A Nostalgia For What We Lose: Interview with Nunzio Paci

The hybrid anatomies created by Nunzio Paci,born in Bologna in 1977, encountered a growing success, and they granted him prestigious exhibitions in Europe, Asia and the US.
The true miracle this artist performs on his canvas is to turn what is still usually perceived as a taboo – the inside of our bodies – into something enchanting.


But his works are complex and multilayered: in his paintings the natural elements and creatures fuse together and as they do so, all boundaries lose their meaning, there is no more an inside and an outside; each body explodes and grows branches, becoming indefinable. Even if besides the figures there still are numbers, anatomical annotations and “keys”, these unthinkable flourishes of the flesh tend to checkmate our vision, sabotage all categories and even dismantle the concept of identity.

But rather than just writing about it, I thought it best to interview Nunzio and let our chat be an introduction to his art.

You began as a street artist, in a strictly urban environment; what was your relationship with nature back then? Did it evolve over the years?

I was born and raised in a small country town in the province of Bologna and I still live in a rural area. Nature has always been a faithful companion to me. I too did go through a rebellious phase: in those years, as I recall them, everything looked like a surface I could spray paint or write on. Now I feel more like a retired warrior, seeking a quiet and dimly lit corner where I can think and rest.

In the West, man wants to think himself separated from nature: if not a proper dominator, at least an external observer or investigator.
This feeling of being outside or above natural laws, however, entails a feeling of exclusion, a sort of romantic longing for this “lost” connection with the rest of the natural world.
Do you think your works express this melancholy, a need for communion with other creatures? Or are you suggesting that the animal, vegetable and mineral kingdoms have actually always been inertwined, and all barriers between them are a cultural construct, an illusion?

I think my work is about “longing for what we constantly lose” – voices, perfumes, memories… I often have the feeling I’m inventing those fragments of memories I had forgotten: I believe this is a form of self-defense on my part, to survive the melancholy you mention. For this reason, through my work, I try to translate what cannot be preserved through time into a visual form, so that I can retrieve these memories in my most nostalgic moments.

Yours are autoptic visions: why do you feel the need to dissect, to open the bodies you draw? As the inside of the body is still a taboo in many ways, how does the public react to the anatomical details in your works?

I need to be selfish. I never think about what the audience might feel, I don’t ask myself what others would or wouldn’t want to see. I am too busy taming my thoughts and turning my traumas into images.
I can’t recall exactly when I became interested in anatomy, but I will never forget the first time I saw somebody skin a rabbit. I was a very young child, and I was disturbed and at the same time fascinated – not by the violent scene in itself, but by what was hidden inside that animal. I immediately decided I would never harm a living being but I would try and understand their “engineering”, their inner design.
Later on, the desire to produce visionary artworks took over, and I started tracing subjects that could be expressive without offending any sensibility. But in the end what we feel when we look at something is also a product of our own background; so generally speaking I don’t think it’s possible to elicit am unambiguous sensation in the public.

You stated you’re not a big fan of colors, and in fact you often prefer earthy nuances, rusty browns, etc. Your latest woks, including those shown in the Manila exhibit entitled Mimesis, might suggest a progressive opening in that regard, as some floral arrangements are enriched by a whole palette of green, purple, blue, pink. Is this a way to add chromatic intricacy or, on the contrary, to make your images “lighter” and more pleasing?

I never looked at color as a “pleasing” or “light” element. Quite the opposite really. My use of color in the Mimesis cyle, just like in nature, is deceptive. In nature, color plays a fundamental role in survival. In my work, I make use of color to describe my subjects’ feelings when they are alone or in danger. Modifying their aspect is a necessity for them, a form of self-defense to protect themselves from the shallowness, arrogance and violence of society. A society which is only concerned with its own useless endurance.

In one of your exhibits, in 2013, you explicitly referenced the theory of “signatures”, the web of alleged correspondences among the different physical forms, the symptoms of illness, celestial mutations, etc.
These analogies, for instance those found to exist between a tree, deer antlers and the artery system, were connected to palmistry, physiognomy and medicine, and were quite popular from Paracelsus to Gerolamo Cardano to Giambattista della Porta.
In your works there’s always a reference to the origins of natural sciences, to Renaissance wunderkammern, to 15th-16th Century botanics. Even on a formal level, you have revisited some ancient techniques, such as the encaustic technique.
What’s the appeal of that period?

I believe that was the beginning of it all, and all the following periods, including the one we live in, are but an evolution of that pioneering time. Man still studies plants, observes animal behavior, tries in vain to preserve the body, studies the mechanisms of outer space… Even if he does it in a different way, I don’t think much has really changed. What is lacking today is that crazy obsession with observation, the pleasure of discovery and the want to take care of one’s own time. In learning slowly, and deeply, lies the key to fix the emotions we feel when we discover something new.

A famous quote (attributed to Banksy, and inspired by a poem by Cesar A. Cruz) says: “Art should comfort the disturbed and disturb the comfortable”.
Are your paintings meant to comfort or disturb the viewer?

My way of life, and my way of being, are reflected in my work. I never felt the urge to shock or distrub the public with my images, nor did I ever try to seek attention. Though my work I wish to reach people’s heart. I want to do it tiptoe, silently, and by asking permission if necessary. If they let me in, that’s where I will grow my roots and reside forever.

 

Werner Herzog, a filmmaker who often addressed in his movies the difficult relationship between man and nature, claims in Grizzly Man (2006) that “the common denominator of the universe is not harmony, but chaos, hostility, and murder”. Elsewhere, he describes the Amazon jungle as a never-ending “collective massacre”.
As compared to Herzog’s pessimistic views, I have a feeling that you might see nature as a continuum, where any predator-pray relationship is eventually an act of “self-cannibalism”. Species fight and assault each other, but in the end this battle is won by life itself, who as an autopoietic system is capable of finding constant nourishment within itself. Decomposition itself is not bad, as it allows new germinations.
What is death to you, and how does it relate to your work?

As far as I’m concerned, death plays a fundamental role, and I find myself constantly meditating on how all is slowly dying. A new sprout is already beginning to die, and that goes for all that’s living. One of the aspects of existence that most fascinate me is its decadence. I am drawn to it, both curious and scared, and my work is perhaps a way to exorcise all the slow dying that surrounds us.

You can follow Nunzio Paci on his official website, Facebook page and Instagram account.

La canzone dei suicidi

Articolo a cura della nostra guestblogger Veronica Pagnani

Nel 1933, dopo numerosi e vani tentativi di raggiungere il successo attraverso la musica, Rezső Seress, pianista ungherese autodidatta, venne abbandonato dalla storica compagna a seguito di una furiosa litigata. Seress, colto dallo strazio e dalla frustrazione, decise così di comporre di getto un brano al pianoforte dal titolo Gloomy Sunday (Domenica tetra).

Strano a dirsi, è proprio grazie a questo brano che Rezső finalmente riesce a riscuotere il meritato successo: il 78 giri appena prodotto fa il giro del mondo, e Rezső ormai crede di aver realizzato il suo sogno. Eppure una serie di fatti terribili e al tempo stesso misteriosi gli faranno cambiare idea.


A Berlino, dopo aver chiesto ad un gruppo musicale di suonare Gloomy Sunday, un giovane si spara un colpo di pistola alla testa, non riuscendo a sopportare l’opprimente melodia che ormai ossessionava la sua mente; soltanto sette giorni dopo una commessa, sempre a Berlino, viene ritrovata impiccata nella sua casa: accanto al suo corpo, uno spartito di Gloomy Sunday.

Una giovane donna di New York si suicidò con il gas. Accanto al suo corpo venne ritrovata una lettera in cui chiedeva che Gloomy Sunday venisse suonata al suo funerale.

note
Persino a Roma vengono registrati nello stesso periodo casi di suicidio legati alla canzone maledetta: un uomo di 82 anni si butta dalla finestra dopo averla suonata al pianoforte, mentre una ragazza, colta da una profonda angoscia, si getta da un ponte.

Infine una donna, in Gran Bretagna, fu ritrovata morta a causa dei barbiturici dalla polizia allertata dai vicini, che non riuscivano più a sopportare l’alto volume con cui la donna era solita ascoltare la canzone.

I giornali dell’epoca riportano di almeno 19 suicidi legati a Gloomy Sunday. Si è molto discusso riguardo a questi casi di suicidio. Sono infatti molti a pensare che in realtà le indagini siano state truccate o “reinterpretate” dalla stampa, e gran parte delle morti sono difficilmente verificabili. Tuttavia, per scongiurare ulteriori morti e giudicandola deprimente, la BBC nel 1941 decise di non trasmettere la versione del brano interpretata da Billie Holiday, in un periodo già particolarmente triste a causa dei bombardamenti tedeschi.


Ironia della sorte, lo stesso Seress rimase vittima della sua canzone: non essendo mai andato negli Stati Uniti per raccogliere i soldi dei diritti d’autore del suo hit mondiale, trascorse la vita nella povertà e nella depressione, gettandosi infine dalla finestra del suo appartamento a Budapest nel 1968. Sopravvisse alla caduta, ma in ospedale riuscì a strangolarsi a morte con un cavo. Di lì a poco anche la sua amata avrebbe messo fine ai suoi giorni avvelenandosi. La leggenda urbana della “canzone ungherese dei suicidi” aveva avuto una degna conclusione.

Oggi la versione di Seress è forse la meno nota, soppiantata dalle più celebri (e meno deprimenti) versioni di Sarah Brightman, Bjork, Emilie Autumn, l’italiana Norma Bruni, Diamanda Galas, Sam Lewis e, naturalmente, Billie Holiday.

Zombie in a Penguin Suit

Zombie in a Penguin Suit è un cortometraggio di Chris Russell, che regala molto più di quanto già non prometta lo strepitoso titolo. Non soltanto un morto vivente in un costume da pinguino: a partire da quest’idea puramente weird, il regista decide di stupirci con un tono adulto, malinconico, disperato e commovente.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jtdEKIsnEkM]

Ecco il sito ufficiale del film.

Macabre collezioni

Abbiamo spesso parlato, su Bizzarro Bazar, di wunderkammer, esibizioni anatomiche, collezionisti del macabro e di oggetti conservati gelosamente nonostante il (o forse proprio a causa del) loro potenziale inquietante. È divertente notare come, nell’immaginario comune, chi si impegna in tale tipo di collezionismo sia normalmente associato alle tendenze dark o, peggio, sataniste; quando spesso si tratta di persone assolutamente comuni che mantengono intatto un quasi infantile senso della curiosità e della meraviglia.

Oggi, grazie a un articolo di Newsweek (segnalatoci da Materies Morbi) questo argomento poco battuto dalla stampa ci risolleva per un attimo dalla superficie di notizie e articoli insipidi quotidiani.

L’autrice dell’articolo, la scrittrice Caroline H. Dworin, si interroga sul perché certe persone provino attrazione verso reperti anatomici, feti sotto formalina, esemplari tassidermici deformi, strumenti chirurgici, o portafogli e antichi grimori rilegati in pelle umana. Alcune parti dell’articolo ci hanno toccato personalmente, visto che anche noi nel nostro piccolo collezioniamo da anni questo tipo di oggetti e reperti. E per una volta ci sembra che le ipotesi fornite dall’articolo siano condivisibili e soprattutto molto umane.

Nell’articolo, la simpatica Joanna Ebstein di Morbid Anatomy viene interpellata sulla sua esperienza come collezionista. Qualche tempo fa noi avevamo chiesto la stessa cosa anche al proprietario del favoloso Nautilus di Torino, e la sua risposta era stata analoga. Quello che attira in questi oggetti è il fatto che sono oggetti che parlano, hanno una storia, e ci interrogano. Sono cioè piccoli pezzi di vita fossilizzata che non possono lasciarci indifferenti. “C’è qualcosa di molto eccitante in simili oggetti, aprono così tante strade differenti: divengono oggetti con un significato”. Joanna sta anche portando avanti un progetto fotografico a lungo termine che documenta i “gabinetti delle meraviglie” privati e le collezioni segrete più incredibili attraverso il globo (Private Cabinets Photo Series).

“Le persone sono veramente attratte dalle cose che creano un ponte fra la vita e la morte”, dice Evan Michelson, proprietaria di Obscura, Antiques and Oddities, un piccolo negozio nell’East Village di New York specializzato in oggetti macabri vittoriani. “Se la tua personalità ha anche solo un’ombra di malinconia, finisci per trovare conforto in cose che altre persone trovano tristi”. Evan ha anche notato che le femmine sembrano essere attratte da questo tipo di collezione in proporzione largamente maggiore dei maschi. La sua collezione personale vanta molti oggetti “malinconici”, elementi di scene del crimine, strumenti medici, stampe di malattie e lesioni incurabili, preparati in barattolo, animali siamesi. “Ho alcuni cuccioli di maiale fusi assieme che sono davvero tristi – aggiunge – sembra che stiano danzando”.

Michelson fa anche collezione di bare per infanti. “Ho a casa mia una delle più piccole bare commerciali mai realizzate. Reca l’iscrizione Soffrite bambini per arrivare a Me. Ha le sue piccole cerniere, e i sostegni per i portatori, come se fossero stati realmente necessari dei portatori”.

Altri ancora trovano in questi oggetti una fonte di ispirazione artistica. Roald Dahl, l’autore di tante favole moderne per bambini, dopo un intervento chirurgico aveva conservato la testa del suo stesso femore, così come alcuni pezzi della sua spina dorsale in un barattolo. Lo aiutavano a meditare, e a scrivere.

“C’è molto poco, a questo mondo, che sia solo bianco o nero”. Così si esprime J. Bazzel, direttore delle comunicazioni del celebre Mütter Museum di Philadelphia, e racconta che nella immensa collezione anatomica del museo trovano posto diversi esemplari di cuoio umano. “Sentiamo parlare di cuoio umano, e subito pensiamo ai Nazisti – ma c’era un periodo in cui rilegare in pelle umana un testo scientifico o medico era un segno di rispetto. Magari un paziente aveva aiutato a scoprire una nuova conoscenza, a capire qualcosa di documentato in quel testo, e utilizzare la sua pelle era un modo di commemorarlo, onorarlo, e tributargli rispetto”. Seguendo questo ragionamento, lo stesso Bazzel, 38 anni, ha donato parte del suo corpo al museo: le sue ossa del bacino, rimosse chirurgicamente anni or sono a causa di uno sfibramento osseo dovuto alla reazione ad un farmaco utilizzato contro l’AIDS, di cui è affetto. Le ha donate al museo per testimoniare e insegnare ai visitatori quanto complessa e devastante la cura di questa sindrome possa risultare. “C’è molto poco a questo mondo, che sia bianco o nero… La paura di una persona è la gioia di un’altra; l’incubo di uno è la realtà di un altro”.