Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 16

The wonderful photo above shows a group of Irish artists from the Metropolitan School of Art in Dublin, including Margaret Clarke and Estella Solomons (via BiblioCuriosa).
And let’s start with the usual firing of links and oddities!

  • This is the oldest diving suit in the world. It is on exhibit in the Raahe museum in Finland, and dates back to the eighteenth century. It was used for short walks under water, to repair the keels of ships. Now, instead, “it dives into your nightmares” (as Stefano Castelli put it).
  • Rediscovered masterpieces: the Christian comic books of the seventies in which sinners are redeemed by the evangelizing heroes. “The Cross is mightier than the switchblade!” (Thanks, Gigio!)

  • On the facade of the Cologne Town Hall there is a statue of Bishop Konrad von Hochstaden. The severity of his ecclesiastical figure is barely surprising; it’s what’s under the pedestal that leaves you stunned.

The figure engaged in an obscene autofellatio is to be reconnected to the classic medieval marginalia, which often included grotesque and bizarre situations placed “in the margin” of the main work — which could be a book, a fresco, a painting or, as in this case, a sculptural complex.
Given that such figures appear on a good number of churches, mainly in France, Spain and Germany, there has been much speculation as to what their purpose and meaning might have been: these were not just echoes of pagan fertility symbols, but complex allegories of salvation, as this book explains (and if you read French, there’s another good one exclusively dedicated to Brittany). Beyond all conjectures, it is clear that the distinction between the sacred and the profane in the Middle Ages was not as clear and unambiguous as we would be led to believe.

  • Let’s remain in the Middle Ages. When in 1004 the niece of the Byzantine emperor dared to use a fork for the first time at table, she caused a ruckus and the act was condemned by the clergy as blasphemous. (No doubt the noblewoman had offended the Almighty, since He later made her die of plague.)
  • Also dead, for 3230 years, but with all the necessary papers: here is the Egyptian passport issued in 1974 for the mummy of Ramesses II, so that he could fly to Paris without a hitch at the check-in. [EDIT: this is actually an amusing fake, as Gabriel pointed out in the comments]

  • Man, I hate it when I order a simple cappuccino, but the bartender just has to show off.
  • Alex Eckman-Lawn adds disturbing and concrete “layers” to the human face. (Thanks, Anastasia!)
  • Another artist, Arngrímur Sigurðsson, illustrated several traditional figures of Icelandic folklore in a book called Duldýrasafnið, which translated means more or less “The Museum of Hidden Beings”. The volume is practically unobtainable online, but you can see many evocative paintings on the official website and especially in this great article. (Thanks, Luca!)
  • Forget Formula One! Here’s the ultimate racing competition!

  • If you love videogames and hate Mondays (sorry, I meant capitalism), do not miss this piece by Mariano Tomatis (Italian only).
  • Remember my old post on death masks? Pia Interlandi is an artist who still makes them today.
  • And finally, let’s dive into the weird side of porn for some videos of beautiful girls stuck in super glue — well, ok, they pretend to be. You can find dozens of them, and for a good reason: this is a peculiar immobilization fetishism (as this short article perfectly summarizes) combining classic female foot worship, the lusciousness of glue (huh?), and a little sadistic excitement in seeing the victim’s useless attempts to free herself. The big plus is it doesn’t violate YouTube adult content guidelines.

Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 13

GIF art by Colin Raff

These last times have been quite dense, in the wake of the publication of The Petrifier.
Allow me a breif summary. 1) On the Italian magazine Venerdì di Repubblica a nice article by Giulia Villoresi came out: it starts out by reviewing the book but soon shifts to the wider subject of new aesthetics of the macabre, saving some nice words for this blog. 2) I was featured on the Swiss website Ossarium for their series Death Expert of the Month, and upon answering one of their three questions I recounted a tragic episode that particularly influenced my work. 3) I also took part in The Death Hangout, a podcast + YouTube series in which I chatted for half an hour with hosts Olivier and Keith, discussing museums and disturbing places, the symbolic meaning of human remains, the cruelty and bestiality of death, etc. 4) Carlo Vannini‘s photographs served as an inspiration to the talented Claudia Crobatia of A Course In Dying for her excellent considerations on the morbid but fruitful curiosity of the generation that grew up with websites like Rotten.com.

Let’s start immediately with the links, but not before having revisited a classic 1972 Monty Python sketch, in which Sam Peckinpah, who in those years was quite controversial for his violent westerns, gets to direct a movie about British upper class’ good old days.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeYznvQvnsY

  • The blog Rocaille – dedicated to the kind of Beauty that lurks in the dark – is one of my favorite virtual spaces. And recently Annalisa visited the wunderkammer Theatrum Mundi (I also wrote about it a while ago), which in turn is one of my favorite concrete spaces. So, you can imagine, I was twice as delighted.
  • Another friend I unconditionally admire is relic hunter Elizabeth Harper, who runs the All The Saints You Should Know website. A few days ago she published a truly exceptional account of the Holy Week processions in Zamora, Spain: during those long days dedicated to the celebration of Christ’s death, she witnessed a paradoxical loosening of social and sexual inhibitions. But is it really a paradox? Maybe not, if, as Georges Bataille pointed out, eroticism is ultimately an anticipation of death itself, which erases individual boundaries. This might be why it is so strictly connected to ecstasy, and to the sacred.

  • Since we’re talking Bataille: in his obscene Story of the Eye, there’s this unforgettable passage where the protagonist Simone slips between her legs the eyeball she tore off the corpse of a priest (the engraving above, inspired by the scene in question , is by Bellmer).
    This eyed vagina, or vagina oculata, is an extreme and repulsive image, but it has an archetypal quality and it is representative of the complex eye/egg analogy that underlies the whole story.
    Following the same juxtaposition between creation (bringing to light) and vision, some have inserted a pinhole camera into the female genitalia. The Brainoise blog talks about it in a fascinating article (Italian only): several artists have in fact tried to use these rudimentary and handcrafted appliances in a Cronenberg-like fusion with the human body.
  • By the way, one of the first posts on Bizzarro Bazar back in 2009 was dedicated to Wayne Martin Belger’s pinhole cameras, which contain organic materials and human remains.
  • Toru Kamei creates beautiful still, or not-so-still, life paintings. Here are some of his works:

  • When it comes to recipes, we Italians can be really exasperating. Post a pic of chicken spaghetti, and in zero time you will be earning many colorful and unlikely names. A food nazi Twitter account.

  • Above is a mummified skeleton found 15 years ago in the Atacama desert of Chile. Many thought — hoped — it would be proved to be of alien origin. DNA tests have shown a much more earthly, and touching, truth.
  • A typical morning in Australia: you wake up, still sleepy, you put your feet down and you realize that one of your slippers has disappeared. Where the heck can it be? You’re sure you left it there last night, beside the other one. You also don’t recall seeing that three-meter python curled up in the bedroom.

  • Everybody knows New Orleans Mardi Gras, but few are familiar with its more visceral version, held each year in several Cajun communities of South Louisiana: the courir de Mardi Gras. Unsettling masks and attires of ancient origin mocking noblemen’s clothes and the clergy, armies of unruly pranksters, bring chaos in the streets and whipped by captains on horseback, sacrificial chickens chased through muddy fields… here are some wonderful black and white photos of this eccentric manifestation. (Thanks, Elisa!)

  • There are several “metamorphic” vanitas, containing a skull that becomes visible only if the image is looked at from a certain distance. This is my favorite one, on the account of the unusual side view and the perfect synthesis of Eros and Thanatos; anybody knows who the artist is? [EDIT: art by Bernhard Gutmann, 1905, “In the midst of life we are in death”. Thanks Roberto!]

  • Country homes in Vermont often feature a special, crooked window that apparently serves no practical purpose. Perhaps they are meant to discourage witches that might be fluttering around the house.
  • My Twitter went a little crazy since I posted the photos of this magnificent goat, found mainly in Siria and Lebanon. The breed is the result of careful genetic selection, and it won several beauty contests for ruminants. And I bet this cutie would break many a heart in the Star Wars Cantina, too.

  • Finally, I would like to leave you with a little gift that I hope is welcome: I created a playlist on Spotify for all readers of Bizzarro Bazar. A very heterogeneous musical offer, but with a common denominator which is ultimately the same underlying this blog: wonder. Whether it’s an experimental indie piece, a dark melody, a tattered and frenzied polka, a nostalgic song, some old blues about death, an ironic and weird reinterpretation of a classic theme, or an example of outsider music played by homeless people and deviant characters, these tunes can surprise you, transport you to unusual soundscapes, sometimes push you out of your comfort zone.
    Each song has been selected for a specific reason I could even explain in a didactic way — but I won’t. I will leave you the pleasure of discovery, and also the freedom to guess why I included this or that.
    The playlist consists of more than 8 hours of music (and I will continue to add stuff), which should be enough for anyone to find a little something, maybe just a starting point for new research and discoveries. Enjoy!

Wunderkammer Reborn – Part I

Why has the new millennium seen the awakening of a huge interest in “cabinets of wonder”? Why does such an ancient kind of collecting, typical of the period between the 1500s and the 1700s, still fascinate us in the internet era? And what are the differences between the classical wunderkammern and the contemporary neo-wunderkammern?

I have recently found myself tackling these subjects in two diametrically opposed contexts.
The first was dead serious conference on disciplines of knowledge in the Early Modern Period, at the University of PAdua; the second, a festival of magic and wonder created by a mentalist and a wonder injector. In this last occasion I prepared a small table with a micro-wunderkammer (really minimal, but that’s what I could fit into my suitcase!) so that after the talk the public could touch and see some curiosities first-hand.

Two traditionally quite separate scenarios – the academic milieu and the world of entertainment – both decided to dedicate some space to the discussion of this phenomenon, which strikes me as indicative of its relevance.
So I thought it might be interesting to resume, in very broad terms, my speech on the subject for the benefit of those who could not attend those meetings.

For practical purposes, I will divide the whole thing into two posts.
In this first one, I will trace what I believe are the key characteristics of historical wunderkammern – or, more precisely, the key concepts worth reflecting upon.
In the next post I will address XXI Century neo-wunderkammern, to try and pinpoint what might be the reasons of this peculiar “rebirth”.

Mirabilia

Evidently, the fundamental concept for a wunderkammer, beginning from the name itself, was the idea of wonder; from the aristocratic cabinets of Ferdinand II of Austria or Rudolf II to the more science-oriented ones like Aldrovandi‘s, Cospi‘s, or Kircher‘s, the purpose of all ancient collections was first and foremost to amaze the visitor.

It was a way for the rich person who assembled the wunderkammer to impress his court guests, showing off his opulence and lavish wealth: cabinets of curiosities were actually an evolution of treasure chambers (schatzkammern) and of the great collections of artworks of the 1400s (kunstkammer).

This predilection of rare and expensive objects generated a thriving international commerce of naturalistic and ethnological items cominc from the Colonies.

The Theatre of the World

But wunderkammern were also meant as a sort of microcosm: they were supposed to represent the entirety of the known universe, or at least to hint at the incredibly vast number of creatures and natural shapes that are present in the world. Samuel Quiccheberg, in his treatise on the arrangement of a utopian museum, was the first to use the word “theatre”, but in reality – as we shall see later on – the idea of theatrical representation is one of the cardinal concepts in classical collections.

Because of its ability to represent the world, the wunderkammer was also understood as a true instrument of research, an investigation tool for natural philosophers.

The System of Knowledge

The organization of a huge array of materials did not initially follow any specific order, but rather proceeded from the collector’s own whims and taste. Little by little, though, the idea of cataloguing began to emerge, which at first entailed the distinction between three macro-categories known as naturalia, artificialia and mirabilia, later to be refined and expanded in different other classes (medicalia, exotica, scientifica, etc.).

Naturalia

Artificialia

Artificialia

Mirabilia

Mirabilia

Medicalia, exotica, scientifica

This ever growing need to distinguish, label and catalogue eventually led to Linnaeus’ taxonomy, to his dispute with Buffon, all the way to Lamarck, Cuvier and the foundation of the Louvre, which marks the birth of the modern museum as we know it.

The Aesthetics of Accumulation

Perhaps the most iconic and well-known aspect of wunderkammern is the cramming of objects, the horror vacui that prevented even the tiniest space from being left empty in the exposition of curiosities and bizarre artifacts gathered around the world.
This excessive aesthetic was not just, as we said in the beginning, a display of wealth, but aimed at astounding and baffling the visitor. And this stunned condition was an essential moment: the wonder at the Universe, that feeling called thauma, proceeds certainly from awe but it is inseparable from a sense of unease. To access this state of consciousness, from which philosophy is born, we need to step outof our comfort zone.

To be suddenly confronted with the incredible imagination of natural shapes, visually “assaulted” by the unthinkable moltitude of objects, was a disturbing experience. Aesthetics of the Sublime, rather than Beauty; this encyclopedic vertigo is the reason why Umberto Eco places wunderkammern among his examples of  “visual lists”.

Conservation and Representation

One of the basic goals of collecting was (and still is) the preservation of specimens and objects for study purposes or for posterity. Yet any preservation is already a representation.

When we enter a museum, we cannot be fully aware of the upstream choices that have been made in regard to the exhibit; but these choices are what creates the narrative of the museum itself, the very “tale” we are told room after room.

Multiple options are involved: what specimens are to be preserved, which technique is to be used to preserve them (the result will vary if a biological specimen is dried, texidermied, or put in a preserving fluid), how to group them, how to arrange their exhibit?
It is just like casting the best actors, choosing the stage costumes, a particular set design, and the internal script of the museum.

The most illuminating example is without doubt taxidermy, the ultimate simulacrum: of the original animal nothing is left but the skin, stretched on a dummy which mimics the features and posture of the beast. Glass eyes are applied to make it more convincing. That is to say, stuffed animals are meant to play the part of living animals. And when you think about it, there is no more “reality” in them than in one of those modern animatronic props we see in Natural History Museums.

But why do we need all this theatre? The answer lies in the concept of domestication.

Domestication: Nature vs. Culture

Nature is opposed to Culture since the time of ancient Greeks. Western Man has always felt the urge to keep his distance from the part of himself he perceived as primordial, chaotic, uncontrollable, bestial. The walls of the polis locked Nature outside, keeping Culture inside; and it’s not by chance that barbarians – seen as half-men half-beasts – were etymologically “those who stutter”, who remained outside of the logos.

The theatre, an advanced form of representation, was born in Athens likely as a substitute for previous ancient human sacrifices (cf. Réné Girard), and it served the same sacred purposes: to sublimate the animal desire of cruelty and violence. The tragic hero takes on the role of the sacrificial victim, and in fact the evidence of the sacred value of tragedies is in the fact that originally attending the theatrical plays was mandatory by law for all citizens.

Theatre is therefore the first attempt to domesticate natural instincts, to bring them literally “inside one’s home” (domus), to comprehend them within the logos in order to defuse their antisocial power. Nature only becomes pleasant and harmless once we narrate it, when we turn it into a scenic design.

And here’s why a stuffed lion (which is a narrated lion, the “image” of a lion as told through the fiction of taxidermy) is something we can comfortably place in our living room without any worry. All study of Nature, as it was conceived in the wunderkammern, was essentially the study of its representation.

By staging it, it was possible to exert a kind of control over Nature that would have been impossible otherwise. Accordingly, the symbol of the wunderkammern, that piece that no collection could do without, was the chained crocodile — bound and incapable of causing harm thanks to the ties of Reason, of logos, of knowledge.

It is worth noting, in closing this first part, that the symbology of the crocodile was also borrowed from the world of the sacred. These reptiles in chains first made their apparition in churches, and several examples can still be seen in Europe: in that instance, of course, they were meant as a reminder of the power and glory of Christ defeating Satan (and at the same time they impressed the believers, who in all probability had never seen such a beast).
A perfect example of sacred taxidermy; domestication as a bulwark against the wild, sinful unconscious; barrier bewteen natural and social instincts.

(Continues in Part Two)

Stupire! – The Festival of Wonders

There are places where the sediments of Time deposited, through the centuries, making the atmosphere thick and stratified like the different, subsequent architectural elements one can detect within a single building: in these places, the past never seems to have disappeared, it seems to survive — or at least we believe we can feel its vestigial traces.

Rocca Sanvitale in Fontanellato (Parma) is one of such majestic places of wonder: it has been the scene of conspiracies, battles, sieges, as well as — certainly — of laughters, romance, banquets and joy; a place full of art (Parmigianino was summoned to paint the fresco in the Room of Diane and Actaeon in 1523) and science (at the end of XIX Century the count Giovanni Sanvitale installed an incredible optical chamber inside the South tower, a device still functioning today).
Here, History is something you breathe. Walking through the rooms of the castle, you wouldn’t be surprised to encounter one of those faded ghosts who incessantly repeat the same gesture, trapped in a sadness deeper than death itself.

And it’s right inside these walls and towers that the first edition of Stupire!, the Festival of Wonders, will be held: three days of surprising shows, workshops, experiments, meetings with mentalists and mad scientists. The purpose of the event is to spread culture in entertaining and unexpected ways, using the tools of illusionism.

Behind this initiative, supported by the municipality of Fontanellato and organized in collaboration with the  Circolo Amici della Magia di Torino, are two absolutely extraordinary minds: Mariano Tomatis and Francesco Busani.

If you follow my blog, you may already know them: they appeared on these pages more than once, and they both performed at my Academy of Enchantment.
Mariano Tomatis (one of my personal heroes) is the fertile wonder injector who is revolutionizing the world of magic from the outside, so to speak. Half historian of illusionism, half philosopher of wonder, and for another additional half activist of enchantment, Mariano fathoms the psychological, sociological and political implications of the art of magic, succeeding in shifting its focal point towards a new balance. Starting from this year, his Blog of Wonders is twinned to Bizzarro Bazar.
If Mariano is the “theorist” of the duo, Francesco Busani is the true mentalist, experienced in bizarre magick, investigator of the occult and unrivaled raconteur. As he explained when I interviewed him months ago, he was among the first magicians to perform one-to-one mentalism in Italy.
This partnership has already given birth to Project Mesmer, a hugely successful mentalism workshop. The Stupire! festival is the crowning result of this collaboration, perhaps their most visionary endeavour.

I will have the honor of opening the Festival, together with Mariano, on May 19.
During our public meeting I will talk about collecting curiosities, macabre objects, ancient cabinets of wonder and neo-wunderkammern. I will also bring some interesting pieces, directly from my own collection.

In the following days, besides Busani’s and Tomatis’ amazing talks performances (you really need to see them to understand how deep they can reach through their magic), the agenda features: Diego Allegri‘s trickeries and shadow puppets, street magic by Hyde, Professor Alchemist and his crazy experiments; Gianfranco Preverino, among the greatest experts in gambling and cheating, will close the festival.
But the event will not be limited to the inside of the castle. On Saturday and Sunday, the streets of Fontanellato will become the scene for the unpredictable guerrilla magic of the group Double Joker Face: surprise exhibitions in public spaces, baffling bystanders.
If that wasn’t enough, all day long on Saturday and Sunday, just outside the Rocca, those who seek forgotten oddities will have a chance to sift through a magic and antique market.

Lastly, Mariano Tomatis’ motto “Magic to the People!” will result in a final, very welcome abracadabra: all the events you just read about will be absolutely free of charge (until seats are available).
Three days of culture, illusionism and wonder in a place where, as we said in the beginning, History is all around. A week-end that will undoubtedly leave the participants with more enchanted eyes.
Because the world does not need more magic, but our own gaze does.

Here you can find the detailed schedule, complete with links to reserve seats for free.

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 5

Here’s a gift pack of strange food for the mind and weird stuff that should keep you busy until Christmas.

  • You surely remember Caitlin Doughty, founder  of the Order of the Good Death as well as author of best-seller Smoke Gets in Your Eyes. In the past I interviewd her, I wrote a piece for the Order, and I even flew to Philadelphia to meet her for a three-day conference.
    Caitlin is also famous for her ironic videos on the culture of death. The latest episode is dedicated to a story that will surely sound familiar, if you follow this blog: the story of the ‘Punsihed Suicide’ of Padua, which was published for the first time in my book His Anatomical Majesty.
    With her trademark humor, Caitlin succeeds in asking what in my view is the fundamental question: is it worth judging a similar episode by our contemporary ethical standards, or is it better to focus on what this tale can tell us about our history and about the evolution of sensibility towards death?

  • In 1966 a mysterious box washed up on a British shore: it contained swords, chandeliers, red capes, and a whole array of arcane symbols related to occultism. What was the function of these objects, and why were they left to the waves?
  • While we’re at it, here is an autopsy photograph from the 1920s, probably taken in Belgium. Was pipe smoking a way of warding off the bad smell?
    (Seen here, thanks again Claudia!)

  • A new photographic book on evolution is coming out, and it looks sumptuous. Robert Clark’s wonderful pictures carry a disquieting message: “Some scientists who study evolution in real time believe we may be in the midst of the world’s sixth mass extinction, a slow-motion funnel of death that will leave the planet with a small fraction of its current biodiversity. One reason that no one can forecast how it will end—and who will be left standing—is that, in many ways, our understanding of evolution itself continues to evolve“.
  • But don’t get too alarmed: our world might eventually be just an illusion. Sure, this concept is far from new: all the great spiritual, mythological or artistic messages have basically been repeating us for millennia that we should not trust our senses, suggesting ther is more to this reality than meets the eye. Yet, up until now, no one had ever tried to prove this mathematically. Until now.
    A cognitive science professor at the University of California elaborated an intriguing model that is causing a bit of a fuss: his hypothesis is that our perception has really nothing to do with the world out there, as it is; our sensory filter might not have evolved to give us a realistic image of things, but rather a convenient one. Here is an article on the Atlantic, and here is a podcast in which our dear professor quietly tears down everything we think we know about the world.
  • Nonsense, you say? What if I told you that highly evolved aliens could already be among us — without the need for a croncrete body, but in the form of laws of physics?

Other brilliant ideas: Goodyear in 1961 developed these illuminated tires.

  • Mariano Tomatis’ Blog of Wonders is actually Bizzarro Bazar’s less morbid, but more magical twin. You could spend days sifting through the archives, and always come up with some pearl you missed the first time: for example this post on the hidden ‘racism’ of those who believe Maya people came from outer space (Italian only).
  • In Medieval manuscripts we often find some exceedingly unlucky figures, which had the function of illustrating all possible injuries. Here is an article on the history and evolution of the strange and slightly comic Wound Man.

  • Looking at colored paint spilled on milk? Not really a mesmerizing thought, until you take four minutes off and let yourself be hypnotized by Memories of Painting, by Thomas Blanchard.

  • Let’s go back to the fallacy of our senses, ith these images of the Aspidochelone (also called Zaratan), one of the fantastical beasts I adored as a child. The idea of a sea monster so huge that it could be mistaken for an island, and on whose back even vegetation can grow, had great fortune from Pliny to modern literature:

  • But the real surprise is to find that the Zaratan actually exists, albeit in miniature:

  • Saddam Hussein, shortly after his sixtieth birthday, had 27 liters of his own blood taken just to write a 600-page calligraphied version of the Quran.
    An uncomfortable manuscript, so much so that authorities don’t really know what to do with it.
  • Time for a couple of Christmas tips, in case you want to make your decorations slightly menacing: 1) a set of ornaments featuring the faces of infamous serial killers, namely Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey DahmerEd Gein and H. H. Holmes; 2) a murderous Santa Claus. Make your guests understand festivities stress you out, and that might trigger some uncontrolled impulse. If you wish to buy these refined, tasteful little objects, just click on pictures to go to the corresponding Etsy store. You’re welcome.

  • Finally, if you run out of gift ideas for Christmas and you find yourself falling back on the usual book, at least make sure it’s not the usual book. Here are four random, purely coincidental examples…
    Happy holidays!

(Click on image to open bookshop)

Speciale: Francesco Busani

Sono ormai diversi anni che mi interesso di illusionismo.
Intendiamoci, non ho neanche mai provato a far sparire un fazzoletto: quello che mi intriga è la portata simbolica del gioco di prestigio, lo scarto di prospettiva che opera, ma soprattutto il potere performativo di rendere instabile il confine tra realtà e finzione. La capacità dell’illusionista di toglierci il terreno sotto i piedi senza ricorrere a tanti giri di parole teorici, con un semplice gesto.
Eppure più si studia, più ci si accorge che a rendere possibile la magia è ancora e sempre la storia che si sta raccontando. Che sia sotterranea o esplicita, la narrativa rimane il vero meccanismo dell’incanto (o dell’inganno).

Quando il mentalista Francesco Busani ha accettato di partecipare all’inaugurazione dell’Accademia dell’Incanto, ho studiato la sua performance nei minimi dettagli.
Non tanto per scoprire i suoi trucchi — esercizio tutto sommato sterile e destinato alla delusione, perché come insegna Teller, “il segreto più grande dietro la messa in scena di un effetto magico che inganni in modo efficace è quello di realizzarlo con un metodo il più brutto possibile”.
No, il suo trucco migliore lo conoscevo già: sapevo che, prima di tutto, Busani è un eccezionale storyteller (uno storyteller “con gli effetti speciali”, come ama definirsi). Così mi sono concentrato sul modo in cui egli tirava i fili della sua narrazione. E sono rimasto con un sorriso stampato sul volto per l’intero show.
Perché durante un suo spettacolo succede qualcosa di strano: tutti ci rendiamo conto razionalmente che le storie fantastiche che Busani racconta sono, almeno in parte, frutto di fantasia; ma non sappiamo fino a che punto, e ci accorgiamo con sorpresa che esiste un’incontrollabile parte di noi che è disposta a crederci.

Un solo esempio: Busani ha raccontato la storia di due monete seppellite per anni assieme a un morto, sugli occhi del cadavere. Con l’aiuto di una spettatrice che si è offerta volontaria dal pubblico, in una routine che non vi svelo, le monete hanno dimostrato di aver acquisito virtù esoteriche e misteriose, a causa del prolungato contatto con la salma.
A colpirmi non è stato soltanto l’effetto finale, pure strabiliante, bensì un altro dettaglio a cui magari pochi hanno prestato attenzione: a chiusura del suo gioco, Francesco ha consegnato le monete nel palmo della spettatrice, e quest’ultima con uno scatto immediato e del tutto involontario ha tirato indietro le mani per non toccarle.

Ecco, quando quelle due monete sono cadute rumorosamente sul tavolo ho compreso quale eccezionale narratore fosse Francesco Busani.

Gran parte del fascino deriva proprio dal fatto che egli fa il “verso”, per così dire, a medium e sensitivi. Possiamo guardare con superiorità chi si affida a cartomanti e maghi, ma con un semplice gioco di prestigio raccontato nella giusta maniera Busani ci dimostra quanto il mito sia ancora intrinsecamente e inconsciamente efficace sulla nostra mente. E non è solo una lezione di umiltà: è anche a suo modo un tributo alla potenza della sconfinata fantasia umana.

Non mi sono dunque lasciato sfuggire l’occasione, la mattina successiva, di fargli qualche domanda in più sulla sua professione.

Partiamo dalla domanda inevitabile: quando e come hai cominciato a interessarti al paranormale da una parte, e all’illusionismo dall’altra?

Il mio è un percorso piuttosto anomalo per un mentalista.  Non mi sono formato nei club magici o negli ambienti dove si ritrovano i prestigiatori, ma arrivo del mondo della ricerca sul paranormale e sull’occulto, che ho coltivato fin da quando, a circa 12 anni, mi sono spaventato durante una seduta spiritica. In quel momento ho capito che l’unico modo per esorcizzare le mie paure era capire se potevano realmente esistere sistemi per contattare l’aldilà.
Successivamente mi sono interessato anche alle facoltà ESP, a figure di sensitivi e medium e ai casi di cronaca misteriosi. Durante tutti questi anni ho visitato luoghi infestati, cimiteri, castelli, ho visto all’opera sensitivi, cartomanti e anche qualche medium. Ho partecipato a ritiri spirituali, ascoltato decine di testimonianze relative a situazioni paranormali, letto centinaia di libri scritti sia da scettici che da believer. Visto che la maggior parte delle persone di cui sentivo o leggevo le testimonianze erano in buona fede, ho cominciato a chiedermi come mai io, assieme ad altre migliaia di ricercatori, non riuscissi a verificare alcunché di particolare.
Questo percorso è proseguito in parallelo con quello religioso di cattolico praticante fino ai ventiquattro anni, quando sono giunto alla conclusione che non esistono prove oggettive e scientifiche di fenomenologie paranormali. In quel preciso momento mi sono staccato anche dal percorso religioso che avevo mantenuto fino a quel momento solo per motivi sociali.
Infine ho scoperto che esistevano illusionisti che, utilizzando perlopiù tecniche derivate dai medium, “simulavano” i prodigi delle sedute spiritiche. Da lì al mentalismo il passo è stato breve.

Ti definisci “scettico al 100%”, eppure a fini scenici utilizzi tutto l’armamentario simbolico dell’occultismo e del paranormale. Non c’è una contraddizione?

Essere scettici e mentalisti non è per nulla un contraddizione: anzi forse è vero il contrario. I più grandi performer, da Derren Brown a Silvan solo per citarne due conosciuti in Italia, sono dichiaratamente scettici. E d’altronde se qualcuno possedesse doti paranormali, non avrebbe bisogno né di definirsi mentalista, né di mantenere il segreto sulle sue tecniche… né probabilmente di esibirsi per soldi!
La mia scelta stilistica, nella maggior parte dei miei spettacoli, è quella di utilizzare contesti e narrazioni che richiamano il mondo dell’occulto e dello spiritismo. Il mentalista è un intrattenitore – non dimentichiamolo – e la sua performance consiste nel sospendere l’incredulità nello spettatore. Questo processo avviene per gradi.
All’inizio di un mio show lo spettatore è cosciente che sta assistendo ad uno spettacolo. Poi, passo dopo passo, uso varie tecniche ed effetti per traghettare lo spettatore verso uno stato di dubbio sempre più profondo, fino a quando non è più in grado di capire dove finisce la finzione e inizia la realtà.

Nei tuoi spettacoli ti poni in maniera radicalmente differente rispetto ai classici mentalisti che sfoggiano “superpoteri” e abilità psichiche sovrumane: spesso si ha la sensazione che tu voglia rimanere un po’ in disparte, come se la tua funzione fosse quella del catalizzatore e del testimone di eventi inspiegabili, piuttosto che il loro diretto artefice. In altre parole, eviti programmaticamente l’effetto “et voilà!”.
Quanto è difficile per un performer questa rimozione dell’ego? Non rischia di diminuire l’impatto dei tuoi trucchi?

Penso che il mentalismo raggiunga il suo effetto più dirompente quando è il pubblico stesso a realizzare dei prodigi. Lo spettatore si aspetta che un illusionista possa stupirlo, ma non che sarà stupito da se stesso.
Questo scarto, seppure non sempre attuabile, è a parer mio l’ultimo gradino della trasmissione della meraviglia al pubblico, quello più alto. Infatti io spesso ci arrivo per gradi. Ad esempio in uno spettacolo scritto da me e dall’amico Luca Speroni, abile mentalista e copywriter, accadeva che ogni effetto magico fosse un passo per far acquisire al pubblico (tutto il pubblico in sala!) i poteri tipici delle guaritrici magiche che ancora oggi esistono nell’Appennino Tosco-Emiliano. Attraverso alcuni riti e un percorso ascetico ogni spettatore che saliva sul palco si trovava ad avere questi poteri sempre più amplificati.
Oppure prendi il mio intervento durante una conferenza/spettacolo con il collettivo Wu Ming e Mariano Tomatis (esiste un video della performance su YouTube): sono riuscito a far gridare a tutto il pubblico una parola che lo spettatore sul palcoscenico aveva soltanto pensato. L’effetto è stato stranissimo: le persone tra il pubblico si guardavano l’un l’altro divertite e si chiedevano come potesse essere accaduto.
Detto questo, non esiste un “modo corretto” per trasmettere lo stupore al pubblico: ogni performer deve trovare il proprio. Il mentalista-superuomo in determinati casi potrebbe far pesare troppo la sua abilità e risultare altezzoso, ma è anche vero che ci sono colleghi preparatissimi che rivestono in modo magistrale il personaggio del mentalista con poteri da X-Men.
Dipende anche dalla situazione. Lo spostamento dell’attenzione sullo spettatore funziona bene con un pubblico non troppo numeroso, ma spesso di fronte a platee più ampie, ad esempio negli spettacoli aziendali, rimango invece vestito dell’abito tipico del mentalista.

Al di là dei tuoi spettacoli di bizarre magic, hai sviluppato un’originale declinazione di mentalismo one-to-one. Come cambia il tuo lavoro quando ti trovi di fronte a un solo spettatore? Quali libertà ti puoi permettere, e a quali devi rinunciare?

Amo in particolar modo il contesto one-to-one, mi consente di esibirmi in ambienti e ambiti in cui spesso sarebbe impossibile realizzare uno spettacolo. Lavorare davanti a un solo spettatore è una bella sfida, sia psicologicamente che tecnicamente: sono indispensabili grande empatia, capacità di improvvisazione e sicurezza. La libertà che ti puoi permettere è quella di “affidare” allo spettatore stesso una parte dell’effetto, vale a dire che è lui che ne elabora e ne gestisce il senso, il significato speciale che un gioco può ricoprire rispetto alla sua sfera personale. Di contro, parlavamo di egocentrismo del performer: ecco, nel one-to-one devi assolutamente scordartelo, va messo da parte e soprattutto dal punto di vista etico bisogna rinunciare alla tentazione del potere quasi illimitato che quel ruolo, in quel momento, ti consentirebbe di avere.

Nel libro Magia a tu per tu racconti nel dettaglio come sei arrivato a costruire i tuoi effetti migliori, e in generale risulta evidente il perfezionismo nello studiare ogni minimo dettaglio della performance. Ti spingi perfino a dare suggerimenti minuziosi sulla logistica, su come posizionare o preparare la scena, eccetera. Eppure una delle cose che mi ha più colpito sono i passaggi in cui, di contro, parli dell’importanza dell’improvvisazione: quei preziosi momenti in cui – magari per quello che potrebbe sembrare a prima vista un incredibile colpo di fortuna – il numero travalica l’intento originario, e diventa qualcosa di più, sorprendendo perfino te stesso. Questo tipo di “fiuto” che ti permette di volgere la casualità a tuo favore, ho il sospetto che nasca proprio dalla meticolosità della preparazione, dall’esperienza. In che misura lasci la porta aperta all’imprevisto?

Un mentalista deve saper cogliere ogni situazione che si crea durante la performance, e volgerla a proprio favore. Non di rado, sia sul palco che in one-to-one, un’informazione ricevuta dallo spettatore permette di creare una variazione che risulta molto più potente dell’effetto magico programmato che, a quel punto, passa in secondo piano e può essere accantonato.
Chiaramente ogni improvvisazione, sia in ambito musicale che teatrale o illusionistico, necessita di una perfetta conoscenza della materia: da qui la maniacale preparazione di tutta l’impalcatura che deve sorreggere una mia performance.
Questa caratteristica di cambiare repentinamente traiettoria è anche una delle differenze che si notano tra gli illusionisti ed i sensitivi: i primi solitamente propongono allo spettatore uno schema che rimane invariato indipendentemente da ciò che lo spettatore comunica (volontariamente o involontariamente). Al contrario i sensitivi, dai quali io prendo ispirazione, sono estremamente opportunisti e se colgono uno spiraglio da cui possono trarre maggior stupore lo utilizzano al volo. Certo, è molto meno faticoso proporre una routine magica in modo “meccanico”, ma penso che la seconda strada porti a risultati eccezionali, e regali grande soddisfazione anche allo spettatore.

Qual è il tuo consiglio d’oro per qualcuno che volesse muovere i primi passi sulla strada del mentalismo?

Vorresti conseguire il brevetto di volo in una scuola dove nessun insegnante ha mai volato? Piuttosto rischioso… Eppure in questi anni ho visto nascere corsi di mentalismo tenuti da performer che non hanno mai fatto uno show in vita loro. Analoga situazione per i libri e i corsi online: hanno la pretesa di spiegare tecniche ed effetti, ma del loro ideatore non trovi traccia. Hai un bel cercare uno show del “docente” per andare a vederlo in scena, è tutto inutile: mai una foto di lui sul palco, mai una recensione. Ecco perché consiglio di frequentare lezioni e corsi tenuti di mentalisti che lavorano sul serio a contatto con il pubblico, che fanno davvero spettacolo.
Diverso è il discorso per i libri di storia dell’illusionismo, di storytelling e di principi generali: in Italia abbiamo scrittori riconosciuti in tutto il mondo, uno per tutti Mariano Tomatis che con il suo ambizioso progetto Mesmer – Lezioni di mentalismo ha realizzato una vera e propria enciclopedia relativa alla storia del mentalismo partendo dal ‘700.

Anche il mestiere ideale ha sempre qualche lato frustrante. C’è qualche aspetto del tuo lavoro che proprio non ti va giù?

La frustrazione inizia quando non si è più in grado di esprimere se stessi dal punto di vista artistico. Per questo motivo cerco sempre di rinnovarmi, e presentare testi che siano stimolanti per me, prima ancora che per il pubblico. Per ora non ho incontrato aspetti negativi, forse perché il mentalismo, pur essendo la mia professione, non riesco ancora a considerarlo un lavoro: rimane sempre la più grande delle mie passioni.

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Francesco Busani.

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 1

Almost every post appearing on these pages is the result of several days of specific study, finding sources, visiting the National Library, etc. It often happens that this continuous research makes me stumble upon little wonders which perhaps do not deserve a full in-depth analysis, but I nonetheless feel sorry to lose along the way.

I have therefore decided to occasionally allow myself a mini-post like this one, where I can point out the best bizarre news I’ve come across in recent times, passed on by followers, mentioned on Twitter (where I am more active than on other social media) or retrieved from my archive.

The idea — and I candidly admit it, since we’re all friends here — is also kind of useful since this is a time of great excitement for Bizzarro Bazar.
In addition to completing the draft for the new book in the BB Collection, of which I cannot reveal any details yet, I am working on a demanding but thrilling project, a sort of offline, real-world materialization of Bizzarro Bazar… in all probability, I will be able to give you more precise news about it next month.

There, enough said, here’s some interesting stuff. (Sorry, some of my own old posts linked here and there are in Italian only).

  • The vicissitudes of Haydn’s head: Wiki page, and 1954 Life Magazine issue with pictures of the skull’s burial ceremony. This story is reminiscent of Descartes’s skull, of which I’ve written here. (Thanks, Daniele!)
  • In case you missed it, here’s my article (in English) for Illustrati Magazine, about midget pornstar Bridget Powers.
  • Continuing my exploration of human failure, here is a curious film clip of a “triphibian” vehicle, which was supposed to take over land, water and the skies. Spoiler: it didn’t go very far.

  • In the Sixties, the western coast of Lake Victoria in Tanzania fell prey to a laughter epidemics.
  • More recent trends: plunging into a decomposing whale carcass to cure rheumatism. Caitlin Doughty (whom I interviewed here) teaches you all about it in a very funny video.

  • Found what could be the first autopsy ever recorded on film (warning, strong images). Our friend pathologist says: “This film clip is a real gem, really beautiful, and the famous Dr. Erdheim’s dissecting skills are remarkable: he does everything with a single knife, including cutting the breastbone (very elegant! I use some kind of poultry shears instead); he proceeds to a nice full evisceration, at least of thoracic organs (you can’t see the abdomen) from tongue to diaphragm, which is the best technique to maintain the connection between viscera, and… he doesn’t get splattered at all! He also has the table at the right height: I don’t know why but in our autopsy rooms they keep on using very high tables, and therefore you have to step on a platform at the risk of falling down in you lean back too much. It is also interesting to see all the activity behind and around the pathologist, they were evidently working on more than one table at the same time. I think the pathologist was getting his hands dirty for educational reasons only, otherwise there would have been qualified dissectors or students preparing the bodies for him. It’s quite a sight to see him push his nose almost right into the cadaver’s head, without wearing any PPE…”

  • A long, in-depth and thought-provoking article on cryonics: if you think it’s just another folly for rich people who can’t accept death, you will be surprised. The whole thing is far more intriguing.
  • For dessert, here is my interview for The Thinker’s Garden, a wonderful website on the arcane and sublime aspects of art, history and literature.

La mamma e i suoi coltelli

Un Guglielmo Tell in gonnella nel Texas degli anni ’50? Perché no?

La signora Louella Gallagher non batte ciglio mentre lancia i suoi coltelli verso le due figlie Connie Ann, di cinque anni, e Colleena Sue, di due e mezzo. In questo cinegiornale del 1950, l’impresa si svolge nella surreale atmosfera di un quartiere borghese; mentre la madre, vestita con il buon gusto di una casalinga di quegli anni, delizia il vicinato con la sua mira infallibile.

Tradizionalmente in ambito circense i lanciatori di coltelli sono maschi e la “vittima” è femmina, che sia una deriva maschilista – come per il numero magico della donna segata a metà (ricordate questo documentario di Mariano Tomatis?) – o meno; qui di certo siamo di fronte a una versione piuttosto inedita di questo spettacolo. Ma d’altronde, come dice il lanciatore di coltelli Gabor in La ragazza sul ponte (1999, Patrice Leconte), “ricorda, non è chi lancia l’importante – è il bersaglio“. Il bersaglio, in effetti, non è semplicemente un manichino inerte, quanto piuttosto il vero fulcro dell’identificazione del pubblico, e a lui è rivolta tutta l’ammirazione per il coraggio e la fiducia assoluta dimostrati nell’abilità del lanciatore.
Difficile vedere due “bersagli” più educati e composti di Connie e Colleena. D’altronde, con una mamma così, bisognava davvero esserlo.

Speciale: Mariano Tomatis

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Ama l’appellativo di wonder injector, istillatore di meraviglia o “tecnico dello stupore”. Quello che comincia come un rapido giro sul suo sito o sul suo blog si trasforma inevitabilmente in un viaggio di diverse ore, in preda ad una vertigine crescente. È difficile raccontare o definire Mariano Tomatis, ed è bello che lo sia.

Mariano si occupa di illusionismo, magia, matematica, criminologia e tecnologia. Ma, qualsiasi campo stia affrontando, lo fa inevitabilmente da un punto di vista inaspettato. Il suo lavoro è tutto proteso a un nuovo modo di relazionarsi con la meraviglia, a farla irrompere nel nostro quotidiano superando i modi triti e ritriti di quei misteri che in queste pagine abbiamo spesso definito “da supermarket”, preconfezionati, tipici di tanti libri o trasmissioni televisive.

Mariano Tomatis è il tipo di persona che, leggendo uno strano trattato esoterico seicentesco contenente alcune tavole crittografate secondo un sistema complicatissimo, si domanda: che tipo di computer avranno usato per codificarlo, all’epoca? E lo costruisce.

20130322m

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

20130322f

20130322g
È anche il tipo di persona che, vedendo l’ennesimo numero di magia in cui una bella ragazza viene tagliata a metà, sa scorgerne le implicazioni sessiste e non esita a raccontarci come un numero simile sia nato sorprendentemente proprio da problematiche politiche legati agli albori dei diritti della donna (in questo breve documentario).

20130526f

20130526h
O, ancora, esaminando uno dei quadri più celebri della storia dell’arte ci racconta le infinite risme di ipotesi, sempre più fantascientifiche, che il dipinto ha originato… per poi gelarci con un’interpretazione molto più semplice e illuminante.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jvE_hcbxrM]

La performance che ha scritto assieme a Ferdinando Buscema ha aperto Ingenuity, una sontuosa celebrazione dell’intelligenza, della curiosità e della meraviglia che ha coinvolto scienziati, artisti, scrittori, designer, musicisti e maghi provenienti da tutto il mondo, organizzata da BoingBoing, uno dei siti di informazione geek e cyberpunk più letti al mondo. Potete vedere la performance qui.

20130814c

Oltre ad aver scritto libri sul mentalismo, sui numeri e sull’illusionismo, Mariano ci regala continuamente nuovi stimoli, riportando storie curiose e poco note che affronta con scrupolo, determinato com’è a “illuminare le meraviglie sul confine tra Scienza e Mistero”.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
In esclusiva per Bizzarro Bazar, ecco la nostra intervista a Mariano Tomatis.

Qual è la tua formazione?

Ho una laurea in Informatica e mi occupo di illusionismo da quindici anni.

Come hai incominciato ad appassionarti di illusionismo, misteri e scienza?

Recentemente ho ritrovato un tema scritto quando facevo le elementari, in cui mi ripromettevo – quando fossi stato “grande” – di fare luce sui principali misteri: dal mostro di Lochness al triangolo delle Bermude, fino alla perduta città di Atlantide. Ho incontrato l’illusionismo ammirando il mago Silvan e formandomi sulle sue scatole magiche. Vivendo a Torino, ho avuto la fortuna di scoprire e frequentare il Circolo Amici della Magia, dove l’arte magica è particolarmente valorizzata. Da qualche anno, insieme a Ferdinando Buscema, stiamo definendo il concetto di “magic experience design” – un approccio all’illusionismo che trascende il contesto teatrale e interviene sulla realtà, facendo succedere eventi magici nel quotidiano.

Il tuo approccio ai cosiddetti “misteri” (quello di Rennes-le-Château viene in mente per primo) è del tutto originale – ironico, scettico, e allo stesso tempo entusiasta: come concili queste tendenze? Si può dire che tu stia sfruttando il fascino di questi enigmi per parlarci in realtà di qualcos’altro?

Conciliare una consapevolezza razionale e un’immersione ingenua nei misteri potrebbe sembrare il tentativo di avere la botte piena e la moglie ubriaca, eppure si tratta di un equilibrio su cui molti autori hanno scritto pagine brillanti. Michael Saler lo chiama “incanto disincantato”. Joshua Landy parla di “sistemi di credenze consapevoli della propria illusorietà”. Orhan Pamuk confessa di scrivere romanzi la cui funzione principale è quella di coltivare tale capacità nel lettore. Il padre della prestigiazione moderna, Robert-Houdin, costruiva i suoi spettacoli in modo da premiare un atteggiamento di distaccata credulità. Con Sherlock Holmes, Conan Doyle ha creato un personaggio talmente verosimile che oggi i suoi fan continuano a visitare la sua casa in Baker Street a Londra, del tutto consapevoli di partecipare a un gioco. Coltivare nel lettore moderno questo atteggiamento è una scelta estetica a cui aderisco pienamente.
Nel dichiarare i suoi intenti, il Cicap afferma di usare il fascino dei misteri per spiegare la Scienza. Nel mio caso, spiegare la Scienza è solo un effetto collaterale: il mio intento è quello di contribuire al re-incantamento del mondo, e credo che il miglior modo di farlo sia l’educazione all’incanto disincantato.

In diversi tuoi lavori si avverte una particolare vertigine, che è quella di non poter esattamente sapere a che punto finiscono i fatti, e quando incomincia il “trucco”. Anche qui ho la sensazione che mischiare realtà e finzione sia, certamente, un gioco divertente; ma al tempo stesso, vista la sistematicità con cui lo utilizzi, che vi sia dietro un progetto più preciso.

Credo di averti risposto sopra. Per citare un altro dei miei autori più amati, Lovecraft mescolò in modi raffinati realtà e finzione, producendo potenti sensazioni di straniamento attraverso i suoi racconti. Nel suo Weird Realism: Lovecraft and Philosophy Graham Harman ne esplora le tecniche narrative con una notevole ampiezza di analisi. Leggendo Harman, oggi mi chiedo come Lovecraft avrebbe sfruttato Twitter, Facebook e YouTube per produrre le stesse sensazioni disturbanti. Accostare personaggi di epoche lontane alle moderne tecnologie offre straordinari spunti creativi. Se c’è un progetto dietro la sistematicità con cui lavoro su questi confini, esso riguarda la possibilità di portare alla luce modi per meravigliare sempre nuovi, più profondi e al passo coi tempi. E magari di ispirare un Lovecraft 2.0!

Lovecraft-Facebook
Il mentalismo è intrigante soprattutto in quanto smaschera le trappole del nostro pensiero. Si può dire che vi sia un utilizzo “sano” del mistero e della meraviglia, e un altro invece “pericoloso”?

Michael Saler identifica nell’ironia l’elemento che è alla base della meraviglia “sana”. Inganno (e autoinganno) diventano pericolosi dove non c’è consapevolezza ironica, ma aperta volontà di approfittare di un altro individuo. Dovremmo sempre tenere in mente le parole di Joseph Pulitzer: «Non esiste delitto, inganno, trucco, imbroglio e vizio che non vivano della loro segretezza. Portate alla luce del giorno questi segreti, descriveteli, rendeteli ridicoli agli occhi di tutti e prima o poi la pubblica opinione li getterà via. La sola divulgazione di per sé non è forse sufficiente, ma è l’unico mezzo senza il quale falliscono tutti gli altri».

Hai parlato di educazione alla complessità: come sta cambiando, o come deve secondo te cambiare, la magia nell’era tecnologica, non soltanto a livello di nuovi strumenti ma anche di portata etica?

La mentalità postmoderna deve contaminare l’illusionismo molto più di quanto abbia fatto finora. È ora che i prestigiatori si interroghino seriamente sul ruolo che possono avere le loro storie nel mondo contemporaneo. Terence McKenna diceva che «il vero segreto della magia è che il mondo è fatto di parole, e che se tu conosci le parole di cui il mondo è fatto puoi farne quello che vuoi». Anche se sembra una considerazione esoterica, è un’immagine precisa del potere che hanno le storie nel plasmare la realtà. Concordo con Wu Ming 4 quando scrive che “le narrazioni ci appartengono almeno quanto noi apparteniamo a esse. Noi interagiamo con le narrazioni allo stesso modo in cui interagiamo con il mondo che ci circonda, consapevoli che per cambiarlo abbiamo innanzi tutto bisogno di raccontarlo diversamente”. Credo che l’illusionismo, come la letteratura militante, possa avere una dimensione marziale – e che tale forza sia ampiamente da esplorare. Il mio documentario Donne a metà (2013) va in quella direzione. Penn&Teller sono la coppia di illusionisti più all’avanguardia su questo versante.

magic-and-the-brain_1

Da specialista dell’incanto per il tuo pubblico, c’è qualcosa oggi che riesce ad incantare te?

Continuamente. Aderisco totalmente alla metafora che David Pescovitz usò per rispondere alla domanda della rivista Edge “Che cosa ti rende ottimista?” L’editor del blog BoingBoing scrisse di essere ottimista perché il mondo è una gigantesca Wunderkammer, pronta a stupirci a ogni angolo.
Un blog come il tuo ha il grande valore di dimostrarlo quotidianamente.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y13tSEyOqGs]

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Mariano Tomatis.