Simone Unverdorben, The False Martyr

Article by guestblogger La cara Pasifae

A little boy went out to play.
When he opened his door he saw the world.
As he passed through the doorway he caused a riflection.
Evil was born!
Evil was born and followed the boy.

(D. Lynch, Inland Empire, 2006)

It was a nice late-summer afternoon, in 2013. I remember well.
A friend had invited me to the opening of his latest exhibition. He had picked an unusual place for the event: an ancient and isolated parish church that stood high up on a hill, the church of Nanto. The building had been recently renovated, and it was open to the public only on specific occasions.
Once there, one immediately feels the urge to look around. The view is beautiful, but it pays the price of the impact the construction industry (I was almost about to say “architecture”) has had on the surroundings, with many industrial buildings covering the lanscapes of Veneto region like a tattoo. Better go inside and look at the paintings.

I was early for the opening, so I had the artist, his works and the entire exhibition area all for myself. I could walk and look around without any hurry, and yet I felt something disturbing my peace, something I couldn’t quite pin down at first:  it kind of wormed its way into my visual field, calling for attention. On a wall, as I was passing from one painted canvas to the next, I eventually spotted a sudden, indefinite blur of colors. A fresco. An image had been resting there well before the exhibition paintings were placed in front of it!

Despite the restoration, as it happens with many medieval and Renaissance frescoes, some elements were still confused and showed vanishing, vaporous outlines. But once in focus, an unsettling vision emerged: the fresco depicted a quite singular torture scene, the likes of which I had never encountered in any other artwork (but I wouldn’t want to pass as an expert on the subject).
Two female figures, standing on either side, were holding the arms of a blonde child (a young Christ, a child-saint, or a puer sacer, a sacred and mystical infant, I really couldn’t say). The kid was being tortured by two young men: each holding a stiletto, they were slicing the boy’s skin all over, and even his face seemed to have been especially brutalized.


Blood ran down the child’s bound feet into a receiving bowl, which had been specifically placed under the victim’s tormented limbs.

The child’s swollen face (the only one still clearly visible) had an ecstatic expression that barely managed to balance the horror of the hemorrhage and of the entire scene: in the background, a sixth male figure sporting a remarkable beard, was twisting a cloth band around the prisoner throat. The baby was being choked to death!

What is the story of this fresco? What tale does it really tell?
The five actors do not look like peasants; the instruments are not randomly chosen: these are thin, sharp, professional blades. The incisions on the victim’s body are too regular. Who perpetrated this hideous murder, who was the object of the resentment the author intended to elicit in the onlookers? Maybe the fresco was a representation — albeit dramatic and exaggerated — of a true crime. Should the choking, flaying and bleeding be seen as a metaphor for some parasitic exploitation, or do they hint at some rich and eccentric nobleman’s quirkiness? Is this a political allegory or a Sadeian chronicle?
The halo surrounding the child’s head makes him an innocent or a saved soul. Was this a homage, a flattering detail to exhalt the commissioner of this work of art? What character was meant to be celebrated here, the subjects on the sides who are carrying out a dreadful, but unavoidable task, or the boy at the center who looks so obscenely resigned to suffer their painful deeds? Are we looking at five emissaries of some brutal but rational justice as they perform their duties, or the misadventure of a helpless soul that fell in the hands of a ferocious gang of thugs?

At the bottom of the fresco, a date: «ADI ⋅ 3 ⋅ APRILE 1479».
This historical detail brought me back to the present. The church was already crowded with people.
I felt somehow crushed by the overload of arcane symbols, and the frustation of not having the adequate knowledge to interpret what I had seen. I furtively took a snapshot. I gave my host a warm farewell, and then got out, hoping the key to unlock the meaning of the fresco was not irretrievably lost in time.

As I discovered at the beginning of my research on this controversial product of popular iconography, the fresco depicts the martyrdom of Saint Simonino of Trent. Simone Unverdorben, a two-year-old toddler from Trent, disappeared on March 23, 1475. His body was found on Easter Day. It was said to have been mauled and strangled. In Northern Italy, in those years, antisemitic abuses and persecutions stemmed from the widely influential sermons of the clergy. The guilt for the heinous crime immediately fell upon the Trent Jewish community. All of its members had to endure one of the biggest trials of the time, being subjected to tortures that led to confessions and reciprocal accusations.

During the preliminary investigations of the Trent trial, a converted Jew was asked if the practice of ritual homicide of Christian toddlers existed within the Hebrew cult. […] The converted Jew, at the end of the questioning, confirmed with abundant details the practice of ritual sacrifice in the Jewish Easter liturgy.
Another testimony emerged from the interrogation of another of the alleged killers of the little Simone, the Jewish physician Tobia. He declared on the rack there was a commerce in Christian blood among Jews. A Jewish merchant called Abraam was said to have left Trent shortly before Simone’s death with the intention of selling Christian blood, headed to Feltre or Bassano, and to have asked around which of the two cities was closer to Trent. Tobia’s confession took place under the terrifying threat of being tortured and in the desperate attempt to avoid it: he therefore had to be cooperative to the point of fabrication; but it was understood that his testimony, whenever made up, should be consistent and plausible.
[…] Among the others, another converted man named Israele (Wolfgang, after converting) was  also interrogated under torture. He declared he had heard about other cases of ritual murders […]. These instances of ritual homicides were inventions whose protagonists had names that came from the interrogee’s memory, borrowed to crowd these fictional stories in a credible way.

(M. Melchiorre, Gli ebrei a Feltre nel Quattrocento. Una storia rimossa,
in Ebrei nella Terraferma veneta del Quattrocento,
a cura di G.M. Varanini e R.C. Mueller, Firenze University Press 2005)

Many were burned at the stake. The survivors were exiled from the city, after their possessions had been confiscated.
According to the jury, the child’s collected blood had been used in the ritual celebration of the “Jewish Easter”.

The facts we accurately extracted from the offenders, as recorded in the original trials, are the following. The wicked Jews living in Trent, having maliciously planned to make their Easter solemn through the killing of a Christian child, whose blood they could mix in their unleavened bread, commisioned it to Tobia, who was deemed perfect for the infamous deed as he was familiar with the town on the account of being a professional doctor. He went out at 10 pm on Holy Thursday, March 23, as all believers were at the Mass, walked the streets and alleys of the city and having spotted the innocent Simone all alone on his father’s front door, he showed him a big silver piece, and with sweet words and smiles he took him from via del Fossato, where his parents lived, to the house of the rich Jew Samuele, who was eagerly waiting for him. There he was kept, with charms and apples, until the hour of the sacrifice arrived. At 1 am, little twenty-nine-months-old Simone was taken to the chamber adjoining the women’s synagogue; he was stripped naked and a band or belt was made from his clothes, and he was muzzled with a handkerchief, so that he wouldn’t immediately choke to death nor be heard; Moses the Elder, sitting on a stall and holding the baby in his lap, tore a piece of flesh off his cheek with a pair of iron pliers. Samuele did the same while Tobia, assisted by Moar, Bonaventura, Israele, Vitale and another Bonaventura (Samuele’s cook) collected in a basin the blood pouring from the wound. After that, Samuele and the aforementioned seven Jews vied with each other to pierce the flesh of the holy martyr, declaring in Hebrew that they were doing so to mock the crucified God of the Christians; and they added: thus shall be the fate of all our enemies. After this feral ordeal, the old Moses took a knife and pierced with it the tip of the penis, and with the pliers tore a chunk of meat from the little right leg and Samuel, who replaced him, tore a piece out of the other leg. The copious blood oozing from the puerile penis was harvested in a different vase, while the blood pouring from the legs was collected in the basin. All the while, the cloth plugging his mouth was sometimes tightened and sometimes loosened; not satisfied with the outrageous massacre, they insisted in the same torture a second time, with greater cruelty, piercing him everywhere with pins and needles; until the young boy’s blessed soul departed his body, among the rejoicing of this insane riffraff.

(Annali del principato ecclesiastico di Trento dal 1022 al 1540, pp. 352-353)

Very soon Simonino (“little Simone”) was acclaimed as a “blessed martyr”, and his cult spread thoughout Northern Italy. As devotion grew wider, so did the production of paintings, ex voto, sculptures, bas reliefs, altar decorations.

Polichrome woodcut, Daniel Mauch’s workshop, Museo Diocesano Tridentino.

Questionable elements, taken from folktales and popular belief, began to merge with an already established, sterotyped antisemitism.

 

From Alto Adige, April 1, 2017.

Despite the fact that the Pope had forbidden the cult, pilgrims kept flocking. The fame of the “saint” ‘s miracles grew, together with a wave of antisemitism. The fight against usury led to the accusation of loan-sharking, extended to all Jews. The following century, Pope Sistus V granted a formal beatification. The cult of Saint Simonino of Trent further solidified. The child’s embalmed body was exhibited in Trent until 1955, together with the alleged relics of the instruments of torture.

In reality, Simone Unverdorben (or Unferdorben) was found dead in a water canal belonging to a town merchant, near a Jewish man’s home, probably a moneylender. If he wasn’t victim of a killer, who misdirected the suspects on the easy scapegoat of the Jewish community, the child might have fallen in the canal and drowned. Rats could have been responsible for the mutilations. In the Nineteenth Century, accurate investigations proved the ritual homicide theory wrong. In 1965, five centuries after the murder, the Church abolished  the worship of Saint “Martyr” Simonino for good.

A violent fury against the very portraits of the “torturers” lasted for a long time. Even the San Simonino fresco in Nanto was defaced by this rage. This is the reason why, during that art exhibition, I needed some time to recognize a painting in that indistinct blur of light and colors.

My attempt at gathering the information I needed in order to make sense of the simulacrum in the Nanto parish church, led me to discover an often overlooked incident, known only to the artists who represented it, their commissioners, their audience; but the deep discomfort I felt when I first looked at the fresco still has not vanished.

La cara Pasifae


Suggested bibliography:
– R. Po – Chia Hsia, Trent 1475. Stories of a Ritual Murder Trial, Yale 1992
– A. Esposito, D. Quaglioni, Processi contro gli Ebrei di Trento (1475-1478), CEDAM 1990
– A. Toaff, Pasque di sangue: ebrei d’Europa e omicidi rituali, Il Mulino 2008

Le Violon Noir

Italian conductor Guido Rimonda, a violin virtuoso, owns an exceptional instrument: the Leclair Stradivarius, built in 1721.
Just like every Stradivarius violin, this too inherited its name from its most famous owner: Jean-Marie Leclair, considered the father of the French violin school, “the most Italian among French composers”.
But the instrument also bears the unsettling nickname of “black violin” (violon noir): the reason lies in a dark legend concerning Jean-Marie Leclair himself, who died in dramatic and mysterious circumstances.

Born in Lyon on May 10, 1697, Leclair enjoyed an extraordinary career: he started out as first dancer at the Opera Theatre in Turin – back in the day, violinists also had to be dance teachers – and, after settling in Paris in 1728, he gained huge success among the critics and the public thanks to his elegant and innovative compositions. Applauded at the Concerts Spirituels, author of many sonatas for violin and continuous bass as well as for flute, he performed in France, Italy, England, Germany and the Netherlands. Appointed conductor of the King’s orchestra by Louis XV in 1733 (a position he held for four years, in rotation with his rival Pierre Guignon, before resigning), he was employed at the court of Orange under Princess Anne.
His decline began in 1746 with his first and only opera work, Schylla and Glaucus, which did not find the expected success, despite the fact that it’s now regarded as a little masterpiece blending Italian and French suggestions, ancient and modern styles. Leclair’s following employment at the Puteaux Theatre, run by his former student Antoine-Antonin Duke of Gramont, ended in 1751 because of the Duke’s financial problems.

In 1758 Leclair left his second wife, Louise Roussel, after twenty-eight years of marriage and collaboration (Louise, a musician herself, had copper-etched all of his works). Sentimentally as well as professionally embittered, he retired to live alone in a small house in the Quartier du Temple, a rough and infamous Paris district.
Rumors began to circulate, often diametrically opposite to one another: some said that he had become a misanthropist who hated all humanity, leading a reclusive life holed up in his apartments, refusing to see anyone and getting his food delivered through a pulley; others claimed that, on the contrary, he was living a libertine life of debauchery.

Not even the musician’s death could put an end to these rumors – quite the opposite: because on the 23rd of October 1764, Jean-Marie Leclair was found murdered inside his home. He had been stabbed three times. The killer was never caught.

In the following years and centuries, the mystery surrounding his death never ceased to intrigue music lovers and, as one would expect, it also gave rise to a “black” legend.
The most popular version, often told by Guido Rimonda himself, holds that Leclair, right after being stabbed, crawled over to his Stradivarius with his last breath, to hold it against his chest.
That violin was the only thing in the world he still truly loved.
His corpse was found two months later, still clutching his musical instrument; while the body was rotting away, his hand had left on the wood a black indelible stain, which is still visible today.

The fact that this is indeed a legend might be proved by police reports that, besides never mentioning the famous violin, describe the discovery of the victim the morning after the murder (and not months later):

On the 23rd of October 1764, by early morning, a gardener named Bourgeois […] upon passing before Leclair’s home, noticed that the door was open. Just about that time Jacques Paysan, the musician’s gardener, arrived at the same place. The violinist’s quite miserable abode included a closed garden.Both men, having noticed Leclair’s hat and wig lying in the garden, looked for witnesses before entering the house. Together with some neighbors, they went inside and found the musician lying on the floor in his vestibule. […] Jean-Marie Leclair was lying on his back, his shirt and undershirt were stained with blood. He had been stabbed three times with a sharp object: one wound was above the left nipple, one under his belly on the right side, and the third one in the middle of his chest. Around the body several objects were found, which seemed to have been put there deliberately. A hat, a book entitled L’élite des bons mots, some music paper, and a hunting knife with no blood on it. Leclair was wearing this knife’s holster, and it was clear that the killer had staged all of this. Examination of the body, carried out by Mister Pierre Charles, surgeon, found some bruises on the lumbar region, on the upper and lower lips and on the jaw, which proved that after a fight with his assassin, Leclair had been knocked down on his back.

(in Marc Pincherle, Jean-Marie Leclair l’aîné, 1952,
quoted in
Musicus Politicus, Qui a tué Jean-Marie Leclair?, 2016)

The police immediately suspected gardener Jascques Paysan, whose testimony was shaky and imprecise, but above all Leclair’s nephew, François-Guillaume Vial.
Vial, a forty-year-old man, was the son of Leclair’s sister; a musician himself, who arrived in Paris around 1750, he had been stalking his uncle, demanding to be introduced at the service of the Duke of Gramont.
According to police report, Vial “complained about the injustice his uncle had put him through, declared that the old man had got what he deserved, as he had always lived like a wolf, that he was a damned cheapskate, that he begged for this, and that he had left his wife and children to live alone like a tramp, refusing to see anyone from the family”. Vial provided a contradictory testimony to the investigators, as well as giving a blatantly false alibi.

And yet, probably discouraged by the double lead, investigators decided to close the case. Back in those days, investigations were all but scientific, and in cases like this all the police did was questioning neighbors and relatives of the victim; Leclair’s murder was left unsolved.

But let’s get back to the black stain that embellishes Rimonda’s violin. Despite the fact that the sources seem to contradict its “haunted” origin, in this case historical truth is much less relevant than the legend’s narrative breadth and impact.

The violon noir is a uniquely fascinating symbol: it belonged to an artist who was perfectly inscribed within the age of Enlightenment, yet it speaks of the Shadows.
Bearing in its wood the imprint of death (the spirit of the deceased through its physical trace), it becomes the emblem of the violence and cruelty human beings inflict on each other, in the face of Reason. But that black mark – which reminds us of Leclair’s last, affectionate and desperate embrace – is also a sign of the love of which men are capable: love for music, for the impalpable, for beauty, for all that is transcendent.

If every Stradivarius is priceless, Rimonda’s violin is even more invaluable, as it represents all that is terrible and wonderful in human nature. And when you listen to it, the instrument seems to give off several voices at the same time: Rimonda’s personality, as he sublimely plays the actual notes, blends with the personality of Stradivari, which can be perceived in the amazingly clear timber. But a third presence seems to linger: it’s the memory of Leclair, his payback. Forgotten during his lifetime, he still echoes today through his beloved violin.

You can listen to Rimonda’s violin in his album Le violon noir, available in CD and digital format.

(Thanks, Flavio!)

Teresa Margolles: Translating The Horror

Imagine you live in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico.
The “City of Evil”, one of the most violent places on the entire planet. Here, in the past few years, murders have reached inconceivable numbers. More than 3000 victims only in 2010 – an average of eight to nine people killed every day.
So every day, you leave your home praying you won’t be caught in some score-settling fight between the over 900 pandillas (armed gangs) tied to the drug cartels. Every day, like it or not, you are a witness to the neverending slaughter that goes on in your town. It’s not a metaphor. It is a real, daily, dreadful massacre.

Now imagine you live in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, and you’re a woman aged between 15 and 25.
Your chances of not being subjected to violence, and of staying alive, drastically drop. In Juárez women like you are oppressed, battered, raped; they often disappear, and their bodies – if they’re ever found – show signs of torture and mutilations.
If you were to be kidnapped, you already know that in all probability your disappearance wouldn’t even be reported. No one would look for you anyway: the police seem to be doing anything but investigating. “She must have had something to do with the cartel – people would say – or else she somehow asked for it“.

Photo credit: Scott Dalton.

Finally, imagine you live in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, you’re a woman and you’re an artist.
How would you explain this hell to those who live outside Juárez? How can you address the burden of desperation and suffering this carnage places upon the hearts of the relatives? How will you be heard, in a world which is already saturated with images of violence? How are you going to convey in a palpable way all this anguish, the sense of constant loss, the waste of human life?

Teresa Margolles, born in 1963 in Culiacán, Sinaloa, was a trained pathologist before she became an artist. She now lives in Mexico City, but in the past she worked in several morgues across South America, including the one in Ciudad Juárez, that terrible mortuary where an endless river of bodies keeps flowing through four huge refrigerators (each containing up to 120 corpses).
A morgue for me is a thermometer of a society. What happens inside a morgue is what happens outside. The way people die show me what is happening in the city.

Starting from this direct experience, Margolles oriented her whole research towards two difficult objectives: one one hand she aims at sabotaging the narrative, ubiquitous in Mexican media and society, which blames the victims (the afore-mentioned “they were asking for it“); on the other, she wants to make the consequences of violence concrete and tangible to her audience, translating the horror into a physical, universal language.

But a peculiar lucidity is needed to avoid certain traps. The easiest way would be to rely on a raw kind of shock art: subjecting the public to scenes of massacre, mutilated bodies, mangled flesh. But the effect would be counter-productive, as our society is already bombarded with such representations, and we are so used to hyperreal images that we can hardly tell them apart from fiction.

It is then necessary to bring the public in touch with death and pain, but through some kind of transfer, or translation, so that the observer is brought on the edge of the abyss by his own sensitivity.

This is the complex path Teresa Margolles chose to take. The following is a small personal selection of her works displayed around the world, in major museums and art galleries, and in several Biennials.

En el aire (2003). The public enters a room, and is immediately seized by a slight euforia upon seeing dozens of soap bubbles joyfully floating in the air: the first childish reaction is to reach out and make them burst. The bubble pops, and some drops of water fall on the skin.
What the audience soon discovers, though, is those bubbles are created with the water and soap that have been used to wash the bodies of homicide victims in the morgue. And suddenly everything changes: the water which fell on our skin created an invisible, magical connection between us and these anonymous cadavers; and each bubble becomes the symbol of a life, a fragile soul that got lost in the void.

Vaporización (2001). Here the water from the mortuary, once again collected and disinfected, is vaporized in the room by some humidifiers. Death saturates the atmosphere, and we cannot help but breathe this thick mist, where every particle bears the memory of brutally killed human beings.

Tarjetas para picar cocaina (1997-99). Margolles collected some pictures of homicide victims connected with drug wars. She then gave them to drug addicts so they could use them to cut their dose of cocaine. The nonjudgemental metaphor is clear – the dead fuel narco-trafficking, every sniff implies the violence – but at the same time these photographs become spiritual objects, invested as they are with a symbolic/magic meaning directly connected to a specific dead person.

Lote Bravo (2005). Layed out on the floor are what look like simple bricks. In fact, they have been created using the sand collected in five different spots in Juárez, where the bodies of raped and murdered women were found. Each handmade brick is the symbol of a woman who was killed in the “city of dead girls”.

Trepanaciones (Sonidos de la morgue) (2003). Just some headphones, hanging from the ceiling. The visitor who decides to wear one, will hear the worldess sounds of the autopsies carried out by Margolles herself. Sounds of open bodies, bones being cut – but without any images that might give some context to these obscene noises, without the possibility of knowing exactly what they refer to. Or to whom they correspond: to what name, broken life, interrupted hopes.

Linea fronteriza (2005). The photograph of a suture, a body sewed up after the autopsy: but the detail that makes this image really powerful is the tattoo of the Virgin of Guadalupe, with its two halves that do not match anymore. Tattoos are a way to express one’s own individuality: a senseless death is the border line that disrupts and shatters it.

Frontera (2011). Margolles removed two walls from Juárez and Culiacán, and exhibited them inside the gallery. Some bullet holes are clearly visible on these walls, the remnants of the execution of two policemen and four young men at the hands of the drug cartel. Facing these walls, one is left to wonder. What does it feel like to stand before a firing squad?
Furthermore, by “saving” these walls (which were quickly replaced by new ones, in the original locations) Margolles is also preserving the visual trace of an act of violence that society is eager to remove from collective memory.

Frazada/La Sombra (2016). A simple structure, installed outdoors, supports a blanket, like the tent of a peddler stand. You can sit in the shade to cool off from the sun. And yet this blanket comes from the morgue in La Paz, where it was used to wrap up the corpse of a femicide victim. The shadow stands for the code of silence surrounding these crimes – it is, once again, a conceptual stratagem to bring us closer to the woman’s death. This shroud, this murder is casting its shadow on us too.

Pajharu/Sobre la sangre (2017). Ten murdered  women, ten blood-stained pieces of cloth that held their corpses. Margolles enrolled seven Aymara weavers to embroider this canvas with traditional motifs. The clotted blood stains intertwine with the floreal decorations, and end up being absorbed and disguised within the patterns. This extraordinary work denounces, on one hand, how violence has become an essential part of a culture: when we think of Mexico, we often think of its most colorful traditions, without taking notice of the blood that soaks them, without realizing the painful truth hidden behind those stereotypes we tourists love so much. On the other hand, though, Sobre la sangre is an act of love and respect for those murdered women. Far from being mere ghosts, they are an actual presence; by preserving and embellishing these blood traces, Margolles is trying to subtract them from oblivion, and give them back their lost beauty.

Lengua (2000). Margolles arranged funeral services for this boy, who was killed in a drug-related feud, and in return asked his family permission to preserve and use his tonge for this installation. So that it could speak on. Like the tattoo in Linea frontizera, here the piercing is the sign of a truncated singularity.
The theoretical shift here is worthy of note: a human organ, deprived of the body that contained it and decontextualized, becomes an object in its own right, a rebel tongue, a “full” body in itself — carrying a whole new meaning. Scholar Bethany Tabor interpreted this work as mirroring the Deleuzian concept of body without organs, a body which de-organizes itself, revolting against those functions that are imparted upon it by society, by capitalism, by the established powers (all that Artaud referred to by using the term “God”, and from which he whished “to have done with“).

37 cuerpos (2007). The remnants of the thread used to sew up the corpses of 37 victims are tied together to form a rope which stretches across the space and divides it like a border.

¿De qué otra cosa podríamos hablar? (2009). This work, awarded at the 53rd Venice Biennial, is the one that brought Margolles in the spotlight. The floor of the room is wet with the water used to wash bodies at the Juárez morgue. On the walls, huge canvases look like abstract paintings but in reality these are sheets soaked in the victims blood.
Outside the Mexican Pavillion, on a balcony overlooking the calle, an equally blood-stained Mexico flag is hoisted. Necropolitics takes over the art spaces.

It is not easy to live in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, to be a woman, and to be an artist who directly tackles the endless, often voiceless violence. It is even more difficult to try and find that miraculous balance between rawness and sensitivity, minimalism and incisivity, while maintaining a radical and poetic approach that can upset the public but also touch their heart.

For this post I am indebted to Bethany Tabor, who at Death & The Maiden Conference presented her brilliant paper Performative Remains: The Forensic Art of Teresa Margolles, focusing on the Deleuzian implications of Margolle’s works.
A couple of available essays on Margolles are
What Else Could We Talk About? and Teresa Margolles and the Aesthetics of Death.

A Most Unfortunate Execution

The volume Celebrated trials of all countries, and remarkable cases of criminal jurisprudence (1835) is a collection of 88 accounts of murders and curious proceedings.
Several of these anecdotes are quite interesting, but a double hanging which took place in 1807 is particularly astonishing for the collateral effects it entailed.

On November 6, 1802, John Cole Steele, owner of a lavander water deposit, was travelling from Bedfont, on the outskirts of London, to his home on Strand. It was deep in the night, and the merchant was walking alone, as he couldn’t find a coach.
The moon had just come up when Steele was surrounded by three men who were hiding in the bushes. They were John Holloway and Owen Haggerty — two small-time crooks always in trouble with the law; with them was their accomplice Benjamin Hanfield, whom they had recruited some hours earlier at an inn.
Hanfield himself would prove to be the weak link. Four years later, under the promise of a full pardon for unrelated offences, he would vividly recount in court the scene he had witnessed that night:

We presently saw a man coming towards us, and, on approaching him, we ordered him to stop, which he immediately did. Holloway went round him, and told him to deliver. He said we should have his money,
and hoped we would not ill-use him. [Steele] put his hand in his pocket, and gave Haggerty his money. I demanded his pocket-book. He replied that he had none. Holloway insisted that he had a book, and if he
did not deliver it, he would knock him down. I then laid hold of his legs. Holloway stood at his head, and swore if he cried out he would knock out his brains. [Steele] again said, he hoped we would not ill-use him. Haggerty proceeded to search him, when [Steele] made some resistance, and struggled so much that we got across the road. He cried out severely, and as a carriage was coming up, Holloway said, “Take care, I’ll silence the b—–r,” and immediately struck him several violent blows on the head and body. [Steele] heaved a heavy groan, and stretched himself out lifeless. I felt alarmed, and said, “John, you have killed the man”. Holloway replied, that it was a lie, for he was only stunned. I said I would stay no longer, and immediately set off towards London, leaving Holloway and Haggerty with the body. I came to Hounslow, and stopped at the end of the town nearly an hour. Holloway and Haggerty then came up, and said they had done the trick, and, as a token, put the deceased’s hat into my hand. […] I told Holloway it was a cruel piece of business, and that I was sorry I had any hand in it. We all turned down a lane, and returned to London. As we came along, I asked Holloway if he had got the pocketbook. He replied it was no matter, for as I had refused to share the danger, I should not share the booty. We came to the Black Horse in Dyot-street, had half a pint of gin, and parted.

A robbery gone wrong, like many others. Holloway and Haggerty would have gotten away with it: investigations did not lead to anything for four years, until Hanfield revealed what he knew.
The two were arrested on the account of Hanfield’s testimony, and although they claimed to be innocent they were both sentenced to death: Holloway and Haggerty would hang on a Monday, February 22, 1807.
During all Sunday night, the convicts kept on shouting out they had nothing to do with the murder, their cries tearing the “awful stillness of midnight“.

On the fatal morning, the two were brought at the Newgate gallows. Another person was to be hanged with them,  Elizabeth Godfrey, guilty of stabbing her neighbor Richard Prince.
Three simultaneous executions: that was a rare spectacle, not to be missed. For this reason around 40.000 perople gathered to witness the event, covering every inch of space outside Newgate and before the Old Bailey.

Haggertywas the first to walk up, silent and resigned. The hangman, William Brunskill, covered his head with a white hood. Then came Holloway’s turn, but the man lost his cold blood, and started yelling “I am innocent, innocent, by God!“, as his face was covered with a similar cloth. Lastly a shaking Elizabeth Godfrey was brought beside the other two.
When he finished with his prayers, the priest gestured for the executioner to carry on.
Around 8.15 the trapdoors opened under the convicts’ feet. Haggerty and Holloway died on the instant, while the woman convulsively wrestled for some time before expiring. “Dying hard“, it was called at the time.

But the three hanged persons were not the only victims on that cold, deadly morning: suddenly the crowd started to move out of control like an immense tide.

The pressure of the crowd was such, that before the malefactors appeared, numbers of persons were crying out in vain to escape from it: the attempt only tended to increase the confusion. Several females of low stature, who had been so imprudent as to venture amongst the mob, were in a dismal situation: their cries were dreadful. Some who could be no longer supported by the men were suffered to fall, and were trampled to death. This was also the case with several men and boys. In all parts there were continued cries “Murder! Murder!” particularly from the female part of the spectators and children, some of whom were seen expiring without the possibility of obtaining the least assistance, every one being employed in endeavouring to preserve his own life. The most affecting scene was witnessed at Green-Arbour Lane,
nearly opposite the debtors’ door. The lamentable catastrophe which took place near this spot, was attributed to the circumstance of two pie-men attending there to dispose of their pies, and one of them having his basket overthrown, some of the mob not being aware of what had happened, and at the
same time severely pressed, fell over the basket and the man at the moment he was picking it up, together with its contents. Those who once fell were never more enabled to rise, such was the pressure of the crowd. At this fatal place, a man of the name of Herrington was thrown down, who had in his hand his younger son, a fine boy about twelve years of age. The youth was soon trampled to death; the father recovered, though much bruised, and was amongst the wounded in St. Bartholomew’s Hospital.

The following passage is especially dreadful:

A woman, who was so imprudent as to bring with her a child at the breast, was one of the number killed: whilst in the act of falling, she forced the child into the arms of the man nearest to her, requesting him, for God’s sake, to save its life; the man, finding it required all his exertion to preserve himself, threw the infant from him, but it was fortunately caught at a distance by anotner man, who finding it difficult to ensure its safety or his own, disposed of it in a similar way. The child was again caught by a person, who contrived to struggle with it to a cart, under which he deposited it until the danger was over, and the mob had dispersed.

Others managed to have a narrow escape, as reported by the 1807 Annual Register:

A young man […] fell down […], but kept his head uncovered, and forced his way over the dead bodies, which lay in a pile as high as the people, until he was enabled to creep over the heads of the crowd to a lamp-iron, from whence he got into the first floor window of Mr. Hazel, tallow-chandler, in the Old Bailey; he was much bruised, and must have suffered the fate of his companion, if he had not been possessed of great strength.

The maddened crowd left a scene of apocalyptic devastation.

After the bodies were cut down, and the gallows was removed to the Old Bailey yard, the marshals and constables cleared the streets where the catastrophe had occurred, when nearly one hundred persons, dead or in a state of insensibility, were found in the street. […] A mother was seen to carry away the body of her dead son; […] a sailor boy was killed opposite Newgate, by suffocation; in a small bag which he carried was a quantity of bread and cheese, and it is supposed he came some distance to witness the execution. […] Until four o’clock in the afternoon, most of the surrounding houses contained some person in a wounded state, who were afterwards taken away by their friends on shutters or in hackney coaches. At Bartholomew’s Hospital, after the bodies of the dead were stripped and washed, they were ranged round a ward, with sheets over them, and their clothes put as pillows under their heads; their faces were uncovered, and there was a rail along the centre of the room; the persons who were admitted to see the shocking spectacle, and identified many, went up on one side and returned on the other. Until two o’clock, the entrances to the hospital were beset with mothers weeping for their sons! wives for their husbands! and sisters for their brothers! and various individuals for their relatives and friends!

There is however one last dramatic twist in this story: in all probability, Hollow and Haggerty were really innocent after all.
Hanfield, the key witness, might have lied to have his charges condoned.

Solicitor James Harmer (the same Harmer who incidentally inspired Charles Dickens for Great Expectations), even though convinced of their culpability in the beginning, kept on investigating after the convicts death and eventually changed his mind; he even published a pamphlet on his own expenses to denounce the mistake made by the Jury. Among other things, he discovered that Hanfield had tried the same trick before, when charged with desertion in 1805: he had attempted to confess to a robbery in order to avoid military punishment.
The Court itself was aware that the real criminals had not been punished, for in 1820, 13 years after the disastrous hanging, a John Ward was accused of the murder of Steele, then acquitted for lack of evidence (see Linda Stratmann in Middlesex Murders).

In one single day, Justice had caused the death of dozens of innocent people — including the convicts.
Really one of the most unfortunate executions London had ever seen.

___________________

I wrote about capital punsihment gone wrong in the past, in this article about Jack Ketch; on the same topic you can also find this post on ‘Bloody Murders’ pamphlets from Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries (both articles in Italian only, sorry!).

Gli ammutinati della Batavia

bat-hist2_0

Il viaggio della Batavia era partito male fin dall’inizio.
Quando questa nave della Compagnia Olandese delle Indie Orientali salpò da Texel, nei Paesi Bassi, il 29 ottobre 1628, una violenta tempesta la separò dalle altre sei imbarcazioni della flotta. Tornata la calma, soltanto tre navi erano in vista: la Batavia, appunto, Assendelft e la Buren. Proseguirono il loro viaggio fino al Capo di Buona Speranza, arrivandoci perfino in anticipo di un mese sulla tabella di marcia. Ma già a questo punto era chiaro che c’era sangue amaro fra il comandante Francisco Pelsaert e il capitano Adrian Jacobsz.
Pelsaert era uno degli uomini di maggiore esperienza di tutta la Compagnia, e mal sopportava l’amore del capitano per la bottiglia: l’aveva ripreso severamente, in pubblico e di fronte alla ciurma. Jacobsz, pur facendo buon viso a cattivo gioco, covava la sua vendetta.

Il terzo uomo più importante sulla nave, dopo il comandante e il capitano, era un certo Jeronimus Cornelisz. La sua era una storia strana, perché non era davvero un marinaio: aveva sempre svolto l’attività di farmacista, come suo padre prima di lui. Ma nel 1627 il suo figlioletto di pochi mesi era morto a causa della sifilide, e Cornelisz si era impuntato nel voler dimostrare che era stata l’infermiera a contagiare il bambino, e non sua moglie. Invischiato in azioni legali, era presto andato in bancarotta. Si era imbarcato sulla Batavia proprio per scappare dall’Olanda e fuggire i suoi guai finanziari.
A bordo della nave, Cornelisz divenne amico di Jacobsz; assieme, i due cominciarono a tramare un piano di ammutinamento per spodestare il comandante Pelsaert.

Le navi ripartirono da Città del Capo dirette verso Java, ma poco dopo aver lasciato la terra si persero di vista. La Batavia ora era sola nell’Oceano Indiano. Durante la traversata, Pelsaert si ammalò e restò per gran parte del tempo chiuso nella sua cabina. Fra gli uomini della ciurma, senza il rigido controllo del comandante, le cose cominciarono a precipitare.

Dei 341 passeggeri circa due terzi erano ufficiali ed equipaggio, circa un centinaio erano soldati e il resto era costituito da civili tra cui alcune donne e bambini. Come si può immaginare, essere donna in così stretta minoranza su una nave che ospitava centinaia di uomini, lasciati a se stessi senza una vera disciplina, era piuttosto rischioso. La prima a fare le spese di questa pesante situazione fu Lucretia Jans, una ventisettenne dell’alta società oladese che viaggiava per raggiungere suo marito a Giacarta. Jacobsz ce l’aveva con lei perché aveva rifiutato le sue avances; così nel pieno dell’oceano Lucretia venne assalita da uomini mascherati che la “appesero fuori bordo per i piedi e maltrattarono indecentemente il suo corpo“. Più tardi la donna dichiarerà di aver riconosciuto Jacobz e un suo scagnozzo dalle voci dei molestatori. Non è chiaro se questo incidente facesse in realtà parte del piano di ammutinamento: se Lucretia non avesse riconosciuto gli assalitori, il comandante Palseart avrebbe dovuto punire tutta la ciurma, e forse Jacobz puntava su un’eventualità simile per diffondere il malcontento fra i marinai.
Ma Palseart, a causa della sua malattia, non arrestò né punì i colpevoli. Mentre Cronelisz e Jacobsz architettavano nuovi espedienti per scatenare l’ammutinamento, la notte del 4 giugno 1629 successe qualcosa di imprevisto.

Il 4 di Giugno, un lunedì mattina, il secondo giorno di Pentecoste, con luna piena e chiara circa due ore prima dell’alba durante la veglia del capitano (Ariaen Jacobsz), giacevo ammalato nella mia cuccetta e tutto d’un tratto sentii, con un duro e terribile movimento, l’urto del timone della nave, e immediatamente dopo sentii la nave incagliarsi nelle rocce, tanto che caddi giù dalla branda. A quel punto corsi di sopra e scoprii che tutte le vele erano spiegate, il vento da sudovest […] e che stavamo nel mezzo di una densa nebbia. Attorno alla nave c’era soltanto una rada schiuma, ma poco dopo sentii il mare infrangersi violentemente intorno a noi. Dissi, “Capitano, cosa avete fatto, a causa della vostra incauta sbadataggine avete passato questo cappio attorno al nostro collo?”

(Diario di Pelsaert)

bat-hist3_0

La Batavia si era incagliata sulla barriera corallina di Morning Reef, nell’arcipelago di Houtman Abrolhos, quaranta miglia al largo della costa ovest dell’Australia. A poco a poco i sopravvissuti vennero trasportati su due isole vicine, Beacon Island e Traitor’s Island. Alcuni uomini, fra cui Cornelisz, rimasero a bordo del relitto. Ma l’arcipelago non offriva a prima vista possibilità di sostentamento per tutti quegli uomini: il cibo scarseggiava (sulle isole si potevano trovare soltanto degli uccelli e qualche leone marino), e il problema più grave era la mancanza d’acqua dolce. Palseart decise, coraggiosamente, di tentare un’impresa impossibile – raggiungere Giacarta con le scialuppe di salvataggio che rimanevano a disposizione.

Alla fine, dopo aver discusso a lungo e ponderato che non c’era speranza di portare l’acqua fuori dal relitto a meno che la nave non fosse caduta a pezzi e i barili fossero arrivati galleggiando fino a terra, o che venisse una buona pioggia quotidiana per alleviare la nostra sete (ma questi erano tutti mezzi molto incerti), decidemmo dopo lungo dibattito […] che saremmo dovuti andare a cercare l’acqua nelle isole limitrofe o sul continente per mantenerci in vita, e se non avessimo trovato acqua, che avremmo allora navigato con le barche senza indugio per Batavia [antico nome di Giacarta], e con la grazia di Dio raccontato laggiù la nostra triste, inaudita, disastrosa vicenda.

(Diario di Pelsaert)

Pelsaert prese con sé 48 uomini fra ufficiali e passeggeri, Jacobsz incluso, e salpò per Giacarta. Ci arrivò 33 giorni dopo, incredibilmente senza perdite umane. Una volta nella capitale, Jacobsz venne arrestato per negligenza. Pelsaert cominciò a organizzare il viaggio di ritorno per salvare i superstiti, ma quello che non sapeva è che nel frattempo qualcosa di davvero inimmaginabile era successo sulle isole.

Cornelisz era rimasto sulla Batavia, incagliata nel corallo; ma poco dopo la partenza di Pelsaert la nave si era completamente sfasciata, portando con sé sott’acqua 40 uomini. Cornelisz riuscì a salvarsi e ad arrivare a riva aggrappandosi ai relitti galleggianti. I naufraghi erano amareggiati e furibondi d’essere stati abbandonati nel momento del bisogno dal loro comandante; Cornelisz quindi ebbe facile gioco nel reclutare una quarantina di uomini senza scrupoli per assicurarsi il potere sul gruppo. La sua intenzione iniziale era quella di catturare qualsiasi barca fosse arrivata per salvarli, e usarla per partire per conto proprio. Ma con il passare dei giorni un altro, più oscuro e folle progetto si fece strada nella sua mente: sarebbe diventato il tiranno incontrastato di quelle piccole e sconosciute isole, e avrebbe costruito un suo privato regno di piacere e di terrore, nel quale passare il resto della sua vita.

Chiaramente Cornelisz doveva eliminare qualsiasi oppositore o individuo pericoloso; così cominciò sistematicamente a sbarazzarsi degli altri sopravvissuti. All’inizio Cornelisz procedette in maniera subdola, spedendo per esempio una quarantina di mozzi a Seal Island, con il pretesto che lì si trovavano delle fonti d’acqua dolce; egli sapeva bene che in realtà non ce n’erano, e li abbandonò al loro destino. Un gruppo di soldati al comando di un certo Wiebbe Hayes vennero mandati ad esplorare delle isole all’orizzonte (West Wallabi Island), con l’intesa che sarebbero stati recuperati appena avessero acceso dei fuochi di segnalazione. Anche questa volta Cornelisz, ovviamente, non aveva alcuna intenzione di tornare a riprenderli.

Se fino ad allora Cornelisz si era mosso discretamente, pian piano ogni scrupolo venne a cadere. Alcuni uomini furono imbarcati per finte ricognizioni, e spinti fuori bordo dai sicari di Cornelisz; altri annegati direttamente sulla spiaggia. I potenziali oppositori erano ormai debellati, il dominio di Cornelisz divenne assoluto e con esso l’escalation di violenza non conobbe più freni. Cornelisz aveva stabilito che il numero ideale di abitanti dell’isola era di 45 persone – tutti gli altri andavano decimati senza pietà. Vennero organizzate le esecuzioni, infermi e malati per primi. I bambini vennero tutti massacrati. Alcune donne furono risparmiate soltanto per diventare schiave sessuali dei nuovi padroni dell’isola; Cornelisz si riservò come ancella personale proprio quella Lucretia Jans già concupita da molti marinai sulla Batavia.
Quando ci si accorse che sulla vicina Seal Island il gruppo d’esplorazione abbandonato a morire era in realtà ancora in vita (si potevano vedere i superstiti aggirarsi sulla spiaggia), Cornelisz inviò i suoi uomini ad ucciderli; missione che essi portarono a termine senza problemi.

Il controllo di Cornelisz era totale. Nonostante non avesse commesso personalmente alcuno dei crimini (aveva provato ad avvelenare un bambino senza successo, lasciando poi ad altri il compito di strangolarlo), con il suo carisma induceva i sottoposti ad agire per lui. A dire la verità, con il passare dei giorni, non vi fu nemmeno più il bisogno di convincerli:

Con una banda devota di giovani assassini, Cornelisz cominciò a uccidere sistematicamente chiunque credeva potesse essere un problema per il suo regno di terrore, o un peso per le loro limitate risorse. Gli ammutinati divennero inebriati di omicidi, e nessuno poteva più fermarli. Avevano bisogno soltanto della minima scusa per annegare, picchiare, strangolare o pugnalare a morte le loro vittime, donne e bambini inclusi.

(Mike Dash, Batavia’s Graveyard)

Ongeluckige_voyagie_vant_schip_Batavia_(Plate_3)

Fra i testimoni, il predicatore Gijsbert Bastiaenz assistette impotente a tutte queste orribili carneficine, e vide trucidare di fronte a sé sua moglie e le sue figlie, tranne la primogenita che uno degli uomini di Cornelisz aveva preteso per sé. Scriverà il resoconto dell’eccidio in una lettera che ci è arrivata intatta.

Ma un giorno successe qualcosa che Cornelisz non aveva previsto: un fuoco di segnalazione venne avvistato su una delle isole all’orizzonte dove erano stati abbandonati Wiebbe Hayes e i suoi soldati. Chiaramente erano riusciti a trovare dell’acqua, e questo complicava le cose per Cornelisz: significava che il gruppo aveva mezzi per sopravvivere, e il pericolo era che quei soldati raggiungessero per primi le eventuali navi di salvataggio in arrivo.
Wiebbe Hayes però era stato avvisato dei massacri che avevano luogo su Beacon Island da alcuni uomini riusciti a fuggire; aveva dunque avuto il tempo di organizzare le sue difese. I suoi soldati avevano costruito armi di fortuna con i materiali arrivati a riva dal naufragio; avevano perfino costruito un piccolo fortino con pietre e blocchi di corallo. A questo punto erano meglio nutriti, e meglio addestrati, dei sicari di Cornelisz, e quando questi arrivarono per dare battaglia riuscirono a sconfiggerli facilmente in diversi scontri.

Quando Cornelisz vide tornare i suoi uomini a mani vuote, andò su tutte le furie e decise di prendere direttamente il comando delle operazioni. Attaccò Hayes, ma venne fatto prigioniero; e qui il suo regno sanguinario, durato per ben due mesi, conobbe la sua fine. A questo punto infatti comparve all’orizzonte una nave. Era Pelsaert che tornava a salvare i naufraghi, ignaro dei terribili eventi.

bat-hist5_0

Il giorno 17, di mattina all’alba, abbiamo levato ancora l’ancora, il vento a nord. […] Prima di mezzogiorno, avvicinandoci all’isola, vedemmo del fumo su un lungo isolotto due miglia ad ovest del relitto, e anche su un’altra piccola isola vicino al relitto, fatto per cui eravamo tutti molto felici, sperando di trovare un buon numero, se non tutti quanti, ancora vivi. Quindi, appena gettata l’ancora, navigai in barca fino all’isola più vicina, portando con me un barile d’acqua, pane di mais, e un fusto di vino; arrivato, non vidi nessuno, cosa che ci diede da pensare. Sbarcai a riva, e allo stesso momento vedemmo una piccola barca con quattro uomini che aggirava la punta nord; uno di loro, Wiebbe Haynes, saltò giù e corse verso di noi, gridando da lontano, “Benvenuti, ma tornate immediatamente a bordo, perché c’è un gruppo di furfanti sulle isole vicino al relitto, con due imbarcazioni, che hanno intenzione di catturare la vostra nave”.

(Diario di Pelsaert)

Haynes spiegò al comandante che aveva preso in ostaggio Cornelisz; Pelsaert catturò senza problemi gli ammutinati, e nei successivi interrogatori ricostruì l’intero accaduto. I crimini commessi, oltre ovviamente all’omicidio di svariate persone, includevano anche innumerevoli stupri e il furto di beni della Compagnia e di effetti personali dei passeggeri.
Il 2 ottobre 1629 venne eseguita, sulla stessa Seal Island, la condanna dei colpevoli. Agli ammutinati venne tagliata la mano destra, prima di essere impiccati. Per Cornelisz la pena comportò l’amputazione di entrambe le mani, prima di salire sul patibolo.

Cornelisz_execution

A Giacarta infine si decisero le sorti degli ultimi protagonisti di questa vicenda.
Il capitano Jacobsz, che era già prigioniero, nonostante le torture non confessò mai di aver tentato l’ammutinamento sulla Batavia; morì probabilmente in prigione.
Il comandante Pelsaert venne ritenuto responsabile di mancanza d’autorità. Gli vennero confiscati tutti gli averi, e nel giro di un anno morì di stenti.
Wiebbe Hayes, che aveva invece combattuto coraggiosamente, divenne un eroe. La Compagnia lo promosse a sergente e in seguito a luogotenente.

batavia-remains-beacon-island

dooienederlander

batavia-wreck

Quello della Batavia è considerato uno degli ammutinamenti più sanguinosi della storia: dei 341 passeggeri originari, soltanto 68 sopravvissero (intorno al centinaio secondo altre fonti). Alcune vittime furono ritrovate, in fosse comuni, durante gli scavi archeologici. Se il relitto e i resti umani sono esposti al Western Australian Museum, a Lelystad nei Paesi Bassi è possibile ammirare una straordinaria replica della Batavia, eseguita a cavallo fra gli anni ’80 e ’90, e costruita con gli stessi attrezzi, metodi e materiali che si usavano nel Seicento.

DCF 1.0

DCF 1.0

Pescatori di uomini

lanzhou

Il corso d’acqua scivola veloce e silenzioso, con il suo carico di terriccio e detriti che gli hanno valso il nome, celebre ma poco invitante, di Fiume Giallo. Dopo aver attraversato la città di Lanzhou, nel nordest della Cina, serpeggia per una trentina di chilometri fino a che un’ansa non lo rallenta: poco più a valle incontra la centrale idroelettrica di Liujiaxia, con la sua diga che fa da sbarramento per la melmosa corrente.
È in seno a questa curva che le acque rallentano ed ogni giorno di buon’ora alcune barche a motore salpano dalla riva per aggirarsi fra i rifiuti galleggianti – una grande distesa che ricopre l’intero fiume. Gli uomini sulle barche esplorano, nella nebbia mattutina, la spazzatura intercettata e ammassata lì dalla diga: raccolgono le bottiglie di plastica per rivenderle al riciclo, ma il prezzo per un chilo di materiale si aggira intorno ai 3 o 4 yuan, vale a dire circa 50 centesimi di euro. Quello per cui aguzzano gli occhi nella luce plumbea è un altro, più allettante bottino. Cercano dei cadaveri portati fino a lì dalla corrente.

5200296-floating-corpse-23-800x503

5200296-floating-corpse-25-800x503

5200296-floating-corpse-05-800x503

Il boom economico e demografico della Cina, senza precedenti, ha necessariamente un suo volto oscuro. Centinaia e centinaia di corpi umani raggiungono ogni anno la diga. Si tratta per la maggior parte di suicidi legati al mondo del lavoro: persone, molto spesso donne, che arrivano a Lanzhou dalle zone rurali affollando la città in cerca di un impiego, e trovano concorrenza spietata, condizioni inumane, precarietà e abusi da parte dei capi. La disperazione sparisce insieme a loro, con un tuffo nella torbida corrente del Fiume Giallo. Il 26% dei suicidi mondiali, secondo i dati raccolti dall’Organizzazione mondiale della sanità, ha luogo in Cina.
Qualcuno dei cadaveri è forse vittima di una piena o un’esondazione del fiume. Altri corpi però arrivano allo sbarramento della diga con braccia e piedi legati. Violenze e regolamenti di conti di cui probabilmente non si saprà più nulla.

1310_3

CFP409195120-174600_copy1

Un tempo, quando un barcaiolo recuperava un cadavere dal fiume, lo portava a riva e avvisava le forze dell’ordine. Talvolta, se c’erano dei documenti d’identità sul corpo, provava a contattare direttamente la famiglia; era una questione di etica, e la ricompensa stava semplicemente nella gratitudine dei parenti della vittima. Ma le cose sono cambiate, la povertà si è fatta più estrema: di conseguenza, oggi ripescare i morti è diventata un’attività vera e propria. Qui un singolo pescatore può trovare dai 50 ai 100 corpi in un anno.
Sempre più giovani raccolgono l’eredità di questo spiacevole lavoro, e scandagliano quotidianamente l’ansa del fiume con occhio esperto; quando trovano un cadavere, lo trascinano verso la sponda, facendo attenzione a lasciarlo con la faccia immersa nell’acqua per preservare il più a lungo possibile i tratti somatici. Lo “parcheggiano” infine in un punto preciso, una grotta o un’insenatura, assicurandolo con delle corde vicino agli altri corpi in attesa d’essere identificati.

5200296-floating-corpse-07-800x503

5200296-floating-corpse-01-800x503

5200296-floating-corpse-08-400x600

5200296-floating-corpse-10-800x503

_50060656_finalpic-bodies

6a00d83451c64169e20134876f0aec970c-500wi

Per i parenti di una persona scomparsa a Lanzhou, sporgere denuncia alla polizia spesso non porta da nessuna parte, a causa dell’enorme densità della popolazione; così i famigliari chiamano invece i pescatori, per accertarsi se abbiano trovato qualche corpo che corrisponde alla descrizione del loro caro. Nei casi in cui l’identità sia certa, possono essere i pescatori stessi che avvisano le famiglie.
Il parente quindi si reca sul fiume, dove avviene il riconoscimento: ma da questo momento in poi, tutto ha un costo. Occorre pagare per salire sulla barca, e pagare per ogni cadavere che gli uomini rivoltano nell’acqua, esponendone il volto; ma il conto più salato arriva se effettivamente si riconosce la persona morta, e si vuole recuperarne i resti. Normalmente il prezzo varia a seconda della persona che paga per riavere le spoglie, o meglio dal suo reddito desunto: se i pescatori si trovano davanti un contadino, la richiesta si mantiene al di sotto dell’equivalente di 100 euro. Se a reclamare il corpo è un impiegato, il prezzo sale a 300 euro, e se è una ditta a pagare per il recupero si può arrivare anche sopra i 400 euro.

5200296-floating-corpse-16-800x503

5200296-floating-corpse-22-800x503

5200296-floating-corpse-21-800x503

5200296-floating-corpse-20-800x503

Nonostante la gente paghi malvolentieri e si lamenti dell’immoralità di questo traffico, i pescatori di cadaveri si difendono sostenendo che si tratta di un lavoro che nessun altro farebbe; il costo del carburante per le barche è una spesa che devono coprire quotidianamente, che trovino corpi o meno, e in definitiva il loro è un servizio utile, per il quale è doveroso un compenso.
Così anche la polizia tollera questa attività, per quanto formalmente illegale.

5200296-floating-corpse-19-800x503

Ci sono infine le salme che non vengono mai reclamate. A quanto raccontano i pescatori, per la maggior parte sono donne emigrate a Lanzhou dalle campagne; le loro famiglie, ignare, pensano probabilmente che stiano ancora lavorando nella grande città. Molte di queste donne sono state evidentemente assassinate.
Nel caso in cui un cadavere non venga mai identificato, o resti troppo a lungo in acqua fino a risultare sfigurato, i pescatori lo riaffidano alla corrente. I filtri della centrale idroelettrica lo tritureranno insieme agli altri rifiuti per poi rituffarlo dall’altra parte della diga, mescolato e ormai tutt’uno con l’acqua.

5200296-floating-corpse-04-800x503

Anche oggi, come ogni giorno, le barche dei pescatori di cadaveri lasceranno la riva per il loro triste raccolto.

5200296-floating-corpse-03-800x503

Abe Sada

Il 25 Novembre del 1936, alle cinque di mattina, mentre Tokyo si risvegliava e per le strade incominciava il quotidiano e indaffarato viavai, un’enorme folla si era già radunata fuori dal tribunale: la gente era lì da ore, in attesa di poter vedere, anche soltanto di sfuggita, la donna di cui tutto il Giappone parlava – Abe Sada.

Ed eccola arrivare, infine, scortata dagli agenti giudiziari, con in testa un curioso cappello a cono che le nascondeva il volto fino a quando non fu all’interno dell’edificio. La folla gridava e gemeva, le donne urlavano, gli agenti cercavano di mantenere l’ordine: il processo che iniziava quella mattina sarebbe stato uno dei più famosi della recente storia giapponese.

Abe Sada (o Sada Abe, a seconda della tradizione di nomenclatura) era nata nel 1905 da una famiglia benestante. Fin da quando era piccola, la madre l’aveva esortata ad essere indipendente e di spirito libero, nonostante le rigide norme che la società nipponica imponeva al tempo alle donne. All’età di quindici anni, però, Sada venne violentata da un conoscente; nonostante il supporto dei genitori, la ragazzina non fu più la stessa. Diventata sempre più incontrollabile, venne venduta da suo padre ad una casa delle geisha di Yokohama – non si seppe mai con certezza se per punizione, o per volontà della stessa Sada. All’epoca, diventare una geisha significava acquistare il prestigio invidiabile di donna emancipata e libera.

Purtroppo la vita nell’okiya era più dura del previsto. Sada finì per assecondare le richieste sessuali di un cliente (cosa che le geisha non erano assolutamente tenute a fare, in contrasto con l’immagine di “cortigiane di lusso” che se ne aveva in Occidente), e si ammalò di sifilide. Si diede quindi alla prostituzione vera e propria, prima con regolare licenza e in seguito in case di tolleranza illegali. Con la morte dei genitori, la sua vita andò totalmente allo sbando: dopo anni di retate della polizia, tentativi falliti di sedurre uomini di potere, e le immancabili violenze e i soprusi con cui dovevano fare i conti tutte le prostitute senza licenza, Sada decise che era giunto il momento di abbandonare il mondo del malaffare. Nel 1936 lasciò finalmente il bordello e si impiegò come apprendista cuoca in un ristorante nel quartiere di Yoshidaya, con la speranza di ripartire da zero.
Proprio in quel ristorante Sada, che non aveva mai conosciuto il vero amore, avrebbe incontrato l’uomo della sua vita.

Il proprietario del locale era infatti Kichizo Ishida, un aitante quarantaduenne che ben presto posò i suoi occhi sulla giovane apprendista; di nascosto da sua moglie, cominciò a proporsi in avances sessuali. Sada dal canto suo aveva mai “conosciuto un uomo così sexy“, come dichiarerà in seguito. La scintilla della passione non tardò a scoccare, e i due iniziarono una torrida relazione clandestina: ritiratisi in un hotel nel quartiere di Shibuya, per quella che doveva essere una fugace scappatella, vi rimasero per quattro giorni. Spostatisi in altri quartieri e in altri hotel, per ben due settimane gli amanti si diedero all’alcol e al sesso, che non si interrompeva nemmeno quando qualche geisha entrava nella loro stanza per servire da bere.

Che l’appetito sessuale di Sada fosse difficilmente saziabile, lo confermò in seguito anche un suo precedente amante, Kinnosuke Kasahara, che l’aveva lasciata proprio a causa della sua incontenibile iperattività: “era davvero forte, davvero potente. Se pure io sono piuttosto debole, lei d’altra parte mi stupiva sempre. Non era soddisfatta se non lo facevamo almeno due, tre, o quattro volte ogni notte. Per lei, era inaccettabile che io non tenessi la mia mano sulle sue parti intime per tutta la notte… All’inizio era fantastico, ma dopo un paio di settimane ero esausto“.

Ishida, la sua nuova fiamma, era invece di tutt’altra pasta, capace di resistere per giorni e giorni di sesso scatenato. Ma non era soltanto la sua prestanza fisica ad affascinare Sada: “è difficile dire esattamente cos’aveva Ishida di così bello. Ma era impossibile trovare qualcosa di negativo nel suo aspetto, il suo atteggiamento, la sua abilità come amante, il modo in cui esprimeva i suoi sentimenti“.
Dopo queste due settimane di follia senza freni, come tornare alla routine del ristorante? Ma, soprattutto, come sopravvivere al pensiero che Ishida avrebbe nuovamente condiviso il letto con sua moglie?

Sada si innamorò perdutamente, e con il sentimento sentì farsi strada in lei una gelosia cieca e totalizzante. Essere l’amante di Ishida non era sufficiente, doveva essere sua moglie, l’unica donna a possederlo; ben presto la sua divenne un’ossessione vera e propria.

Una sera, Sada assistette a una rappresentazione teatrale nella quale una geisha attaccava il suo amante con un pugnale, e decise che avrebbe fatto lo stesso con Ishida. Incontratolo al ristorante, estrasse un grosso coltello da cucina che aveva comprato il giorno prima, e lo minacciò di morte; Ishida, seppure inizialmente allarmato, si mostrò infine divertito e lusingato dalla scenata di gelosia della donna. La portò dunque ad una taverna nel distretto a luci rosse di Ogu, per una nuova maratona di sesso.

Ancora due notti e due giorni di passione, l’uno nelle braccia dell’altra; mentre facevano l’amore, Sada teneva talvolta il coltello alla base del pene di Ishida – “non avrai nessun’altra donna oltre a me” gli diceva, e l’uomo rideva.

Un nuovo gioco che i due amanti cominciarono a provare era l’asfissia erotica. Sada usava l’obi del suo kimono per soffocare Ishida al momento dell’orgasmo, rilasciando in seguito la presa e intensificando così il piacere. Ishida fece lo stesso con lei, e i due cominciarono a strangolarsi regolarmente durante gli accoppiamenti, ancora scherzando sulla gelosia della donna: “Metterai la corda intorno al mio collo e la stringerai ancora mentre sto dormendo, non è vero? – le diceva Ishida – Se cominci a strangolarmi, non fermarti…

Il 18 maggio 1936, alle due del mattino, Ishida dormiva. Sada, in silenzio, passò due volte la corda attorno al suo collo, e strinse per qualche minuto finché l’uomo non morì soffocato. Restò sdraiata accanto al corpo per diverse ore, poi prese il coltello da cucina e tagliò i genitali di Ishida; li avvolse in alcune pagine di giornale. Con il sangue scrisse sulla gamba sinistra del cadavere le parole Sada, Kichi Futari-kiri (“Sada e Kichi insieme”), poi ripeté la scritta sulle lenzuola prima di incidere con la lama il suo nome nel braccio sinistro del morto. Abe Sada si rivestì, uscì dalla stanza e disse ai gestori dell’hotel di non disturbare Ishida. Infine lasciò l’albergo con il suo prezioso pacchetto nascosto nelle pieghe del vestito: “perché non potevo portare con me la sua testa o il suo corpo. Volevo prendere la parte di lui che mi avrebbe riportato le memorie più intense.

Poco dopo la scoperta del cadavere mutilato di Ishida, la notizia della latitanza di Sada fece il giro del paese; i giornali immediatamente dettagliarono l’oscena vicenda, e il panico si diffuse ovunque, tra falsi avvistamenti e personaggi politici la cui carriera crollava nel giro di un giorno non appena il loro nome veniva collegato alla prostituta castratrice. Sada, dal canto suo, non aveva mai lasciato Tokyo: alloggiava in un hotel a Shinagawa sotto falso nome, ancora ossessionata dall’uomo che aveva ucciso e dal feticcio prelevato dal suo corpo. “Mi sentivo attaccata al pene di Ishida e pensai che soltanto dopo essermi accomiatata tranquillamente da esso, avrei potuto morire. Scartai le pagine che li avvolgevano, e guardai il suo pene e il suo scroto. Misi il suo pene in bocca, e provai perfino ad inserirlo dentro di me… non funzionò, anche se continuavo a provare e provare. Quindi, decisi che sarei scappata a Osaka, restando con il pene di Ishida per tutto il tempo. Alla fine, sarei saltata da un dirupo sul Monte Ikoma, stringendo il suo pene nella mano.

Alle 4 di pomeriggio del 20 maggio, soltanto due giorni dopo l’omicidio, Abe Sada venne arrestata: per settimane radio e giornali non parlarono d’altro.
Il processo durò soltanto un mese perché la donna si dichiarò subito colpevole e venne condannata, per omicidio non premeditato e mutilazione di cadavere, a scontare sei anni di reclusione. Gli anni passati in carcere saranno i più tranquilli e regolari della sua vita.

Quello che avrebbe potuto restare un semplice episodio di cronaca nera, divenne presto un simbolo fondamentale delle contraddizioni del Giappone pre-bellico.
La controversa figura di Abe Sada si ritagliò infatti un posto tutto particolare nell’immaginario giapponese: per alcuni incarnava lo stereotipo della dokufu, donna criminale spietata e sanguinaria, ma per altri la portata rivoluzionaria della storia era ben altra.
Durante tutti gli interrogatori (le cui trascrizioni divennero un best-seller), la donna aveva sottolineato sempre e soltanto l’accecante amore che nutriva per Ishida, il senso di esclusività che avvertiva nei suoi confronti, l’impossibilità di dividerlo con altre donne. Questa non era una semplice assassina: Sada parlava liberamente e sfacciatamente d’amore, di sesso e di romanticismo in un’epoca in cui la morigeratezza era un imperativo sociale. Senza mezzi termini, accusava i maschi che non soddisfacevano il piacere sessuale femminile, ed esaltava l’uomo che sapeva interpretare i desideri della propria compagna: “a letto, le dimensioni non fanno l’uomo. Quello che amavo di Ishida erano la tecnica e il suo desiderio di darmi piacere“.

Dopo aver scontato la pena, Sada provò a dileguarsi, accettando diversi lavori che generalmente finivano non appena i datori scoprivano chi fosse veramente. A partire dagli anni ’50 Sada lavorò in un pub chiamato Hoshikikusui nel quartiere di Inari-cho. Ogni sera faceva la sua entrata, scendendo una lunga scalinata mentre gli avventori ululavano, proteggendosi le parti intime con le mani. “Nascondete i coltelli! Non andate a fare pipì!“, gridava qualcuno, ma Sada zittiva tutti con uno sguardo furioso. Soltanto quando era calato un pesante silenzio, ricominciava ad avanzare e, finalmente arrivata fra la gente, passava versando da bere ai tavoli.

Abe Sada, photographed July 26, 1951-5

Per tutta la vita, lo stigma e la curiosità del pubblico non la abbandonarono mai. Sada riuscì a sparire del tutto solo dopo il 1970, data della sua ultima fotografia conosciuta, che la ritrae seduta al fianco di un attore; nulla si seppe più di lei, nonostante le voci che di volta in volta la volevano morta suicida oppure rinchiusa in convento. Ma, anche se svanita dall’occhio pubblico, Sada assurse nel tempo al grado di icona letteraria e cinematografica, ispirando artisti, filosofi e scrittori. Dei tre film a lei dedicati, il più celebre è il capolavoro di Nagisa Oshima, Ecco l’impero dei sensi (1976), censurato in molti paesi e presentato con enorme successo a Cannes.

Con il passare del tempo Abe Sada è stata definita in mille modi, spesso diametralmente opposti, come se non ci potessero essere vie di mezzo nel suo caso: “pervertita sessuale” e simbolo di femminismo; mostro necrofilo e “tenera, calda figura di salvezza per le future generazioni“. Una cosa è certa: Abe Sada e la sua passione omicida, violenta e struggente al tempo stesso, sono entrate indelebilmente nell’immaginario collettivo giapponese.
Ciò che invece venne dimenticato (in quella che potremmo leggere come una seconda, metaforica e definitiva castrazione), fu proprio il pene mozzato di Ishida: conservato al Museo di Patologia dell’Università di Tokyo, e ancora visibile in esposizione poco dopo la Seconda Guerra Mondiale, oggi se n’è persa ogni traccia.

Arte criminologica

Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Pee Gee Daniel

Accade spesso che per il raggiungimento di mete stupefacenti la via che vi ci conduce si presenti impervia.

Anche in questo caso, al termine di un percorso accidentato, tra gli inestricabili paesini del cuore della Lomellina, sfrecciando lungo sottili assi viari a prova di ammortizzatore, si giunge finalmente a un prodigioso sancta sanctorum per gli amanti del macabro, dell’insolito e del curioso, nascosto – come sempre si conviene a un vero tesoro – nell’ampio soppalco di una grande cascina bianca, dispersa tra le campagne.

1

Là sopra vi attendono, beffardamente occhieggianti dalle loro teche collocate in un ordine rapsodico ma di indubbio impatto, teste sotto formalina galleggianti in barattoli di vetro, mani mozze, corpi mummificati, arti pietrificati, crani di gemelli dicefali, barattoli di larve di sarcophaga carnaria, cadaveri adagiati dentro bare in noce, un austero mezzobusto della Cianciulli (la celeberrima “Saponificatrice di Correggio”), pezzi rari come alcuni documenti olografi di Cesare Lombroso, parti anatomiche provenienti da vecchi gabinetti medici, armi del delitto, strumenti di tortura o per elettroshock in uso in un recente passato, memento di pellagrosi e briganti, tsantsa umane e di scimmia prodotte dalla tribù ecuadoriana dei Jivaros, bambolotti voodoo, cimeli risalenti a efferati fatti di cronaca nostrana.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Creatore e gestore di questa casa-museo del crimine è il facondo Roberto Paparella. Sarà lui a introdurvi e accompagnarvi per le varie installazioni con la giusta dose di erudizione e intrattenimento: un po’ chaperon, un po’ cicerone e un po’ Virgilio dantesco.

Diplomato in arte e restauro (la parte inferiore dell’edificio è infatti occupata da mobilio in attesa di recupero) e criminologo, il Paparella ha saputo combinare questi due aspetti dando vita a una disciplina ibrida che ha voluto battezzare “arte criminologica”, cui è improntata l’intera mostra permanente che ho avuto il piacere di visitare in quel di Olevano. Poiché c’è innanzitutto da dire che non di mero collezionismo si tratta: molti dei pezzi che vi troviamo sono cioè manufatti e ricostruzioni iperrealistiche composti ad hoc dalla sapienza tecnica del nostro, cosicché i reperti storici e i “falsi d’autore” si mescolano e si confondono in maniera pressoché indistinguibile, giocando sul significato più ampio del termine “originale”.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2718

DSCN2709

My beautiful picture

È forse utile spiegare che il museo è ospitato all’interno di una comunità terapeutica. Roberto Paparella infatti, oltre a essere un artista del lugubre, un restauratore, un ricercatore scrupoloso nel campo criminologico e un tabagista imbattibile, è anche stato il più giovane direttore di una comunità per tossicodipendenti in Italia (autore insieme al giurista Guido Pisapia, fratello dell’attuale sindaco di Milano, di un testo per operatori del settore), mentre oggi si occupa di ragazzi usciti dall’istituto penale minorile. Proprio questo, mi ha rivelato, è stato uno dei principali sproni alla sua vera passione: ripercorrere quotidianamente i vari iter giudiziari e la teoria giuridica di delitti e pene in compagnia dei suoi ragazzi ha fatto rinascere in lui questo interesse per delinquenti, vittime, atti omicidiari e “souvenir” a essi connessi.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Una vocazione riaffiorata dal passato, visto che il primo a instillare in lui questo gusto grandguignolesco fu in effetti il padre che, dopo aver visitato il museo delle cere di Milano, aveva deciso di farsene uno in proprio, nello scantinato di casa sua, che aveva poi chiamato La taverna rossa e nel quale amava condurre famigliari e amici nel tentativo di impressionarli con le ricostruzioni di famosi assassini, seppure di produzione casalinga e un po’ naif.
La tradizione familiare peraltro prosegue, visto che i due figli di Paparella, cresciuti tra cadaveri dissezionati più o meno posticci, tengono a fornire spontaneamente i propri pareri in merito alla attendibilità di questa o quella riproduzione artigianale di cui il padre è autore.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2725

Per quanto riguarda la “falsificazione” anatomica di salme o parti di esse, è una cura certosina quella che viene impiegata, avvalendosi di uno studio filologico, di un’attenta scelta dei materiali, di una efficace disposizione scenografica dei corpi stessi e delle luci che ne esalteranno le forme. Come nel caso di Elisa Claps, i cui resti Paparella ha rielaborato ricoprendo uno scheletro in resina con uno speciale ritrovato indiano noto come cartapelle, capace di ricreare l’effetto di un tegumento incartapecorito dalla lunga esposizione agli elementi atmosferici, e infine decorato con altri componenti di provenienza umana (l’apparato dentario è fornito da alcuni studi odontoiatrici, mentre i capelli vengono recuperati da vecchie parrucche di capelli veri, scovate nei mercatini).
Paparella afferma che nel suo operato si cela anche una motivazione morale: la volontà di ridare una consistenza tridimensionale alle vittime come ai carnefici, nella speranza di muovere dentro allo spettatore quelli che potremmo individuare come i due momenti aristotelici della pietà e del terrore.

Continuando la visita, incontriamo il corpo del cosiddetto Vampiro della Bergamasca, già esaminato a suo tempo dal Lombroso, alle cui misurazioni antropometriche lo scultore si è attenuto fedelmente: per la cronaca, Vincenzo Verzeni era un serial killer o, secondo la terminologia clinica del tempo, un «monomaniaco omicida necrofilomane, antropofago, affetto da vampirismo», che provava una frenesia erotica nello strappare coi denti larghi brani di carne alle proprie vittime.

Accanto, ecco lo scheletro di un morto di mafia, con sasso in bocca e mani amputate, che emerge faticosamente dalla terra mentre, sull’altro lato, in una posizione rattrappita, una mummia azteca lancia al visitatore una versione parodistica dell’Urlo di Munch. Alle sue spalle, addossata all’estesa parete, un’intera schiera di calchi delle teste di alienati e criminali ci osserva in maniera inquietante, a breve distanza dai calchi dei genitali di stupratori e di pazienti affette dal terribile tribadismo.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Si prosegue lungo una parete tappezzata di scatti ANSA di celebri processi del secondo dopoguerra, finché – in un accostamento emblematico dello stile di questo stravagante museo – poggiato su una lapide di candido marmo, ci si imbatte in un set anti-vampiri completo, con tanto di teschio, altarino portatile, barattolo contenente terra consacrata, chiodone in ferro in luogo dell’abusato paletto di frassino, argilla, paramenti ecclesiastici vari, pipistrelli essiccati, breviario e crocefisso a portar via, il tutto serbato in uno scrigno ligneo di pregevole fattura.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Ritornati all’entrata, al momento del commiato, troverete a salutarvi il manichino animato di Antonio Boggia, pluriomicida della Milano ottocentesca. A qualche passo dall’automa, l’occhio cade su una pesante mannaia in ferro, usata dallo stesso Boggia per le sue esecuzioni. Vera o falsa? Non sta a noi rivelarvelo. Se vi va, andando alla mostra (che vi si offrirà ben più particolareggiata di questo mio stringato resoconto) portatevi in tasca il giusto quantitativo di carbonio 14, oppure, più semplicemente, godetevi lo spettacolo senza porvi troppe domande.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture
Museo di Arte Criminologica
, via Cascina Bianca 1, 27020 Olevano di Lomellina (PV)
È necessario prenotare: tel. 3333639136 tel./fax 038451311 email: [email protected]

Bloody Murders

johnson20-cvr-0001-0

Quando state entrando ad un concerto, o a uno spettacolo teatrale, vi viene consegnato il programma della serata. Una cosa simile accadeva, in Inghilterra, anche per un tipo particolare di spettacolo pubblico: le esecuzioni capitali.

tumblr_mcryzmX2HS1rn6z3jo1_500
Nel XVIII e XIX Secolo, infatti, alcune stamperie e case editrici inglesi si erano specializzate in un particolare prodotto letterario. Venivano generalmente chiamati Last Dying Speeches (“ultime parole in punto di morte”) o Bloody Murders (“sanguinosi omicidi”), ed erano dei fogli stampati su un verso solo, di circa 50×36 cm di grandezza. Venivano venduti per strada, per un penny o anche meno, nei giorni precedenti un’esecuzione annunciata; quando arrivava il gran giorno, veniva preparata spesso un’edizione speciale per le folle che si assiepavano attorno al patibolo.

execution-of-wm-corder

008090564_439_height

dying-speeches
Sull’unica facciata stampata si potevano trovare tutti i dettagli più scabrosi del crimine commesso, magari un resoconto del processo, e anche delle accattivanti illustrazioni (un ritratto del condannato, o del suo misfatto, ecc.). Usualmente il testo si concludeva con un piccolo brano in versi, spacciato per “le ultime parole” del condannato, che ammoniva i lettori a non seguire questo funesto esempio se volevano evitare una fine simile.

4787793

4787751

4788099

4787939
La vita di questi foglietti non si esauriva nemmeno con la morte del condannato, perché nei giorni successivi all’esecuzione ne veniva stampata spesso anche una versione aggiornata con le ultime parole pronunciate dal condannato – vere, stavolta -, il racconto del suo dying behaviour (“comportamento durante la morte”) o altre succulente novità del genere.

broadside-detail

2180084755_b2f4e78eb8

4788820
I Bloody Murders erano un ottimo business, appannaggio di poche stamperie di Londra e delle maggiori città inglesi: costavano poco, erano semplici e veloci da preparare, e alcune incisioni (ad esempio la figura di un impiccato in controluce) potevano essere riutilizzate di volta in volta. Il successo però dipendeva dalla tempestività con cui questi volantini venivano fatti circolare.

4787919

4787749

4787747

4787893
Questi foglietti erano pensati per un target preciso, le classi medie e basse, e facevano leva sulla curiosità morbosa e sui toni iperbolici per attirare i loro lettori. Era un tipo di letteratura che anche le famiglie più povere potevano permettersi; e possiamo immaginarle, raccolte attorno al tavolo dopo cena, mentre chi tra loro sapeva leggere raccontava ad alta voce, per il brivido e il diletto di tutti, quelle violente e torbide vicende.

4787678
La Harvard Law School Library è riuscita a collezionare più di 500 di questi rarissimi manifesti, li ha digitalizzati e messi online. Consultabili gratuitamente, possono essere ricercati secondo diversi parametri (per crimine, anno, città, parole chiave, ecc.) sul sito del Crime Broadsides Project.