Collectible tattoos

For some days now I have been receiving suggestions about Dr. Masaichi Fukushi‘s tattoo collection, belonging to Tokyo University Pathology Department. I am willing to write about it, because the topic is more multifaceted than it looks.

Said collection is both well-known and somewhat obscure.
Born in 1878, Dr. Fukushi was studying the formation of nevi on the skin around 1907, when his research led him to examine the correlation between the movement of melanine through vascularized epidermis and the injection of pigments under the skin in tattoos. His interest was further fueled by a peculiar discovery: the presence of a tattoo seemed to prevent the signs of syphilis from appearing in that area of the body.

In 1920 Dr. Fukushi entered the Mitsui Memorial Hospital, a charity structure where treatment was offered to the most disadvantaged social classes. In this environment, he came in contact with many tattooed persons and, after a short period in Germany, he continued his research on the formation of congenital moles at Nippon Medical University. Here, often carrying out autopsies, he developed an original method of preserving tattooed epidermis he took from corpses; he therefore began collecting various samples, managing to stretch the skin so that it could be exhibited inside a glass frame.

It seems Dr. Fukushi did not have an exclusively scientific interest in tattoos, but was also quite compassionate. Tattooed people, in fact, often came from the poorest and most problematic bracket of japanese society, and Fukushi’s sympathy for the less fortunate even pushed him, in some instances, to take over the expenses for those who could not afford to complete an unfinished tattoo. In return, the doctor asked for permission to remove their skin post mortem. But his passion for tattoos also took the form of photographic records: he collected more than 3.000 pictures, which were destroyed during the bombing of Tokyo in WWII.
This was not the only loss, for a good number of tattooed skins were stolen in Chicago as the doctor was touring the States giving a series of academic lectures between 1927 and 1928.
Fukushi’s work gained international attention in the 40s and the 50s, when several articles appeared on the newspapers, such as the one above published on Life magazine.

Life

As we said earlier, the collection endured heavy losses during the 1945 bombings. However some skin samples, which had been secured elsewhere, were saved and — after being handed down to Fukushi’s son, Kalsunari — they could be today inside the Pathology Department, even if not available to the public. It is said that among the specimens there are some nearly complete skin suits, showing tattoos over the whole body surface. All this is hard to verify, as the Department is not open to the public and no official information seems to be found online.

Then again, if in the Western world tattoo is by now such a widespread trend that it hardly sparks any controversy, it still remains quite taboo in Japan.
Some time ago, the great Italian tattoo artist Pietro Sedda (author of the marvelous Black Novel For Lovers) told me about his last trip to Japan, and how in that country tattooers still operate almost in secret, in small, anonymous parlors with no store signs, often hidden inside common apartment buildings. The fact that tattoos are normally seen in a negative way could be related to the traditional association of this art form with yakuza members, even though in some juvenile contexts fashion tattoos are quite common nowadays.

A tattoo stygma existed in Western countries up to half a century ago, ratified by explicit prohibitions in papal bulls. One famous exception were the tattoos made by “marker friars” of the Loreto Sanctuary, who painted christian, propitiatory or widowhood symbols on the hands of the faithful. But in general the only ones who decorated their bodies were traditionally the outcast, marginalized members of the community: pirates, mercenaries, deserters, outlaws. In his most famous essay, Criminal Man (1876), Cesare Lombroso classified every tattoo variation he had encountered in prisoners, interpreting them through his (now outdated) theory of atavism: criminals were, in his view, Darwinianly unevolved individuals who tattooed themselves as if responding to an innate primitiveness, typical of savage peoples — who not surprisingly practiced tribal tattooing.

Coming back to the human hides preserved by Dr. Fukushi, this is not the only, nor the largest, collection of its kind. The record goes to London’s Wellcome Collection, which houses around 300 individual pieces of tattoed skin (as opposed to the 105 specimens allegedly stored in Tokyo), dating back to the end of XIX Century.

enhanced-buzz-wide-23927-1435850033-7

enhanced-buzz-wide-23751-1435850156-21

enhanced-buzz-wide-19498-1435849839-13

enhanced-buzz-wide-18573-1435849882-14

Human_skin_tattooed_with_the_words_République_Française_F_Wellcome_L0057040

The edges of these specimens show a typical arched pattern due to being pinned while drying. And the world opened up by these traces from the past is quite touching, as are the motivations that can be guessed behind an indelible inscription on the skin. Today a tattoo is often little more than a basic decoration, a tribal motif (the meaning of which is often ignored) around an ankle, an embellishment that turns the body into a sort of narcissistic canvas; in a time when a tattoo was instead a symbol of rebellion against the establishment, and in itself could cause many troubles, the choice of the subject was of paramount relevance. Every love tattoo likely implied a dangerous or “forbidden” relationship; every sentence injected under the skin by the needle became the ultimate statement, a philosophy of life.

enhanced-buzz-wide-18325-1435849786-17

enhanced-buzz-wide-22871-1435849601-14

enhanced-buzz-wide-25187-1435849704-8

enhanced-buzz-wide-26586-1435849809-15

enhanced-buzz-wide-27691-1435849758-7

These collections, however macabre they may seem, open a window on a non-aligned sensibility. They are, so to speak, an illustrated atlas of that part of society which is normally not contemplated nor sung by official history: rejects, losers, outsiders.
Collected in a time when they were meant as a taxonomy of symbols allowing identification and prevention of specific “perverse” psychologies, they now speak of a humanity who let their freak flag fly.

enhanced-buzz-wide-16612-1435849486-7

enhanced-buzz-wide-32243-1435849426-7

enhanced-buzz-wide-31525-1435849449-17

enhanced-buzz-wide-16819-1435849507-7

(Thanks to all those who submitted the Fukushi collection.)

The Museum of Failure

I have a horror of victories.
(André Pieyre de Mandiargues)

Museums are places of enchantment and inspiration (starting from their name, referring to the Muses). If they largely celebrate progress and the homo sapiens‘ highest achievements, it would be important to recognize that enchantment and inspiration may also arise from contemplating broken dreams, misadventures, accidents that happen along the way.

It is an old utopian project of mine, with which I’ve been flirting for quite a long time: to launch a museum entirely dedicated to human failure.

Lacking the means to open a real museum, I will have to settle for a virtual tour.
Here is the map of my imaginary museum.

Museo_eng

As you can see, the tour goes through six rooms.
The first one is entitled Forgotten ingenuity, and here are presented the lives of those inventors, artists or charlatans whose passage on this Earth seems to have been overlooked by official History. Yet among the protagonists of this first room are men who knew immense fame in their lifetime, only to fall from hero to zero.
As a result of an hypertrophic ego, or financial recklessness, or a series of unfortunate events, these characters came just one step away from victory, or even apparently conquered it. Martin F. Tupper was the highest grossing anglo-saxon XIX Century poet, and John Banvard was for a long time the most celebrated and successful painter of his era. But today, who remembers their names?
This introduction to failure is a sort of sic transit, and pushes the visitor to ask himself some essential questions on the ephemeral nature of success, and on historical memory’s inconsistency.

JohnBanvard_ca1855

John Banvard (1815-1891)

The second room is entirely dedicated to odd sciences and wrong theories.
Here is a selection of the weirdest pseudoscientific ideas, abandoned or marginalized disciplines, complex systems of thought now completely useless.
Particular attention is given to early medical doctrines, from Galen‘s pneuma to Henry Cotton‘s crazy surgical therapies, up to Voronoff‘s experiments. But here are also presented completely irrational theories (like those who maintain the Earth is hollow or flat), along other ones which were at one point influential, but now have an exclusively historical value, useful perhaps to understand a certain historical period (for instance, the physiognomy loved by Cesare Lombroso, or Athanasius Kircher‘s musurgy).

This room is meant to remind the visitor that progress and scientific method are never linear, but rather they develop and grow at the cost of failed attempts, dead-end streets, wrong turns. And in no other field as in knowledge, is error as fundamental as success.

The third room is devoted to Lost challenges. Here are celebrated all those individuals who tried, and failed.
The materials in this section prove that defeat can be both sad and grotesque: through multimedia recreations and educational boards the visitors can learn (just to quote a few examples) about William McGonagall, the world’s worst poet, who persisted in composing poems although his literary abilities were disatrous to say the least; about the clumsy and horrendously spectacular attempt to blow up  a whale in Florence, Oregon, or to free a million and a half helium balloons in the middle of a city; and of course about the “flying tailor“, a classic case of extreme faith in one’s own talent.

flying_tailor

Next, we enter the space dedicated to Unexpected accidents, often tragic-comic and lethal.
A first category of failures are those made popular by the well-known Darwin Awards, symbolically bestowed upon those individuals who manage to kill themselves in very silly ways. These stories warn us about overlooked details, moments of lessened clarity of mind, inability to take variables into account.
But that is not all. The concept behind the second section of the room is that, no matter how hard we try and plan our future in every smallest detail, reality often bursts in, scrambling all our projects. Therefore here are the really unexpected events, the hostile fate, all those catastrophes and fiascos that are impossible to shun.

This double presentation shows how human miscalculation on one hand, and the element of surprise “kindly” provided by the world on the other, make failure an inevitable reality. How can it be overcome?

funny-interesting-photos-tafrihi-com-2

auto-004

The last two rooms try to offer a solution.
If failure cannot be avoided, and sooner or later happens to us all, then maybe the best strategy is to accept it, freeing it from its attached stygma.

One method to exorcise shame is to share it, as suggested by the penultimate room. Monitors screen the images of the so-called fail videos, compilations of homemade footage showing common people who, being unlucky or inept, star in embarassing catastrophes. The fact these videos have a huge success on the internet confirms the idea that not taking ourselves too seriously, and being brave enough to openly share our humiliation, is a liberating and therapeutic act.
On the last wall, the public is invited to hang on a board their own most scorching failure, written down on a piece of paper.

Fail

The final room represents the right to fail, the joy of failing and the pride of failure.
Here, on a big bare wall, failure and fortune are represented as yin and yang, each containing the other’s seed, illusory opposites concealing only one reality – the neverending transformation, which knows no human category such as success or failure, indifferent, its vortex endlessly spinning.
To take failure back means to sabotage its paralyzing power, and to learn once again how to move and follow the rythm.

9b17fb23445737.5632351187e1c

Above the exit door, an ironic quote by Kurt Vonnegut reminds the visitor: “We are dancing animals. How beautiful it is to get up and go out and do something. We are here on Earth to fart around. Don’t let anybody tell you any different“.

Arte criminologica

Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Pee Gee Daniel

Accade spesso che per il raggiungimento di mete stupefacenti la via che vi ci conduce si presenti impervia.

Anche in questo caso, al termine di un percorso accidentato, tra gli inestricabili paesini del cuore della Lomellina, sfrecciando lungo sottili assi viari a prova di ammortizzatore, si giunge finalmente a un prodigioso sancta sanctorum per gli amanti del macabro, dell’insolito e del curioso, nascosto – come sempre si conviene a un vero tesoro – nell’ampio soppalco di una grande cascina bianca, dispersa tra le campagne.

1

Là sopra vi attendono, beffardamente occhieggianti dalle loro teche collocate in un ordine rapsodico ma di indubbio impatto, teste sotto formalina galleggianti in barattoli di vetro, mani mozze, corpi mummificati, arti pietrificati, crani di gemelli dicefali, barattoli di larve di sarcophaga carnaria, cadaveri adagiati dentro bare in noce, un austero mezzobusto della Cianciulli (la celeberrima “Saponificatrice di Correggio”), pezzi rari come alcuni documenti olografi di Cesare Lombroso, parti anatomiche provenienti da vecchi gabinetti medici, armi del delitto, strumenti di tortura o per elettroshock in uso in un recente passato, memento di pellagrosi e briganti, tsantsa umane e di scimmia prodotte dalla tribù ecuadoriana dei Jivaros, bambolotti voodoo, cimeli risalenti a efferati fatti di cronaca nostrana.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Creatore e gestore di questa casa-museo del crimine è il facondo Roberto Paparella. Sarà lui a introdurvi e accompagnarvi per le varie installazioni con la giusta dose di erudizione e intrattenimento: un po’ chaperon, un po’ cicerone e un po’ Virgilio dantesco.

Diplomato in arte e restauro (la parte inferiore dell’edificio è infatti occupata da mobilio in attesa di recupero) e criminologo, il Paparella ha saputo combinare questi due aspetti dando vita a una disciplina ibrida che ha voluto battezzare “arte criminologica”, cui è improntata l’intera mostra permanente che ho avuto il piacere di visitare in quel di Olevano. Poiché c’è innanzitutto da dire che non di mero collezionismo si tratta: molti dei pezzi che vi troviamo sono cioè manufatti e ricostruzioni iperrealistiche composti ad hoc dalla sapienza tecnica del nostro, cosicché i reperti storici e i “falsi d’autore” si mescolano e si confondono in maniera pressoché indistinguibile, giocando sul significato più ampio del termine “originale”.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2718

DSCN2709

My beautiful picture

È forse utile spiegare che il museo è ospitato all’interno di una comunità terapeutica. Roberto Paparella infatti, oltre a essere un artista del lugubre, un restauratore, un ricercatore scrupoloso nel campo criminologico e un tabagista imbattibile, è anche stato il più giovane direttore di una comunità per tossicodipendenti in Italia (autore insieme al giurista Guido Pisapia, fratello dell’attuale sindaco di Milano, di un testo per operatori del settore), mentre oggi si occupa di ragazzi usciti dall’istituto penale minorile. Proprio questo, mi ha rivelato, è stato uno dei principali sproni alla sua vera passione: ripercorrere quotidianamente i vari iter giudiziari e la teoria giuridica di delitti e pene in compagnia dei suoi ragazzi ha fatto rinascere in lui questo interesse per delinquenti, vittime, atti omicidiari e “souvenir” a essi connessi.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Una vocazione riaffiorata dal passato, visto che il primo a instillare in lui questo gusto grandguignolesco fu in effetti il padre che, dopo aver visitato il museo delle cere di Milano, aveva deciso di farsene uno in proprio, nello scantinato di casa sua, che aveva poi chiamato La taverna rossa e nel quale amava condurre famigliari e amici nel tentativo di impressionarli con le ricostruzioni di famosi assassini, seppure di produzione casalinga e un po’ naif.
La tradizione familiare peraltro prosegue, visto che i due figli di Paparella, cresciuti tra cadaveri dissezionati più o meno posticci, tengono a fornire spontaneamente i propri pareri in merito alla attendibilità di questa o quella riproduzione artigianale di cui il padre è autore.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2725

Per quanto riguarda la “falsificazione” anatomica di salme o parti di esse, è una cura certosina quella che viene impiegata, avvalendosi di uno studio filologico, di un’attenta scelta dei materiali, di una efficace disposizione scenografica dei corpi stessi e delle luci che ne esalteranno le forme. Come nel caso di Elisa Claps, i cui resti Paparella ha rielaborato ricoprendo uno scheletro in resina con uno speciale ritrovato indiano noto come cartapelle, capace di ricreare l’effetto di un tegumento incartapecorito dalla lunga esposizione agli elementi atmosferici, e infine decorato con altri componenti di provenienza umana (l’apparato dentario è fornito da alcuni studi odontoiatrici, mentre i capelli vengono recuperati da vecchie parrucche di capelli veri, scovate nei mercatini).
Paparella afferma che nel suo operato si cela anche una motivazione morale: la volontà di ridare una consistenza tridimensionale alle vittime come ai carnefici, nella speranza di muovere dentro allo spettatore quelli che potremmo individuare come i due momenti aristotelici della pietà e del terrore.

Continuando la visita, incontriamo il corpo del cosiddetto Vampiro della Bergamasca, già esaminato a suo tempo dal Lombroso, alle cui misurazioni antropometriche lo scultore si è attenuto fedelmente: per la cronaca, Vincenzo Verzeni era un serial killer o, secondo la terminologia clinica del tempo, un «monomaniaco omicida necrofilomane, antropofago, affetto da vampirismo», che provava una frenesia erotica nello strappare coi denti larghi brani di carne alle proprie vittime.

Accanto, ecco lo scheletro di un morto di mafia, con sasso in bocca e mani amputate, che emerge faticosamente dalla terra mentre, sull’altro lato, in una posizione rattrappita, una mummia azteca lancia al visitatore una versione parodistica dell’Urlo di Munch. Alle sue spalle, addossata all’estesa parete, un’intera schiera di calchi delle teste di alienati e criminali ci osserva in maniera inquietante, a breve distanza dai calchi dei genitali di stupratori e di pazienti affette dal terribile tribadismo.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Si prosegue lungo una parete tappezzata di scatti ANSA di celebri processi del secondo dopoguerra, finché – in un accostamento emblematico dello stile di questo stravagante museo – poggiato su una lapide di candido marmo, ci si imbatte in un set anti-vampiri completo, con tanto di teschio, altarino portatile, barattolo contenente terra consacrata, chiodone in ferro in luogo dell’abusato paletto di frassino, argilla, paramenti ecclesiastici vari, pipistrelli essiccati, breviario e crocefisso a portar via, il tutto serbato in uno scrigno ligneo di pregevole fattura.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Ritornati all’entrata, al momento del commiato, troverete a salutarvi il manichino animato di Antonio Boggia, pluriomicida della Milano ottocentesca. A qualche passo dall’automa, l’occhio cade su una pesante mannaia in ferro, usata dallo stesso Boggia per le sue esecuzioni. Vera o falsa? Non sta a noi rivelarvelo. Se vi va, andando alla mostra (che vi si offrirà ben più particolareggiata di questo mio stringato resoconto) portatevi in tasca il giusto quantitativo di carbonio 14, oppure, più semplicemente, godetevi lo spettacolo senza porvi troppe domande.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture
Museo di Arte Criminologica
, via Cascina Bianca 1, 27020 Olevano di Lomellina (PV)
È necessario prenotare: tel. 3333639136 tel./fax 038451311 email: [email protected]

Il Museo Criminologico di Roma

2013-01-03 11.01.00

Nella seconda metà dell’800, in Europa e in Italia, divenne sempre più evidente la necessità di una riforma carceraria; allo stesso tempo, e grazie agli intensi dibattiti sulla questione, crebbe l’interesse per lo studi delle cause della delinquenza, e dei possibili metodi per curarla. Mentre quindi la Polizia Scientifica muoveva i primi passi, il grande criminologo Cesare Lombroso studiava le possibili correlazioni fra la morfologia fisica e l’attitudine al delitto, e grazie a lui prendeva vita il primo, grande museo di antropologia criminale a Torino.

A Roma, invece, si dovette aspettare fino al 1931 perché potesse aprire al pubblico il “Museo Criminale”, che ospitava la collezione di reperti utilizzati precedentemente per gli studi della scuola di Polizia scientifica. Il Museo ebbe poi fasi e fortune alterne, tanto da venire chiuso nel 1968, e riaperto solo nel 1975 con la nuova denominazione “MUCRI – Museo criminologico”. La nuova sede, all’interno delle carceri del palazzo del Gonfalone, è quella in cui il Museo si trova ancora oggi. Dalla fine degli anni ’70 il museo è stato nuovamente chiuso per quasi vent’anni, per riaprire al pubblico nel 1994.

Il Museo oggi conta centinaia di reperti, divisi in tre grandi sezioni: la Giustizia dal Medioevo al XIX secolo, l’Ottocento e l’evoluzione del sistema penitenziario, il Novecento e i protagonisti del crimine.

2013-01-03 10.41.38

2013-01-03 10.49.54

2013-01-03 10.51.53
La prima sezione, che ripercorre i metodi di punizione e di tortura in uso dal Medioevo fino al XIX secolo, è ovviamente la più impressionante. Dalle asce per decapitazione cinquecentesche, alle gogne, ai banchi di fustigazione, alle mordacchie, agli strumenti di tortura dell’Inquisizione, tutto ci parla di un’epoca in cui la crudeltà delle pene eguagliava, se non addirittura superava, quella del crimine stesso. Fra gli oggetti esposti segnaliamo la tonaca del celebre boia pontificio Mastro Titta, la spada che decapitò Beatrice Cenci, una forca e tre ghigliottine (fra cui quella in uso a Piazza del Popolo fino al 1869).

517507417_db6b739f85_z

2013-01-03 10.52.41

2013-01-03 10.52.26

2013-01-03 10.47.10
Nella seconda sezione, dedicata all’Ottocento, troviamo traccia della nascita dell’antropologia criminale, e dell’evoluzione del sistema carcerario. Possiamo vedere il calco del cranio del brigante Giuseppe Villella (su cui Lombroso scoprì nel 1872 la “prova” della delinquenza atavica: la “fossetta occipitale mediana”); lo spazio dedicato agli attentati politici espone, tra l’altro, il cranio, il cervello e gli scritti dell’anarchico lucano Giovanni Passannante, che attentò alla vita del re Umberto I a Napoli, nel 1878. Ugualmente impressionanti il letto di contenzione e le camicie di forza che testimoniano la nascita dei manicomi criminali.

giovannipassannante_cervello

7165628283_224f9178e4_c

2013-01-03 11.03.08

2013-01-03 11.02.55

2013-01-03 10.57.08

2013-01-03 10.56.39

2013-01-03 11.00.33

2013-01-03 11.02.23
Ma forse la parte più sorprendente è quella delle cosiddette “malizie carcerarie”, ovvero i sotterfugi con cui i detenuti comunicavano tra di loro, occultavano armi o inventavano sistemi per evadere o compiere atti di autolesionismo. Un’estrema inventiva che si tinge di toni tristi e spesso macabri.

7165624283_d429147e2e_c
L’ultima sezione, quella dedicata ai grandi episodi di cronaca nera del Novecento, è una vera e propria wunderkammer del crimine, dove decine e decine di oggetti e reperti sono esposti in un percorso eterogeneo che spazia dagli anni ’30 agli anni ’90. Una stanza ospita armi e indizi trovati sulla scena dei delitti italiani fra i più celebri, come ad esempio quelli perpetrati da Leonarda Cianciulli, la “saponificatrice di Correggio”; tra gli altri, sono esibiti gli oggetti personali di Antonietta Longo, la “decapitata di Castelgandolfo”, le armi della banda Casaroli, la pistola con cui la contessa Bellentani uccise il suo amante durante una sfarzosa serata di gala. Vi si trovano anche materiali pornografici sequestrati (quando erano ancora illegali), ed esempi di merce di contrabbando, inclusi numerosi quadri ed opere d’arte.

7350834806_d8df25bcfb_c

2013-01-03 11.07.17

2013-01-03 11.10.56

2013-01-03 11.04.53
Altre vetrine interessanti ripercorrono le testimonianze relative alla criminalità organizzata, al banditismo (con oggetti appartenuti a Salvatore Giuliano), al terrorismo, e a tutte le declinazioni possibili del crimine (furti, falsi, giochi d’azzardo, ecc.). Nella sezione dedicata allo spionaggio si può ammirare uno splendido e curioso baule dentro il quale fu rinvenuto, dopo un rocambolesco inseguimento, un piccolo ometto seduto su un seggiolino, legato con le cinghie e avvolto da coperte e cuscini. Si trattava di una spia che cercava di imbarcarsi clandestinamente all’aeroporto di Fiumicino.

2013-01-03 11.15.06

2013-01-03 11.15.18
Il Museo Criminologico si trova in Via del Gonfalone 29 (una laterale di Via Giulia), ed è aperto dal martedì al sabato dalle ore 9 alle 13; martedì e giovedì dalle 14.30 alle 18.30. Ecco il sito ufficiale del MUCRI.

Speciale “Nautilus”

Se siete in viaggio, o abitate, a Torino, c’è una bottega che non potete mancare di visitare. Si tratta sicuramente del più incredibile negozio d’Italia, e lo scrittore David Sedaris si è spinto fino a definirlo addirittura “the greatest shop in the world“: è il “Nautilus”. Prende il suo nome dal mollusco omonimo, considerato un fossile vivente.

Appena entrati, dopo un’occhiata all’invitante vetrina, vi sembrerà di tornare indietro nel tempo e vi troverete immersi nella magia di un’antica wunderkammer. La collezione di oggetti d’epoca macabri e stravaganti affolla il piccolo locale (com’è giusto che sia: il gusto barocco dell’accumulo di dettagli vuole la sua parte).

Vi scoprirete quindi ad indugiare su centinaia di oggetti curiosi, principalmente strumenti medici e chirurgici di tempi andati, animali esotici impagliati, feti sotto formalina, calchi in gesso di teste deformi e maschere mortuarie, fossili, teschi, cartografie, cartelli e insegne d’epoca, mummie, scheletri, macchinari medici esoterici e teste frenologiche, maialini e vitelli siamesi. Un’imponente quantità di oggetti, ammassati in una sorta di folle museo della biologia e della tecnica, che cattura l’interesse dello scienziato così come del ricercatore del meraviglioso.

Il Nautilus collabora anche attivamente con il Museo Cesare Lombroso, recentemente aperto a Torino, che vi consigliamo di visitare. Il negozio è inoltre segnalato sul sito Atlas Obscura, vera e propria “mappatura” dei luoghi curiosi e dei posti incredibili nei quattro angoli del mondo.

Alessandro, uno dei due proprietari di questa invidiabile collezione, ha gentilmente accettato di parlarci di questa sua passione, concedendo a Bizzarro Bazar un’intervista in esclusiva che qui pubblichiamo.

Come è cominciata la tua passione per l’antiquariato medico e naturalistico?

La passione per il collezionismo l’ho avuta da sempre… collezionavo figurine, i tappi delle bottiglie, gli adesivi, fino ad impossessarmi della collezione di francobolli di mio papà (che però perse rapidamente di interesse non appena cessò l’alone di irrangiungibilità che la circondava). Da ragazzetto saccheggiavo regolarmente un mercatino dell’usato di qualsiasi carabattola, per la “gioia” di mia mamma, fino a quando iniziai a collezionare antichi ferri da stiro, mettendo insieme un’importante collezione… Ma fu il ritrovamento fortuito ad un mercatino di un vecchio stetoscopio di legno a far scattare la scintilla della passione per la storia della medicina e per gli antichi strumenti chirurgici, filone che ho approfondito in questi ultimi anni. Le pratiche più “cruente” sono quelle che hanno maggiormente acceso la mia fantasia: l’amputazione, la trapanazione cranica, il salasso… E proprio una sega da amputazione della fine del 1500, un vero pezzo da museo, è sicuramente uno dei pezzi della mia collezione che mi è stato più difficile cedere nel passato, ad un amico-cliente… ma fu la classica “proposta indecente” a cui non si poteva dire di no…

Dopo qualche anno di collezionismo “medico” ho conosciuto Fausto, mio socio e co-papà del Nautilus, grazie al quale piano piano ho esteso i miei campi di interesse, fino a spaziare in tutti gli aspetti della scienza e natura… e oltre.


Come è nata l’idea di aprire il Nautilus? A che tipo di clientela è rivolto il negozio?

Il Nautilus nasce sicuramente da un nostro sogno, dal poter avere la nostra personale wunderkammer in cui poter godere delle nostre collezioni in modo più compiuto, invece di doverle immaginare inscatolate in qualche buio garage… e allo stesso tempo dal desiderio di poterle condividere con altri appassionati.

La dimensione commerciale del Nautilus è parecchio “marginale”, per usare un eufemismo: la bottega è quasi sempre chiusa, abbiamo una tensione alla vendita bassissima, insomma, un disastro… ma non potrebbe essere diversamente, un collezionista per ovvi motivi è restio a fare il semplice commerciante.

I nostri clienti inizialmente erano collezionisti in senso “classico”: il medico che colleziona gli strumenti antichi del suo mestiere, l’appassionato di elettrostatica, il collezionista eccentrico che è fissato con i caschi protettivi industriali… Sempre più però questi scambi diventano marginali, perché cresce il numero di clienti che non collezionano in un ambito specifico, ma “semplicemente” si innamorano di un oggetto e lo ospitano nelle loro case. E non a caso sempre più i nostri clienti sono arredatori di interni alla ricerca di un pezzo “speciale” capace di nobilitare da solo un intero ambiente.


Il Nautilus non è semplicemente un negozio di antiquariato, ma una vera e propria wunderkammer. Qual è il senso, al giorno d’oggi, di assemblarne una?

In effetti sì, il riferimento nobile è quello della stanza delle meraviglie, riletta forse in chiave moderna, dove al posto del lusso principesco delle antiche collezioni possono trovare legittimità anche oggetti “umili” (mi vengono in mente ad esempio gli zoccoli dei contadini francesi per sgusciare le castagne, irte di speroni di ferro, notevoli e inconsapevoli opere dadaiste).

E penso che in un certo senso la wunderkammer risponda ad un desiderio molto primitivo e semplice dell’uomo, quello cioè di essere circondato da un contesto in cui si trova “bene”. Il perché poi una persona si senta più “a casa sua” in una stanza bianca completamente vuota piuttosto che in un antro traboccante anticaglie… beh, lascio agli psico-qualchecosa l’ardua interpretazione…


Il tuo è un interesse di tipo strettamente scientifico, o sei maggiormente attratto dall’aspetto “meraviglioso” della tua collezione? Quanto conta, cioè, il gusto del macabro e del bizzarro?

Quando sono in bottega e guardo la stratificazione di oggetti nel Nautilus l’unico filo conduttore che riesco a riconoscere e che lega in modo coerente questo coacervo è il senso della “meraviglia”, cioè lo stupore provato di fronte a ciascun oggetto a cui abbiamo dato ospitalità nelle nostre collezioni.

Certo, c’è il piacere imprescindibile della scoperta, c’è la valenza economica (in fondo è una passione diventata attività lavorativa), c’è il valore storico… eppure alla fine è quella sensazione che ti sottrae all’esperienza dell’”abituale” a legittimare un simile accumulo, cui talvolta guardo addirittura con sospetto, prospettandomi mille domande… Quindi sicuramente un debole per il bizzarro è presente… quello che invece non avverto è l’attrazione per il macabro, che non intravvedo nemmeno nei pezzi più “estremi” (come ad esempio i reperti anatomici in formalina, di cui naturalmente ben comprendo il potenziale macabro o morboso).


Quanto c’è di infantile nel collezionismo?

Il senso della meraviglia cui accennavo prima… mi piace molto la definizione del collezionista visto come “senex puerilis”, un “anziano fanciullo”. Forse chi l’ha formulata pensava di darle una connotazione leggermente spregiativa, io la trovo invece assolutamente azzeccata e gratificante. È come se contenesse la possibilità di godere allo stesso tempo di due dimensioni incompatibili, la saggezza spesso cinica dell’età matura e la capacità di stupirsi propria dell’infanzia… E in fondo il collezionista vive costantemente questa lotta contro il tempo che passa, a cui tenta di sottrarre i pezzi della sua collezione garantendo loro nuova vita – e cercando forse di conquistare anche per sé una certa sensazione di eternità…


Qual è il pezzo della collezione a cui sei più affezionato? Quale il più raro e/o costoso?

Ho avuto un periodo in cui ero parecchio intrigato dai modelli anatomici in cera, ed ho rastrellato buona parte della bibliografia disponibile sul tema, oltre a qualche bel modello. Sicuramente ci appassiona il tema della teratologia, con tutte le anomalie della natura: dai vitellini a due teste, agli agnellini siamesi (altra vendita molto rimpianta)… I campioni anatomici umani li trovo molto emozionanti, con il loro un affascinante senso di “vita sospesa”.

Il braccio della mummia è uno dei nostri beniamini, ma sono molto affezionato anche ad una piccola scultura francese di un gatto… quindi alla fine più che il valore o la rarità ciò che di solito rende “speciale” ai nostri occhi un pezzo è la storia che porta con sé, il viaggio o le circostanze che lo hanno portato fino a noi.  Poi arriva comunque sempre il giorno in cui sentiamo che il momento è arrivato, e finalmente possiamo lasciar andare l’oggetto difeso fino ad allora: c’è una gran soddisfazione nel veder brillare gli occhi del collezionista che ha appena conquistato un nuovo pezzo che tu hai scovato e accudito per un po’…


Ti capita di essere considerato “un tipo strano” per via della tua passione?

Talvolta, esagerando un po’, dico che il mondo si divide tra quelli che entrano dentro il Nautilus, e quelli che invece rimangono appiccicati con il naso davanti alla vetrina, ma poi alla fine se ne vanno con espressioni più o meno perplesse.

E quelli che entrano però giustamente si aspetterebbero un padrone di casa all’altezza, quantomeno un Igor guercio con la gobba, o il cugino del Gobbo di Notre-Dame, o almeno un freak sopravvissuto al circo Barnum… e quindi la mia presenza delude sempre un po’.

Mi chiedono spesso se non ho paura a stare in bottega, in mezzo a tutte quelle presenze inquietanti, ma me la cavo sempre molto facilmente dicendo che in realtà io ho paura quando esco fuori dalla bottega… per cui, al solito… chi sono i veri mostri e i veri “strani” ?

(Cliccate sulla foto qui sopra per vederla in alta definizione).

Il Nautilus si trova in via Bellezia 15/B a Torino. Apre su appuntamento, per informazioni o prenotazioni chiamate il 339 5342312.

Ecco il link al sito del Nautilus, ricco di numerose fotografie.

Ringraziamo Alessandro per la sua squisita cortesia.

Ringraziamo anche Stefano Bessoni, regista, fan del Nautilus, e autore delle foto contenute in questo articolo.