Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 7

In the seventh episode of Bizzarro Bazar: the tragic and startling story of the Sutherland Sisters; a piece of the Moon which fell to Earth; a creature halfway between the plant kingdom and the animal kingdom. [Be sure to turn on English captions.]

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Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

A Computer In A Skirt

(This article originally appeared on #ILLUSTRATI n. 46: #HEROES)

Credits: NASA/Sean Smith

Next year this beautiful lady, Katherine Johnson, will turn one hundred. When she was a little girl, her father Joshua used to repeat to her: “You are as good as anybody in this town, but you’re no better”.
It was hard to believe you were as good as anybody else for a coloured little girl who had grown up in White Sulphur Springs, where education ended compulsorily with the eighth grade for anybody who was not white.
Katherine’s father, Joshua, worked as a farmer and handyman for the Greenbrier Hotel, the thermal resort where the wealthiest squires of all Virginia used to spend their holidays; it was perhaps for this reason that he wanted his daughter to follow her own path without hesitation, in spite of the segregationist barriers. If she wasn’t allowed to study in the small town where they lived, he was going to bring her to Institute, 130 miles further west.

Katherine, for her part, sped up the process: at the age of 14 she had already finished high school, at the age of 18 she earned a degree with honours in mathematics. In 1938 the Supreme Court established that “white-only” universities should admit coloured students, therefore in 1939 Katherine became the first African-American woman to attend the graduate school at the West Virginia University in Morgantown.
After completing her studies, however, a career was far from being guaranteed. Katherine wished she could take up research, but once again she had to cope with two disadvantages: she was a woman, and on top of that African-American.

She taught mathematics for more than ten years, waiting for a good chance which eventually presented itself in 1952. NASA (called NACA at the time) had started to employ both white and African-American mathematics, and offered her a job. Therefore in 1953 Katherine Johnson joined the very first team of the space agency.
She started working in the “computer in skirts” section, a pool of women whose job was to read the data from the black boxes of planes and carry out other mathematical tasks. One day Katherine was assigned to an all-male flight research team; she was supposed to work with them for a limited time, but Katherine’s knowledge of analytic geometry made her bosses “forget” to return her to her old position.

But she couldn’t escape segregation. Katherine was required to work, eat, and use restrooms in areas separated from those of her white peers. Regardless of whoever had carried out the work, reports were signed only by the men of the pool.
But Katherine had kept in mind her father’s words, and her strategy was to ignore what she was expected to do. She used to participate in the all-male engineering meetings, she signed reports in place of her male superiors, and in spite of any objection. Because she had never thought she was inferior – nor superior – to anybody.

That was a pioneering era and participating in the first Space Task Force in history meant venturing in completely new operations and facing unknown issues. With her competence and talent for geometry, Katherine was one of the most brilliant “human computers”. She calculated the trajectory of the first American space flight, the one of Alan Shepard in 1961.

Then at some point NASA decided to move on to electronic computers, dismantling the team of “human calculators”; the first flight programmed using the machines was that of John Glenn, who orbited around the Earth. But the astronaut himself refused to leave unless Katherine manually verified all the calculations made by the computers. She was the only one he trusted.
Later Katherine helped to calculate the trajectory of Apollo 11, launched in 1969. Seeing Neil Armstrong taking the first step on the Moon moved her, but only to a certain point: for somebody who had been working on that mission for years, this certainly came as no surprise.

For a long time, little was known about the work carried out by Katherine (and her colleagues): overlooked for decades by a society that was always reluctant to acknowledge her real value, today her name is studied at school and her story has been recently narrated by the film Hidden figures (2016, directed by Theodore Melfi). The contribution offered by Katherine to the space race is now regarded as essential – although the ones who became heroes were those astronauts who could have never left the Earth soil without her precise calculations.

Smiling, about to turn one hundred, Katherine Johnson continues to repeat: “I’m as good as anybody, but no better”.

 

The Unexpected Ascent

(This article originally appeared on #ILLUSTRATI n. 44, Che ci faccio qui)

It’s September 7, 2013. At the 0B pavilion of the Wallops Flight Facility, on the east coast of Virginia, NASA is getting ready to launch a rocket towards the Moon.
The LADEE probe was designed to study the atmosphere and the exosphere of our satellite, and to gather information about moon dust. For this purpose, the probe is equipped with two technologically advanced mass spectrometers, and a sensor which is capable of detecting the collisions of the minuscule dust particles that rise up from the lunar ground due to the electrostatic effect.

As the countdown begins, dozens of specialists supervise the data flow coming from the various sectors of the rocket, checking the advancing launch phases on their monitors. Vibrations, balancing, condition of the ogive: everything seems to be going according to plan, but mental tension and concentration are palpable. It is a 280 million dollar mission, after all.

Yet at the 0B pavilion of the Wallops Flight Facility, on the east coast of Virginia, there is also someone who is happily ignoring the frantic atmosphere.
She knows nothing about electrostatics, mass spectrometers, solid rocket fuels or space agencies. Furthermore, she does not even know what a dollar is.
The peaceful creature just knows that she is very satisfied, having just gulped down as many as three flies within two minutes (although she ignores what a minute is).
From the edge of her body of water she looks at the moon, yes, like every night, but without trying to reach it. And like every night, she croaks, pleased with her simple life.

A life that had always been without mysteries, ever since she was just a tadpole. A comfortably predictable life.
But now, all of a sudden – here come the thunderous roar, the flames, the smoke. Absurdity breaks into the reality of our poor frog. From the pool, she rises in the air, sucked up by the rocket’s contrail. Flung up in the sky, in an unexpected flight, in a definitive and shining rapture.

NASA Wallops Flight Facility © Chris Perry

She sees her entire existence passing before her eyes, like in a movie – although she doesn’t know what a movie is. The endless stakeouts waiting for a tiny little insect, the cool nights spent soaking in the water, the eggs she has never managed to lay, the brief moments of fulfilment… but now, because of this cruel and unnatural joke, it all seems to be meaningless!
“There is no criterion for such an end” reflects the amphibious philosopher in the fraction of a second in which the incredible trajectory pushes her towards the rocket’s furnace “but maybe it is better this way. Who would really want to be weighed down by a reason? Every moment I have lived, good or bad, has contributed to bring me here, in a vertiginous ascent towards the flash of light in which I am about to dissolve. If this world is a meaningless dance, it is a dance after all. So let’s dance!”
And with this last thought, the fatal blaze.

One must imagine that frog happy.

La donna gorilla

La trasformazione a vista d’occhio di una donna in gorilla è uno dei trucchi storici che hanno avuto maggiore successo nei luna-park, nelle fiere itineranti, nei sideshow e nei circhi di tutto il mondo. Ultimamente sta un po’ passando di moda, dopo decenni di lustro e splendore, ma qualche circo (anche italiano) utilizza ancora questa attrazione per divertire e intrattenere il pubblico.

L’attrazione consiste in questo: voi (il pubblico) entrate in una piccola stanza oscura, e vedete sul palco una gabbia illuminata. All’interno della gabbia, una donna discinta. L’imbonitore sale sul palco, e comincia ad affabularvi con la sua storia. Il più delle volte vi racconterà del celebre “anello mancante”, quel primate che si troverebbe fra lo stadio di scimmia e quello umano, che Darwin non riuscì mai a individuare. Dopo avervi rassicurato della robustezza della gabbia, e avervi preparato allo show più elettrizzante dell’intero pianeta, vi annuncerà che la ragazza sta per mutare di forma sotto ai vostri occhi! Sì, proprio lei, quella bella prigioniera che scuote le sbarre della gabbia grugnendo, è l’anello mancante! Può passare indistintamente dallo stadio umano a quello di scimmia e viceversa! “Guardate i suoi denti divenire feroci fauci, signore e signori!”

Mentre, scettici, aspettate il momento clou, comincia davvero a succedere qualcosa: lentamente, come in un morphing cinematografico, alla ragazza spuntano dei peli, le braccia divengono nere e muscolose e per ultima la sua faccia assume i tratti di uno scimmione tropicale… e poco importa se capite benissimo che il gorilla è in realtà un tizio in un costume, siete colpiti e ipnotizzati dall’effetto della trasformazione, che è talmente vivida e reale… in quel momento sospeso, in quell’attimo di sorpresa, il gorilla con un colpo secco sfonda le sbarre della gabbia, e si avventa verso di voi urlando! Nelle grida di panico e nel fuggi fuggi generale (aiutato dai circensi che, con la scusa di salvarvi la pelle, vi indirizzano gesticolando verso l’uscita), senza sapere come, vi trovate fuori dall’attrazione, insicuri e un po’ frastornati da ciò che avete visto.

Cosa è successo? Si tratta in verità di un ingegnoso trucco ottico messo a punto nei lontani anni 1860 da due scienziati, Henry Dircks e John Henry Pepper (l’effetto prenderà il nome di quest’ultimo, data la sua celebrità nell’epoca vittoriana, nonostante egli avesse più volte cercato di dare il giusto credito al vero inventore, Dircks). Inizialmente studiato per il teatro, non prese mai piede sui grandi palcoscenici: fu invece “riciclato” per i luna-park e viene tutt’ora impiegato nei più grandi parchi a tema del mondo.

Il segreto sta in un pannello di vetro o uno specchio semitrasparente, camuffato e posto tra il pubblico e la scena. Il vetro è angolato (in verde nella figura) in modo da riflettere gli oggetti che vengono illuminati in una seconda camera (nascosta al pubblico, il quale vede soltanto il palco, delimitato dal quadratino rosso). Visto da una posizione più elevata, l’effetto sarebbe visibile in questo modo:

Le due camere (quella di scena e quella “segreta”) devono combaciare perfettamente nel riflesso sul vetro. Il fantasmino nascosto nella stanza di sinistra, quando è illuminato, è visibile nel riflesso come se fosse presente veramente sulla scena; se è illuminato fiocamente, appare come una presenza ectoplasmatica; e se resta al buio, rimane completamente invisibile.

Una volta preparate con cura le due camere e il vetro, il resto diviene semplice: la donna mantiene una posizione fissa in fondo alla stanza visibile, e mentre il gorilla (il fantasma, nello schema) viene gradatamente illuminato, il pubblico vedrà i suoi peli “comparire” a poco a poco, come in una dissolvenza incrociata, sul corpo della giovane fanciulla. Finché, ad un certo punto, resterà soltanto il gorilla, capace (grazie a un cambio di luci repentino e a un calcolato “sbalzo di tensione” che oscura la scena per un paio di secondi) di balzare fuori dalla sua stanza segreta e sfondare la gabbia per gettarsi sul pubblico.

L’effetto, come già detto, era stato pensato per il teatro. Gli attori avrebbero avuto la possibilità di fingere un combattimento o un dialogo con uno spettro realistico. Il vero problema erano però i soldi: sembrava una follia riadattare tutti i teatri soltanto perché Amleto avesse finalmente la possibilità di parlare con uno spettro del padre più “evanescente” del solito.

Oggi la tecnica del “fantasma di Pepper” è utilizzata invece, oltre che nei circhi, anche in molti musei scientifici e culturali, per movimentare la didattica di alcune esibizioni.

Pagina Wikipedia (in inglese) sul Pepper’s Ghost.