un’epoca in cui i processi per stregoneria erano diffusi, è facile comprendere come accusare un proprio nemico d’aver stretto un patto con Satana fosse un metodo facile ed economico per toglierselo dai piedi.

MACBR111

In questo contesto emerse la figura di Matthew Hopkins, il cacciatore di streghe più famoso della Storia.
Nato intorno al 1620 a Wenham Magna, minuscolo villaggio inglese nella contea di Suffolk, era il quarto dei sei figli di un pastore puritano piuttosto amato dai suoi compaesani. Della vita di Matthew prima del 1644 si conosce molto poco: sembra che avesse un’infarinatura di giurisprudenza, e che avesse acquistato una locanda a Mistley con i soldi ricevuti in eredità, ma questi aneddoti sono poco verificabili.

Quello che è certo è che all’inizio degli anni 40 del Seicento Hopkins si trasferì a Manningtree, Essex, e lì nel 1644 si autoproclamò Witchfinder General. Si trattava di un titolo che voleva sembrare ufficiale (general significa “rappresentante del Governo”), ma ovviamente il Parlamento non aveva mai istituito la carica di Cacciatore di Streghe; Hopkins era comunque ben deciso a guadagnarsi fama e fortuna, e quell’altisonante appellativo non era che l’inizio. La sua carriera vera e propria cominciò quello stesso anno, quando Hopkins dichiarò di aver sentito alcune donne parlare dei loro incontri con il demonio. Da quel momento in poi, assieme al fido compare John Stearne, cominciò a viaggiare per l’Inghilterra orientale, principalmente tra Suffolk, Essex e Norfolk, disinfestando borghi, villaggi e città dalle temute streghe.

640px-Wickiana5

Hopkins e Stearne arrivavano in una nuova cittadina, annunciavano di essere stati incaricati dal Parlamento di scoprire le streghe della zona, raccoglievano denunce e “indizi”, quindi passavano ai fatti: accusavano e processavano anche venti o venticinque persone, trovavano immancabilmente le prove dell’avvenuto Patto con il diavolo, e mandavano tutti al patibolo.
Bisogna sottolineare che i processi per stregoneria erano diversi da tutti gli altri procedimenti giudiziari, perché la gravità del crimine era tale da permettere ai giudici di abbandonare le normali procedure legali ed ogni scrupolo etico (crimen exceptum): la confessione andava estorta con qualsiasi mezzo e ad ogni costo. Ma la tortura era pur sempre illegale in Inghilterra.

Così i metodi di Hopkins per scoprire se l’imputata fosse realmente una strega, pur essendo fra i più crudeli, rimanevano sempre sul limite di ciò che si poteva considerare tortura: la prassi più utilizzata prevedeva ad esempio la deprivazione del sonno. Si teneva l’imputata sveglia e immobile per giorni, seduta con le gambe incrociate e impedendole di dormire, finché la poveretta non finiva per ammettere qualsiasi cosa.

Si cercava poi sul suo corpo il Segno della Bestia – che non era difficile da trovare, visto che praticamente tutto (da un terzo capezzolo, a una zona di pelle un po’ secca, a un neo particolarmente grosso) poteva essere interpretato in tal senso. Se non vi era alcun Segno del Diavolo sul corpo, significava una sola cosa: che non era visibile ad occhio nudo. Ecco quindi entrare le assistenti di Hopkins, donne che viaggiavano con lui e che svolgevano la funzione di witch prickers, “pungolatrici di streghe”. Il Segno del Diavolo era infatti immune al dolore e non sanguinava, a quanto si diceva, e per trovarlo le witch prickers utilizzavano degli spilloni appositi tormentando il corpo della presunta strega in ogni sua parte.

Witch-pricking_Needles00

In queste lunghe ore di osservazione, spesso Hopkins e altri testimoni vedevano comparire uno o più “famigli“, cioè i demoni minori al servizio della strega, che si presentavano sotto forma di cane, gatto, capra o altri animali, e che bevevano il sangue che scorreva dal corpo della strega come fosse latte. L’apparizione di un famiglio era, com’è ovvio, uno degli indizi di colpevolezza più schiaccianti.

Witches'Familiars1579

Matthewhopkins

C’erano pochissime probabilità che tutte queste indagini fallissero nel trovare prove inconfutabili della natura diabolica della strega. Ma se proprio non si era ancora certi, Hopkins poteva sempre ricorrere alla sua trovata più clamorosa, l’infame ordalia dell’acqua. Secondo una teoria dell’epoca, l’acqua (simbolo del battesimo, elemento purissimo) avrebbe rifiutato di accogliere una strega: bastava quindi legare l’imputata a una sedia e gettarla in un fiume o un lago. Se fosse rimasta a galla, si sarebbe trattato per forza di una strega; se fosse annegata, la sua anima innocente sarebbe volata all’altro mondo nella grazia di Dio.
Quest’ultimo metodo era davvero troppo estremo, e le autorità intimarono a Hopkins di utilizzarlo esclusivamente con il consenso della vittima; così già alla fine del 1645 la pratica venne abbandonata.

Cucking_stool

Ordeal_of_water

Fin dall’inizio della loro “battuta di caccia”, in virtù degli spietati processi, i nomi di Hopkins e Stearne sparsero il terrore in tutta l’Inghilterra dell’est. Una terribile fama li precedeva, e appena circolava voce che i due, con le loro assistenti femminili, si stessero dirigendo verso un determinato villaggio, la gente del posto non dormiva certo sonni tranquilli. Anche con tutta la superstizione e le convinzioni sull’esistenza delle streghe, il popolo poteva vedere benissimo che i processi di Hopkins erano solo delle farse, il cui esito era deciso in anticipo.
Ma cosa alimentava la foga di quest’uomo nella sua missione? Ci credeva veramente, o aveva qualche interesse nascosto?

Lasciando alle spalle un’impressionante scia di cadaveri, la caccia in verità stava fruttando al Witchfinder General un lauto bottino. Nonostante lui più tardi dichiarasse che la sua paga, necessaria a sostenere la sua compagnia e tre cavalli, fosse di soli venti scellini a città, i registri contabili raccontano una realtà differente: l’onorario di Hopkins era di 23 sterline a città, più le spese di viaggio – una somma altissima per l’epoca. Le spese a carico dei vari municipi erano talmente elevate, che nella cittadina di Ipswich fu necessario istituire una tassa speciale per coprirle. Improvvisarsi cacciatore di streghe freelance era senza dubbio un colpo geniale, se non ci si faceva scrupoli a mandare a morte decine e decine di persone.

Witches_Being_Hanged

L’eco delle gesta del Witchfinder General arrivò anche al Parlamento, e diversi membri espressero preoccupazione per il degenerare della cosa. Anche altre voci, come quella del predicatore puritano John Gaule, si levarono contro l’operato di Hopkins. Fu così che si arrivò a un peculiare ribaltamento della situazione: nella contea di Norfolk, nel 1646, i due cacciatori di streghe vennero fatti sedere sul banco degli imputati. I giudici volevano assicurarsi che non fossero stati usati mezzi di tortura per estorcere confessioni; intendevano indagare sulle parcelle richieste da Hopkins e Stearle alle comunità che avevano visitato; e infine insinuarono, in un sorprendente e ironico twist, che se Hopkins era davvero tanto esperto nella stregoneria e nella demonologia, forse nascondeva anch’egli un segreto…

Dopo questo primo interrogatorio, Hopkins comprese che sarebbe stato più saggio per lui chiudere l’attività. Quando la corte si riaggiornò nel 1647, egli era già tornato a vivere a Manningtree. La carriera del Witchfinder General durò quindi poco più di un anno, 14 mesi per la precisione. Nonostante il breve periodo, i numeri sono impressionanti: tra il 1644 e il 1646 egli fu responsabile della morte di circa trecento donne, impiccate, bruciate, annegate, o morte in prigione. Se si pensa che in totale, dall’inizio della caccia alle streghe nel primo ‘400 fino alla sua fine nel tardo ‘700, in Inghilterra furono condannate per stregoneria meno di cinquecento persone, significa che il 60% del totale delle uccisioni è da attribuirsi al Witchfinder General.

Ma la sua inquietante ombra non si limita ai processi da lui personalmente celebrati: nel 1647, già “in pensione”, Hopkins scrisse The Discovery of Witches, un vero e proprio manuale per individuare le streghe. Questo libro ebbe fortuna nel Nuovo Mondo, e fu utilizzato come testo di riferimento in vari processi, fra cui quelli, tristemente noti, di Salem nel Massachussetts.

Con il tempo la figura di Hopkins divenne quasi mitologica, una sorta di orco o di uomo nero dalla malvagità senza confini. Si racconta che venne processato per stregoneria, sottoposto al suo stesso metodo inumano di “ordalia dell’acqua”, e che morì annegato in un fiume. Ma questa è soltanto una leggenda, con un confortevole e troppo preciso contrappasso. Nella realtà Matthew Hopkins, il Witchfinder General, morì di tubercolosi il 12 agosto 1647, nel suo letto.

Nel 1968 la sua storia venne portata sul grande schermo, romanzata, da Michael Reeves nel cult Il grande inquisitore che fece scandalo per le sue insistite sequenze di tortura e nel quale il Witchfinder General è interpretato da un grande Vincent Price.

witch-three1

Il libro di Hopkins, The Discovery of Witches, è disponibile gratuitamente online sul sito del Progetto Gutenberg.

Il boia maldestro

Charles_I_execution,_and_execution_of_regicides

Londra, durante i circa trent’anni della Restaurazione (1660-1688), era una città in preda alla violenza, immersa in un clima di paranoia e terrore. Oltre ai “classici” crimini come furti, rapine, omicidi e via dicendo, si rischiava anche di venire denunciati come cattolici, o peggio ancora nemici della corona: i processi, religiosi e politici, colpivano chi non era devotamente aderente all’ortodossia anglicana, così come chi aveva avversato il ritorno di Re Carlo II. E la pena capitale era inflitta con inquietante leggerezza, soprattutto durante le famigerate “assise sanguinose” nel 1685, presiedute dal temibile giudice Jeffreys che mandò al patibolo quasi 300 uomini senza battere ciglio.

Dal 1666 al 1678, il più celebre fra i boia era certamente Jack Ketch. Forse di origini irlandesi, la sua data di nascita non si conosce, né si sa quale mestiere svolgesse prima di diventare carnefice della corona. Molto spesso gli aguzzini avevano una carriera di macellaio alle spalle, e in effetti Ketch mostrava una certa dimestichezza nello squartare i cadaveri dei condannati.

ant2006-0140.dvi
All’epoca, infatti, la pena più severa fra tutte era riservata agli accusati di alto tradimento, e veniva denominata hanged, drawn and quartered: il condannato veniva legato a un’asse e trascinato da un cavallo fino alla pubblica piazza; qui, veniva completamente denudato e legato ad una scala in legno. (Per legge, le donne accusate del medesimo crimine andavano a questo punto arse vive – perché denudarle pubblicamente avrebbe offeso il comune pudore…).
Il collo veniva assicurato ad uno dei pioli della scala con una corda stretta a nodo corto, in modo da soffocare il suppliziato ma senza ucciderlo. Gli venivano tagliati pene e testicoli, e gettati in un braciere; ancora vivo, il condannato veniva poi sbudellato, e le sue viscere erano estratte dal boia che le bruciava di fronte ai suoi occhi. Infine si procedeva a decapitare il condannato, e a squartarne il corpo in quattro parti.

Drawing_of_William_de_Marisco

BNMsFr2643FroissartFol97vExecHughDespenser
Ma non era finita qui: i resti del giustiziato dovevano essere esposti in vari punti strategici di Londra, come ad esempio lungo il London Bridge o a Temple Bar, affinché servissero da monito. Ecco che Ketch procedeva quindi, nelle segrete della prigione di Newgate, chiamate appropriatamente Jack Ketch’s Kitchen, a bollire i “quarti” dei condannati. Nel 1661 un visitatore di nome Ellwood descrisse quanto vide, come in una scena di un moderno film horror: “teste venivano portate per essere bollite, dentro a sporchi cesti di vimini, e i boia compiaciuti e beffardi le canzonavano”. Le teste venivano gettate nelle pentole e bollite nella canfora per prevenire la putrefazione, prima di essere esposte nei luoghi di maggior passaggio.

Traitors_heads_on_old_london_bridge
Ketch dovette occuparsi di diversi condannati a questo tipo di supplizio, perché quando Carlo II cominciò la restaurazione vennero mandati a morte tutti i regicidi (responsabili di aver firmato la condanna di Carlo I) che erano ancora in vita. Ma la maggior parte dei suoi servigi riguardavano le “semplici” impiccagioni, nelle quali eccelleva.

Purtroppo per lui, un punto debole Ketch ce l’aveva. Per quanto fosse a suo agio con cappi e coltelli, non sapeva proprio maneggiare l’ascia. A sua discolpa, c’è da dire che le decapitazioni erano relativamente rare e riservate ai nobili; fino a pochi anni prima, si faceva addirittura arrivare un boia dal Continente, esperto nell’utilizzo dell’ascia. Fatto sta che Ketch (a causa di tagli nel budget giudiziario?) si prese carico anche di quest’arte in cui non aveva alcuna esperienza, e che avrebbe macchiato per sempre il suo buon nome.

Froissart_Chronicles,_execution

Il primo grosso scandalo che riguardò il boia fu l’esecuzione di Lord Russell nel 1683. Secondo la legge, il nobiluomo andava decapitato con un solo fendente, e una volta sul patibolo Lord Russell pagò, com’era d’uso a quel tempo, una bella somma a Ketch affinché svolgesse il suo lavoro in maniera decisa e pulita.
Mai soldi furono spesi peggio.

Secondo alcuni, il boia esagerava spesso con l’alcol – abitudine che, come si sa, non aiuta la mira. Fatto sta che Ketch sollevò la mannaia, ma il colpo che si abbattè sul condannato ferì il collo senza staccare la testa; la seconda stoccata ancora una volta non bastò. Lord Russell era ancora vivo, fra spruzzi di sangue e urla disumane. Un altro paio di colpi, e finalmente la lama fece rotolare via la testa di Lord Russell. Quell’infinita agonia fu talmente straziante da impressionare perfino le folle abituate al sangue, che seguivano avidamente e con regolarità le esecuzioni. Ketch fu costretto a pubblicare un opuscolo intitolato Apologie, in cui si scusava per la barbarie dello spettacolo, adducendo come attenuante il fatto che Lord Russell aveva sbagliato a “posizionarsi nel modo corretto” sui ceppi.

Due anni dopo, venne il turno di James Scott, primo Duca di Monmouth, anch’egli condannato alla decapitazione. Il Duca rifiutò il cappuccio o qualsiasi altro trattamento di favore, e una volta sul patibolo allungò la solita, profumata mancia a Ketch. Le sue ultime parole furono: “Non servitemi come avete fatto con Lord Russell. Ho sentito che l’avete colpito tre o quattro volte…”

250px_monmouth_execution
Questa volta, se possibile, andò ancora peggio. Il primo fendente colpì addirittura la spalla del povero Duca; il secondo e il terzo non fecero che aprire nuove ferite non fatali. Fra i fischi della folla, Ketch depose l’ascia, deciso a lasciar perdere: lo fecero risalire sul patibolo a completare il lavoro. Ci vollero dai cinque agli otto colpi prima che il condannato finisse di soffrire. La gente era talmente inferocita che, se non ci fossero state le guardie a proteggerlo mentre si allontanava, Ketch sarebbe stato linciato sul posto.

Jack_Ketch_(John_Price)_from_NPG
Un anno dopo, nel 1686, Ketch fu incarcerato per resistenza ad un ufficiale; il suo assistente, Paskah Rose, prese il suo posto ma venne arrestato dopo appena quattro mesi, per rapina. Una volta uscito di prigione, Ketch riprese la sua carica, e ricominciò proprio dall’impiccagione del suo assistente a Tyburn. Verso la fine dello stesso anno, Jack Ketch morì.

17m41zks7wcccjpg
A quanto si dice, Ketch fu un personaggio davvero spiacevole, costantemente ubriaco, ossessivamente avido di denaro, sempre pronto a lamentarsi del proprio compenso e a rivendere i vestiti dei condannati più nobili. Eppure, a causa delle sue ultime, maldestre performance, la figura di Ketch si guadagnò inaspettatamente un posto di rilievo nell’immaginario popolare: protagonista di ballate, poemi, pamphlet, citato da scrittori del calibro di Dickens, divenne il classico spauracchio per minacciare i bambini indisciplinati. E, grazie al tipico black humor inglese, entrò a far parte dei teatri di burattini della tradizione di Punch & Judy: in questi spettacoli, spesso il “boia pasticcione” viene ingannato e finisce immancabilmente per impiccarsi da solo.

i-149

Lo sconosciuto dall’elmo di ferro

Una sera imprecisata del 1907, nel lussuoso centro sportivo londinese di King Street, Covent Garden. Due fra gli uomini più ricchi del mondo – fra una sbuffata di sigaro, e una puntata sull’incontro di boxe a cui stavano assistendo – discutevano di una questione piuttosto singolare. L’argomento di discussione era se fosse possibile per un uomo attraversare il mondo intero senza mai essere identificato.

Lonsdale-Morgan

Hugh Cecil Lowther, quinto conte di Lonsdale, era convinto che l’impresa fosse attuabile; il suo interlocutore, il finanziere americano John Pierpont Morgan, sosteneva il contrario. Quest’ultimo, nella foga, si disse disposto a scommettere ben 100.000 dollari, equivalenti a diversi milioni di euro in valuta odierna: era forse la più grande somma mai scommessa nella storia. Lì vicino, ad ascoltarli, stava un gentleman inglese di nome Harry Bensley, celebre donnaiolo e viveur, mantenuto da una costante rendita di circa 5.000 sterline l’anno grazie ai suoi investimenti in Russia. A lui, quei soldi fecero subito gola, ma soprattutto lo attirò la bizzarra avventura che la sfida sembrava promettere. Così, interrompendo l’accalorata discussione, annunciò che accettava la scommessa del magnate americano.

Harry Bensley, sulla sinistra.

Harry Bensley, sulla sinistra.

I termini della prova furono messi nero su bianco. Bensley avrebbe dovuto soddisfare ben 15 condizioni, che lo costringevano a viaggiare mascherato, spingendo una carrozzella per bambini, attraversando 169 città inglesi, e 125 città in 18 nazioni differenti in giro per il mondo – tra cui Irlanda, Canada, Stati Uniti, Sud America, Nuova Zelanda, Australia, Sud Africa, Giappone, Cina, India, Egitto, Italia, Francia, Spagna, Portogallo, Belgio, Germania e Olanda. Doveva cominciare il suo viaggio investendo esclusivamente una sterlina in materiale “pubblicitario”, cioè fotografie, dépliant e pamphlet, da vendere durante il suo girovagare: non avrebbe potuto avere altra fonte di reddito oltre al ricavato di quelle foto per tutta la durata della sfida. Anche i vestiti erano limitati ad un unico cambio e, per rendere le cose ancora più complicate, durante il viaggio avrebbe dovuto perfino ammogliarsi – trovare, cioè, una donna disposta a sposarlo senza conoscere la sua vera identità.

image9

close

harry6
Così, il primo gennaio del 1908, all’età di 31 anni, Harry Bensley si presentò sul luogo indicato dal contratto, a Trafalgar Square, indossando un elmo di ferro da armatura e spingendo un passeggino che conteneva i suoi vestiti e il materiale pubblicitario: al suo fianco, il “garante” (chiamato The Minder) che l’avrebbe accompagnato durante l’intera epopea, per assicurarsi che le condizioni della scommessa venissero rispettate. La folla esultante lo acclamò, visto che la notizia della incredibile impresa si era già sparsa ovunque; e così accadde anche nelle tappe successive del viaggio – tutti acquistavano le fotografie, c’era chi lasciava delle offerte, praticamente i soldi gli piovevano addosso.

image10

pram

postcd4
Talmente tanti soldi, in realtà, che ad un certo punto Bensley venne arrestato per vendita di cartoline senza permesso a Bexley Heath, Kent; arrivato in tribunale con il suo elmo, Harry spiegò al giudice i termini della scommessa e, grazie alla benevolenza di costui, per la prima volta nella storia si svolse un processo in totale anonimità dell’imputato. Giudicato colpevole, sotto il nome di “Uomo nella Maschera di Ferro”, venne condannato a una multa di una dozzina di sterline, e gli venne permesso di continuare il suo viaggio.
Altri gustosi aneddoti raccontano di come una cameriera si nascose sotto il letto della camera di Bensley nel tentativo di svelare la sua identità e guadagnarsi le 1.000 sterline messe in palio da un giornale, ma venne scoperta in tempo; e di come lo stesso Re Edoardo VII, divertito, chiese perfino un autografo al misterioso “cavaliere”, che rifiutò per ovvie ragioni di privacy…
Anche le offerte di matrimonio non mancavano: Harry disse di averne ricevute più di 200, da nobildonne provenienti dall’Europa, dall’Australia e dall’America. Le rifiutò tutte.

postcd3
Dopo sei anni, l’impresa procedeva con immenso successo: Bensley aveva già visitato 12 paesi, e avrebbe molto probabilmente vinto la scommessa, se non fosse incappato in un tragico imprevisto: la Prima Guerra Mondiale. Arrivato a Genova, infatti, ricevette un infausto telegramma in cui il finanziere americano Morgan gli comunicava che la sfida era da considerarsi conclusa. Egli temeva che la Guerra avrebbe messo a repentaglio il suo impero economico e, non avendo certo voglia di perdere soldi in maniera frivola, si ritirò dalla scommessa. Nonostante gli fossero state riconosciute 4.000 sterline di ricompensa, Bensley fu devastato dalla notizia. Rabbioso e deluso, donò tutto il ricavato in beneficenza; tornò in patria, si arruolò nel 1915, combattè per un anno al fronte prima di rimanere ferito ed essere rispedito a casa.

Army Service record

I suoi investimenti finanziari in Russia crollarono in seguito alla Rivoluzione, ed egli tirò a campare facendo la maschera nei cinema, il guardiano d’hotel, e più tardi lavorando in una fabbrica di armamenti fino alla sua morte, avvenuta il 21 maggio 1956 all’età di 79 anni. L’elmo e la carrozzina, conservati in soffitta, non furono mai più ritrovati.

image13
Questa è la storia ufficiale del viaggiatore mascherato, così come è raccontata sul sito del pronipote (illegittimo) di Bensley, che però avanza qualche dubbio. Secondo quanto si racconta nella sua famiglia, le cose sarebbero andate molto diversamente: dopo una notte di gioco d’azzardo in continua perdita, Bensley avrebbe puntato l’intera sua fortuna (investimenti in Russia compresi) su una sola carta… e avrebbe perso.
Gli altri giocatori, cioè proprio il Conte di Lonsdale e J. P. Morgan, impietositi, avrebbero “commutato” questo debito in una sorta di farsesco contrappasso dantesco. Il dongiovanni avrebbe dovuto imparare a fare a meno del suo fascino, coprendosi il volto; il damerino abituato alla bella vita avrebbe dovuto campare con una sterlina sola, spingendo una carrozzina a elemosinare in giro per il mondo, con un unico cambio di vestiti. Gli fu consentito, per salvaguardare quel briciolo di onore che gli rimaneva, di far passare questa punizione per una impresa eroica – ma si trattava in realtà di una vera e propria beffa, un dileggio conosciuto a pochi insider, che sanciva di fatto la sua uscita dal circolo del bel mondo londinese.

Ma attenzione, perché ora viene il bello. Tutto quello che avete appena letto, sia la versione “ufficiale” che quella “segreta”, potrebbe non essere mai accaduto.

Negli scorsi anni, infatti, sono emersi nuovi dettagli che delineano una storia dai risvolti molto più ambigui: pare che del fantomatico uomo mascherato si fossero perse le tracce già dall’autunno del 1908, poco dopo l’inizio della sfida. I discendenti di Bensley, che hanno dato vita al sito internet proprio per racimolare informazioni sul loro antenato, ammettono che non vi sia alcuna prova che egli abbia mai lasciato l’Inghilterra.
La sfida, quindi, non sarebbe stata completata? E allora, le 4.000 sterline vinte da Bensley e da lui donate in beneficenza?
Davvero difficile che il magnate J. P. Morgan abbia potuto decidere di versare quella somma nell’agosto del 1914, come racconta la storia ufficiale, visto che era morto l’anno prima.

Nel dicembre del 1908, su un giornale chiamato Answers to Correspondents on Every Subject under the sun, veniva posta la fatidica domanda: ma dove diavolo è finito l’uomo con la maschera di ferro? Poco dopo alla testata arrivò una lettera, pubblicata il 19 dicembre, da parte di un uomo che sosteneva di essere, per l’appunto, l’uomo mascherato.

Scan0015

Nella lunga lettera, l’anonimo confessava che la scommessa, la sfida e il viaggio intorno al mondo non erano altro che un’elaborata bufala, studiata meticolosamente mentre egli stava scontando una condanna in prigione. L’ispirazione, raccontava, gli era arrivata da un libro sulla celeberrima e misteriosa figura della Maschera di Ferro incarcerata alla Bastiglia: aveva così preso forma l’idea di spostarsi di città in città indossando l’elmo per attirare l’attenzione delle folle, dando risonanza alle sue apparizioni mediante la finta storia della scommessa fra i due milionari (ignari di tutto). Una volta uscito di galera, l’uomo era però senza il becco d’un quattrino: con la complicità di un tedesco conosciuto in cella, che si sarebbe finto “garante” della scommessa, aveva quindi raggirato i primi ignari finanziatori con la promessa di futuri dividendi, riuscendo ad acquistare l’elmo, il passeggino e il lotto iniziale di fotografie da vendere. Quanto al matrimonio, che secondo le “condizioni” egli avrebbe dovuto contrarre durante il viaggio, non c’era problema: egli era già sposato, e pronto a far spuntare sua moglie al momento opportuno come parte della messinscena.

image12

3pram
La truffa aveva funzionato: fin dal primo giorno la risposta della gente era stata sensazionale. Anche la parte relativa al giudice che gli permetteva di tenere l’elmo in un’aula di tribunale era veritiera: egli era stato davvero processato anonimamente, grazie alla fama della sua “sfida”.

Ma l’arzigogolato inganno gli si era presto ritorto contro: dopo dieci mesi in cammino, senza mai lasciare la Gran Bretagna, indossando continuamente l’elmo e spingendo una carrozzina di 50 chili per quasi 4.000 chilometri, la sua salute era peggiorata. “Gli occhi mi bruciavano, e soffrivo di tremende emicranee. In diverse occasioni svenni sul bordo della strada, e in alcuni casi fui confinato a letto per due o tre giorni di fila.” Ad un certo punto, sfinito, il truffatore aveva gettato la spugna, e si era dileguato. La lettera ad Answers era, in un certo senso, l’ultimo atto della recita, in cui l’attore calava (figuratamente, e concretamente) la maschera divenuta troppo pesante. Non rinunciando però ad un ultimo moto d’orgoglio: “posso affermare, senza tema d’esser contraddetto, che mi sono guadagnato il viaggio, e ho mantenuto me stesso, mia moglie, e il mio assistente, i cavalli e gli inservienti che ho impiegato, interamente con la vendita delle mie cartoline e pamphlet, e che non ho ricevuto nulla sotto forma di carità sin dal primo giorno del mio itinerario“.

Questa confessione è quasi certamente opera di Bensley, visto che i fatti citati dall’anonimo autore coincidono con un elemento chiave scoperto di recente (e passato sotto silenzio sul poco aggiornato sito dei discendenti, forse più interessati alla leggenda): nel 1904, egli era stato effettivamente processato per truffa e condannato a quattro anni di carcere.
L’allora ventinovenne Bensley era descritto dai giornali come un semplice manovale, figlio di un operaio di una segheria: un imbroglione qualunque, che si era fatto prestare dei soldi con la promessa di una favolosa eredità pronta per essere riscattata.

E, nella storia delle truffe, Bensley sarebbe rimasto del tutto anonimo, se la sua fantasia non si fosse scatenata proprio con l’idea dell’Uomo nella Maschera di Ferro. Il progetto di fingersi un gentleman facoltoso impegnato in una pittoresca ed eccentrica scommessa mostrava senza dubbio un guizzo di straordinaria inventiva. Si trattava di una truffa giocata sul meccanismo dell’esagerazione: “se è così assurdo – era indotta a pensare la gente – deve per forza essere vero”.
Peccato che quegli stessi dettagli strampalati (l’elmo, la carrozzina, gli spostamenti a piedi) si fossero presto rivelati il punto debole del piano, facendo finire il gioco prima del previsto.

postcd2f
Ecco il sito del pronipote di Harry Bensley. The Big Retort è il blog che ha scoperto la lettera ad Answers. Ulteriori dettagli in questo articolo di Baionette Librarie, ottimo sito che si occupa di steampunk, fantascienza, armi, fatine e conigli.

Bloody Murders

johnson20-cvr-0001-0

Quando state entrando ad un concerto, o a uno spettacolo teatrale, vi viene consegnato il programma della serata. Una cosa simile accadeva, in Inghilterra, anche per un tipo particolare di spettacolo pubblico: le esecuzioni capitali.

tumblr_mcryzmX2HS1rn6z3jo1_500
Nel XVIII e XIX Secolo, infatti, alcune stamperie e case editrici inglesi si erano specializzate in un particolare prodotto letterario. Venivano generalmente chiamati Last Dying Speeches (“ultime parole in punto di morte”) o Bloody Murders (“sanguinosi omicidi”), ed erano dei fogli stampati su un verso solo, di circa 50×36 cm di grandezza. Venivano venduti per strada, per un penny o anche meno, nei giorni precedenti un’esecuzione annunciata; quando arrivava il gran giorno, veniva preparata spesso un’edizione speciale per le folle che si assiepavano attorno al patibolo.

execution-of-wm-corder

008090564_439_height

dying-speeches
Sull’unica facciata stampata si potevano trovare tutti i dettagli più scabrosi del crimine commesso, magari un resoconto del processo, e anche delle accattivanti illustrazioni (un ritratto del condannato, o del suo misfatto, ecc.). Usualmente il testo si concludeva con un piccolo brano in versi, spacciato per “le ultime parole” del condannato, che ammoniva i lettori a non seguire questo funesto esempio se volevano evitare una fine simile.

4787793

4787751

4788099

4787939
La vita di questi foglietti non si esauriva nemmeno con la morte del condannato, perché nei giorni successivi all’esecuzione ne veniva stampata spesso anche una versione aggiornata con le ultime parole pronunciate dal condannato – vere, stavolta -, il racconto del suo dying behaviour (“comportamento durante la morte”) o altre succulente novità del genere.

broadside-detail

2180084755_b2f4e78eb8

4788820
I Bloody Murders erano un ottimo business, appannaggio di poche stamperie di Londra e delle maggiori città inglesi: costavano poco, erano semplici e veloci da preparare, e alcune incisioni (ad esempio la figura di un impiccato in controluce) potevano essere riutilizzate di volta in volta. Il successo però dipendeva dalla tempestività con cui questi volantini venivano fatti circolare.

4787919

4787749

4787747

4787893
Questi foglietti erano pensati per un target preciso, le classi medie e basse, e facevano leva sulla curiosità morbosa e sui toni iperbolici per attirare i loro lettori. Era un tipo di letteratura che anche le famiglie più povere potevano permettersi; e possiamo immaginarle, raccolte attorno al tavolo dopo cena, mentre chi tra loro sapeva leggere raccontava ad alta voce, per il brivido e il diletto di tutti, quelle violente e torbide vicende.

4787678
La Harvard Law School Library è riuscita a collezionare più di 500 di questi rarissimi manifesti, li ha digitalizzati e messi online. Consultabili gratuitamente, possono essere ricercati secondo diversi parametri (per crimine, anno, città, parole chiave, ecc.) sul sito del Crime Broadsides Project.

Le gemelle silenziose

Sappiamo che le affinità fra gemelli omozigoti sono molte: condividono in fondo lo stesso identico patrimonio genetico, e se crescono assieme spesso si influenzano vicendevolmente per quanto riguarda il comportamento. In alcuni casi hanno dei gusti marcatamente differenti; quasi sempre però mostrano una comprensione reciproca che, vista dall’esterno, può apparire straordinaria. Ma la storia delle gemelle Gibbons contiene un elemento più viscerale, inspiegabile, come se questa sintonia fosse arrivata ad un livello superiore e ancora oggi impossibile da spiegare.

176690

June e Jennifer Gibbons erano nate nell’isola Barbados l’11 aprile del 1963. I genitori si trasferirono ad Haverfordwest, nel Galles (il padre era luogotenente nella RAF) poco dopo la nascita delle gemelline. Si trattava dell’unica famiglia di colore della città, e certamente il problema dell’integrazione deve aver pesato sullo sviluppo delle piccole gemelle. Divenne presto evidente che le bambine avevano alcune difficoltà di linguaggio, tanto che soltanto la mamma Gloria era in grado di capire quello che farfugliavano, e in alcuni casi nemmeno lei. A causa di questi disordini linguistici, June e Jennifer crebbero senza legare con gli altri bambini, sempre sole e chiuse nel loro mondo.

La scuola, come è comprensibile, fu per loro un trauma severo: rifiutavano di parlare, scrivere o leggere, e gli insegnanti cominciarono a mandarle a casa prima della fine dell’orario per dare loro qualche minuto di vantaggio sui bulli che le molestavano in continuazione. Fu in quel periodo che cominciarono ad essere chiamate the silent twins.

Se avevano eretto un muro impenetrabile per il mondo, all’interno del loro “spazio protetto” vivevano però una realtà differente.
Le gemelle avevano sviluppato un loro linguaggio, incomprensibile agli estranei (criptofasia), e dei giochi segreti particolari e complicati. Giocavano a “specchiarsi” l’una nell’altra, imitando a vicenda le azioni compiute; la sera decidevano chi delle due, al risveglio mattutino, avrebbe respirato per prima, e finché questo respiro non veniva avvertito l’altra sorella doveva giacere immobile, come morta. Mentre in classe non c’era verso di costringerle a leggere, nella serenità della loro cameretta erano avide divoratrici di libri, e riempivano i loro quaderni di racconti, disegni e romanzi scritti a quattro mani. Le pagine erano riempite di caratteri minuscoli, tanto che fra una riga blu e l’altra dei fogli dei loro diari trovavano spazio quattro righe di testo.

stwins2

All’età di 14 anni, avevano ormai escluso dalla loro vita praticamente chiunque: compagni, conoscenti, mamma, papà, e i due fratelli. Soltanto alla piccola Rosie, la sorella minore, era consentito entrare sporadicamente nel loro universo. Ormai il silenzio era divenuto un voto vero e proprio, e il linguaggio segreto utilizzato fra di loro era sempre più impenetrabile. Si muovevano con gesti lenti, all’unisono, senza dubbio rispettando le regole di un oscuro gioco. I diversi psicologi e terapeuti non riuscirono a fare nulla per renderle più sociali, e le ragazze sprofondarono inesorabilmente nel loro rapporto esclusivo.

Le gemelle, a onor del vero, provarono ad uscire dall’isolamento attraverso la scrittura. Due dei loro romanzi, Pepsi-Cola Addict e Discomania, firmati rispettivamente da June e Jennifer, vennero pubblicati a loro spese, senza però attrarre l’attenzione sperata. Qualche breve flirt con dei ragazzi americani non portò ugualmente a nulla di importante. Il problema vero sorse quando le due cominciarono ad avere dei comportamenti delinquenziali: piccoli crimini, che culminarono però in due episodi di incendi dolosi, appiccati dalle gemelle alle scuole speciali che frequentavano. Il loro rapporto di amore si mischiava inoltre ad accessi di odio violento, visto che un giorno Jennifer aveva tentato di strangolare June con un cavo della radio, e una settimana dopo June aveva spinto Jennifer giù da un ponte nel fiume sottostante.

La risposta del sistema giudiziario fu particolarmente dura: reputate pericolose, le due ragazze vennero rinchiuse nel Broadmoor Hospital, un ospedale di massima sicurezza per malati mentali. Lì, insieme a maniaci, psicopatici e schizofrenici, passarono 14 anni della loro vita, incontrandosi soltanto in orari precisi.

stwins

Le gemelle avevano fin dall’inizio pattuito che se una di loro fosse morta, l’altra avrebbe rotto il patto del silenzio, avrebbe cominciato a parlare, e vissuto una vita normale. Nel corso degli anni di reclusione forzata, erano arrivate alla drammatica conclusione che fosse necessario che una delle due morisse: non sarebbero mai state libere, se non tramite il sacrificio.
La loro biografa ed amica, Marjorie Wallace, raccontò il momento in cui le rivelarono il loro piano:

Portai mia figlia – credo avesse circa otto anni – a prendere il tè con le gemelle. Dovevamo passare per tutte queste porte chiuse a chiave, fino alla grande sala. Jennifer e June erano là, sempre piuttosto allegre, e ci portavano il tè su un vassoio con piccoli biscotti. Ci sedemmo e cominciammo a chiacchierare. Di colpo, nel bel mezzo della conversazione, Jennifer disse: ” Marjorie-Marjorie-Marjorie, io morirò”. Io dissi: “Non essere stupida, Jennifer. Sei in buona salute”. Mi guardò e mi disse: “Abbiamo deciso, io morirò”. […] Poi June disse: “Sì, abbiamo deciso”. Mi passarono dei biglietti, e c’era scritto che la decisione era che Jennifer sarebbe dovuta morire per liberare June. June era nata per prima, June aveva più talento, June era più estroversa. Aveva il diritto di vivere. June poteva vivere per entrambe, e Jennifer no.

Il 9 marzo 1993 le due sorelle (che allora avevano 29 anni) vennero spostate da Broadmoor alla Caswell Clinic a Bridgend, dove sarebbero state sottoposte finalmente a un regime più libero. Nel minibus che le trasportava, però, Jennifer di colpo poggiò la testa sulla spalla della sorella. June dichiarerà in seguito: “Pensavo fosse stanca. Sembrava che dormisse, ma i suoi occhi erano aperti e sbarrati”. Quando il bus arrivò alla clinica, non si riuscì a svegliare Jennifer. Portata all’ospedale, vi morì poche ore dopo.

L’autopsia rivelò che Jennifer era morta di miocardite acuta, un’infiammazione del muscolo cardiaco. Secondo gli anatomopatologi, potevano esserci circa 40 motivi diversi per una tale infiammazione; eppure il Dr. Knight, patologo, disse di non avere mai visto un cuore così severamente infiammato senza alcuna ragione evidente.

silent twins

Rimasta sola, June fu effettivamente in grado di conquistarsi una vita più comune, senza farmaci o cliniche. Ancora oggi rifugge dai riflettori dei media; conduce una vita serena e anonima aiutando di tanto in tanto i vecchi genitori, accettata finalmente dalla comunità, senza grossi problemi, e tenta di lasciarsi il passato dietro le spalle.

La morte di Jennifer resta un mistero per la medicina.

L’effigie di Sarah Hare

Stow Bardolph è piccolo villaggio del Norfolk, in Inghilterra, che conta 1000 abitanti, quasi tutti contadini. Un turista che per caso si trovasse a passare per quelle piatte campagne disseminate di pecore non troverebbe nulla di particolarmente interessante da visitare nel minuscolo borgo, e finirebbe a rintanarsi di fianco al focolare nell’unico pub di Stow Bardolph, chiamato Hare Arms, che più che un pub è una tenuta, attorniato com’è da giardini in cui beccheggiano pavoni e galline.

DSCF6533

8337081_123894258815
Anche una visita alla chiesetta del paese, dedicata alla Trinità, potrebbe ad una prima occhiata rivelarsi deludente, visto l’interno spoglio e “povero”. Eppure, in un angolo, c’è uno strano armadietto chiuso. Chi l’ha aperto, giura che non scorderà più quel momento.

Dscf6508

8337081_123894248333
“Avevo visto sue fotografie negli anni, da quando l’avevo scoperta a scuola, ma nulla mi avrebbe potuto preparare al brivido della porta dell’armadietto che si apriva. Allora ho capito il motivo di questa porta – lei è terrificante, il suo volto tozzo, verrucoso, lo sguardo sprezzante”, riporta un visitatore.

Dscf6510
Ma chi è la donna ritratta nella scultura?
La macabra effigie in cera contenuta nell’armadietto è quella di Sarah Hare, morta nel 1744 all’età di 55 anni dopo che, secondo la leggenda, aveva osato cucire di domenica, nel giorno di riposo dedicato al Signore; si era quindi punta un dito, forse per punizione divina, soccombendo in seguito alla setticemia. A parte questo episodio, la sua vita non era stata per nulla eccezionale. Eppure il suo testamento, se da un lato ostentava una carità e una generosità notevoli, dall’altra includeva una strana disposizione: “Desidero che sei uomini poveri della parrocchia di Stow o Wimbotsham mi sotterrino, e ricevano cinque scellini per il servizio. Desidero che tutti i poveri di Alms Row abbiano due scellini e una moneta da sei penny ciascuno davanti alla mia tomba, prima che mi calino giù. […] Desidero che la mia faccia e le mie mani siano modellati in cera, con un pezzo di velluto color porpora quale ornamento sulla mia testa, e messi in una cassa di mogano con un vetro antestante, e che siano fissati a questo modo vicino al luogo dove riposa il mio cadavere; sul contenitore potranno essere incisi il mio nome e la data della mia morte nel modo che più si desidera. Se non riuscirò ad eseguire tutto questo mentre sono ancora in vita, potrà essere fatto dopo la mia morte”.

8337081_123894253992
Non sappiamo se i calchi del volto e delle mani vennero eseguiti mentre Sarah Hare era ancora viva, oppure post-mortem: quello che è chiaro è che il suo testamento venne rispettato alla lettera. Possiamo immaginarci la solenne processione con cui il busto venne portato, nell’armadio di legno, fino alla cappella di famiglia che l’avrebbe infine ospitato per i secoli a venire.

Di sculture funebri in marmo che ritraggono il defunto è pieno il mondo, ma la statua in cera di Sarah Hare è l’unica di questo tipo in Inghilterra, se si escludono le effigi presenti nell’abbazia di Westminster. La cosa più straordinaria è l’ordinarietà del soggetto – una donna non celebre, né nobile, di certo non bella, che nella sua vita non diede alcun contributo particolare alla Storia.

DSCF6510 0
Nel 1987 la statua venne restaurata da alcuni esperti che lavoravano anche per Madame Tussauds, assieme all’armadio che negli anni era stato attaccato dai roditori, e all’antica stoffa di velluto rosso ormai quasi distrutta. Oggi quindi l’immagine di cera resiste ancora, quasi 270 anni dopo la sua morte.

In questi 270 anni si sono avvicendati re e regine, l’impero Britannico è sorto e crollato, sono state combattute sanguinose guerre di dimensioni inaudite, il mondo e la vita sono cambiati radicalmente. Ma, in uno sperduto paesino di campagna, dietro un’anta di mogano, ancora non è finita la lunga, immobile e silenziosa veglia che Sarah Hare si è scelta come propria personale forma di immortalità.

2382602226_ab0d8f3851_z

Mary Toft

Il 19 novembre 1726 un breve ma insolito articolo apparve sul Weekly Journal, giornale inglese:

“Da Guildford ci arriva una strana ma ben testimoniata notizia. Che una povera donna che vive a Godalmin, vicino alla città, è stata il mese scorso aiutata da Mr. John Howard, Eminente Chirurgo e Ostetrico, a partorire una creatura che assomigliava ad un coniglio, ma con cuore e polmoni cresciuti fuori dal torace, 14 giorni dopo che lo stesso medico le aveva fatto partorire un coniglio perfettamente formato; e pochi giorni dopo, altri 4; e venerdì, sabato e domenica, un altro coniglio al giorno; e tutti e nove morti vedendo la luce. La donna ha giurato che due mesi fa, lavorando in un campo con altre donne, incontrarono un coniglio e lo rincorsero senza un motivo: questo creò in lei un desiderio così forte che (essendo incinta) abortì il suo bambino, e da quel momento non è capace di evitare di pensare ai conigli”.

Letta così sembra una di quelle leggende scaturite dall’idea, diffusa all’epoca, che qualsiasi cosa impressionasse la mente di una donna incinta (un sogno, o un animale veduto durante la gravidanza) poteva marchiare in qualche modo anche il feto, dando origine a difetti di nascita. Eppure questa storia si sarebbe presto tramutata in uno dei più grossi scandali medici degli albori.

La donna dell’articolo era Mary Toft, contadina di 24 o 25 anni, sposata e con tre figli. Come tutte le compaesane, Mary non aveva smesso il lavoro nei campi con la gravidanza; e quando, nell’agosto precedente, aveva avvertito dei dolori al ventre, si era accorta con orrore di aver espulso dei pezzi di carne. Poteva forse essere un aborto, ma stranamente la gravidanza continuò e quando il 27 settembre Mary partorì, uscirono soltanto delle parti che sembravano animali. Questi resti vennero inviati a John Howard, il medico citato nell’articolo, che inizialmente si dimostrò scettico. Si recò ciononostante a visitare Mary Toft ed esaminandola non trovò nulla di strano; eppure nei giorni successivi le doglie ricominciarono, e nuove parti di animali continuarono a essere espulse dall’utero della donna: gambe di gatto, gambe di coniglio, budella e altri pezzi di animali irriconoscibili.

A quel punto la storia stava cominciando a fare scalpore, anche perché la stampa esisteva da poco, ed era la prima volta che un caso simile veniva seguito contemporaneamente, “in diretta”, in tutta l’Inghilterra. Un altro chirurgo, Nathaniel St. André, si interessò al caso, e su ordine della Famiglia Reale si recò a Guildford, dove Howard aveva condotto Mary Toft offrendo a chiunque dubitasse della storia di assistere a uno degli straordinari parti. Nel frattempo la donna aveva infatti dato alla luce altri tre conigli, non completamente formati, che apparentemente scalciavano nell’utero prima di morire e venire espulsi.

St. André, arrivato a Guildford, potè quindi investigare il caso direttamente e restò impressionato: il 15 novembre, nel giro di poche ore, Mary Toft partorì il torso di un coniglio. St. André esaminò il torso, immerse i polmoni in acqua per vedere se l’animale avesse respirato aria (e infatti i polmoni galleggiavano) ed esaminò accuratamente la donna. La sua diagnosi fu che i conigli si sviluppavano sicuramente all’interno delle tube di Falloppio. Nei giorni seguenti dall’utero della donna uscirono un altro torso, la pelle di un coniglio e, pochi minuti dopo, la testa.

Il re Giorgio I, affascinato dalla storia, decise di inviare un altro medico a Guildford: si trattava di Cyriacus Ahlers – e questa fu la svolta. Ahlers, infatti, era segretamente scettico sull’intera vicenda, e tenne gli occhi ben aperti. Non trovò segni di effettiva gravidanza sulla donna, ma anzi notò una cosa piuttosto sospetta: prima dei famosi parti, la donna sembrava stringere le ginocchia come per impedire che qualcosa cadesse. Ahlers cominciò a dubitare anche di Howard, l’ostetrico, che si rifiutava di lasciare che fosse Ahlers ad assistere la donna durante le contrazioni. Non lasciò trapelare i suoi dubbi, ma disse a tutti i presenti di credere alla storia, e con una scusa lasciò Guildford, portando con sé alcuni pezzi di coniglio. Esaminandoli con più cura, scoprì che sembravano essere stati macellati con uno strumento da taglio, e notò tracce di grano e paglia nei loro intestini, come se provenissero da un allevamento. Riportò tutto questo al Re e in poco tempo lo scandalo esplose.

Mary fu portata a Londra e alloggiata in carcere, per ulteriori esami, e nella comunità scientifica si formarono immediatamente due fazioni: da una parte gli scettici, Ahlers in prima linea; dall’altra Howard e St. André, che erano convinti sostenitori della genuinità dei prodigiosi eventi. La stampa diede eccezionale risonanza al dibattito e le cose precipitarono quando un inserviente della prigione ammise di essere stato corrotto dalla cognata di Mary Toft affinché introducesse un coniglio nella cella della donna.

Il 7 dicembre, dopo essere stata esaminata da decine di medici e sottoposta ad estenuanti interrogatori e alle minacce di una dolorosa operazione chirurgica, Mary Toft cedette e confessò: era stata tutta una truffa. Dopo il suo aborto spontaneo, quando la cervice era ancora dilatata, aveva con l’aiuto di un complice inserito nell’utero le zampe e il corpo di un gatto, e la testa di un coniglio. In seguito,  le parti di animali erano state posizionate più esternamente, nella vagina. Mary Toft venne immediatamente incarcerata con l’accusa di “vile truffa e impostura”. Anche i diversi medici implicati, Howard e St. André su tutti, vennero citati in tribunale e a loro discolpa si dichiararono all’oscuro della frode.

Ma lo smascheramento dell’inganno fu una bomba soprattutto per l’immagine della medicina nell’opinione pubblica: articoli satirici apparvero in ogni giornale, prendendosi beffa della credulità dei chirurghi implicati nel caso, e dei medici tout court. Le ballate popolari si incentrarono immediatamente sui dettagli più volgari della vicenda e le barzellette si affollarono di conigli maliziosi e grandi luminari della scienza fatti fessi da una contadina. La risonanza fu internazionale e persino Voltaire, dalla Francia, indicò il caso di Mary Toft come un esempio di quanto gli Inglesi protestanti fossero influenzati da una Chiesa ignorante e da antiche superstizioni.
La professione sanitaria venne talmente danneggiata in poco tempo che decine e decine di medici cercarono disperatamente di dichiararsi estranei ai fatti o di provare che erano stati fin dall’inizio scettici sul caso. Molte carriere vennero stroncate dall’abbaglio preso, e altre ci misero lustri a riprendersi dal tonfo.

La folla stazionava davanti alla prigione in cui Mary Toft era rinchiusa, nella speranza di vederla anche solo di sfuggita. Nel 1727 Mary fu liberata e tornò a casa. Da allora di lei si seppe poco, se non che ebbe una figlia e qualche altro piccolo guaio con la legge, fino alla sua morte nel 1763. Ma nonostante questo suo forzato “ritiro” dalle scene, il suo nome visse ancora a lungo nelle canzoni, e venne immancabilmente rispolverato ogni volta che i grandi geni della scienza facevano un clamoroso, ridicolo passo falso.