Inanimus, Monsters & Chimeras of the Present

I look above me, towards the movable hooks once used to hang the meat, and I visualize the blood and pain that these walls had to contain – sustain – for many long years. Death and pain are the instruments life has to proceed, I tell myself.

I’m standing inside Padua’s former slaughterhouse: a space specifically devised for massacre, where now animals are living a second, bizarre life thanks to Alberto Michelon’s artworks.
When I meet him, he immediately infects me with the feverish enthusiasm of someone who is lucky (and brave) enough to be following his own vocation. What comes out of his mouth must clearly be a fifth of what goes through his mind. As John Waters put it, “without obsession, life is nothing“.
Animals and taxidermy are Alberto’s obsession.

Taxidermy is traditionally employed in two main fields: hunting trophies, and didactical museum installations.
In both context, the demand for taxidermic preparations is declining. On one hand we are witnessing a drop in hunting activities, which find less and less space in European culture as opposed to ecological preoccupations and the evolution of the ethical sensitiviy towards animals. On the other hand, even great Natural History Museums already have their well-established collections and seldom acquire new specimens: often a taxidermist is only called when restoration is required on already prepared animals.

This is why – Alberto explains – I mainly work for private customers who want to preserve their domestic pets. It is more difficult, because you have to faithfully recreate the cat or dog’s expressiveness based on their photographs; preparing a much-loved and familiar pet requires the greatest care. But I get a huge satisfaction when the job turns out well. Customers often burst into tears, they talk to the animal – when I present them with the finished work, I always step aside and leave them a bit of intimacy. It’s something that helps them coming to terms with their loss.”

What he says doesn’t surprise me: in a post on wunderkammern I associated taxidermy’s second youth (after a time in which it looked like this art had become obsolete) to the social need of reconfiguring our relationship with death.
But the reason I came here is Alberto is not just an ordinary taxidermist: he is Italy’s only real exponent of artistic taxiermy.

Until November 5, here at the ex-slaughterhouse, you can visit his exhibition Inanimus – A Contemporary Bestiary, a collection of his main works.
To a casual observer, artistic non-naturalist taxidermy could seem not fully respectful towards the animal. In realuty, most artists who use animal organic material as a medium do so just to reflect on our own relationship with other species, creating their works from ethical sources (animals who died of natural causes, collected in the wild, etc.).

Alberto too follows such professional ethics, as he began his experiment using leftovers from his workshop. “I was sorry to have to throw away pieces of skin, or specimens that wouldn’t find an arrangement“, he tells me. “It began almost like a diversion, in a very impulsive way, following a deep urge“.
He candidly confesses that he doesn’t know much about the American Rogue Taxidermy scene, nor about modern art galleries. And it’s clear that Alberto is somewhat alien to the contemporary art universe, so often haughty and pretentious: he keeps talking about instinct, about playing, but must of all – oh, the horror! – he takes the liberty of doing what no “serious” artist would ever dream of doing: he explains the message of his own works, one by one.

His installations really have much to say: rather than carrying messages, though, they are food for thought, a continuous and many-sided elaboration of the modernity, an attempt to use these animal remains as a mirror to investigate our own face.
Some of his works immediately strike me for the openness with which they take on current events: from the tragedy of migrants to GMOs, from euthanasia to the present-day fear of terrorist attacks.

I don’t think I’ve ever seen any other artist using taxidermy to confront the present in such a direct way.
A roe deer head covered in snake skin, wearing an orange uniform reminiscent of Islamic extremists’ prisoners, is chained to the wall. The reference is obvious: the heads of decapitated infidels are assimilated to hunting trophies.
To be honest, I find this explicit allusion to current events imagery (which, like it or not, has gained a “pop” quality) pretty unsettling, and I’m not even sure that I like it – but if something pulls the rug out from under my feet, I bless it anyways. This is what the best art is supposed to do.

Other installations are meant to illustrate Western contradictions, halfway through satire and open criticism to a capitalistic system ever harder to sustain.
A tortoise, represented as an old bejeweled lady with saggy breasts, is the emblem of a conservative society based on economic privilege: a “prehistoric” concept that, just like the reptile, has refused to evolve in any way.

A conqueror horse, fierce and rampant, exhibits a luxurious checked fur composed from several equines.
A social climber horse: to be where he stands, he must have done away with many other horses“, Alberto tells me with a smile.

An installation shows the internal organs of a tiger, preserved in jars that are arranged following the animal’s anatomy: the eyes, tomgue and brain are placed at the extremity where the head should be, and so on. Some chimeras seem to be in the middle of a bondage session: an allusion to poaching for aphrodisiac elixirs such as the rhino horn, and to the fil rouge linking us to those massacres.

A boar, sitting on a toilet, is busy reading a magazine and searching for a pair of glass eyes to fill his empty eye sockets.
The importance of freedom of choice regarding the end of life is incarnated by two minks who hanged themselves – rather than ending up in a fur coat.
The skulls of three livestock animals are hanged like trophies, and plastic flowers come out of the hole bored by the slaughterhouse firearm (“I picked up the flowers from the graves at the cemetery, replacing them with new flowers“, Michelon tells me).

As you might have understood by now, the most interesting aspect of the Inanimus works is the neverending formal experimentation.
Every installation is extremely different from the other, and Alberto Michelon always finds new and surprising ways of using the animal matter: there are abstract paintings whose canvas is made of snake or fish skin; entomological compositions; anthropomorphic taxidermies; a crucifix entirely built by patiently gluing together bone fragments; tribal masks, phallic snakes mocking branded underwear, skeletal chandeliers, Braille texts etracted from lizard skin.

Ma gli altri tassidermisti, diciamo i “puristi”, non storcono il naso?
Certamente alcuni non la ritengono vera tassidermia, forse pensano che io mi sia montato la testa. Non mi importa. Cosa vuoi farci? Questo progetto sta prendendo sempre più importanza, mi diverte e mi entusiasma.

On closer inspection, there’s not a huge difference between classic and artistic taxidermy. The stuffed animals we find in natural science museums, as well as Alberto’s, are but representations, interpretations, simulachra.
Every taxidermist uses the skin, and shape, of the animal to convey a specific vision of the world; and the museum narrative (although so conventional as to be “invisible” to our eyes) is maybe no more legit than a personal perspective.

Although Alberto keeps repeating that he feels he’s a novice, still unripe artist, the Inanimus works show a very precise artistic direction. As I approach the exit, I feel I have witnessed something unique, at least in the Italian panorama. I cannot therefore back away from the ritual prosaic last question: future projects?
I want to keep on getting better, learning, experimenting new things“, Alberto replies as his gaze wanders all around, lost in the crowd of his transfigured animals.

Inanimus – un bestiario contemporaneo
Padova, Cattedrale Ex-macello, Via Cornaro 1
Until October 17, 2017 [Extended to November 5, 2017]

The mysterious artist Pierre Brassau

In 1964 the Gallerie Christinae in Göteborg, Sweden, held an exhibition of young avantgarde painters.
Among the works of these promising artists from Italy, Austria, Denmark, England and Sweden, were also four abstract paintings by the french Pierre Brassau. His name was completely unknown to the art scene, but his talents looked undisputable: this young man, although still a beginner, really seemed qualified to become the next Jackson Pollock — so much so that since the opening, his paintings stole the attention from all other featured works.

Journalists and art critics were almost unanimous in considering Pierre Brassau the true revelation of Gallerie Christinae’s exhibit. Rolf Anderberg, a critic for the Posten, was particularly impressed and penned an article, published the next day, in which he affirmed: “Brassau paints with powerful strokes, but also with clear determination. His brush strokes twist with furious fastidiousness. Pierre is an artist who performs with the delicacy of a ballet dancer“.

As should be expected, in spite of the general enthusiasm, there was also the usual skeptic. One critic, making a stand, defiantly declared: “only an ape could have done this“.
There will  always be somebody who must go against the mainstream. And, even if it’s hard to admit, in doing so he sometimes can be right.
Pierre Brassau, in reality, was actually a monkey. More precisely a four-year-old African chimpanzee living in the Borås Zoo.

Showing primate’s works in a modern art exhibition was Åke “Dacke” Axelsso’s idea, as he was at the time a journalist for the daily paper Göteborgs-Tidningen. The concept was not actually new: some years before, Congo the chimp  had become a celebrity because of his paintings, which fascinated Picasso, Miro and Dali (in 2005 Congo’s works were auctioned for 14.400 punds, while in the same sale a Warhol painting and a Renoir sculpture were withdrawn).
Thus Åke decided to challenge critics in this provocative way: behind the humor of the prank was not (just) the will to ridicule the art establishment, but rather the intention of raising a question that would become more and more urgent in the following years: how can we judge an abstract art piece, if it does not contain any figurative element — or if it even denies that any specific competence is needed to produce art?

Åke had convinced the zoo keeper, who was then 17 years old, to provide a chimp named Peter with brushes and canvas. In the beginning Peter had smeared the paint everywhere, except on the canvas, and even ate it: he had a particularly sweet tooth, it is said, for cobalt blue — a color which will indeed be prominently featured in his later work. Encouraged by the journalist, the primate started to really paint, and to enjoy this creative activity. Åke then selected his four best paintings to be shown at the exhibit.

Even when the true identity of mysterious Pierre Brassau was revealed, many critics stuck by their assessment, claiming the monkey’s paintings were better than all the others at the gallery. What else could they say?
The happiest person, in this little scandal, was probably Bertil Eklöt, a private collector who had bought a painting by the chimpanzee for $90 (about $7-800 today). Perhaps he just wanted to own a curious piece: but now that painting could be worth a fortune, as Pierre Brassau’s story has become a classic anecdote in art history. And one that still raises the question on whether works of art are, as Rilke put it, “of an infinite solitude, and no means of approach is so useless as criticism“.

The first international press article on Brassau appeared on Time magazine. Other info taken from this post by Museum of Hoaxes.

(Thanks, Giacomo!)

Kristian Burford


Entrate in una galleria d’arte, e in una stanza vedete uno spazio delimitato da lunghe tende multicolori che evidentemente nascondono qualcosa. Per guardarvi dentro, però, siete costretti ad avvicinare gli occhi a uno degli strappi nella stoffa: appena riuscite a vedere all’interno, ecco che vi appare un ambiente domestico, e di colpo vi sentite come se steste spiando da un buco nella serratura. Sentite un piccolo brivido quando capite che la “stanza” non è vuota: c’è una figura umana, un giovane uomo, allungato sul letto. Sembra sprofondato in una drammatica incoscienza, ma mentre lo osservate vi rendete conto di altri piccoli dettagli: c’è il monitor di un computer acceso vicino a lui, mentre una telecamera è montata su un treppiede e puntata sul letto. Ecco che di colpo la scena assume una luce diversa, mentre affiora una possibile narrazione: l’uomo ha forse appena fatto del sesso virtuale? L’abbandono in cui lo vediamo è quello che segue l’orgasmo? Stiamo ancora guardando attraverso le tende, ipnotizzati dalla scena, da quella scultura iperrealistica di un corpo stremato e dalla storia che crediamo di indovinare, e allo stesso tempo siamo imbarazzati per la nostra morbosa curiosità.





L’artista losangelino Kristian Burford senza dubbio ama mettere il suo pubblico a disagio. Le sue perturbanti installazioni ci pongono nella scomoda situazione di dover fare i conti con le nostre pulsioni più nascoste, con il lato oscuro del desiderio e con i nostri istinti voyeuristici.

8 9

Spesso, nei suoi diorami ricchissimi di dettagli, l’artista decide di limitare la libertà dello spettatore, obbligandolo a dei punti di vista predeterminati: si può osservare questi set soltanto da particolari angolazioni, tramite feritoie o spiragli, proprio come dei “guardoni”. Una sua opera, ad esempio, mostra uno scorcio di stanza d’albergo, con una figura nuda sullo sfondo che, di spalle, sta facendo qualcosa che non si riesce a distinguere chiaramente.



Ma non è soltanto questo aspetto a rendere destabilizzanti le sue opere tridimensionali. Le sculture in cera mostrano un’intimità (dall’esplicita connotazione sessuale) che non è mai solare, ma al contrario spesso travagliata. I volti dei protagonisti mostrano una sottile tragicità, come se fossero racchiusi in una sorta di melanconia, tutti protesi verso il loro interno dopo una probabile auto-soddisfazione erotica. Ed è il nostro stesso mondo interiore a venire messo in discussione, mentre lo stratagemma del voyeurismo ci convince di assistere ad un momento speciale, segreto, fissato nell’immobilità del soggetto.





Le ultime opere di Burford si distaccano dalle precedenti ma ne proseguono la riflessione sullo sguardo e sull’individuo. All’interno di grandi box di vetro, ecco un tavolo da ufficio, anonimo. In piedi, una figura femminile completamente nuda e senza capelli si riflette in un freddo gioco di specchi che la moltiplicano all’infinito. Sembra uno di quegli incubi in cui ci si presenta al lavoro, accorgendosi subito dopo di essere nudi.



Eppure, mentre guardiamo dentro a questi box, ne restiamo esclusi. Da fuori, possiamo osservare con sguardo da entomologo la nudità senza protezioni della scultura, la vediamo immersa in centinaia di copie di se stessa. Tutte inermi, confinate in spazi lavorativi angusti, vittime di un crudele gioco che le priva di qualsiasi identità o privacy.



Che siano confuse stanze di passioni tormentate, o algide scatole che rinchiudono l’individuo in un contesto disumanizzante, le installazioni di Burford – in maniera obliqua, scomoda e incisiva – sembrano parlare sempre e comunque delle nostre terribili, immense solitudini.


Le ali della musica

In questa installazione dell’artista Céleste Boursier-Mougenot esposta a Londra, ad acuni piccoli uccelli viene offerta la possibilità di creare una composizione musicale.

Chi l’avrebbe mai detto che i passeri amano le sonorità post-rock?


Nel Regno dell’Irreale

Henry Darger era la classica persona che passa inosservata. Abiti sciatti ma puliti, un umile lavoro come custode dell’ospedale locale, la messa ogni giorno, un lavoro di volontariato a favore dei bambini che avevano subito abusi o erano stati trascurati, una fissazione per la storia della Guerra Civile Americana. Aveva avuto un’infanzia piuttosto difficile, subendo anche un internamento in manicomio (e all’inizio del ‘900, non era uno scherzo: significava lavori forzati e severe punizioni); eppure di tutte quelle sofferenze Henry sembrava non portare alcun segno, anzi spesso ricordava di aver avuto anche momenti felici. Un solitario, ma di buon cuore. Un uomo qualsiasi, nella grande città ventosa di Chicago. Anche la sua morte avvenne senza clamore, una mattina d’aprile del 1973.

Eppure Henry nascondeva un segreto.

Qualche giorno dopo la sua morte, frugando nella sua stanza per liberarla, i padroni di casa trovarono il progetto nascosto di Henry Darger, l’opera di una vita.

Il romanzo fantasy The story of the Vivian Girls, reintitolato recentemente The Realms of Unreal, scritto da Darger durante un periodo di oltre 60 anni, è un’opera straordinaria per dimensioni: più di 15.145 pagine di racconto, fittissime, e alcuni volumi rilegati contenenti diverse centinaia di illustrazioni, papiri colorati ad acquerello, ritagli di giornale e di libri da colorare. Oltre a questo, Darger scrisse anche un’autobiografia di 5.084 pagine, e un secondo lavoro di fiction, Crazy House, di più di 10.000 pagine.

Durante tutti quegli anni di vita da recluso, Darger aveva accumulato un archivio immenso di ritagli di giornale, pubblicità, pagine di libri per bambini. Su quella base, ricopiando i suoi ritagli, aveva illustrato le avventure delle Vivian Girls, le protagoniste del suo romanzo. In The Realms of Unreal, le ragazze Vivian sono sette principesse (cattoliche) di un mondo immaginario in cui i Glandeliniani (atei convinti) sfruttano i bambini e ne abusano costantemente. Dopo che viene messo in atto il più scioccante omicidio infantile mai causato dal Governo Glandeliniano, i bambini si sollevano e si scatena una guerra senza confine, il vero fulcro del romanzo, che si sviluppa fra fughe rocambolesche, epiche battaglie e crudeli scene di tortura.

Si è molto discusso su quello “scioccante omicidio infantile“. Darger, infatti, era rimasto particolarmente colpito dall’assassinio di una bambina, Elsie Paroubek, strangolata da uno sconosciuto nel 1911: aveva ritagliato la foto della piccola vittima da un giornale e l’aveva conservata come una reliquia. Quando un giorno l’immagine andò perduta, egli si convinse che la foto fosse stata rubata da qualche malintenzionato introdottosi in casa sua. Dopo aver elaborato preghiere e novene rivolte a Dio affinché gli fosse concesso di recuperare la fotografia, Darger decise che quell’affronto andava risolto in altro modo: nel suo romanzo in corso d’opera, che diventava ogni giorno di più una sorta di universo parallelo nel quale Henry risolveva i suoi conflitti interiori, fece scoppiare la guerra fra le Vivian girls e i Glandeliniani proprio a causa dell’omicidio di una piccola schiava ribelle. In virtù di questa ossessione di Darger per la piccola Elsie Paroubek, trasfigurata in eroina nel suo romanzo, il biografo MacGregor avanza l’ipotesi che l’assassino della bambina (mai identificato) fosse proprio lo stesso Darger.

Le prove che Henry Darger potesse realmente essere un pedofilo o un assassino non sono mai affiorate. Certo è che gran parte delle illustrazioni di Realms of Unreal mostrano ragazzine nude, spesso torturate e uccise dai Glandeliniani con un’attenzione e una cura dei particolari che ricordano i disegni realizzati dai più famosi serial killer. A intorbidire ancora più le acque, nella maggioranza dei dipinti le piccole bambine nude sfoggiano genitali maschili. È molto probabile che, come notano i maggiori esegeti dell’opera di Darger, il vecchio recluso non avesse un’idea chiara dell’anatomia femminile, essendo rimasto molto probabilmente illibato fino alla fine dei suoi giorni.

È innegabile che i suoi dipinti abbiano una forza strana e inquietante: sia che le sorelle Vivian siano in pericolo, sia che giochino innocentemente su un prato, una sottile vena di voyeurismo naif e infantile pervade ogni dettaglio, e nonostante i colori sgargianti e appariscenti il mondo di Darger è sempre impregnato di una tensione erotico-sadica piuttosto morbosa.

In una catarsi psicanalitica durata sessant’anni, Darger disegnò centinaia e centinaia di fogli, anche di grandi dimensioni, illustrando le varie fasi dell’avventura bellica delle sue eroine. Il romanzo ha addirittura due finali, uno in cui le sorelle Vivian escono vittoriose dalla guerra, e uno in cui soccombono alle forze degli atei adulti Glandeliniani.

Queste sue fantasie private, che nelle intenzioni originali non avevano forse alcuna pretesa d’arte, ma semplicemente di riscatto ed evasione da una vita troppo solitaria, sono oggi riconosciute come uno dei maggiori esempi di outsider art (arte degli emarginati). Le sue illustrazioni vengono esposte nelle maggiori gallerie, e vendute all’asta a prezzi elevatissimi. Documentari e saggi vengono prodotti sulla sua arte. L’American Folk Art Museum sta cercando di trasformare in museo il piccolo, povero appartamento nel quale Henry Darger, chino sui suoi fogli, privo di amici e lontano da tutti, fuggiva nello sconfinato e sublime mondo partorito dalla sua fantasia.

il più scioccante omicidio infantile mai causato dal governo Glandelinian