Wunderkammer Reborn – Part II

(Second and last part – you can find the first one here.)

In the Nineteenth Century, wunderkammern disappeared.
The collections ended up disassembled, sold to private citizens or integrated in the newly born modern museums. Scientists, whose discipline was already defined, lost interest for the ancient kind of baroque wonder, perhaps deemed child-like in respect to the more serious postitivism.
This type of collecting continued in sporadic and marginal ways during the first decades of the Twetieth Century. Some rare antique dealer, especially in Belgium, the Netherlands or Paris, still sold some occasional mirabilia, but the golden age of the trade was long gone.
Of the few collectors of this first half of the century the most famous is André Breton, whose cabinet of curiosities is now on permanent exhibit at the Centre Pompidou.

The interest of wunderkammern began to reawaken during the Eighties from two distinct fronts: academics and artists.
On one hand, museology scholars began to recognize the role of wunderkammern as precursors of today’s museal collections; on the other, some artists fell in love with the concept of the chamber of wonders and started using it in their work as a metaphor of Man’s relationship with objects.
But the real upswing came with the internet. The neo-wunderkammer “movement” developed via the web, which opened new possibilities not only for sharing the knowledge but also to revitalize the commerce of curiosities.

Let’s take a look, as we did for the classical collections, to some conceptual elements of neo-wunderkammern.

A Democratic Wunderkammer

The first macroscopic difference with the past is that collecting curiosities is no more an exclusive of wealthy billionaires. Sure, a very-high-profile market exists, one that the majority of enthusiasts will never access; but the good news is that today, anybody who can afford an internet conection already has the means to begin a little collection. Thanks to the web, even a teenager can create his/her own shelf of wonders. All that’s needed is good will and a little patience to comb through the many natural history collectibles websites or online auctions for some real bargain.

There are now children’s books, school activities and specific courses encouraging kids to start this form of exploration of natural wonders.

The result of all this is a more democratic wunderkammer, within the reach of almost any wallet.

Reinventing Exotica

We talked about the classic category of exotica, those objects that arrived from distant colonies and from mysterious cultures.
But today, what is really exotic – etymologically, “coming from the outside, from far away”? After all we live in a world where distances don’t matter any more, and we can travel without even moving: in a bunch of seconds and a few clicks, we can virtually explore any place, from a mule track on the Andes to the jungles of Borneo.

This is a fundamental issue for the collectors, because globalization runs the risk of annihilating an important part of the very concept of wonder. Their strategies, conscious or not, are numerous.
Some collectors have turned their eyes towards the only real “external space” that is left — the cosmos; they started looking for memorabilia from the heroic times of the Space Race. Spacesuits, gear and instruments from various space missions, and even fragments of the Moon.

Others push in the opposite direction, towards the most distant past; consequently the demand for dinosaur fossils is in constant growth.

But there are other kinds of new exotica that are closer to us – indeed, they pertain directly to our own society.
Internal exoticism: not really an oxymoron, if we consider that anthropologists have long turned the instruments of ethnology towards the modern Western worold (take for instance Marc Augé). To seek what is exotic within our own cultre is to investigate liminal zones, fringe realities of our time or of the recent past.

Thus we find a recent fascination for some “taboo” areas, related for example to crime (murder weapons, investigative items, serial killer memorabilia) or death (funerary objecs and Victorian mourning apparel); the medicalia sub-category of quack remedies, as for example electric shock terapies or radioactive pharamecutical products.

Jessika M. collection – photo Brian Powell, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Funerary collectibles.

Violet wand kit; its low-voltage electric shock was marketed as the cure for everything.

Even curiosa, vintage or ancient erotic objects, are an example of exotica coming from a recent past which is now transfigured.

A Dialogue Between The Objects

Building a wunderkammer today is an eminently artistic endeavour. The scientific or anthropological interest, no matter how relevant, cannot help but be strictly connected to aesthetics.
There is a greater general attention to the interplay between the objects than in the past. A painting can interact with an object placed in front of it; a tribal mask can be made to “dialogue” with an other similar item from a completely different tradition. There is undoubtedly a certain dose of postmodern irreverence in this approach; for when pop culture collectibles are allowed entrance to the wunderkammer, ending up exhibited along with precious and refined antiques, the self-righteous art critic is bound to shudder (see for instance Victor Wynd‘s peculiar iconoclasm).

An example I find paradigmatic of this search for a deeper interaction are the “adventurous” juxtapositions experimented by friend Luca Cableri (the man who brought to Moon to Italy); you can read the interview he gave me if you wish to know more about him.

Wearing A Wunderkammer

Fashion is always aware of new trends, and it intercepted some aspects of the world of wunerkammern. Thanks mainly to the goth and dark subcultures, one can find jewelry and necklaces made from naturalistic specimens: on Etsy, eBay or Craigslist, countless shops specialize in hand-crafted brooches, hair clips or other fashion accessories sporting skulls, small wearable taxidermies and so on.

Conceptual Art and Rogue Taxidermists

As we said, the renewed interest also came from the art world, which found in wunderkammern an effective theoretical frame to reflect about modernity.
The first name that comes to mind is of course Damien Hirst, who took advantage of the concept both in his iconic fluid-preserved animals and in his kaleidoscopic compositions of lepidoptera and butterflies; but even his For The Love of God, the well-known skull covered in diamonds, is an excessively precious curiosity that would not have been out of place in a Sixteenth Century treasure chamber.

Hirst is not the only artist taking inspiration from the wunderkammer aesthetics. Mark Dion, for instance, creates proper cabinets of wonders for the modern era: in his work, it’s not natural specimens that are put under formaldeyde, but rather their plastic replicas or even everyday objects, from push brooms to rubber dildos. Dion builds a sort of museum of consumerism in which – yet again – Nature and Culture collide and even at times fuse together, giving us no hope of telling them apart.

In 2013 Rosamund Purcell’s installation recreated a 3D version of the Seventeenth Century Ole Worm Museum: reinvention/replica, postmodern doppelgänger and hyperreal simulachrum which allows the public to step into one of the most famous etchings in the history of wunderkammern.

Besides the “high” art world – auction houses and prestigious galleries – we are also witnessing a rejuvenation of more artisanal sectors.
This is the case with the art of taxidermy, which is enjoying a new youth: today taxidermy courses and workshops are multiplying.

Remember that in the first post I talked about taxidermy as a domestication of the scariest aspects of Nature? Well, according to the participants, these workshops offer a way to exorcise their fear of death on a comfortably small scale, through direct contact and a creative activity. (We shall return on this tactile element.)
A further push towards innovation has come from yet another digital movement, called Rogue Taxidermy.

Artistic, non-traditional taxidermy has always existed, from fake mirabilia and gaffs such as mummified sirens and Jenny Hanivers to Walter Potter‘s antropomorphic dioramas. But rogue taxidermists bring all this to a whole new level.

Initially born as a consortium of three artists – Sarina Brewer, Scott Bibus e Robert Marbury – who were interested in taxidermy in the broadest sense (Marbury does not even use real animals for his creations, but plush toys), rogue taxidermy quickly became an international movement thanks to the web.

The fantastic chimeras produced by these artists are actually meta-taxidermies: by exhibiting their medium in such a manifest way, they seem to question our own relationship with animals. A relationship that has undergone profound changes and is now moving towards a greater respect and care for the environment. One of the tenets of rogue taxidermy is in fact the use of ethically sourced materials, and the animals used in preparations all died of natural causes. (Here’s a great book tracing the evolution and work of major rogue taxidermy artists.)

Wunderkammer Reborn

So we are left with the fundamental question: why are wunderkammern enjoying such a huge success right now, after five centuries? Is it just a retro, nostalgic trend, a vintage frivolous fashion like we find in many subcultures (yes I’m looking at you, my dear hipster friends) or does its attractiveness lie in deeper urgencies?

It is perhaps too soon to put forward a hypothesis, but I shall go out on a limb anyway: it is my belief that the rebirth of wunderkammern is to be sought in a dual necessity. On one hand the need to rethink death, and on the other the need to rethink art and narratives.

Rethinking Death
(And While We’re At It, Why Not Domesticate It)

Swiss anthropologist Bernard Crettaz was among the first to voice the ever more widespread need to break the “tyrannical secrecy” regarding death, typical of the Twentieth Century: in 2004 he organized in Neuchâtel the first Café mortel, a free event in which participants could talk about grief, and discuss their fears but also their curiosities on the subject. Inspired by Crettaz’s works and ideas, Jon Underwood launched the first British Death Café in 2011. His model received an enthusiastic response, and today almost 5000 events have been held in 50 countries across the world.

Meanwhile, in the US, a real Death-Positive Movement was born.
Originated from the will to drastically change the American funeral industry, criticized by founder Caitlin Doughty, the movement aims at lifting the taboo regarding the subject of death, and promotes an open reflection on related topics and end-of-life issues. (You probably know my personal engagement in the project, to which I contributed now and then: you can read my interview to Caitlin and my report from the Death Salon in Philadelphia).

What has the taboo of death got to do with collecting wonders?
Over the years, I have had the opportunity of talking to many a collector. Almost all of them recall, “as if it were yesterday“, the emotion they felt while holding in their hands the first piece of their collection, that one piece that gave way to their obsession. And for the large majority of them it was a naturalistic specimen – an animal skeleton, a taxidermy, etc.: as a friend collector says, “you never forget your first skull“.

The tactile element is as essential today as it was in classical wunderkammern, where the public was invited to study, examine, touch the specimens firsthand.

Owning an animal skull (or even a human one) is a safe and harmless way to become familiar with the concreteness of death. This might be the reason why the macabre element of wunderkammern, which was marginal centuries ago, often becomes a prevalent aspect today.

Ryan Matthew Cohn collection – photo Dan Howell & Steve Prue, from Morbid Curiosities (courtesy P. Gambino)

Rethinking Art: The Aesthetics Of Wonder

After the decline of figurative arts, after the industrial reproducibility of pop art, after the advent of ready-made art, conceptual art reached its outer limit, giving a coup the grace to meaning.  Many contemporary artists have de facto released art not just from manual skill, from artistry, but also from the old-fashioned idea that art should always deliver a message.
Pure form, pure signifier, the new conceptual artworks are problematic because they aspire to put a full stop to art history as we know it. They look impossible to understand, precisely because they are designed to escape any discourse.
It is therefore hard to imagine in what way artistic research will overcome this emptiness made of cold appearance, polished brilliance but mere surface nonetheless; hard to tell what new horizon might open up, beyond multi-million auctions, artistars and financial hikes planned beforehand by mega-dealers and mega-collectors.

To me, it seems that the passion for wunderkammern might be a way to go back to narratives, to meaning. An antidote to the overwhelming surface. Because an object is worth its place inside a chamber of marvels only by virtue of the story it tells, the awe it arises, the vertigo it entails.
I believe I recognize in this genre of collecting a profound desire to give back reality to its lost enchantment.
Lost? No, reality never ceased to be wonderous, it is our gaze that needs to be reeducated.

From Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – photo C. Fleurant

Eventually, a  wunderkammer is just a collection of objects, and we already live submerged in an ocean of objects.
But it is also an instrument (as it once was, as it has always been) – a magnifying glass to inspect the world and ourselves. In these bizarre and strange items, the collector seeks a magical-narrative dimension against the homologation and seriality of mass production. Whether he knows it or not, by being sensitive to the stories concealed within the objects, the emotions they convey, their unicity, the wunderkammer collector is carrying out an act of resistence: because placing value in the exception, in the exotic, is a way to seek new perspectives in spite of the Unanimous Vision.

Da Cabinets de Curiosités (2011) – foto C. Fleurant

Wunderkammer Reborn – Part I

Why has the new millennium seen the awakening of a huge interest in “cabinets of wonder”? Why does such an ancient kind of collecting, typical of the period between the 1500s and the 1700s, still fascinate us in the internet era? And what are the differences between the classical wunderkammern and the contemporary neo-wunderkammern?

I have recently found myself tackling these subjects in two diametrically opposed contexts.
The first was dead serious conference on disciplines of knowledge in the Early Modern Period, at the University of PAdua; the second, a festival of magic and wonder created by a mentalist and a wonder injector. In this last occasion I prepared a small table with a micro-wunderkammer (really minimal, but that’s what I could fit into my suitcase!) so that after the talk the public could touch and see some curiosities first-hand.

Two traditionally quite separate scenarios – the academic milieu and the world of entertainment – both decided to dedicate some space to the discussion of this phenomenon, which strikes me as indicative of its relevance.
So I thought it might be interesting to resume, in very broad terms, my speech on the subject for the benefit of those who could not attend those meetings.

For practical purposes, I will divide the whole thing into two posts.
In this first one, I will trace what I believe are the key characteristics of historical wunderkammern – or, more precisely, the key concepts worth reflecting upon.
In the next post I will address XXI Century neo-wunderkammern, to try and pinpoint what might be the reasons of this peculiar “rebirth”.

Mirabilia

Evidently, the fundamental concept for a wunderkammer, beginning from the name itself, was the idea of wonder; from the aristocratic cabinets of Ferdinand II of Austria or Rudolf II to the more science-oriented ones like Aldrovandi‘s, Cospi‘s, or Kircher‘s, the purpose of all ancient collections was first and foremost to amaze the visitor.

It was a way for the rich person who assembled the wunderkammer to impress his court guests, showing off his opulence and lavish wealth: cabinets of curiosities were actually an evolution of treasure chambers (schatzkammern) and of the great collections of artworks of the 1400s (kunstkammer).

This predilection of rare and expensive objects generated a thriving international commerce of naturalistic and ethnological items cominc from the Colonies.

The Theatre of the World

But wunderkammern were also meant as a sort of microcosm: they were supposed to represent the entirety of the known universe, or at least to hint at the incredibly vast number of creatures and natural shapes that are present in the world. Samuel Quiccheberg, in his treatise on the arrangement of a utopian museum, was the first to use the word “theatre”, but in reality – as we shall see later on – the idea of theatrical representation is one of the cardinal concepts in classical collections.

Because of its ability to represent the world, the wunderkammer was also understood as a true instrument of research, an investigation tool for natural philosophers.

The System of Knowledge

The organization of a huge array of materials did not initially follow any specific order, but rather proceeded from the collector’s own whims and taste. Little by little, though, the idea of cataloguing began to emerge, which at first entailed the distinction between three macro-categories known as naturalia, artificialia and mirabilia, later to be refined and expanded in different other classes (medicalia, exotica, scientifica, etc.).

Naturalia

Artificialia

Artificialia

Mirabilia

Mirabilia

Medicalia, exotica, scientifica

This ever growing need to distinguish, label and catalogue eventually led to Linnaeus’ taxonomy, to his dispute with Buffon, all the way to Lamarck, Cuvier and the foundation of the Louvre, which marks the birth of the modern museum as we know it.

The Aesthetics of Accumulation

Perhaps the most iconic and well-known aspect of wunderkammern is the cramming of objects, the horror vacui that prevented even the tiniest space from being left empty in the exposition of curiosities and bizarre artifacts gathered around the world.
This excessive aesthetic was not just, as we said in the beginning, a display of wealth, but aimed at astounding and baffling the visitor. And this stunned condition was an essential moment: the wonder at the Universe, that feeling called thauma, proceeds certainly from awe but it is inseparable from a sense of unease. To access this state of consciousness, from which philosophy is born, we need to step outof our comfort zone.

To be suddenly confronted with the incredible imagination of natural shapes, visually “assaulted” by the unthinkable moltitude of objects, was a disturbing experience. Aesthetics of the Sublime, rather than Beauty; this encyclopedic vertigo is the reason why Umberto Eco places wunderkammern among his examples of  “visual lists”.

Conservation and Representation

One of the basic goals of collecting was (and still is) the preservation of specimens and objects for study purposes or for posterity. Yet any preservation is already a representation.

When we enter a museum, we cannot be fully aware of the upstream choices that have been made in regard to the exhibit; but these choices are what creates the narrative of the museum itself, the very “tale” we are told room after room.

Multiple options are involved: what specimens are to be preserved, which technique is to be used to preserve them (the result will vary if a biological specimen is dried, texidermied, or put in a preserving fluid), how to group them, how to arrange their exhibit?
It is just like casting the best actors, choosing the stage costumes, a particular set design, and the internal script of the museum.

The most illuminating example is without doubt taxidermy, the ultimate simulacrum: of the original animal nothing is left but the skin, stretched on a dummy which mimics the features and posture of the beast. Glass eyes are applied to make it more convincing. That is to say, stuffed animals are meant to play the part of living animals. And when you think about it, there is no more “reality” in them than in one of those modern animatronic props we see in Natural History Museums.

But why do we need all this theatre? The answer lies in the concept of domestication.

Domestication: Nature vs. Culture

Nature is opposed to Culture since the time of ancient Greeks. Western Man has always felt the urge to keep his distance from the part of himself he perceived as primordial, chaotic, uncontrollable, bestial. The walls of the polis locked Nature outside, keeping Culture inside; and it’s not by chance that barbarians – seen as half-men half-beasts – were etymologically “those who stutter”, who remained outside of the logos.

The theatre, an advanced form of representation, was born in Athens likely as a substitute for previous ancient human sacrifices (cf. Réné Girard), and it served the same sacred purposes: to sublimate the animal desire of cruelty and violence. The tragic hero takes on the role of the sacrificial victim, and in fact the evidence of the sacred value of tragedies is in the fact that originally attending the theatrical plays was mandatory by law for all citizens.

Theatre is therefore the first attempt to domesticate natural instincts, to bring them literally “inside one’s home” (domus), to comprehend them within the logos in order to defuse their antisocial power. Nature only becomes pleasant and harmless once we narrate it, when we turn it into a scenic design.

And here’s why a stuffed lion (which is a narrated lion, the “image” of a lion as told through the fiction of taxidermy) is something we can comfortably place in our living room without any worry. All study of Nature, as it was conceived in the wunderkammern, was essentially the study of its representation.

By staging it, it was possible to exert a kind of control over Nature that would have been impossible otherwise. Accordingly, the symbol of the wunderkammern, that piece that no collection could do without, was the chained crocodile — bound and incapable of causing harm thanks to the ties of Reason, of logos, of knowledge.

It is worth noting, in closing this first part, that the symbology of the crocodile was also borrowed from the world of the sacred. These reptiles in chains first made their apparition in churches, and several examples can still be seen in Europe: in that instance, of course, they were meant as a reminder of the power and glory of Christ defeating Satan (and at the same time they impressed the believers, who in all probability had never seen such a beast).
A perfect example of sacred taxidermy; domestication as a bulwark against the wild, sinful unconscious; barrier bewteen natural and social instincts.

(Continues in Part Two)

Speciale: Francesco Busani

Sono ormai diversi anni che mi interesso di illusionismo.
Intendiamoci, non ho neanche mai provato a far sparire un fazzoletto: quello che mi intriga è la portata simbolica del gioco di prestigio, lo scarto di prospettiva che opera, ma soprattutto il potere performativo di rendere instabile il confine tra realtà e finzione. La capacità dell’illusionista di toglierci il terreno sotto i piedi senza ricorrere a tanti giri di parole teorici, con un semplice gesto.
Eppure più si studia, più ci si accorge che a rendere possibile la magia è ancora e sempre la storia che si sta raccontando. Che sia sotterranea o esplicita, la narrativa rimane il vero meccanismo dell’incanto (o dell’inganno).

Quando il mentalista Francesco Busani ha accettato di partecipare all’inaugurazione dell’Accademia dell’Incanto, ho studiato la sua performance nei minimi dettagli.
Non tanto per scoprire i suoi trucchi — esercizio tutto sommato sterile e destinato alla delusione, perché come insegna Teller, “il segreto più grande dietro la messa in scena di un effetto magico che inganni in modo efficace è quello di realizzarlo con un metodo il più brutto possibile”.
No, il suo trucco migliore lo conoscevo già: sapevo che, prima di tutto, Busani è un eccezionale storyteller (uno storyteller “con gli effetti speciali”, come ama definirsi). Così mi sono concentrato sul modo in cui egli tirava i fili della sua narrazione. E sono rimasto con un sorriso stampato sul volto per l’intero show.
Perché durante un suo spettacolo succede qualcosa di strano: tutti ci rendiamo conto razionalmente che le storie fantastiche che Busani racconta sono, almeno in parte, frutto di fantasia; ma non sappiamo fino a che punto, e ci accorgiamo con sorpresa che esiste un’incontrollabile parte di noi che è disposta a crederci.

Un solo esempio: Busani ha raccontato la storia di due monete seppellite per anni assieme a un morto, sugli occhi del cadavere. Con l’aiuto di una spettatrice che si è offerta volontaria dal pubblico, in una routine che non vi svelo, le monete hanno dimostrato di aver acquisito virtù esoteriche e misteriose, a causa del prolungato contatto con la salma.
A colpirmi non è stato soltanto l’effetto finale, pure strabiliante, bensì un altro dettaglio a cui magari pochi hanno prestato attenzione: a chiusura del suo gioco, Francesco ha consegnato le monete nel palmo della spettatrice, e quest’ultima con uno scatto immediato e del tutto involontario ha tirato indietro le mani per non toccarle.

Ecco, quando quelle due monete sono cadute rumorosamente sul tavolo ho compreso quale eccezionale narratore fosse Francesco Busani.

Gran parte del fascino deriva proprio dal fatto che egli fa il “verso”, per così dire, a medium e sensitivi. Possiamo guardare con superiorità chi si affida a cartomanti e maghi, ma con un semplice gioco di prestigio raccontato nella giusta maniera Busani ci dimostra quanto il mito sia ancora intrinsecamente e inconsciamente efficace sulla nostra mente. E non è solo una lezione di umiltà: è anche a suo modo un tributo alla potenza della sconfinata fantasia umana.

Non mi sono dunque lasciato sfuggire l’occasione, la mattina successiva, di fargli qualche domanda in più sulla sua professione.

Partiamo dalla domanda inevitabile: quando e come hai cominciato a interessarti al paranormale da una parte, e all’illusionismo dall’altra?

Il mio è un percorso piuttosto anomalo per un mentalista.  Non mi sono formato nei club magici o negli ambienti dove si ritrovano i prestigiatori, ma arrivo del mondo della ricerca sul paranormale e sull’occulto, che ho coltivato fin da quando, a circa 12 anni, mi sono spaventato durante una seduta spiritica. In quel momento ho capito che l’unico modo per esorcizzare le mie paure era capire se potevano realmente esistere sistemi per contattare l’aldilà.
Successivamente mi sono interessato anche alle facoltà ESP, a figure di sensitivi e medium e ai casi di cronaca misteriosi. Durante tutti questi anni ho visitato luoghi infestati, cimiteri, castelli, ho visto all’opera sensitivi, cartomanti e anche qualche medium. Ho partecipato a ritiri spirituali, ascoltato decine di testimonianze relative a situazioni paranormali, letto centinaia di libri scritti sia da scettici che da believer. Visto che la maggior parte delle persone di cui sentivo o leggevo le testimonianze erano in buona fede, ho cominciato a chiedermi come mai io, assieme ad altre migliaia di ricercatori, non riuscissi a verificare alcunché di particolare.
Questo percorso è proseguito in parallelo con quello religioso di cattolico praticante fino ai ventiquattro anni, quando sono giunto alla conclusione che non esistono prove oggettive e scientifiche di fenomenologie paranormali. In quel preciso momento mi sono staccato anche dal percorso religioso che avevo mantenuto fino a quel momento solo per motivi sociali.
Infine ho scoperto che esistevano illusionisti che, utilizzando perlopiù tecniche derivate dai medium, “simulavano” i prodigi delle sedute spiritiche. Da lì al mentalismo il passo è stato breve.

Ti definisci “scettico al 100%”, eppure a fini scenici utilizzi tutto l’armamentario simbolico dell’occultismo e del paranormale. Non c’è una contraddizione?

Essere scettici e mentalisti non è per nulla un contraddizione: anzi forse è vero il contrario. I più grandi performer, da Derren Brown a Silvan solo per citarne due conosciuti in Italia, sono dichiaratamente scettici. E d’altronde se qualcuno possedesse doti paranormali, non avrebbe bisogno né di definirsi mentalista, né di mantenere il segreto sulle sue tecniche… né probabilmente di esibirsi per soldi!
La mia scelta stilistica, nella maggior parte dei miei spettacoli, è quella di utilizzare contesti e narrazioni che richiamano il mondo dell’occulto e dello spiritismo. Il mentalista è un intrattenitore – non dimentichiamolo – e la sua performance consiste nel sospendere l’incredulità nello spettatore. Questo processo avviene per gradi.
All’inizio di un mio show lo spettatore è cosciente che sta assistendo ad uno spettacolo. Poi, passo dopo passo, uso varie tecniche ed effetti per traghettare lo spettatore verso uno stato di dubbio sempre più profondo, fino a quando non è più in grado di capire dove finisce la finzione e inizia la realtà.

Nei tuoi spettacoli ti poni in maniera radicalmente differente rispetto ai classici mentalisti che sfoggiano “superpoteri” e abilità psichiche sovrumane: spesso si ha la sensazione che tu voglia rimanere un po’ in disparte, come se la tua funzione fosse quella del catalizzatore e del testimone di eventi inspiegabili, piuttosto che il loro diretto artefice. In altre parole, eviti programmaticamente l’effetto “et voilà!”.
Quanto è difficile per un performer questa rimozione dell’ego? Non rischia di diminuire l’impatto dei tuoi trucchi?

Penso che il mentalismo raggiunga il suo effetto più dirompente quando è il pubblico stesso a realizzare dei prodigi. Lo spettatore si aspetta che un illusionista possa stupirlo, ma non che sarà stupito da se stesso.
Questo scarto, seppure non sempre attuabile, è a parer mio l’ultimo gradino della trasmissione della meraviglia al pubblico, quello più alto. Infatti io spesso ci arrivo per gradi. Ad esempio in uno spettacolo scritto da me e dall’amico Luca Speroni, abile mentalista e copywriter, accadeva che ogni effetto magico fosse un passo per far acquisire al pubblico (tutto il pubblico in sala!) i poteri tipici delle guaritrici magiche che ancora oggi esistono nell’Appennino Tosco-Emiliano. Attraverso alcuni riti e un percorso ascetico ogni spettatore che saliva sul palco si trovava ad avere questi poteri sempre più amplificati.
Oppure prendi il mio intervento durante una conferenza/spettacolo con il collettivo Wu Ming e Mariano Tomatis (esiste un video della performance su YouTube): sono riuscito a far gridare a tutto il pubblico una parola che lo spettatore sul palcoscenico aveva soltanto pensato. L’effetto è stato stranissimo: le persone tra il pubblico si guardavano l’un l’altro divertite e si chiedevano come potesse essere accaduto.
Detto questo, non esiste un “modo corretto” per trasmettere lo stupore al pubblico: ogni performer deve trovare il proprio. Il mentalista-superuomo in determinati casi potrebbe far pesare troppo la sua abilità e risultare altezzoso, ma è anche vero che ci sono colleghi preparatissimi che rivestono in modo magistrale il personaggio del mentalista con poteri da X-Men.
Dipende anche dalla situazione. Lo spostamento dell’attenzione sullo spettatore funziona bene con un pubblico non troppo numeroso, ma spesso di fronte a platee più ampie, ad esempio negli spettacoli aziendali, rimango invece vestito dell’abito tipico del mentalista.

Al di là dei tuoi spettacoli di bizarre magic, hai sviluppato un’originale declinazione di mentalismo one-to-one. Come cambia il tuo lavoro quando ti trovi di fronte a un solo spettatore? Quali libertà ti puoi permettere, e a quali devi rinunciare?

Amo in particolar modo il contesto one-to-one, mi consente di esibirmi in ambienti e ambiti in cui spesso sarebbe impossibile realizzare uno spettacolo. Lavorare davanti a un solo spettatore è una bella sfida, sia psicologicamente che tecnicamente: sono indispensabili grande empatia, capacità di improvvisazione e sicurezza. La libertà che ti puoi permettere è quella di “affidare” allo spettatore stesso una parte dell’effetto, vale a dire che è lui che ne elabora e ne gestisce il senso, il significato speciale che un gioco può ricoprire rispetto alla sua sfera personale. Di contro, parlavamo di egocentrismo del performer: ecco, nel one-to-one devi assolutamente scordartelo, va messo da parte e soprattutto dal punto di vista etico bisogna rinunciare alla tentazione del potere quasi illimitato che quel ruolo, in quel momento, ti consentirebbe di avere.

Nel libro Magia a tu per tu racconti nel dettaglio come sei arrivato a costruire i tuoi effetti migliori, e in generale risulta evidente il perfezionismo nello studiare ogni minimo dettaglio della performance. Ti spingi perfino a dare suggerimenti minuziosi sulla logistica, su come posizionare o preparare la scena, eccetera. Eppure una delle cose che mi ha più colpito sono i passaggi in cui, di contro, parli dell’importanza dell’improvvisazione: quei preziosi momenti in cui – magari per quello che potrebbe sembrare a prima vista un incredibile colpo di fortuna – il numero travalica l’intento originario, e diventa qualcosa di più, sorprendendo perfino te stesso. Questo tipo di “fiuto” che ti permette di volgere la casualità a tuo favore, ho il sospetto che nasca proprio dalla meticolosità della preparazione, dall’esperienza. In che misura lasci la porta aperta all’imprevisto?

Un mentalista deve saper cogliere ogni situazione che si crea durante la performance, e volgerla a proprio favore. Non di rado, sia sul palco che in one-to-one, un’informazione ricevuta dallo spettatore permette di creare una variazione che risulta molto più potente dell’effetto magico programmato che, a quel punto, passa in secondo piano e può essere accantonato.
Chiaramente ogni improvvisazione, sia in ambito musicale che teatrale o illusionistico, necessita di una perfetta conoscenza della materia: da qui la maniacale preparazione di tutta l’impalcatura che deve sorreggere una mia performance.
Questa caratteristica di cambiare repentinamente traiettoria è anche una delle differenze che si notano tra gli illusionisti ed i sensitivi: i primi solitamente propongono allo spettatore uno schema che rimane invariato indipendentemente da ciò che lo spettatore comunica (volontariamente o involontariamente). Al contrario i sensitivi, dai quali io prendo ispirazione, sono estremamente opportunisti e se colgono uno spiraglio da cui possono trarre maggior stupore lo utilizzano al volo. Certo, è molto meno faticoso proporre una routine magica in modo “meccanico”, ma penso che la seconda strada porti a risultati eccezionali, e regali grande soddisfazione anche allo spettatore.

Qual è il tuo consiglio d’oro per qualcuno che volesse muovere i primi passi sulla strada del mentalismo?

Vorresti conseguire il brevetto di volo in una scuola dove nessun insegnante ha mai volato? Piuttosto rischioso… Eppure in questi anni ho visto nascere corsi di mentalismo tenuti da performer che non hanno mai fatto uno show in vita loro. Analoga situazione per i libri e i corsi online: hanno la pretesa di spiegare tecniche ed effetti, ma del loro ideatore non trovi traccia. Hai un bel cercare uno show del “docente” per andare a vederlo in scena, è tutto inutile: mai una foto di lui sul palco, mai una recensione. Ecco perché consiglio di frequentare lezioni e corsi tenuti di mentalisti che lavorano sul serio a contatto con il pubblico, che fanno davvero spettacolo.
Diverso è il discorso per i libri di storia dell’illusionismo, di storytelling e di principi generali: in Italia abbiamo scrittori riconosciuti in tutto il mondo, uno per tutti Mariano Tomatis che con il suo ambizioso progetto Mesmer – Lezioni di mentalismo ha realizzato una vera e propria enciclopedia relativa alla storia del mentalismo partendo dal ‘700.

Anche il mestiere ideale ha sempre qualche lato frustrante. C’è qualche aspetto del tuo lavoro che proprio non ti va giù?

La frustrazione inizia quando non si è più in grado di esprimere se stessi dal punto di vista artistico. Per questo motivo cerco sempre di rinnovarmi, e presentare testi che siano stimolanti per me, prima ancora che per il pubblico. Per ora non ho incontrato aspetti negativi, forse perché il mentalismo, pur essendo la mia professione, non riesco ancora a considerarlo un lavoro: rimane sempre la più grande delle mie passioni.

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Francesco Busani.

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – VIII

Angela Carter
LA CAMERA DI SANGUE
(1984-95, Feltrinelli, f.c.)

Femminista innamorata del simbolo, del mito e del fiabesco barocco, Angela Carter è stata una delle voci più distinte e originali della letteratura britannica del Novecento. I suoi romanzi e racconti vengono talvolta inseriti nella vaga definizione di “realismo magico”, in ragione dell’irruzione del fantastico nel contesto realistico, ma la scrittura della Carter unisce alla piacevolezza dell’affabulazione una complessa stratificazione di rimandi culturali che la avvicinano per certi versi al postmoderno. Non fanno eccezione queste fiabe classiche, rilette dalla Carter alla luce di una sensibilità moderna che ha metabolizzato stimoli distanti ed eclettici (la tradizione orale, i maudits francesi, Sade, la psicanalisi, ecc.).

Le favole reinventate ne La camera di sangue (fra le altre, Cappuccetto Rosso, Il gatto con gli stivali, la Bella e la Bestia, ecc.) sono di volta in volta crudeli, comiche, inquietanti o suggestive, ma sempre costruite alla luce di una particolare ironia che ne esalta i sottotesti sessuali o sessisti.

Il femminismo di Angela Carter, per quanto radicale, non è certamente manicheo ma pare anzi ambiguamente affascinato dalle figure maschili oppressive e dominanti (davvero esclusivamente per “denunciarle”?). In questo senso la vera e propria perla di questa antologia rimane il racconto d’apertura che dà il titolo alla raccolta, una rilettura libera della favola di Barbablù. La raffinatezza della descrizione dei sentimenti della sposa-bambina “acquistata” e segregata dal marito-orco è tra i punti più alti del libro: l’attrazione e la repulsione si confondono in modo quasi impercettibile nell’insicurezza virginale della protagonista. La prima notte di nozze avviene in una imponente camera del castello in cui il marito ha fatto istallare una dozzina di specchi – indicando la folla di ragazzine riflesse, esclama soddisfatto: “Guarda, me ne sono procurato un intero harem!”. Poi la deflorazione, ed ecco che con l’arrivo del sangue si disvela la maschera della sessualità come aggressione; sarà sempre il sangue a guidare come un filo rosso la protagonista alla scoperta del vero volto dell’assassino collezionista di mogli; e il sogno idilliaco si trasformerà in incubo proprio con l’apertura della porta proibita, la segreta del nero desiderio maschile, fatto di crudeltà e dominazione.

Per un’analisi del testo, rimandiamo a questa pagina.

Jacques Chessex
L’ULTIMO CRANIO DEL MARCHESE DI SADE
(2012, Fazi Editore)

Il libro postumo di Chessex esce in Italia a quasi tre anni dalla morte dell’autore svizzero, avvenuta per attacco cardiaco nel corso di una conferenza. E L’ultimo cranio ha certamente qualcosa di profetico, perché parla di uno scrittore che sta per morire: si tratta del famigerato Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, quel “divino marchese” che con il passare del tempo diviene una figura sempre più centrale nella cultura occidentale. La prima parte del romanzo racconta gli ultimi mesi di vita di Sade rinchiuso nel manicomio di Charenton, ormai minato nella salute a causa dei continui eccessi. La sua agonia è lenta e dolorosa: proprio lui, che ha passato gran parte della sua vita in cella, è ora costretto a fare i conti con un’altra prigione, quella della carne che va disfacendosi. Emorragie, coliche, tosse asmatica, obesità e sincopi lo rendono ancora più blasfemo e intrattabile del solito. In preda a uno sconfinato cupio dissolvi, Sade è ormai maniacalmente ossessionato dalle sue dissolutezze. La seconda parte del romanzo traccia invece la storia del suo cranio, che attraversa l’Europa e i secoli ritornando in superficie di tanto in tanto, e portando con sé un’aura magica di malvagità e sciagure. Come una vera e propria reliquia al contrario, il cranio diviene il simbolo beffardo di un ateismo che ha bisogno di martiri e di santi tanto quanto le religioni che disprezza. Questa duplicità rimanda evidentemente al celebre saggio di Klossowski Sade prossimo mio, in cui l’autore sottolinea più volte che l’ateismo del Marchese aveva necessità di una religione da vilipendere, e in definitiva anche il Sade di Chessex brucia di furia sovrumana, quasi divina. L’ultimo cranio, nonostante le accuse di pornografia e immoralità (oltre al sesso, il libro contiene anche qualche blasfemia esplicita), sorprende per la sostanziale pacatezza del linguaggio e i toni riflessivi che contrastano con la rabbia del protagonista: Chessex compone qui una misurata e matura vanitas, che ci parla della dissoluzione finale da cui non può scappare nemmeno un animo indomito.

Proprio perché l’uomo è solo, ha così terribilmente bisogno di simboli. Di un cranio, di amuleti, di oggetti di scongiuro. La consapevolezza vertiginosa della fine dell’individuo nella morte. A ogni istante, la rovina. Forse bisognerebbe considerare la passione per un cranio, e singolarmente per un cranio stregato, come una manifestazione disperata di amore di sè e del mondo già perduto“.