Napoleon’s Penis

The surgical tool kit that was used to perform the autopsy on Napoleon’s body at Saint Helena is on display at the Museum of History of Medicine in Paris.
But few people know that those scalpels probably also emasculated the Emperor.

In his last few months on Saint Helena, Napoleon suffered from excruciating stomach pains. Sir Hudson Lowe, the governor of the island under whose control Bonaparte had been confined, dismissed the whole thing as a slight anemia. Yet on May 5, 1821 Bonaparte died.
The autopsy conducted the following day by Napoleon’s personal physician, Francesco Carlo Antommarchi, revealed that he had been killed by a stomach tumor, aggravated by large ulcers (although the actual causes of death have been debated).
But during the autoptic examination Antommarchi apparently took some liberties.

Francesco Carlo Antommarchi

The heart was extracted and put in in a vase filled with spirit; it was meant to be delivered to the Emperor’s second wife, Maria Luisa, in Parma. In reality, she must have been hardly impressed by such a token of love, since a few months after Napoleon’s death she already married her lover. The stomach, that cancerous organ responsible for Napoleon’s death, was also removed and preserved in liquid. Antommarchi then made a cast of Bonaparte’s face, from which he later produced the famous death mask displayed at the Musée de l’Armée.

But at this point the doctor from Marseilles decided he’d grab a further, macabre trophy: he severed Napoleon’s penis. Antommarchi’s motives for this extra cut are unclear. Some speculate it might have been some sort of revenge for the way the irascible Napoleon mistreated him in the last few months; according to other sources, the doctor (sometimes described as an ignorant and disrespectful man) simply thought he could make a profit out of it.

But perhaps it was not even Antommarchi who took the controversial specimen. Thirty years later, in 1852, Mamluk Ali (Louis-Etienne Saint-Denis, Napoleon’s most faithful valet) published a memorial in the Revue des Mondes. In the article, Ali attributed the responsibility of this mutilation to himself and to Abbot Angelo Paolo Vignali, the chaplain who administered extreme unction to Bonaparte. He stated that he and Vignali had removed some unspecified “portions” of Napoleon’s corpse during the autopsy.

All these stories are quite dubious; it seems unlikely that such a disfigurement could go unnoticed. Five English doctors, plus three English and three French officers, were present at Napoleon’s autopsy. After the embalming, his faithful waiter Marchand dressed his body in uniform. How come no one noticed the absence of manhood on the body of the “little corporal”?

In any case,  what may or may not have been Napoleon’s true penis, but a penis nonetheless, began to circulate in Europe.
And even if it’s unclear who was responsible for severing it, in the end it was chaplain Vignali who smuggled it back to Corsica, along with more conventional mementos (documents and letters, a few pieces of silverware, a lock of hair, a pair of breeches, etc.), and the organ passed to his heirs upon Vignali’s death in a bloody vendetta in 1828. It remained in the family for almost a century, and was finally purchased by an anonymous buyer at an auction in 1916, together with the entire collection. In the auction catalog, the penis was described with a euphemism: “mummified tendon“.

After being bought by the famous antiquarian bookstore Maggs of London, the lot was resold in 1924 to Philadelphia collector Abraham Simon Wolf Rosenbach, who exhibited it three years later at the Museum of French Art in New York. Here the penis of Napoleon was on public display for the first and only time, and a jouranlist described it as a “maltreated strip of buck-skin shoelace or a shriveled eel“.

In 1944 Rosenbach sold the collection once again, and it continued to be passed from hand to hand. But despite the historical value of these memorabilia the market proved to be less and less interested, and the Vignali collection remained unsold at various auctions. In 1977 a major part of the collection was acquired by the French government, and destined to join the remains of Napoleon at Les Invalides. Not the penis, however, which the French refused to even acknowledge. It was John K. Lattimer, an American urologist, who bought it for $ 4,000. His intention, it seems, was to permanently remove it from circulation so that it would not be ridiculed.

The urologist had amassed an impressive collection of macabre historical curiosities – from the blood-stained collar that President Lincoln wore on the night of his murder at Ford’s theater, to one of the poison capsules Göring used to commit suicide. Lattimer kept the infamous “mummified tendon” locked away in a suitcase under his bed for years, protecting it from the public’s morbid curiosity, and he always refused any purchase proposal. He X-rayed the specimen, and it turned out to actually be a human penis.

After Lattimer’s death in 2007, his daughter took on the laborious task of archiving this incredible collection.
The penis is still part of the collection: Tony Perrottet, author of the book Napoleon’s Privates, is among the very few who have had the opportunity to see it in person. “It was kind of an amazing thing to behold. There it was: Napoleon’s penis sitting on cotton wool, very beautifully laid out, and it was very small, very shriveled, about an inch and a half long. It was like a little baby’s finger.
Here is the video showing the moment when the writer finally found himself face to face with the illustrious genitals:

Perrottet was not given permission to film the actual penis at the time, but in a 2015 reading he exhibited an alleged replica, which you can see below.

One can understand Perrottet’s obvious excitation in the video: the author declared that, to him, Napoleon’s penis is the symbol “of everything that’s interesting about history. It sort of combines love and death and sex and tragedy and farce all in this one story“. And certainly all these elements do contribute to the fascination we feel for such a relic, which is at once comic, macabre, obscene and titillating. But there’s more.

The body of a man who – for better or for worse – so profoundly changed the history of the world, possesses an almost magical aura. Why then does the thought of it being disrespected and desecrated provoke an unmentionable, subtle satisfaction? Why did Lattimer fear that showing that small, withered and mummified penis would result in public derision?

Perhaps it’s because that little piece of meat looks like a masterpiece of irony, a perfect retaliation.
As comedian George Carlin put it,

men are terrified that their pricks are inadequate and so they have to compete with one another to feel better about themselves and since war is the ultimate competition, basically, men are killing each other in order to improve their self-esteem. You don’t have to be a historian or a political scientist to see the Bigger Dick foreign policy theory at work.

George Carlin, Jammin’ In New York (1992)

The controversial POTUS tweet (01/03/2018) on who might have the “bigger button”.

On the other hand, this relic also reminds us that Napoleon was mortal, after all, and brings his figure back to the concreteness of a corpse on the autopsy table. The mummified penis takes the place of that hominem te memento (“Remember that you are only a man”) that was repeated in the ear of Roman generals returning from a victory so they wouldn’t get a big head, or the sic transit that the protodeacon pronounced at the passage in San Pietro of the newly elected Pope (“thus passes the glory of the world”).

That flap of shrunken and withered skin is at once a symbol of vanitas, and a mockery of the typical machismo so often exhibited by leaders and rulers. It reminds us that “the Emperor has no clothes”.
Worse: he has no clothes, no life, and no manhood.

Part of the informations in this article come from Bess Lovejoy’s wonderful book Rest In Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses (2014).
One chapter of my book
Paris Mirabilia is devoted to the Museum of History of Medicine.
Tony Perrottet’s Napoleon’s Privates: 2,500 Years of History Unzipped is essentially a collection of spicy anecdotes about famous historical figures. Among these, one in particular is relevant. During the WWII, Stalin asked Winston Churchill to help out with the Russian army’s “serious condom shortage”. The British Prime Minister had a special batch of extra-large condoms prepared, then sent them to Russia with the label “Made in Britain – Medium“. This glaring example of foreign policy would have delighted George Carlin.

Il Turco

Nel 1770, alla corte di Maria Teresa d’Austria, fece la sua prima sconcertante apparizione il Turco.

Vestito come uno stregone mediorientale, con tanto di vistoso turbante, il Turco sedeva ad un grosso tavolo di fronte a una scacchiera, e fumava una lunghissima pipa tradizionale; da sopra la barba nerissima, i suoi occhi grigi, ancorché vuoti e privi d’espressione, sembravano osservare tutto e tutti.  Il Turco era in attesa del coraggioso giocatore che avrebbe osato sfidarlo a scacchi.

Turk-engraving5

Tuerkischer_schachspieler_windisch4

Ciò che davvero impressionò tutti i presenti era che il Turco non era un uomo in carne ed ossa: era un automa. Il suo inventore, Wolfgang von Kempelen, lo aveva creato proprio per compiacere la Regina, con la quale si era vantato l’anno prima di essere in grado di costruire la macchina più spettacolare del mondo. Prima che cominciasse la partita a scacchi, Kempelen aprì le ante dell’enorme scatola sulla quale poggiava la scacchiera, e gli spettatori poterono vedere una intricatissima serie di meccanismi, ruote dentate e strane strutture ad orologeria – non c’era nessun trucco, si poteva vedere da una parte all’altra della struttura, quando Kempelen apriva anche le porte sul retro. Un’altra sezione della macchina era invece quasi vuota, a parte una serie di tubi d’ottone. Quando il Turco era messo in moto, si sentiva chiaramente il ritmico sferragliare dei suoi ingranaggi interni, simile al ticchettio che avrebbe prodotto un enorme orologio.

Il primo volontario si fece avanti e Kempelen lo informò che il Turco doveva avere sempre le pedine bianche, e muovere invariabilmente per primo. A parte questa “concessione”, si scoprì ben presto che il Turco non soltanto era un ottimo giocatore di scacchi, ma aveva anche un certo caratterino. Se un avversario tentava una mossa non valida, il Turco scuoteva la testa, rimetteva la pedina al suo posto e si arrogava il diritto di muovere; se il giocatore ci riprovava una seconda volta, l’automa gettava via la pedina.

arab1
Alla sua presentazione ufficiale a corte, il Turco sbaragliò facilmente qualsiasi avversario. Per Kempelen sarebbe anche potuta finire lì, con il bel successo del suo spettacolo. Ma il suo automa divenne di colpo l’argomento di conversazione preferito in tutta Europa: intellettuali, nobili e curiosi volevano confrontarsi con questa incredibile macchina in grado di pensare, altri sospettavano un trucco, e alcuni temevano si trattasse di magia nera (pochi per la verità, era pur sempre l’epoca dei Lumi). Nonostante volesse dedicarsi a nuove invenzioni, di fronte all’ordine dell’Imperatore Giuseppe II, Kempelen fu costretto controvoglia a rimontare il suo automa e ad esibirsi nuovamente a corte; il successo fu ancora più clamoroso, e all’inventore venne suggerito (o, per meglio dire, imposto) di iniziare un tour europeo.

Kempelen-charcoal

Nel 1783 il Turco viaggiò fra spettacoli pubblici e privati, presso le principali corti europee e nei saloni nobiliari, perdendo alcune partite ma vincendone la maggior parte. A Parigi il più grande scacchista del tempo, François-André Danican Philidor, vinse contro il Turco ma confessò che quella era stata la partita più faticosa della sua carriera. Dopo Parigi vennero Londra, Leipzig, Dresda, Amsterdam, Vienna. A poco a poco si spense il clamore della novità, e il Turco rimase smantellato per una ventina d’anni: nessuno aveva ancora scoperto il suo segreto. Quando Kempelen morì nel 1804, suo figlio decise di vendere il macchinario a Johann Nepomuk Mälzel, un appassionato collezionista di automi. Mälzel decise che avrebbe dato nuova vita al Turco, perfezionandolo e rendendolo ancora più spettacolare. Aggiunse alcune parti, modificò alcuni dettagli, e infine installò una scatola parlante che permetteva alla macchina di pronunciare la parola “échec!” quando metteva sotto scacco l’avversario.

1-0.The_Turk.Granger_Collection_0059574_H.L02645400
Perfino Napoleone Bonaparte volle giocare contro il Turco. Si racconta che l’Imperatore provò una mossa illecita per ben tre volte; le prime due volte l’automa scosse il capo e rimise la pedina al suo posto, ma la terza volta perse le staffe e con un braccio – evidentemente incurante di chi aveva di fronte! – il Turco spazzò via tutti pezzi dalla scacchiera. Napoleone rimase estremamente divertito dal gesto insolente, e giocò in seguito alcune partite più “serie”.

Malzels-exhibition-ad
Nel 1826 Mälzel portò il Turco in America, dove la sua popolarità non smise di crescere su tutta la costa orientale degli States, da New York a Boston a Philadelphia; Edgar Allan Poe scrisse un famoso trattato sull’automa (anche se non azzeccò affatto il suo segreto), e numerosi “cloni” ed imitazioni del Turco cominciarono ad apparire – ma nessuno ebbe il successo dell’originale.

Ma ogni cosa fa il suo tempo. Nel 1838 Mälzel morì, e il Turco, inizialmente messo all’asta, finì relegato in un angolo del Peale Museum di Baltimora. Nel 1854 un incendio raggiunse il Museo, e ci fu chi giurò di aver sentito il Turco, avvolto dalle fiamme, che gridava “Scacco! Scacco!“, mentre la sua voce diveniva sempre più flebile. Dell’incredibile automa si salvò soltanto la scacchiera, che era conservata in un luogo separato.

Nel 1857 Silas Mitchell, figlio dell’ultimo proprietario del Turco, decise che non c’era più motivo di nascondere il vero funzionamento della macchina, visto che era andata ormai distrutta. Così, su una prestigiosa rivista di scacchi, pubblicò infine il “segreto meglio mantenuto di sempre”. Si scoprì che, fra le ipotesi degli scettici e le teorie di chi aveva tentato di risolvere l’enigma, alcune parti dell’ingegnosa opera erano state indovinate, ma mai interamente.

turk-hidden-1-4
Dentro al macchinario del Turco si nascondeva un maestro di scacchi in carne ed ossa. Quando il presentatore apriva i diversi scomparti per mostrarli al pubblico, l’operatore segreto si spostava su un sedile mobile, secondo uno schema preciso, facendo così scivolare in posizione alcune parti semoventi del macchinario. In questo modo, poiché non tutte le ante venivano aperte contemporaneamente, lo scacchista rimaneva sempre al riparo dagli occhi degli spettatori. Ma come poteva sapere in che modo giocare la sua partita?

Sotto ogni pezzo degli scacchi era impiantato un forte magnete, e l’operatore nascosto poteva seguire le mosse dell’avversario perché la calamita attirava a sé altrettanti magneti attaccati con un filo all’interno del coperchio superiore della scatola. L’operatore, per vedere nel buio del mobile in legno, usava una candela i cui fumi uscivano discretamente da un condotto di aerazione nascosto nel turbante del Turco; i numerosi candelabri che illuminavano la scena aiutavano a mascherare la fuoriuscita del fumo. Una complessa serie di leve simili a quelle di un pantografo permettevano al maestro di scacchi di fare la sua mossa, muovendo il braccio dell’automa. C’era perfino un quadrante in ottone con una serie di numeri, che poteva essere visto anche dall’esterno: questo permetteva la comunicazione in codice fra l’operatore all’interno della scatola e il presentatore all’esterno.

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

1041323440_a377ac2955
Nel 1989 John Gaughan presentò a una conferenza sulla magia una perfetta ricostruzione del Turco, che gli era costata quattro anni di lavoro. Questa volta, però, non c’era più bisogno di un operatore umano all’interno del macchinario: a dirigere le mosse dell’automa era un programma computerizzato. Meno di dieci anni dopo Deep Blue sarebbe stato il primo computer a battere a scacchi il campione mondiale in carica, Garry Kasparov.

Oggi la tecnologia è arrivata ben oltre le più assurde fantasie di chi rimaneva sconcertato di fronte al Turco; eppure alcune delle domande che ci sono tanto familiari (potranno mai le macchine soppiantare gli uomini? È possibile costruire dei sistemi meccanici capaci di pensiero?) non sono poi così moderne come potremmo credere: nacquero per la prima volta proprio attorno a questa misteriosa e ironica figura dall’esotico turbante.

turk-chess-automaton-01-x640
(Grazie, Giulia!)

Maschere mortuarie

Le maschere mortuarie sono una delle tradizioni più antiche del mondo, diffusa praticamente ovunque dall’Europa all’Asia all’Africa. Così come assieme al cadavere venivano spesso lasciati viveri, armi o altri oggetti che potessero servire al morto nel suo viaggio verso l’aldilà, spesso coprire il volto con una maschera garantiva al suo spirito maggiore forza e protezione. Nelle tradizioni africane queste maschere erano minacciose e terribili, per spaventare ed allontanare i dèmoni dall’anima del defunto. Nell’antico bacino del Mediterraneo, invece, la maschera veniva forgiata stilizzando le reali fattezze del morto: ricorderete certamente le più famose maschere funerarie, quella di Tutankhamen e quella attribuita tradizionalmente ad Agamennone (qui sopra).

Ma già dal basso Impero Romano, e poi nel Medio Evo, le maschere non si seppellivano più assieme al corpo, si conservavano come ricordi; inoltre si cercò di riprodurre in maniera sempre più fedele il volto del defunto. Si ricorse allora all’uso di calchi in cera o in gesso, applicati sulla faccia poco dopo la morte del soggetto da ritrarre: da questo negativo venivano poi prodotte le maschere funerarie vere e proprie. Si trattava di un processo che pochi si potevano permettere e dunque riservato a un’élite composta da nobili e sovrani – ma anche a personalità di spicco dell’arte, della letteratura o della filosofia. È grazie a questi calchi che oggi conosciamo con esattezza il volto di molti grandi del passato: Dante, Leopardi, Voltaire, Robespierre, Pascal, Newton e innumerevoli altri ancora.

La differenza con un ritratto dipinto o una scultura dal vivo è evidente: nelle maschere mortuarie non è possibile l’idealizzazione, lo scultore riproduce senza imbellettare, e ogni minimo difetto nel volto rimane impresso così come ogni grazia. Non soltanto, alcune maschere mostrano volti con fattezze già cadaveriche, occhi infossati, guance molli e cadenti, mascelle allentate. Con la sensibilità odierna ci si può domandare se sia davvero il caso di ricordare il defunto in questo stato – dubbio non soltanto moderno, visto che Eugène Delacroix aveva dato disposizioni affinché “dopo la sua morte dei suoi lineamenti non fosse conservata memoria”.

Eppure, se pensiamo che la fotografia post-mortem prenderà il posto delle maschere dalla fine del 1800, forse queste estreme, ultime immagini hanno un valore e un significato simbolico necessario. Possibile che ci raccontino qualcosa della persona a cui apparteneva quel volto? Il volto di un cadavere ci interroga sempre, pare nascondere un ambiguo segreto; quando poi si tratta del viso di un grande uomo, l’emozione è ancora più forte. Ci ricorda che la morte arriva per tutti, certo, ma segna anche la fine di una vita straordinaria, magari di un’epoca come nel caso della maschera mortuaria di Napoleone. E, soprattutto, riporta nomi celebri a una concretezza e una fisicità terrena che nessun dipinto, statua o addirittura fotografia potrà mai avere: si fanno segni della loro realtà storica, ci ricordano che questi uomini leggendari sono davvero passati di qui, hanno avuto un corpo come noi, e sono stati capaci di cambiare il mondo.

Se volete approfondire, questa pagina raccoglie molte delle principali maschere mortuarie con splendide foto; è anche consigliata una visita al Virtual Museum of Death Mask, più incentrato sulla tradizione russa, e che permette di confrontare le foto o i ritratti “in vita” e le maschere mortuarie di alcuni personaggi celebri.

Bizzarro Bazar a New York – I

New York, Novembre 2011. È notte. Il vento gelido frusta le guance, s’intrufola fra i grattacieli e scende sulle strade in complicati vortici, senza che si possa prevedere da che parte arriverà la prossima sferzata. Anche le correnti d’aria sono folli ed esagerate, qui a Times Square, dove il tramonto non esiste, perché i maxischermi e le insegne brillanti degli spettacoli on-Broadway non lasciano posto alle ombre. Le basse temperature e il forte vento non fermano però il vostro esploratore del bizzarro, che con la scusa di una settimana nella Grande Mela, ha deciso di accompagnarvi alla scoperta di alcuni dei negozi e dei musei più stravaganti di New York.

Partiamo proprio da qui, da Times Square, dove un’insegna luminosa attira lo sguardo del curioso, promettendo meraviglie: si tratta del museo Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not!, una delle più celebri istituzioni mondiali del weird, che conta decine di sedi in tutto il mondo. Proudly freakin’ out families for 90 years! (“Spaventiamo le famiglie, orgogliosamente, da 90 anni”), declama uno dei cartelloni animati.

L’idea di base del Ripley’s sta proprio in quel “credici, oppure no”: si tratta di un museo interamente dedicato allo strano, al deviante, al macabro e all’incredibile. Ad ogni nuovo pezzo in esposizione sembra quasi che il museo ci sfidi a comprendere se sia tutto vero o se si tratti una bufala. Se volete sapere la risposta, beh, la maggior parte delle sorprendenti e incredibili storie raccontate durante la visita sono assolutamente vere. Scopriamo quindi le reali dimensioni dei nani e dei giganti più celebri, vediamo vitelli siamesi e giraffe albine impagliate, fotografie e storie di freak celebri.

Ma il tono ironico e fieramente “exploitation” di questa prima parte di museo lascia ben presto il posto ad una serie di reperti ben più seri e spettacolari; le sezioni antropologiche diventano via via più impressionanti, alternando vetrine con armi arcaiche a pezzi decisamente più macabri, come quelli che adornano le sale dedicate alle shrunken heads (le teste umane rimpicciolite dai cacciatori tribali del Sud America), o ai meravigliosi kapala tibetani.

Tutto ciò che può suscitare stupore trova posto nelle vetrine del museo: dalla maschera funeraria di Napoleone Bonaparte, alla pistola minuscola ma letale che si indossa come un anello, alle microsculture sulle punte di spillo.

Talvolta è la commistione di buffoneria carnevalesca e di inaspettata serietà a colpire lo spettatore. Ad esempio, in una pacchiana sala medievaleggiante, che propone alcuni strumenti di tortura in “azione” su ridicoli manichini, troviamo però una sedia elettrica d’epoca (vera? ricostruita?) e perfino una testa umana sezionata (questa indiscutibilmente vera). Il tutto per il giubilo dei bambini, che al Ripley’s accorrono a frotte, e per la perplessità dei genitori che, interdetti, non sanno più se hanno fatto davvero bene a portarsi dietro la prole.

Insomma, quello che resta maggiormente impresso del Ripley’s – Believe It Or Not è proprio questa furba commistione di ciarlataneria e scrupolo museale, che mira a confondere e strabiliare lo spettatore, lasciandolo frastornato e meravigliato.

Per tornare unpo’ con i piedi per terra, eccoci quindi a un museo più “serio” e “ufficiale”, ma di certo non più sobrio. Si tratta del celeberrimo American Museum of Natural History, uno dei musei di storia naturale più grandi del mondo – quello, per intenderci, in cui passava una notte movimentata Ben Stiller in una delle sue commedie di maggior successo.

Una giornata intera basta appena per visitare tutte le sale e per soffermarsi velocemente sulle varie sezioni scientifiche che meriterebbero ben più attenzione.

Oltre alle molte sale dedicate all’antropologia paleoamericana (ricostruzioni accurate degli utensili e dei costumi dei nativi, ecc.), il museo offre mostre stagionali in continuo rinnovo, una sala IMAX per la proiezione di filmati di interesse scientifico, un’impressionante sezione astronomica, diverse sale dedicate alla paleontologia e all’evoluzione dell’uomo, e infine la celebre sezione dedicata ai dinosauri (una delle più complete al mondo, amata alla follia dai bambini).

Ma forse i veri gioielli del museo sono due in particolare: il primo è costituito dall’ampio uso di splendidi diorami, in cui gli animali impagliati vengono inseriti all’interno di microambienti ricreati ad arte. Che si tratti di mammiferi africani, asiatici o americani, oppure ancora di animali marini, questi tableaux sono accurati fin nel minimo dettaglio per dare un’idea di spontanea vitalità, e da una vetrina all’altra ci si immerge in luoghi distanti, come se fossimo all’interno di un attimo raggelato, di fronte ad alcuni degli esemplari tassidermici più belli del mondo per precisione e naturalezza.

L’altra sezione davvero mozzafiato è quella dei minerali. Strano a dirsi, perché pensiamo ai minerali come materia fissa, inerte, e che poche emozioni può regalare – fatte salve le pietre preziose, che tanto piacciono alle signore e ai ladri cinematografici. Eppure, appena entriamo nelle immense sale dedicate alle pietre, si spalanca di fronte a noi un mondo pieno di forme e colori alieni. Non soltanto siamo stati testimoni, nel resto del museo, della spettacolare biodiversità delle diverse specie animali, o dei misteri del cosmo e delle galassie: ecco, qui, addirittura le pietre nascoste nelle pieghe della terra che calpestiamo sembrano fatte apposta per lasciarci a bocca aperta.

Teniamo a sottolineare che nessuna foto può rendere giustizia ai colori, ai riflessi e alle mille forme incredibili dei minerali esposti e catalogati nelle vetrine di questa sezione.

Alla fine della visita è normale sentirsi leggermente spossati: il Museo nel suo complesso non è certo una passeggiata rilassante, anzi, è una continua ginnastica della meraviglia, che richiede curiosità e attenzione per i dettagli. Eppure la sensazione che si ha, una volta usciti, è di aver soltanto graffiato la superficie: ogni aspetto di questo mondo nasconde, ora ne siamo certi, infinite sorprese.

(continua…)

Tristan da Cunha

Aprite un atlante e guardate bene l’Oceano Atlantico, sotto l’equatore. Notate nulla?

Al centro dell’oceano, praticamente a metà strada fra l’Africa e l’America del Sud, potete scorgere un puntino. Completamente perduta nell’infinita distesa d’acqua, ecco Tristan da Cunha, l’ultimo sogno di ogni romantico: l’isola abitata più inaccessibile del mondo.

L’isola, di origine vulcanica, venne avvistata per la prima volta nel 1506; le sue coste vennero esplorate nel 1767, ma fu soltanto nel 1810 che un singolo uomo, Jonathan Lambert, vi si rifugiò, dichiarandola di sua proprietà. Lambert, però, morì due anni dopo, e Tristan venne annessa dalla Gran Bretagna (per evitare che qualcuno potesse usarla come base per tentare la liberazione di Napoleone, esiliato nel frattempo a Sant’Elena). Tristan da Cunha divenne per lungo tempo scalo per le baleniere dei mari del Sud, e per le navi che circumnavigavano l’Africa per giungere in Oriente. Poi, quando venne aperto il Canale di Suez, l’isolamento dell’arcipelago diventò pressoché assoluto.

Le correnti burrascose si infrangevano con violenza sulle rocce di fronte all’unico centro abitato dell’isola, Edinburgh of the Seven Seas, chiamato dai pochi isolani The Settlement. Chi sbarcava a Tristan, o lo faceva a causa di un naufragio oppure nel disperato tentativo di evitarlo. Fra i naufraghi e i primi coloni, c’erano anche alcuni navigatori italiani.

Nel 1892, infatti, due marinai di Camogli naufraghi del Brigantino Italia infrantosi sulle scogliere dell’Isola decisero, per amore di due isolane, di stabilirsi a Tristan da Cunha; essi diedero vita a due nuove famiglie (che ancor oggi portano il loro nome, Lavarello e Repetto) che si aggiunsero alle cinque già esistenti sull’isola, completando in questo modo il quadro delle parentele che esiste uguale ancor oggi a più di un secolo di distanza. Dopo i due italiani, nessun altro si fermerà a Tristan da Cunha originando nuove stirpi.

Passarono i decenni, ma la vita sull’isola rimase improntata alla semplicità rurale. Fra i tranquilli campi di patate e le basse case di pietra giunsero lontani racconti di una Grande Guerra, poi di un’altra. Tristan rimase pacifica, protetta dal suo deserto d’acqua, una terra emersa inaccessibile che nemmeno il progresso industriale poteva guastare.

Poi, nel 1961, il vulcano al centro dell’isola si risvegliò, e gli abitanti vennero evacuati. Sfollati in Sud Africa, rimasero disgustati dall’apartheid che vi regnava, così distante dai principi solidaristici della loro primitiva e utopica comunità. Ottennero così di essere trasferiti in Gran Bretagna, e lì scoprirono un mondo radicalmente diverso: un Occidente in pieno boom economico, che si apprestava a conquistare ogni risorsa, perfino a spedire uomini sulla Luna.

Dopo due anni, gli isolani ne avevano abbastanza della rumorosa modernità. Ottennero il permesso di tornare a Tristan, e nel ’63 sbarcarono nuovamente sulla loro terra, e tornarono ad occuparsi delle loro fattorie.

E anche oggi, Tristan resta un’isola mitica e remota: è raggiungibile unicamente via mare, e se ottenete il necessario permesso per sbarcare, neanche così è molto semplice. Non c’è infatti un porto sull’isola, che deve essere raggiunta mediante piccole imbarcazioni che sfidano le violente onde dell’oceano.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgIg4TdvBjQ]

Gli abitanti, oggi poco più di 260, pur fieri ed orgogliosi della loro solitudine, si stanno lentamente aprendo alle nuove tecnologie (per molto tempo l’unico accesso a internet è rimasto all’interno dell’ufficio dell’Amministratore dell’isola). Vivono in armonia e serenità, senza alcuna traccia di criminalità. La proprietà privata è stata introdotta soltanto nel 1999. Le navi da crociera che fanno scalo a Tristan sono pochissime (meno di una decina in tutto l’anno), e le uniche imbarcazioni che vi si recano regolarmente sono quelle dei pescatori di aragoste del Sud Africa.

Anna Lajolo e Giulio Lombardi hanno passato tre mesi sull’isola, intessendo rapporti di amicizia con gli islanders, e sono ritornati in Italia regalandoci un documentario, e diversi testi fondamentali per comprendere le difficoltà e le delizie della vita in questo paradiso dimenticato dal mondo, e lo spirito concreto e generoso degli abitanti: L’isola in capo al mondo, 1994; Tristan de Cuña: i confini dell’asma, 1996; Tristan de Cuña l’isola leggendaria, 1999; Le lettere di Tristan, 2006.

Ecco il sito governativo dell’isola.