Paris Mirabilia

I am thrilled to announce my latest effort will come out in October: Paris Mirabilia – Journey Through A Rare Enchantment. It is a guide to the bizarre and lesser-known Paris, among strange boutiques, obscure museums and eccentric collections.

The book is not part of the Bizzarro Bazar Collection, but launches a brand new series: the Mirabilia Collection.
Each volume, dedicated to a different city, is intended not just as a handbook for the curious mind, but also as a little gem that will, I hope, appeal to the bibliophile. In fact, as you never change a winning team, the photographs are once again by the great Carlo Vannini.

Waiting for the official release, I have udpdated the Collections section and prepared a page for Paris Mirabilia where you can see some more photos. If you just can’t wait, the book is available for pre-order at this link. The book will also be availble in Italian and in French.
Bon appétit!

 

The Punished Suicide

This article originally appeared on Death & The Maiden, a website exploring the relationship between women and death.

Padova, Italy. 1863.

One ash-grey morning, a young girl jumped into the muddy waters of the river which ran just behind the city hospital. We do not know her name, only that she worked as a seamstress, that she was 18 years old, and that her act of suicide was in all probability provoked by “amorous delusion”.
A sad yet rather unremarkable event, one that history could have well forgotten – hadn’t it happened, so to speak, in the right place and time.

The city of Padova was home to one of the oldest Universities in history, and it was also recognized as the cradle of anatomy. Among others, the great Vesalius, Morgagni and Fallopius had taught medicine there; in 1595 Girolamo Fabrici d’Acquapendente had the first stable anatomical theater built inside the University’s main building, Palazzo del Bo.
In 1863, the chair of Anatomical Pathology at the University was occupied by Lodovico Brunetti (1813-1899) who, like many anatomists of his time, had come up with his own process for preserving anatomical specimens: tannization. His method consisted in drying the specimens and injecting them with tannic acid; it was a long and difficult procedure (and as such it would not go on to have much fortune) but nonetheless gave astounding results in terms of quality. I have had the opportunity of feeling the consistency of some of his preparations, and still today they maintain the natural dimensions, elasticity and softness of the original tissues.
But back to our story.

When Brunetti heard about the young girl’s suicide, he asked her body be brought to him, so he could carry out his experiments.
First he made a plaster cast of the her face and upper bust. Then he peeled away all of the skin from her head and neck, being especially careful as to preserve the girl’s beautiful golden hair. He then proceeded to treat the skin, scouring it with sulfuric ether and fixing it with his own tannic acid formula. Once the skin was saved from putrefaction, he laid it out over the plaster cast reproducing the girl’s features, then added glass eyes and plaster ears to his creation.

But something was wrong.
The anatomist noticed that in several places the skin was lacerated. Those were the gashes left by the hooks men had used to drag the body out of the water, unto the banks of the river.
Brunetti, who in all evidence must have been a perfectionist, came up with a clever idea to disguise those marks.

He placed some wooden branches beside her chest, then entwined them with tannised snakes, carefully mounting the reptiles as if they were devouring the girl’s face. He poured some red candle wax to serve as blood spurts, and there it was: a perfect allegory of the punishment reserved in Hell to those who committed the mortal sin of  suicide.

He called his piece The Punished Suicide.

Now, if this was all, Brunetti would look like some kind of psychopath, and his work would just be unacceptable and horrifying, from any kind of ethical perspective.
But the story doesn’t end here.
After completing this masterpiece, the first thing Brunetti did was showing it to the girl’s parents.
And this is where things take a really weird turn.
Because the dead girl’s parents, instead of being dismayed and horrified, actually praised him for the precision shown in reproducing their daughter’s features.
So perfectly did I preserve her physiognomy – Brunetti proudly noted, – that those who saw her did easily recognize her”.

But wait, there’s more.
Four years later, the Universal Exposition was opening in Paris, and Brunetti asked the University to grant him funds to take the Punished Suicide to France. You would expect some kind of embarrassment on the part of the university, instead they happily financed his trip to Paris.
At the Exposition, thousands of spectators swarmed in from all around the world to see the latest innovations in technology and science, and saw the Punished Suicide. What would you think happened to Brunetti then? Was he hit by scandal, was his work despised and criticized?
Not at all. He won the Grand Prix in the Arts and Professions.

If you feel kind of dizzy by now, well, you probably should.
Looking at this puzzling story, we are left with only two options: either everybody in the whole world, including Brunetti, was blatantly insane; or there must exist some kind of variance in perception between our views on mortality and those held by people at the time.
It always strikes me how one does not need to go very far back in time to feel this kind of vertigo: all this happened less than 150 years ago, yet we cannot even begin to understand what our great-great-grandfathers were thinking.
Of course, anthropologists tell us that the cultural removal of death and the medicalization of dead bodies are relatively recent processes, which started around the turn of the last century. But it’s not until we are faced with a difficult “object” like this, that we truly grasp the abysmal distance separating us from our ancestors, the intensity of this shift in sensibility.
The Punished Suicide is, in this regard, a complex and wonderful reminder of how society’s boundaries and taboos may vary over a short period of time.
A perfect example of intersection between art (whether or not it encounters our modern taste), anatomy (it was meant to illustrate a preserving method) and the sacred (as an allegory of the Afterlife), it is one of the most challenging displays still visible in the ‘Morgagni’ Museum of Anatomical Pathology in Padova.

This nameless young girl’s face, forever fixed in tormented agony inside her glass case, cannot help but elicit a strong emotional response. It presents us with many essential questions on our past, on our own relationship with death, on how we intend to treat our dead in the future, on the ethics of displaying human remains in Museums, and so on.
On the account of all these rich and fruitful dilemmas, I like to think her death was at least not entirely in vain.

The “Morgagni” Museum of Pathology in Padova is the focus of the latest entry in the Bizzarro Bazar Collection, His Anatomical Majesty. Photography by Carlo Vannini. The story of the ‘Punished Suicide’ was unearthed by F. Zampieri, A. Zanatta and M. Rippa Bonati on Physis, XLVIII(1-2):297-338, 2012.

La Morgue, yesterday and today

Regarding the Western taboo about death, much has been written on how its “social removal” happened approximately in conjunction with WWI and the institution of great modern hospitals; still it would be more correct to talk about a removal and medicalization of the corpse. The subject of death, in fact, has been widely addressed throughout the Twentieth Century: a century which was heavily imbued with funereal meditations, on the account of its history of unprecedented violence. What has vanished from our daily lives is rather the presence of the dead bodies and, most of all, putrefaction.

Up until the end of Nineteenth Century, the relationship with human remains was inevitable and accepted as a natural part of existence, not just in respect to the preparation of a body at home, but also in the actual experience of so-called unnatural deaths.
One of the most striking examples of this familiarity with decomposition is the infamous Morgue in Paris.

Established in 1804, to replace the depository for dead bodies which during the previous centuries was found in the prison of Grand Châtelet, the Morgue stood in the heart of the capital, on the île de la Cité. In 1864 it was moved to a larger building on the point of the island, right behind Notre Dame. The word had been used since the Fifteenth Century to designate the cell where criminals were identified; in jails, prisoners were put “at the morgue” to be recognized. Since the Sixteenth Century, the word began to refer exclusively to the place where identification of corpses was carried out.

Due to the vast number of violent deaths and of bodies pulled out of the Seine, this mortuary was constantly filled with new “guests”, and soon transcended its original function. The majority of visitors, in fact, had no missing relatives to recognize.
The first ones to have different reasons to come and observe the bodies, which were laid out on a dozen black marble tables behind a glass window, were of course medical students and anatomists.

This receptacle for the unknown dead found in Paris and the faubourgs of the city, contributes not a little to the forwarding of the medical sciences, by the vast number of bodies it furnishes, which, on an average, amount to about two hundred annually. The process of decomposition in the human body may be seen at La Morgue, throughout every stage to solution, by those whose taste, or pursuit of science, leads them to that melancholy exhibition. Medical men frequently visit the place, not out of mere curiosity, but for the purpose of medical observation, for wounds, fracturs, and injuries of every description occasionally present themselves, as the effect of accident or murder. Scarcely a day passes without the arrival of fresh bodies, chiefly found in the Seine, and very probably murdered, by being flung either out of the windows which overhang the Seine river, or off the bridges, or out of the wine and wood-barges, by which the men who sell the cargoes generally return with money in their pockets […]. The clothes of the dead bodies brought into this establishment are hung up, and the corpse is exposed in a public room for inspection of those who visit the place for the purpose of searching for a lost friend or relative. Should it not be recognised in four days, it is publicly dissected, and then buried.

(R. Sears, Scenes and sketches in continental Europe, 1847)

This descripton is, however, much too “clean”. Despite the precautions taken to keep the bodies at low temperature, and to bathe them in chloride of lime, the smell was far from pleasant:

For most of the XIX Century, and even from an earlier time, the smell of cadavers was part of the routine in the Morgue. Because of its purpose and mode of operation, the Morgue was the privileged place for cadaveric stench in Paris […]. In fact, the bodies that had stayed in the water constituted the ordinary reality at the Morgue. Their putrefaction was especially spectacular.

(B. Bertherat, Le miasme sans la jonquille, l’odeur du cadavre à la Morgue de Paris au XIXe siècle,
in Imaginaire et sensibilités au XIXe siècle, Créaphis, 2005)

What is curious (and quite incomprehensible) for us today is how the Morgue could soon become one of the trendiest Parisian attractions.
A true theatre of death, a public exhibition of horror, each day it was visited by dozens of people of all backgrounds, as it certainly offered the thrill of a unique sight. It was a must for tourists visiting the capital, as proven by the diaries of the time:

We left the Louvre and went to the Morgue where three dead bodies lay waiting identification. They were a horrible sight. In a glass case one child that had been murdered, its face pounded fearfully.

(Adelia “Addie” Sturtevant‘s diary, September 17, 1889)

The most enlightening description comes from the wonderful and terrible pages devoted to the mortuary by Émile Zola. His words evoke a perfect image of the Morgue experience in XIX Century:

In the meantime Laurent imposed on himself the task of passing each morning by the Morgue, on the way to his office. […]When he entered the place an unsavoury odour, an odour of freshly washed flesh, disgusted him and a chill ran over his skin: the dampness of the walls seemed to add weight to his clothing, which hung more heavily on his shoulders. He went straight to the glass separating the spectators from the corpses, and with his pale face against it, looked. Facing him appeared rows of grey slabs, and upon them, here and there, the naked bodies formed green and yellow, white and red patches. While some retained their natural condition in the rigidity of death, others seemed like lumps of bleeding and decaying meat. At the back, against the wall, hung some lamentable rags, petticoats and trousers, puckered against the bare plaster. […] Frequently, the flesh on the faces had gone away by strips, the bones had burst through the mellow skins, the visages were like lumps of boned, boiled beef. […] One morning, he was seized with real terror. For some moments, he had been looking at a corpse, taken from the water, that was small in build and atrociously disfigured. The flesh of this drowned person was so soft and broken-up that the running water washing it, carried it away bit by bit. The jet falling on the face, bored a hole to the left of the nose. And, abruptly, the nose became flat, the lips were detached, showing the white teeth. The head of the drowned man burst out laughing.

Zola further explores the ill-conealed erotic tension such a show could provoke in visitors, both men and women. A liminal zone — the boundaries between Eros and Thanatos — which for our modern sensibility is even more “dangerous”.

This sight amused him, particularly when there were women there displaying their bare bosoms. These nudities, brutally exposed, bloodstained, and in places bored with holes, attracted and detained him. Once he saw a young woman of twenty there, a child of the people, broad and strong, who seemed asleep on the stone. Her fresh, plump, white form displayed the most delicate softness of tint. She was half smiling, with her head slightly inclined on one side. Around her neck she had a black band, which gave her a sort of necklet of shadow. She was a girl who had hanged herself in a fit of love madness. […] On a certain occasion Laurent noticed one of the [well-dressed ladies] standing at a few paces from the glass, and pressing her cambric handkerchief to her nostrils. She wore a delicious grey silk skirt with a large black lace mantle; her face was covered by a veil, and her gloved hands seemed quite small and delicate. Around her hung a gentle perfume of violet. She stood scrutinising a corpse. On a slab a few paces away, was stretched the body of a great, big fellow, a mason who had recently killed himself on the spot by falling from a scaffolding. He had a broad chest, large short muscles, and a white, well-nourished body; death had made a marble statue of him. The lady examined him, turned him round and weighed him, so to say, with her eyes. For a time, she seemed quite absorbed in the contemplation of this man. She raised a corner of her veil for one last look. Then she withdrew.

Finally, the Morgue was also an ironically democratic attraction, just like death itself:

The morgue is a sight within reach of everybody, and one to which passers-by, rich and poor alike, treat themselves. The door stands open, and all are free to enter. There are admirers of the scene who go out of their way so as not to miss one of these performances of death. If the slabs have nothing on them, visitors leave the building disappointed, feeling as if they had been cheated, and murmuring between their teeth; but when they are fairly well occupied, people crowd in front of them and treat themselves to cheap emotions; they express horror, they joke, they applaud or whistle, as at the theatre, and withdraw satisfied, declaring the Morgue a success on that particular day.
Laurent soon got to know the public frequenting the place, that mixed and dissimilar public who pity and sneer in common. Workmen looked in on their way to their work, with a loaf of bread and tools under their arms. They considered death droll. Among them were comical companions of the workshops who elicited a smile from the onlookers by making witty remarks about the faces of each corpse. They styled those who had beenburnt to death, coalmen; the hanged, the murdered, the drowned, the bodies that had been stabbed or crushed, excited their jeering vivacity, and their voices, which slightly trembled, stammered out comical sentences amid the shuddering silence of the hall.

(É. Zola, Thérèse Raquin, 1867)

In the course of its activity, the Morgue was only sporadically criticized, and only for its position, deemed too central. The curiosity in seeing the bodies was evidently not perceived as morbid, or at least it was not considered particularly improper: articles on the famous mortuary and its dead residents made regular appearance on newspapers, which gladly devoted some space to the most mysterious cases.
On March 15, 1907 the Morgue was definitively closed to the public, for reasons of “moral hygiene”. Times were already changing: in just a few years Europe was bound to know such a saturation of dead bodies that they could no longer be seen as an entertainment.

And yet, the desire and impulse to observe the signs of death on the human body never really disappeared. Today they survive in the virtual morgues of internet websites offering pictures and videos of accidents and violence. Distanced by a computer screen, rather than the ancient glass wall, contemporary visitors wander through these hyperrealistic mortuaries where bodily frailness is articulated in all its possible variations, witnesses to death’s boundless imagination.
The most striking thing, when surfing these bulletin boards where the obscene is displayed as in a shop window, is seeing how users react. In this extreme underground scene (which would make an interesting object for a study in social psychology) a wide array of people can be found, from the more or less casual visitor in search of a thrill, up to the expert “gorehounds”, who seem to collect these images like trading cards and who, with every new posted video, act smart and discuss its technical and aesthetic quality.
Perhaps in an attempt to exorcise the disgust, another constant is the recourse to an unpleasant and out-of-place humor; and it is impossible to read these jokes, which might appear indecent and disrespectful, without thinking of those “comical companions” described by Zola, who jested before the horror.

Aggregators of brutal images might entail a discussion on freedom of information, on the ethics and licitness of exhibiting human remains, and we could ask ourselves if they really serve an “educational” purpose or should be rather viewed as morbid, abnormal, pathological deviations.
Yet such fascinations are all but unheard of: it seems to me that this kind of curiosity is, in a way, intrinsic to the human species, as I have argued in the past.
On closer inspection, this is the same autoptic instinct, the same will to “see with one’s own eyes” that not so long ago (in our great-great-grandfathers’ time) turned the Paris Morgue into a sortie en vogue, a popular and trendy excursion.

The new virtual morgues constitute a niche and, when compared to the crowds lining up to see the swollen bodies of drowning victims, our attitude is certainly more complex. As we’ve said in the beginning, there is an element of taboo which was much less present at the time.
To our eyes the corpse still remains an uneasy, scandalous reality, sometimes even too painful to acknowledge. And yet, consciously or not, we keep going back to fixing our eyes on it, as if it held a mysterious secret.

 

Subversive farts & musical anuses

Those who have been reading me for some time know my love for unconventional stories, and my stubborn belief that if you dig deep enough into any topic, no matter how apparently inappropriate, it is possible to find some small enlightenments.
In this post we will attempt yet another tightrope walking exercise. Starting from a question that might sound ridiculous at first: can flatulence give us some insight about human nature?

An article appeared on the Petit Journal on May 1st 1894 described “a more or less lyrical artist whose melodies, songs without words, do not come exactly from the heart. To do him justice it must be said that he has pioneered something entirely his own, warbling from the depth of his pants those trills which others, their eyes towards heaven, beam at the ceiling“.
The sensational performer the Parisian newspaper was referring to was Joseph Pujol, famous by his stage name Le Pétomane.

Born in Marseille, and not yet thirty-seven at the time, Pujol had initially brought his act throughout the South of France, in Cette, Béziers, Nîmes, Toulouse and Bordeaux, before eventually landing in Paris, where he performed for several years at the Moulin Rouge.
His very popular show was entirely based on his extraordinary abilities in passing wind: he was able to mimic the sound of different musical instruments, cannon shots, thunders; he could modulate several popular melodies, such as La Marseillese, Au clair de la lune, O sole mio; he could blow out candles with an air blast from 30 centimeters away; he could play flutes and ocarinas through a tube connected with his derriere, with which he was also able to smoke a cigarette.
Enjoying an ever-increasing success between XIX and XX Century, he even performed before the Prince of Whales, and Freud himself attended one of his shows (although he seemed more interested in the audience reactions rather than the act itself).

Pujol had discovered his peculiar talent by chance at the age of thirteen, when he was swimming in the sea of his French Riviera. After sensing a piercing cold in his intestine, he hurried back to the shore and, inside a bathing-hut, he discovered that his anus had, for some reason, taken in a good amount of sea water. Experimenting throughout the following years, Pujol trained himself to suck air into his bottom; he could not hold it for very long, but this bizarre gift guaranteed him a certain notoriety among his peers at first, and later among his fellow soldiers when he joined the army.
Once he had reached stage fame, and was already a celebrated artist, Pujol was examined by several doctors who were interested in studying his anatomy and physiology. Medicine papers are a kind of literature I very much enjoy reading, but few are as delectable as the article penned by Dr. Marcel Badouin and published in 1892 on the Semaine médicale with the title Un cas extraordinaire d’aspiration rectale et d’anus musical (“An extraordinary case of rectal aspiration and musical anus”). If you get by in French, you can read it here.
Among other curiosities, in the article we discover that one of Pujol’s abilities (never included in his acts on grounds of decency) was to sit in a washbowl, sucking in the water and spraying it in a strong gush up to a five-meter distance.

The end of Joseph Pujol’s carreer coincided with the beginning of the First World War. Aware of the unprecedented inhumanity of the conflict, Pujol decided that his ridiculous and slightly shameful art was no longer suitable in front of such a cruel moment, and he retired for good to be a baker, his father’s job, until his death in 1945.
For a long time his figure was removed, as if he was an embarassement for the bougeoisie and those French intellectuals who just a few years earlier were laughing at this strange ham actor’s number. He came back to the spotlight only in the second half of XX Century, namely because of a biography published by Pauvert and of the movie Il Petomane (1983) directed by Pasquale Festa Campanile, in which the title character is played by Italian comedian Ugo Tognazzi with his trademark bittersweet acting style (the film on the other hand was never released in France).

Actually Pujol was not the first nor the last “pétomane”. Among his forerunners there was Roland the Farter, who lived in XII-Century England and who earned 30 acres of land and a huge manorfor his services as a buffoon under King Henry II. By contract he went on to perform before the sovereign, at Christmas, “unum saltum et siffletum et unum bumbulum” (one jump, one whistle and one fart).
But the earliest professional farter we know about must be a medieval jester called Braigetóir, active in Ireland and depicted in the most famous plate of John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande, with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581).

The only one attempting to repeat Pujol’s exploits in modern times is British performer Paul Oldfield, known as Mr. Methane, who besides appearing on Britain’s Got Talent also recorded an album and launched his own Android app. If you look for some of his videos on YouTube, you will notice how times have unfortunately changed since the distinguished elegance shown by Pujol in the only remaining silent film of his act.


Let’s get back now to our initial question. What does the story of Joseph Pujol, and professional farters in general, tell us? What is the reason of their success? Why does a fart make us laugh?

Flatulence, as all others bodily expressions associated with disgust, is a cultural taboo. This means that the associated prohibition is variable in time and latitude, it is acquired and not “natural”: it is not innate, but rather something we are taught since a very early age (and we all know what kind of filthy behavior kids are capable of).
Anthropologists link this horror for bodily fluids and emissions to the fear of our animal, pre-civilized heritage; the fear that we might become primitive again, the fear of seeing our middle-class ideal of dignity and cleanliness crumble under the pressure of a remainder of bestiality. It is the same reason for which societies progressively ban cruelty, believed to be an “inhuman” trait.

The interesting fact is that the birth of this family of taboos can be historically, albeit conventionally, traced: the process of civilization (and thus the erection of this social barrier or fronteer) is usually dated back to the XVI and XVII Centuries — which not by chance saw the growing popularity of Della Casa’s etiquette treatise Il Galateo.
In this period, right at the end of the Middle Ages, Western culture begins to establish behavioral rules to limit and codify what is considered respectable.

But in time (as Freud asserted) the taboo is perceived as a burden and a constriction. Therefore a society can look for, or create, certain environments that make it acceptable for a brief period to bend the rules, and escape the discipline. This very mechanism was behind the balsphemous inversions taking place in Carnival times, which were accepted only because strictly limited to a specific time of the year.

In much the same way, Pujol’s fart shows were liberating experiences, only possible on a theatrical stage, in the satyrical context of cabaret. By fracturing the idealistic facade of the gentleman for an hour or so, and counterposing the image of the physiological man, the obscenity of the flesh and its embarassements, Pujol on a first level seemed to mock bourgeois conventions (as later did Buñuel in the infamous dinner scene from his 1974 film The Phantom of Liberty).
Had this been the case, had Pujol’s act been simply subversive, it would had been perceived as offensive and labeled as despicable; his success, on the other hand, seems to point in another direction.

It’s much more plausible that Pujol, with his contrived and refined manners conflicting with the grotesque intestinal noises, was posing as a sort of stock comic character, a marionette, a harmless jester: thanks to this distance, he could arguably enact a true cathartic ritual. The audience laughed at his lewd feats, but were also secretely able to laugh at themselves, at the indecent nature of their bodies. And maybe to accept a bit more their own repressed flaws.

Perhaps that’s the intuition this brief, improper excursus can give us: each time a fart in a movie or a gross toilet humor joke makes us chuckle, we are actually enacting both a defense and an exorcism against the reality we most struggle to accept: the fact that we still, and anyway, belong to the animal kingdom.

Paul Grappe, the diserter transvestite

Sometimes the most unbelievable stories remain forever buried between the creases of history. But they may happen to leave a trail behind them, although very small; a little clue that, with a good deal of fortune and in the right hands, finally brings them to light. As archaeologists dig up treasures, historians unearth life’s peculiarities.

If Paul Grappe hadn’t been murdered by his wife on the 28th of July 1928, not a single hint to his peculiar story would have been found in the Archive of the Paris Police Prefecture. And if Fabrice Virgili, research manager at the CNRS, scrutinizing the abovementioned archives almost one hundred years later to write an article about conjugal violence at the beginning of the century, hadn’t given a look at that dossier…

The victim: Grappe Paul Joseph, born on the 30th of August 1891 in Haute Marne, resident 34 Rue de Bagnolet, shot dead on the 28th of July 1928.

The culprit: Landy Louise Gabrielle, born on the 10th of March 1892 in Paris, Grappe’s spouse.

This is how the life of Paul Grappe ended. But, as we go back through the years starting from the trial papers, we discover something really astonishing.

Paris-crue-1910--vue-gare-de-Lyon

In the 1910s Paris sounds like a promise to a young man coming from Haute-Marne. It was mainly a working-class context and like everybody else the twenty-year-old Paul Grappe worked hard to make ends meet. He hadn’t received a proper education but the uncontrollable vitality that would mark out his entire existence encouraged him to work hard: with stubborn determination he obliged himself to study, and became an optician. He also attended some mandolin’s courses, where he met Louise Landy.

Their modest financial means didn’t interfere with their feelings: they fell in love and in 1911 they tied the knot. Shortly afterwards, Paul had to leave for military service, but managed to be appointed to stand guard over the bastions of Paris, in order to be close to his own Louise. Our soldier was a skilled runner, he could ride, swim (which was quite uncommon at the time) and he quickly distinguished himself until he was appointed corporal. Having spent the required two years on active service, Paul thought he was finally done with the army. But the War clouds were gathering, and everything quickly deteriorated. In August 1914 Paul Grappe was sent to the front to fight against Germany.

The 102nd Infantry division constantly moved, day after day, because the front was not well defined yet. Then gradually came the time to confront the enemy: at the beginning there were only small skirmishes, then came the first wounded, the first dead. And, finally, the real battle began. For the French, the most bloody stage of the entire world war was exactly this first battle, called Battle of the Frontiers, that claimed thousands of victims – more than 25,000 in one day, the 22nd of August 1914.

Paul Grappe was at the forefront. When Hell arrived, he had to confront its devastating brutality.

He was wounded in the leg at the end of August, he was treated and sent back to the trenches in October. The situation had changed, the front was stabilized, but the battles were not less dangerous. During a bloody gunfight Paul was wounded again, in the right index finger. A finger hit by a bullet? He was strongly suspected of having practiced self-mutilation, and in such situations people were not particularly kind to those who did something like that: Paul risked death penalty and summary execution. But some brothers in arms gave evidence for him, and Paul escaped the war court. Convalescent, he was moved to Chartres. December, January, February and March went by. Four months seemed to be too much time to recover from the loss of one single finger, and his superiors suspected that Paul was willingly reopening his wounds (like many other soldiers used to do); in April 1915 he was ordered to go back to the front. And it was here that, confronted with the perspective of going back to that horrible limbo made of barbed wire, mud, whistling bullets and cannon shots, Paul decided that he would change his life forever: he chose to desert.

He left the military hospital and, instead of going to the barracks, he caught the first train to Paris.

17-123245464a951320f3

We can only imagine how Louise felt: she was happy to learn that her husband was safe and sound, far from the war, and afraid that everything could end at any moment, if he was discovered. During the spring of 1915 the army was desperately in need of men, even people declared unfit for military service were sent to the front, and consequently the efforts to find the missing deserters were redoubled. For three times the guards burst into the home of his mother-in-law, where Paul was hidden, but couldn’t find him.

As for Paul – that had always had a wild and untamed temper – he couldn’t stand the pressure of secrecy. He was obliged to live as a real prisoner, he didn’t dare stick his nose out of the door: simply walking down the streets of Paris, a young man in his twenties would have aroused suspicion at that time because all the young men – maybe with the exception of some ministry’s employees – were at the front.

One day, overcome by boredom, joking with Louise he chose one of her dresses and wore it. Why not dress up as a woman?

Louise and Paul took a turn. He had a careful shave; his wife put a delicate make-up on him, adjusted the female clothes, put his head into a lady’s little hat. It wasn’t a perfect disguise, but it might work.

Holding their breath, they went out in the streets. They walked down the road for a little while, pretending to be at ease. They sat down in a café, and realized that people apparently didn’t notice anything strange about those two friends that were enjoying their drinks. Coming back home, they shivered as they noticed a man that was intensely gazing at them, fixing them… the man finally whistled in admiration. It was the ultimate evidence: disguised as a woman, Paul was so convincing that he deceived even the attentive eye of a tombeur de femmes.

From that moment on, to the outside world, the two of them formed a couple of women who used to live together. Paul bought some clothes, adopted a more feminine hairstyle, learnt to change his voice. He chose the name of Suzanne Landgard. For those who take on a new identity, it is very important to choose a proper name, and Landgard could be interpreted as “he who protects (garde) Landy?”.

Now Paul/Suzanne could go out barefaced, he could also contribute to the family economy: while Louise worked in a company that produced educational materials, Suzanne started working in a tailor’s shop. But maybe she struggled to stay in her role, because, as far as we know, she frequently changed job because of problems concerning her relationship with her colleagues.

War was over, at last. Paul wanted to stop living undercover, but he was still in danger. Like many other deserters used to do at the time, also our couple left for Spain (a neutral country) and for a short time took shelter in the Basque Country. They returned to Paris in 1922.

But the atmosphere of the capital had changed: the so-called “crazy years” had just begun and Paris was a town that wanted to forget the war at any cost. It was therefore rich in novelties, artistic avant-gardes and unrestrained pleasures. Louise and Suzanne realized that after all they may look like two garçonnes, fashionable women flaunting a masculine hairdo and wearing trousers, shocking conservative people. Louise used to paint lead toy soldiers during the evening, after work, to make some extra money.

Paul couldn’t find a job instead, and his insatiable lust for life led him to spend some time at the Bois de Boulogne, a public park that during those years was a well known meeting point for free love: there gathered libertines, partner-swappers, prostitutes and pimps.

Did Paul, dressed as Suzanne, whore to bring some money home? Maybe he didn’t. Anyhow, he became one of the “queen” of the Bois.

From then on, his days became crowded with casual intercourses, orgies, female and male lovers, and even encoded newspaper ads. Paul/Suzanne even tried to convince Louise to participate in these erotic meetings, but this only fuelled the first conflicts within the couple, that was very close until then.

His thirst for experience was not yet satiated: in 1923 Suzanne Landgard was one of the first “women” that jumped with a parachute.

You are not tall enough, my dear, I am a refined person, I want to get out of this mass, this brute mass that goes to work in the morning, like slaves do, and goes back home at evening”, he repeated to Louise.

In January 1924 the long awaited amnesty arrived at last.

The same morning in which the news was spread, Paul went down the stairs dressed as a man, without make-up. The porter of the apartment building was shocked as she saw him go out: “Madame Suzanne, have you gone crazy?” “I am not Suzanne, I am Paul Grappe and I am going to declare myself a deserter to apply for the amnesty.” As soon as the authorities learnt about his case, even the press discovered it. Some newspaper headlines read: “The transvestite deserter”. Prejudices started to circulate: paradoxically, now that he was discovered to be a man (so the two supposed lesbians were a married couple) Paul and Louise were evicted. The Communist Party mobilized to defend the two proletarians that were victims of prejudices, and in a short time Paul found himself at the core of an improvised social debate. The little popularity he gained maybe went to his head: believing that he may become a celebrity, or have some chance as an actor, he started to distribute autographed pictures of him both as a male and as a female and went as far as to hire a book agent.

But the more prosaic reality was that Paul told the fantastic story of his endeavours mostly in the cafés, to be offered some drinks. He showed the picture album of him as Suzanne, and also kept a dossier of obscene photographs, that are lost today. Little by little he started to drink at least five litres of wine per day. He lost one job after another, and turned aggressive even at home.

As he recovered his manhood – that same virility that condemned him to the horror of the trenches – he became violent. Before the Great War he had shown no signs of bisexuality nor violence, and most probably the traumas he suffered on the battlefield had a share in the quick descent of Paul Grappe into alcoholism, brutality and chaos.

He used to spend all the salary of his wife to get drunk. The episodes of domestic violence multiplied.

In a desperate attempt of reconciliation, Louise accepted to participate in her husband’s sexual games, and in order to please him (this is what she declared later in her deposition) took an attractive Spanish boy named Paco as her lover. But the unstable Paul didn’t appreciate her efforts, and started to feel annoyed by this third party. When he ordered his wife to leave Paul, Louise left him instead.

From that moment on, their story looks like the sad and well-known stories of many drifting couples: he found her at her mother’s home, he threatened her with a gun, and begged her to go back home with him. She surrendered, but she quickly discovered she was pregnant. Who was the father? Paul, or her lover Paco? In December 1925 the child was born, and Louise decided to call him Paul – obviously to reassure her husband about his fatherhood. The three of them lived a serene life for some months, like a real family. Paul started again to look for a job and tried to drink less. But it didn’t last. Crises and violence started again, until the night of the murder the man apparently went as far as to threaten to hurt his child. Louise killed Paul shooting twice at his head, then ran to the police headquarters to give herself up.

The trial had a certain media echo, because of the sensationalist hues of the story: the accused, the wife that shot dead the “transvestite deserter”, was represented by the famous lawyer Maurice Garçon. While Louise was in prison, her child died of meningitis. Therefore the lawyer insisted on the fact that the widow was also a mourning mother, a victim of conjugal violence that had to kill her husband to protect their infirm child – on the other hand he tried to play down the woman’s complicity in her husband’s desertion, transvestism, and shocking behaviours. In 1929, Louise Landy was declared innocent, which rarely happened in the case of trials for murder of the spouse. From that moment on Louise disappeared from any news section, and there was no more news about her except that she got married again, and then died in 1981.

The story of Paul Grappe, with all that it suggests about those troubled times, the traumas of the soldiers, the inner conflicts implied by gender, was discovered by Fabrice Virgili who told it in his book La garçonne et l’assassin : Histoire de Louise et de Paul, déserteur travesti dans le Paris des années folles (the title is ironical, and the garçonne is obviously Paul, whereas Louise is the murderer), and also inspired the comic strip by Chloé Cruchaudet entitled Mauvais genre.

mauvais_genre_couverture

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – III

Eccoci al nostro terzo ed ultimo appuntamento con la Parigi più insolita e curiosa.

Quando ci troviamo nel cuore di una metropoli, tutto ci aspetteremmo tranne che poter osservare… gli animali selvaggi nel proprio habitat. Eppure, nel centralissimo quartiere di Les Halles a pochi passi del Centre Pompidou, esiste un luogo davvero unico: il Museo della Caccia e della Natura.

Prima di approfondire le implicazioni filosofiche ed artistiche di questa stupefacente istituzione, lasciatevi raccontare quello che attende il visitatore che decida di varcare la soglia del Museo.
Mentre ci si avventura nella luce soffusa della prima stanza, gli arazzi alle pareti, le ricercate poltrone antiche e i raffinati mobili d’ebano intarsiati di splendide fantasie in avorio danno l’impressione di essere appena entrati in un’abitazione privata di un ricco collezionista dell’800. Eppure, a sorpresa, ecco un cinghiale proprio nel bel mezzo di questo nobile salotto – l’animale ci fissa, la sua enorme massa scura è minacciosa ed imponente. Chiaramente si tratta di un esemplare tassidermico, ma il contrasto con l’ambiente circostante è spiazzante.
Lì vicino si può notare un armadio diverso dagli altri: è il pannello dedicato proprio al cinghiale. I cassetti e le ante di questo particolare mobiletto si possono aprire liberamente: facendo scivolare un largo e basso cassetto, ecco una ricostruzione del terreno del sottobosco – in cui all’inizio si stenta a scorgere alcunché se non del fango e delle foglie secche, ma ecco, guardando meglio si possono distinguere le impronte lasciate dal passaggio degli zoccoli del cinghiale. E’ la pista che dovremmo saper riconoscere e seguire se volessimo dare la caccia a questa difficile preda. In un altro cassettino, ecco una riproduzione degli escrementi della bestia.

chasse 8

chasse 5

chasse 4

chasse 3

chasse 2

chasse 1

Vi è anche una specie di binocolo integrato all’interno del legno dell’armadio. Accostando gli occhi, vediamo un paesaggio naturale in tre dimensioni. Sembra tutto piuttosto statico, i rami ondeggiano un poco e le acque di un lago si increspano, finché, con un po’ di pazienza, scorgiamo qualcosa che si muove in lontananza, fra le foglie… che sia proprio un cinghiale?

chasse 14

Lasciata la stanza del cinghiale, si entra in quella del cervo, e lo strano senso di spaesamento si rinnova.
A parte le due bellissime plancie esplicative ai lati del mobile, marchiate a fuoco nel legno, che raccontano le abitudini e le caratteristiche dell’animale, non vi è traccia delle classiche e pedisseque targhette da museo. Alcune sottili associazioni sono liberamente lasciate alla sensibilità del visitatore, come ad esempio quando a due passi dal teschio del cervo s’incontra una statua che rappresenta un satiro: molti passeranno oltre, senza accorgersi che le corna della statua antica sono perfettamente somiglianti a quelle del cervo… ma quando nella mente dell’osservatore prende forma questa analogia, ecco che senza bisogno di tante parole quella stanza svela l’importanza fondamentale dell’animale (il cervo, in questo caso) nell’immaginario umano. E mano a mano che ci si aggira per le sale, risulta sempre più evidente che, più che un Museo della Caccia, questo luogo è un tributo al complesso e stratificato rapporto fra esseri umani ed animali, e a come esso sia mutato nel corso dei millenni.

chasse 18

chasse 7

chasse 12

chasse 9

chasse 11

chasse 15

chasse 16

chasse 17

Nelle altre stanze si possono trovare opere d’arte e installazioni moderne proposte di fianco a carabine d’epoca, saloni che esplorano la tradizione venatoria del trofeo (rappresentazione ed esposizione della gloria del massacro, inquietante ed infantile al tempo stesso), teche piene di maschere di carnevale dalle fattezze animalesche che dimostrano come, a livello simbolico, la bestia sia radicata nel nostro inconscio – tanto da spingerci a dare vita anche ad animali e chimere di fantasia, di cui facciamo la conoscenza nello splendido gabinetto dell’unicorno.

chasse 38

chasse 37

chasse 40

chasse 34

chasse 35

chasse 45

chasse 46

chasse 50

chasse 49

chasse 47

chasse 25

chasse 19

chasse 20

chasse 21

chasse 23

Ma qual è la storia dietro a questo eccentrico museo? La fondazione si deve a François Sommer e a sua moglie Jacqueline: ricco collezionista e appassionato cacciatore, Sommer fu tra i primi a sostenere attivamente la necessità di una caccia etica, rispettosa dell’equilibrio naturale. Il cinghiale e il cervo, in via di estinzione, ritornarono a popolare le foreste francesi proprio grazie a Sommer e alle sue tenute, in cui voleva che gli animali selvaggi potessero moltiplicarsi al riparo dalla venagione indiscriminata.

chasse 32

chasse 33

chasse 56

chasse 53

chasse 57

chasse 58

chasse 59

chasse 60

Eppure, per quanto rispettoso e appassionato naturalista, egli era pur sempre un amante della caccia: da qui l’idea di un museo che mostrasse quanto questa attività avesse contribuito alla civilizzazione, e che allo stesso tempo esplorasse la nostra percezione degli animali e come si è radicalmente evoluta dalla preistoria ai giorni nostri.

chasse 61

chasse 62

chasse 67

chasse 68

chasse 69

chasse 70

Oggi che è venuto a mancare il suo fine sostentativo, rifiutiamo la caccia come superflua e crudele (affidandoci per l’approvvigionamento di carne ad altri metodi, bisogna vedere se meno crudeli), e consideriamo gli animali come vittime: ma un tempo il cinghiale, ad esempio, era un fiero e pericolosissimo avversario, capace di sbudellare il cacciatore con le sue zanne in pochi minuti. Esisteva dunque un naturale rispetto per l’animale che si è venuto a modificare.
Nel nostro Occidente ipertecnologico ed industrializzato, la caccia sta progressivamente perdendo ogni motivo di esistere; questo non cancella però il peso fondamentale che questa attività ha rivestito nei secoli. La storia della caccia, in fondo, è la storia del faticoso tentativo dell’uomo di prevalere nella gerarchia naturale, ma anche la storia delle nostre paure più ancestrali, dei nostri sogni, dei nostri miti.

chasse 72

chasse 73

Per approfondire e completare questa riflessione sui rapporti fra esseri umani e animali, ci rechiamo nuovamente nella banlieue, questa volta a nord-ovest di Parigi sulla rive gauche, ad Asnières-sur-Seine. Qui si trova il Cimitero dei Cani che, nonostante il nome, ospita anche molte altre specie di animali da compagnia.

chiens 1

Ufficialmente aperto alla fine dell’estate del 1899, il cimitero rispecchia il trasformarsi della funzione dell’animale (da utilitario ad animale di compagnia) avvenuta nel corso del XIX° Secolo. Se in quegli ultimi decenni le condizioni di vita degli “amici a quattro zampe” erano infatti migliorate, si avvertiva l’esigenza di una sistemazione più consona anche per le spoglie degli animali deceduti, e che fino a quel momento venivano squartati, o abbandonati nell’immondizia, o gettati nella Senna.

chiens 23

chiens 54

Nonostante alcune croniche difficoltà che continueranno, nel corso del secolo successivo, ad affliggerlo, il Cimitero dei Cani conoscerà un successo crescente, popolandosi di monumenti e sepolture sempre più prestigiose. Nel 1900 ad esempio viene eretto all’entrata del cimitero un monumento alla memoria di Barry, un San Bernardo che all’inizio del secolo precedente aveva “salvato la vita a 40 persone, restando ucciso dalla 41ma!”; a quanto pare, cioè, il coraggioso cane morì stremato da quest’ultimo sforzo. Alla sua morte, il suo corpo venne imbalsamato e conservato presso il Museo di storia naturale di Berna.
Un’altra tomba commemora un cane randagio che il 15 maggio del 1958 venne a morire proprio alle porte del cimitero: casualità straordinaria, si trattava del quarantamillesimo animale ad essere seppellito lì.

chiens 2

chiens 5

chiens 56

Ma qui, tutte le tombe raccontano delle storie di affetto e di amore fra persone ed animali, legami forti che apparentemente nulla hanno da invidiare a quelli fra esseri umani. Alcune iscrizioni sono davvero toccanti: “Figlia mia / Amore della mia vita / Ti amo / Tua mamma“, recita la tomba di Caramel. Sulla lapide della scimmietta Kiki è iscritto il verso “Dormi mia cara / fosti la gioia della mia vita“. Il proprietario del barboncino Youpi, morto nel 2001, scrive: “Il tuo immenso affetto ha illuminato la mia vita, sono talmente triste senza di te e il tuo meraviglioso sguardo“. E ancora: “In memoria della mia cara Emma, dal 12 Aprile 1889 al 2 Agosto 1900 fedele compagna e sola amica della mia vita errante e desolata“.

chiens 10

chiens 17

chiens 51

chiens 29

chiens 6

chiens 8

chiens 9

chiens 11

chiens 12

chiens 13

chiens 16

chiens 49

chiens 53

chiens 50

Iscrizioni commoventi, dicevamo: in certi casi l’incontro fra uomo e animale può rivelarsi una bellissima amicizia, tanto che ogni barriera specifica viene a cadere di fronte all’affetto creatosi fra due esseri viventi.
Eppure, bisogna ammetterlo, il Cimitero dei Cani fa anche un po’ sorridere. I mausolei sfarzosi e riccamente ornati, le grosse lapidi erette per un pesciolino rosso o per un criceto, i monumenti fatti scolpire appositamente per tartarughe, cavalli, topolini, uccelli, conigli e perfino gazzelle, fennec e lemuri ci possono sembrare in alcuni casi francamente esagerati.

chiens 55

chiens 48

chiens 45

chiens 44

chiens 40

chiens 35

chiens 36

chiens 38

chiens 37

chiens 19

chiens 27

chiens 22

chiens 31

chiens 30

chiens 21

chiens 20

chiens 18

Ma si tratta sempre, a ben vedere, dello stesso antico bisogno (forse, sì, patetico, ma incrollabile e a suo modo eroico) che sta alla base di qualsiasi necropoli: la necessità, tutta umana, di dare valore alle cose e alla vita, cercando di impedire che il passaggio sulla terra di coloro che amiamo termini senza lasciare traccia alcuna. Una battaglia destinata a fallire, in ultima istanza, ma che offre conforto a chi si trova ad elaborare un lutto.

chiens 15

chiens 14

chiens 46

chiens 39

chiens 34

Abbandoniamo il Cimitero dei Cani, non prima di aver visitato un’ultima, umile tomba: quella di una celebre star del cinema…

chiens 47

Terminiamo quindi il nostro viaggio con una visita a quello che è probabilmente il luogo più magico dell’intera capitale: il Musée des Arts Forains.
Si tratta di un’enorme collezione/installazione dedicata alle  fêtes foraines, cioè quelle giostre itineranti che da noi presero il nome di luna park (dal primo parco di attrazioni della storia, a Coney Island). Un tempo le giostre non erano nemmeno itineranti, ma trovavano posto all’interno delle città; poi, in seguito alle lamentele per il rumore, vennero spostate lontano dai centri abitati, e con il nomadismo iniziò anche il loro declino.

artsforains 1

artsforains 4

artsforains 5

artsforains 10

artsforains 11

artsforains 12

artsforains 13

Il Museo è collocato all’interno dei pittoreschi Pavillons Bercy, antichi depositi di vino, e magazzini di scalo per le merci in attesa d’essere caricate sui battelli fluviali. La visita guidata (che va prenotata in anticipo, visto che i gruppi hanno un numero limitato di partecipanti) si articola in tre diversi spazi: il Teatro del Meraviglioso, il Musée des Art Forains vero e proprio, e il Salone Veneziano.

artsforains 2

Il Teatro del Meraviglioso accoglie il visitatore con un’esplosione di luci colorate e di strane scenografie, in una sorta di ritorno all’atmosfera delle esposizioni universali di inizio secolo. C’è da restare a bocca aperta. Un elefante, appeso ad una mongolfiera, porta sulla schiena un incredibile e fragilissimo diorama creato interamente in mollica di pane; fra le foglie e gli intricati tronchi naturali, appositamente selezionati per la loro forma curiosa e artistica, fanno la ruota i pavoni meccanici; statue di sirene montano la guardia agli antenati dei flipper; tutto intorno, macchinari e giocattoli fantastici mentre, in fondo al salone, una corsa di cavalli con le biglie impegna i visitatori in una gara all’ultimo lancio. Sì, perché tutte le giostre che si trovano nel museo, originali di fine ‘800 e inizio ‘900, sono ancora funionanti e il tour include l’esperienza di provarne alcune in prima persona.

artsforains 17

artsforains 19

artsforains 18

artsforains 16

artsforains 20

artsforains 21

artsforains 23

artsforains 24

artsforains 25

artsforains 26

artsforains 27

artsforains 28

artsforains 29

artsforains 30

Nel salone a fianco, è la musica a farla da padrone. Un unicorno se ne sta ritto vicino ad un pianoforte i cui tasti si muovono da soli, mentre la guida turistica (per metà Virgilio, per metà imbonitore) dà inizio alle danze, facendo vibrare le pareti al suono di un antico organo e un carillon di tubi che si diramano lungo su tutte le pareti. Assieme ai visitatori che si cimentano in un valzer improvvisato, si muovono a tempo di musica sui loro baldacchini e parapetti anche gli automi con le fattezze di alcuni personaggi famosi degli anni d’oro di Parigi.

artsforains 31

artsforains 32

artsforains 33

artsforains 34

Questo spazio, evocativo e misterioso, viene utilizzato per serate ed eventi ed è anche dotato, per queste occasioni speciali, di 12 video proiettori che sono in grado di trasformare i muri nelle pareti interne del Nautilus, il celebre sottomarino del Capitano Nemo.

artsforains 7

Ci si sposta poi in un diverso padiglione, dove è ospitato il Musée des Arts Forains, dedicato al luna park vero e proprio. Come prima cosa, si prova sui propri timpani la potenza sonora dell’Organetto di Barberia: quando il mantice soffiava nelle canne, questo strumento a rullo spandeva l’allegra musica per chilometri sottovento, annunciando con le sue note l’arrivo delle giostre in città.

artsforains 41

artsforains 35

artsforains 38

artsforains 39

Poi, ecco comparire l’emblema e il simbolo di qualsiasi luna park: la giostra con i cavalli. Ad una popolaione divenuta urbana a seguito della rivoluzione industriale, questa attrazione ricordava le proprie origini rurali; e, al tempo stesso, prometteva alla gente comune il sogno di sentirsi nobili cavalieri per lo spazio di qualche giro di giostra.
Uno dei dettagli interessanti è il fatto che solitamente i cavalli hanno un solo lato perfettamente decorato e dipinto, quello che dà verso l’esterno. Il loro fianco interno, invece, è pitturato molto più grossolanamente – con il tipico cinismo dei circensi, i costruttori sapevano che l’importante era attirare chi sulla giostra non era ancora salito!

artsforains 42

I visitatori montano sulle loro selle, chiudono gli occhi, e sulle note di Mon manège à moi di Édith Piaf i cavalli di legno si mettono in moto… da quando fu creata, nel 1890, più di due milioni di persone hanno riscoperto la loro anima di bambini su questa giostra di origine tedesca.

artsforains 45

artsforains 48

artsforains 47

artsforains 51

artsforains 52

artsforains 53

artsforains 54

artsforains 59

Dopo aver passato in rassegna innumerevoli altri tipi di attrazioni, si sale sulla giostra probabilmente più bizzarra dell’intera collezione: un manège vélocipédique del 1897. Qui sono i visitatori stessi che con le loro pedalate mettono in moto la giostra, raggiungendo velocità da capogiro.

artsforains 55

artsforains 56

artsforains 57

artsforains 58

Infine, ecco che ci si sposta nel terzo padiglione, dedicato a Venezia, per una “corsa” molto più rilassante e serena su una giostra di gondole, mentre si ammira l’insolita ricostruzione dei canali e dei palazzi che adorna le pareti.

artsforains 62

artsforains 61

La visita termina con uno spettacolo di musica lirica interpretata dagli automi di Casanova, del Doge, di Arlecchino, Pantalone, eccetera.

artsforains 63

artsforains 64

Ritornati fuori, alla luce del sole, ci si accorge con sorpresa che senza l’aiuto di un orologio sarebbe impossibile dire quanto sia durata la visita. Un’ora e mezza, due ore, o ancora di più? Per qualche ragione, all’interno di questo spazio, per il quale l’aggettivo “meraviglioso” non è affatto fuori luogo, ogni cognizione del tempo è rimasta alterata.
Ci si guarda l’un l’altro, ed ecco che – ultima magia – negli occhi di tutti brilla quell’antico senso di incanto che sembrava ormai perduto.

artsforains 49

MUSEE DE LA CHASSE ET DE LA NATURE
62, rue des Archives
Apertura: Tutti i giorni tranne il lunedì.
Orari: Mar-Dom 11-18, Mer 11-21.30
Sito Web

CEMETIERE DES CHIENS
4, pont de Clichy
Asnières-sur-Seine
Apertura: tutti i giorni tranne il lunedì.
Orari: dal 16 marzo al 15 ottobre 10-18, dal 16 ottobre al 15 marzo 10-16.30

MUSEE DES ARTS FORAINS
53, Av des Terroirs de France
Apertura e orari: consultare il calendario per le prenotazioni sul sito.
Sito Web

(Questo articolo è l’ultimo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. I primi due capitoli sono qui e qui.)

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – II

deyrolle 1

Cominciamo il nostro secondo tour di Parigi facendo una capatina da Deyrolle. Dal 1831 questo favoloso negozio propone, in un’atmosfera da camera delle meraviglie, importanti collezioni tassidermiche, entomologiche e naturalistiche.

deyrolle 2

deyrolle 3

deyrolle 4

La Maison Deyrolle ospita anche regolarmente esposizioni di famosi artisti (vi sono passate le opere, fra gli altri, di Niki De Saint Phalle e Damien Hirst), invitati ad elaborare dei progetti specifici a partire dall’immenso catalogo di preparati tassidermici ed entomologici a disposizione.

deyrolle 5

deyrolle 6

deyrolle 7

deyrolle 8

Aggirandosi per le stanze stracolme di animali, fra uccelli esotici e orsi bruni, non si fatica a capire perché Deyrolle sia una vera e propria istituzione, e conti i migliori professionisti sul campo. Va anche sottolineato che nessuno di questi animali è stato ucciso al fine di essere imbalsamato: gli esemplari non domestici provengono da zoo, circhi o allevamenti nei quali sono morti di vecchiaia o malattia.

MuseeOrsay_20070324

Spostiamoci ora in uno dei templi dell’arte mondiale, il Musée d’Orsay. Qui, fino al 25 Gennaio 2015, sarà possibile visitare l’esposizione Sade – Attaquer le soleil, che si propone di rintracciare l’influenza del Marchese De Sade sull’arte del XIX e XX secolo.

sade 2

Franz von Stuck, Giuditta e Oloferne, 1927

sade 3

Eugène Delacroix, Medea furiosa, 1838

La mostra da sola vale il biglietto d’ingresso: l’impressionante corpus di opere selezionate conta più di 500 pezzi. Da Delacroix a von Stuck, da Goya a Kubin, da Füssli a Beardsley, da Ernst a Bellmer, l’esposizione si concentra sull’impossibilità di rappresentare il desiderio, sul corpo, sulla crudeltà. La filosofia sadiana, per quanto negata e messa al bando per più di un secolo, si rivela in realtà un fil rouge, insinuatosi clandestinamente nel mondo dell’arte, che unisce pittori differenti e lontani fra loro nel tempo e nello spazio, una sorta di corrente sotterranea che porta fino alla “riscoperta” dell’autore da parte dei Surrealisti e al suo successivo sdoganamento.

sade 4

Franz von Stuck, Il peccato, 1899

sade 5

Alfred Kubin, La donna a cavallo, 1900-1901

Ma l’influenza di Sade non risiede soltanto nelle opere degli artisti che ha in qualche modo ispirato: secondo i curatori, egli ha cambiato anche il modo in cui guardiamo all’arte precedente ai suoi scritti. La prima sezione infatti, intitolata Humain, trop humain, inhumain mostra come tutti i temi sadiani fossero già presenti nell’arte prima di lui, ma all’interno di codici accettabili. Una scena di martirio in una chiesa, ad esempio, non scandalizzava nessuno. Sade però fa cadere il velo, e dopo di lui non sarà più possibile ammirare uno spettacolo di violenza senza pensare alle sue parole: “La crudeltà, ben lontana dall’essere un vizio, è il primo sentimento che la natura imprime in noi; il bambino rompe il suo giocattolo, morde il seno della nutrice, strangola il suo uccellino, molto prima d’avere l’età della ragione” (La filosofia nel boudoir, 1795).

sade 6

Jindrich Styrsky, Emilie viene a me in sogno, 1933

sade 9

Francisco de Goya, I cannibali, 1800-1808

sade 1

Félix Vallotton, Orfeo smembrato dalle Menadi, 1914

Non lontano dal Musée d’Orsay si trova il quartiere universitario della Sorbona. Ci trasferiamo al Museo della Storia della Medicina, che raccoglie una collezione di strumenti chirurgici d’epoca.

histoire de la medecine 1

histoire de la medecine 2

histoire de la medecine 3

histoire de la medecine 4

histoire de la medecine 5

histoire de la medecine 6

histoire de la medecine 7

histoire de la medecine 8

histoire de la medecine 9

histoire de la medecine 10

histoire de la medecine 11

Fra i pezzi più straordinari, vi sono certamente gli strumenti ideati nell’800 dall’urologo Jean Civiale per l’estrazione dei calcoli (le immagini qui sotto rendono bene l’idea di quanto l’operazione fosse complicata – e terrificante, visto che il tutto era svolto in assenza di anestesia); e se questo non bastasse a farvi venire la pelle d’oca, ecco le seghe con catena a carica automatica per amputazioni, fra gli strumenti meno precisi e maneggevoli mai sperimentati in chirurgia.

histoire de la medecine 15

histoire de la medecine 17

histoire de la medecine 16

histoire de la medecine 14

histoire de la medecine 12

  histoire de la medecine 20

histoire de la medecine 22

histoire de la medecine 23

histoire de la medecine 24

histoire de la medecine 25

histoire de la medecine 26

histoire de la medecine 27

histoire de la medecine 28

histoire de la medecine 29

histoire de la medecine 30

histoire de la medecine 31

histoire de la medecine 32

histoire de la medecine 33

histoire de la medecine 34

histoire de la medecine 35

Ma il vero gioiello del museo, a nostro parere, è il tavolo realizzato dall’italiano Efisio Marini e offerto a Napoleone III.

histoire de la medecine 37

Perché è così interessante? Perché quello che sembra un semplice tavolino mosaicato su cui è appoggiata la scultura di un piede, è in realtà formato a partire da pezzi pietrificati di cervello, sangue, bile, fegato, polmoni e ghiandole. Il piede è un vero piede, anch’esso pietrificato, così come le quattro orecchie che spuntano dalla superficie del tavolino e le vertebre sezionate che lo adornano. Osservando da vicino quest’opera incredibile, non si fatica a comprendere perché Efisio Marini fosse considerato uno dei più abili anatomisti preparatori del suo tempo (vedi il nostro articolo sui pietrificatori).

histoire de la medecine 36

histoire de la medecine 38

histoire de la medecine 39

Ritorniamo infine ai nostri amati animali, ma stavolta con una visita più classica: quella alla Grande Galérie de l’Evolution. Non è certo un museo poco conosciuto, quindi aspettatevi un po’ di coda e le grida entusiaste dei più piccoli.

gge 2

gge 1

Ma una volta dentro, tutti ridiventano bambini. Dopo essere passati sotto al gigantesco scheletro di un capodoglio, e una prima sala dedicata agli animali marini (per la verità un po’ deludente), si arriva al grande salone che contiene una fra le attrazioni principali: la spettacolare camminata dei mammiferi africani.

gge 5

gge 6

gge 7

gge 8

gge 9

gge 10

gge 11

gge 12

gge 13

Sotto una volta d’acciaio e vetro che cambia colore imitando le diverse fasi del giorno, gli animali della savana sembrano avviati verso un’invisibile Arca di Noè, o verso un futuro ancora sconosciuto (una nuova evoluzione?). Fu proprio questa installazione curiosa e innovativa che vent’anni fa, quando la Galleria aprì i battenti sostituendo la precedente Galleria di Zoologia, le assicurò una rapida fama.

gge 14

gge 15

gge 16

gge 17

gge 18

gge 19

gge 20

gge 21

gge 22

gge 23

gge 24

Ma la biodiversità e le infinite forme di vita plasmate dall’evoluzione trovano spazio sui tre piani del complesso, fra diorami artistici e illuminanti raffronti fra le varie specie.

gge 30

gge 26

gge 29

gge 28

gge 25

gge 34

gge 32

gge 33

gge 38

gge 31

gge 27

gge 4

gge 36

gge 37

Fra qualche giorno la terza ed ultima parte di questa ricognizione della Parigi meno risaputa: preparatevi perché abbiamo tenuto il meglio per la fine…

gge 39

LA MAISON DEYROLLE
46, rue du Bac
Apertura: dal lunedì al sabato
Orari: Lun 10-13 e 14-19, mar-sab 10-19
Sito web

MUSEE D’ORSAY
1, rue de la Légion d’Honneur
Apertura: chiuso il lunedì
Orari: 9.30-18, il giovedì 9.30-21.45
Sito web

MUSEE DE L’HISTOIRE DE LA MEDECINE
12, rue de l’Ecole de Médecine
Apertura: tutti i giorni tranne giovedì e domenica
Orari: 14-17.30
Sito web

GRANDE GALERIE DE L’EVOLUTION
36 rue Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire
Apertura: tutti i giorni tranne il martedì e il 1 maggio.
Orari: 10-18
Sito web

(Questo articolo è il secondo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. Gli altri due capitoli sono qui e qui.)

Bizzarro Bazar a Parigi – I

View on Paris

Qualche anno fa avevamo pubblicato due articoli-reportage su New York (li trovate qui e qui), dedicati a musei, negozi e luoghi insoliti della Grande Mela. Quest’anno, invece, il vostro fedele esploratore del perturbante si è diretto a Parigi, dove ha scovato per voi alcuni fra gli angoli meno battuti della capitale francese.

Già nel XVIII secolo Francesco Algarotti sentenziava “molti vanno a Parigi, ma pochi ci sono stati“, e forse questo è ancora più vero oggi che il turismo di massa detta le regole per visitare qualsiasi città, imponendo al viaggiatore tutta una serie di tappe obbligate da spuntare come caselline della tombola. Questa esperienza di superficie certamente rassicura il pellegrino di aver visto “tutte le cose più importanti”, ma rischia di farlo tornare a casa con l’immagine della città che già aveva prima di partire. E invece anche Parigi, come tutti i luoghi ricchi d’una storia antica e travagliata, nasconde un volto sconosciuto ai più.

Dimenticatevi quindi – o, meglio, date pure per assodati – i fasti di Versailles, le folle che risalgono la Torre Eiffel, gli assiepati scalini di Montmartre, il sorriso beffardo della Gioconda o lo shopping di lusso sui Champs-Elisées; e preparatevi per un viaggio alla scoperta dei meravigliosi gioielli che le luci della Ville Lumière hanno lasciato nella penombra.

ecole_veterinaire2

Come prima tappa partiamo dalla banlieue a sud-est di Parigi, a soli tre chilometri dalla capitale, visitando a Maisons-Alfort il Musée Fragonard, che si trova ospitato all’interno della Scuola Veterinaria. Qui un’immensa collezione di ossa e di scheletri animali si contende la scena con dei modelli in gesso degli organi interni, a grandezza naturale oppure in scala notevolmente maggiore, a fini di studio.

fragonard-1

fragonard-2

fragonard-3

fragonard-4

fragonard-5

fragonard-6

fragonard-7

fragonard-8

fragonard-9

fragonard-10

fragonard-11

fragonard-12

Le cose cominciano a farsi più impressionanti quando si raggiunge la sezione teratologica del museo, che espone le diverse malformazioni, mutazioni genetiche e mostruosità. Preparati a secco, mummificati, oppure in soluzione ci presentano la versione animale dei “gemelli siamesi”: agnelli craniopaghi e toracopaghi, maiali con sviluppi fetali parassitari e galline con arti in sovrannumero si alternano a feti ciclopi, vitelli idrocefali e capre nate senza testa (anencefalia).

fragonard-13

fragonard-14

fragonard-15

fragonard-16

fragonard-17

fragonard-18

fragonard-19

fragonard-20

fragonard-21

fragonard-22

fragonard-23

fragonard-24

Ma è nell’ultima stanza che sono contenuti i reperti più straordinari. Si tratta dei celebri écorchés di Fragonard, di cui abbiamo parlato in questo articolo: duecento anni prima di Gunther Von Hagens e del suo Body Worlds, e senza alcuna delle tecnologie ultramoderne disponibili oggi, l’anatomista francese era riuscito a preservare perfettamente alcuni cadaveri sezionati e fissati in modo da esporre l’anatomia interna a beneficio degli studenti.

fragonard-25

fragonard-26

fragonard-27

fragonard-28

In alcuni casi disposti in pose artistiche, come “l’uomo con la mandibola” o i “feti danzanti“, i preparati anatomici sono ancora perfetti, con le loro vernici lucide e brillanti e un’espressività per nulla diminuita dal passare dei secoli.

fragonard-31

fragonard-29

fragonard-30

fragonard-32

fragonard-33

fragonard-34

Difficile non rimanere a bocca aperta di fronte al più incredibile fra tutti i pezzi conservati qui: il “Cavaliere dell’Apocalisse“, montato su un vero e proprio cavallo, a sua volta sezionato.

fragonard-35

fragonard-36

fragonard-37

fragonard-38

fragonard-39

fragonard-40

Spostiamoci ora nel cuore della città.
Quartiere un tempo malfamato, divenuto iconico per i suoi spettacoli osé, per il Moulin Rouge, i bordelli, il Grand Guignol e i cafés a tema, Pigalle si è oggi adeguato ai tempi e alle esigenze turistiche, reinventandosi come paradiso dei locali di lap dance e dei negozi del sesso. Lungo il Boulevard de Clichy le vetrine propongono, senza censure o pudori, una costellazione di futuristici sex toys, coadiuvanti, afrodisiaci, ritardanti, arditi capi di lingerie affiancati al consueto armamentario BDSM fatto di cuoio, borchie, scudisci e ball gag.

Proprio al centro di questa esibizione del sesso fatto spettacolo e merchandising, si apre il Musée de l’Erotisme. Anche ad Amsterdam, nel Red Light District, ne esiste uno di simile, ma quello di Parigi si distingue dal suo omonimo olandese per almeno tre motivi: il primo è la ricchezza della sezione antropologica, che conta svariate decine di manufatti provenienti da diverse epoche e latitudini.

erotisme-1

erotisme-2

erotisme-3

erotisme-4

erotisme-5

erotisme-6

Dalle terrecotte etrusche ai feticci africani, dalle colorate statue balinesi agli avori cinesi, la collezione dimostra come il tema erotico sia stato affrontato senza particolari inibizioni da quasi tutte le culture tradizionali e spesso proprio nel contesto dell’arte sacra (come simbolo/auspicio/invocazione di fecondità e fertilità).

erotisme-7

erotisme-8

erotisme-9

erotisme-10

erotisme-11

Il secondo punto di interesse è la parte dedicata alla storia e al costume delle case chiuse dalla fine del I secolo al 1946, con fotografie d’epoca, documenti vari e perfino un bidet in porcellana originale (come è noto, questo accessorio da bagno si diffuse proprio nell’ambito della prostituzione).

erotisme-12

erotisme-13

erotisme-14

erotisme-15

erotisme-16

erotisme-17

Infine, ai livelli più alti (il museo si sviluppa su ben sette piani!) vengono ospitate mostre temporanee di artisti internazionali, le cui opere esposte sono in alcuni casi disponibili per l’acquisto.

erotisme-18

erotisme-19

erotisme-21

erotisme-23

erotisme-22

erotisme-20

Ben più dei sexy shop che lo circondano, il Museo rimanda un’immagine dell’eros che un po’ si è andata a perdere nel tempo: attraverso queste varie declinazioni artistiche, raffigurazioni antiche e contemporanee, il desiderio sessuale viene riportato alla sua originaria dimensione mitologica, archetipica e sacra.

erotisme-24

Dall’Eros passiamo a Thanatos, e addentriamoci nei labirinti sotterranei che si snodano sotto le case di Montparnasse.
Nonostante il loro nome ricordi quelle romane, le Catacombe di Parigi erano in realtà le antiche cave da cui veniva estratta la pietra per costruire la città: quando nel 1785 il Cimitero degli Innocenti nel quartiere delle Halles, che era stato in uso per quasi dieci secoli, venne evacuato a causa del pericolo d’infezione, si decise di spostare i resti nelle cave ormai abbandonate. Consacrate nel 1786 come ossario municipale, le Catacombe ospitarono fino al 1814 le salme traslate da tutti i cimiteri della capitale, mano a mano che questi venivano chiusi per insalubrità. Oggi si stima che vi siano raccolte le ossa di circa sei o sette milioni di parigini.

catacombes-1

catacombes-2

catacombes-3

catacombes-4

catacombes-5

catacombes-9

Fermati, qui sta l’impero della morte“, avverte un verso inciso all’entrata dell’ossario.
A venti metri sotto il suolo, sui lati degli stretti corridoi e delle gallerie oscure, sono disposte le une sulle altre migliaia e migliaia di ossa, a formare una scenografia macabra impressionante.

catacombes-10

catacombes-7

catacombes-11

catacombes-12

catacombes-13

catacombes-14

catacombes-15

Talvolta il muro di teschi e tibie si apre su camere più larghe, piccoli altari, croci o altri luoghi di raccoglimento. Lungo tutto il percorso (di ben due chilometri) sono disseminati poemi, aforismi, testi sacri e profani che esortano a meditare sulla propria mortalità.

catacombes-16

catacombes-17

catacombes-18

catacombes-19

catacombes-20

Questi morti accerchiano il visitatore, lo soverchiano in numero schiacciante – è davvero l’Impero della Morte, con le sue armate silenziose, che ci attende quaggiù: eppure, paradossalmente, non ci si può sentire dei veri e propri intrusi in questo mondo senza luce, perché il destino che attende tutti gli uomini accomuna l’ospite a questi resti anonimi. Fra le ossa vi sono, probabilmente, anche quelle di Rabelais, La Fontaine, Perrault, così come i ghigliottinati Danton e Robespierre, eppure nulla ormai li distingue dai loro coetanei. Mai come quaggiù l’égalité del motto nazionale francese assume una sfumatura beffarda e, al tempo stesso, stranamente rassicurante.

catacombes-23

catacombes-21

catacombes-26

catacombes-25

catacombes-27

MUSEE FRAGONARD
7, avenue Général-de-Gaulle
Maisons-Alfort
Apertura: mercoledì e giovedì, sabato e domenica
Orari: 14-18

MUSEE DE L’EROTISME
72 Boulevard de Clichy
Apertura: tutti i giorni
Orari: 10-02
Sito web

CATACOMBES DE PARIS
1, avenue du Colonel Henri Rol-Tanguy (place Denfert-Rochereau)
Apertura: da martedì a domenica
Orari: 10-20
Sito web

(Questo articolo è il primo di una serie dedicata a Parigi. Gli altri due capitoli sono qui e qui.)

Reportage Bizarre

Quest’anno al Festival di Cannes il cinema italiano emergente è stato ben rappresentato da un cortometraggio intitolato Lievito madre, che si è aggiudicato il terzo premio fra i sedici corti presenti nella sezione Cinéfondation, dedicata alle scuole di cinema del mondo. Si tratta del saggio di diploma del giovane regista e fumettista romano Fulvio Risuleo, 23 anni, realizzato all’interno del prestigioso Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia di Roma.

Lievito madre racconta il più classico dei triangoli – lui, lei, l’altro; eppure la vicenda acquista toni fantastici e grotteschi in quanto l'”altro” non è in questo caso umano, bensì fatto di acqua, farina e lievito… e dotato di una sua particolare “vitalità”.

Prima di Lievito madre, Risuleo aveva diretto nel 2013 il cortometraggio Ghigno sardonico, che prende spunto dalle tecniche di ascolto della presunta “voce delle piante” negli anni ’70 (ne avevamo parlato in questo articolo) per arrivare a un violento e comico climax.


Se già questi primi cortometraggi dimostrano uno spiccato gusto per il surrealismo, Fulvio Risuleo conferma la propria idea di cinema con il suo ultimo lavoro, intitolato Reportage Bizarre.

Si tratta di un progetto cinematografico per il web, girato nella più totale indipendenza produttiva e creativa, che si propone di esplorare una Parigi inconsueta e sconosciuta. Reportage Bizarre è composto di 20 diversi video-frammenti che lo spettatore seleziona “alla cieca”: il percorso casuale può inizialmente far sembrare il tutto una sorta di disorganico archivio di found footage, finché non si cominciano a notare alcuni personaggi ed oggetti che ricorrono con frequenza sempre maggiore, costruendo diverse, intriganti linee narrative.
Un misterioso uomo claudicante che compare in diversi punti della città, un investigatore alla ricerca di un assassino, una ragazza con un cerotto blu sulla fronte che si ritrova alla fine di una relazione sentimentale, l’onnipresenza del durian (frutto esotico di cui avevamo parlato qui), strani dinosauri-giocattolo di plastica rosa che spuntano nei momenti più inaspettati, una setta di artisti underground con un’ossessione segreta… a poco a poco si delinea un affresco misterioso e per certi versi lynchiano, in cui Parigi disvela il suo volto simbolico sommerso.

Ecco la nostra intervista a Fulvio Risuleo.

Innanzitutto, com’è andata a Cannes?

I francesi mi hanno accolto bene. È stato bello vedere centinaia di persone alle proiezioni e rispondere alle domande dei curiosi. Cannes è un gran festival perché ha in sé la cultura ufficiale e le ricercatezze di nicchia; il tutto presentato con la stessa importanza e visibilità.

Quale tipo di cinema ti interessa?

A me interessa il cinema con delle idee in grado di mostrare la realtà in maniera diversa. Se per realtà si intende la vita di tutti i giorni. Quando mi capita di pensare una storia, alla fine succede che contiene sempre qualche elemento surreale o strano. Non ci posso fare nulla. Quello che mi sforzo di fare è renderlo più credibile possibile per poter arrivare meglio nella testa dello spettatore.

Puoi parlarci dei tuoi referenti (letterari, artistici, cinematografici)?

Le idee sono alimentate per lo più dal quotidiano. La lingua italiana è piena di elementi figurati che sono miniere di storie. Aprono molto la testa… ecco, per esempio, già la frase “aprono molto la testa” dimostra come un’espressione figurata possa suggerire un’idea splatter. Altre ispirazioni me le danno i mostri, quelli dentro di noi e quelli che ci sono da sempre e vivono liberi nel mondo esterno. In più, tutte le volte che qualcuno mi dice “non sai che mi è successo oggi”, oppure “ma lo sai cosa ho letto ieri”, ecco, tutti i racconti che seguono mi ispirano molto.
Credo che anche Roland Topor ragionasse così, e lui è un artista che stimo e studio.

Da dove nasce il tuo evidente interesse per l’assurdo e il bizzarro? Come lo coltivi?

Ignoro da dove nasca. Quello che so è che spesso con un’idea bizzarra, assurda, si possono affrontare questioni difficili da mostrare realisticamente. Spesso si riesce ad essere anche meno retorici con un’immagine o un suono che appartiene al mondo dell’insolito. Sicuramente è un bel modo per essere universali, perché tutti sognano, tutti hanno fobie, tutti hanno dei feticci. A patto che anche nell’idea più strana si possa trovare intimità e calore.

Come è nata l’idea di Reportage Bizarre? E come sei riuscito a realizzarlo?

Dopo tre anni di Centro Sperimentale di Cinematografia passati a esercitarmi con corti cinematografici professionali, ma dal processo creativo abbastanza lento, volevo fare qualcosa di completamente diverso. Tanti motivi mi attiravano verso Parigi, molti dei quali inconsci. L’idea era quello di fare un reportage mostrando le miei sensazioni in quella città che conoscevo solo per il riflesso della sua fama. Per poco più di un mese ho vagato a caso per i quartieri, tanta gente mi ha aiutato consigliandomi le cose più strane da vedere. Ho trattato questo progetto come un taccuino di appunti filmati, esplorando Parigi come fosse un paese esotico. Atmosfere, idee a cuore aperto, pezzi di film, scene scartate e visioni varie. Poi tornato a Roma un gruppo di fidati collaboratori mi ha aiutato a dare una forma a tutto ciò.

Questo progetto, libero e sperimentale come solo un lavoro indipendente si può permettere d’essere, mostra insieme ai tuoi due corti una linea definita, un progetto ben preciso – insomma, una tua “missione” cinematografica e artistica.

Personalmente mi interessa continuare una ricerca sul linguaggio e sui diversi modi per narrare. Ma mi interessa anche che qualcosa possa cambiare in un futuro prossimo nel nostro paese. Mi piacerebbe contribuire a far ritornare il fermento in Italia. Questo, al di là di essere un momento di crisi economico, è un momento di crisi degli umani: i registi, i produttori e tanti artisti in generale sono diventati egoisti, poco interessati alla ricerca di strade meno facili, e soprattutto poco curiosi. Personalmente non mi riesce di stare fermo, e certe volte è proprio una dannazione.

Cattura2

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Reportage Bizarre.
Fulvio Risuleo, in qualità di illustratore, ha partecipato anche al progetto Parade, che ho prefazionato.

Cafés maudits

La bohème dei decadentisti esercita ancora su di noi un fascino irresistibile. Nell’immaginario moderno, gli eccessi dei poeti maledetti sono indissolubilmente associati a Montmartre, ai café-concert nei quali Rimbaud, Verlaine, Baudelaire, Musset e compagnia bella si perdevano nel florilegio di visioni sbocciate dal loro assenzio. Pochi anni più tardi, durante la Belle Époque, Parigi era un ribollire di mode, tendenze e stimoli artistici diversi: il Novecento si annunciava ottimisticamente come un secolo di progresso, di pace e di benessere, il cinema e la radio erano appena nati, perfino la morale stava cambiando e la zona dei divertimenti notturni “proibiti”, attorno a Pigalle, conosceva il suo apogeo.

A Pigalle non c’erano soltanto il cabaret con i suoi can-can e le prostitute. All’epoca sorgevano come funghi piccoli locali “a tema”, i cui esercenti facevano a gara per attirare il pubblico superandosi l’un l’altro in fantasia e bizzarrie. C’erano cabaret di ispirazione medievale, caffè lillipuziani, oppure ambientati nei fondali marini, e via dicendo – oltre ovviamente al Grand Guignol (di cui abbiamo parlato qui).

Fra i locali più incredibili spiccavano tre piccoli caffè, fondati alla fine dell’Ottocento e gestiti da un unico proprietario, che promettevano meraviglie già dal nome: il Cabaret de l’Enfer, il Cabaret du Ciel e il Cabaret du Néant.

Il Cabaret “dell’Inferno” e quello “del Cielo” erano situati sul Boulevard de Clichy accanto all’Hotel de Place Blanche, e già a vederli dalla strada si proponevano come locali gemelli, o per meglio dire speculari.


Si poteva scegliere di rilassarsi nell’angelica atmosfera del Paradiso, dove si veniva accolti da camerieri travestiti da cherubini, con tanto di ali e parrucca bionda. Nella grande sala, simile all’interno di una cattedrale gotica e allietata dalla musica di un organo, si sorseggiava il liquore dalla “sacra coppa”; cominciavano poi vari spettacoli e pantomime che sbeffeggiavano la liturgia cristiana, balletti celestiali piuttosto “discinti”, esibizioni di cori angelici.


Alla fine di questi spettacoli, un attore che impersonava San Pietro apriva con la sua enorme chiave la porta che conduceva alla seconda sala, una sorta di grotta dorata dalle cui stalattiti pendevano statuine di angeli e altri arredi sacri. Qui un ultimo numero di varietà concludeva la serata.


Ma molti preferivano entrare attraverso le enormi fauci che portavano dritti al regno di Satana. Qui erano i diavoli a dare il benvenuto all’avventore, e a scagliarlo in una sorta di pacchiana e impressionante raffigurazione di un girone infernale.

Le pareti della cupa e oscura grotta erano ricoperte da una babele di altorilievi raffiguranti la dannazione eterna delle anime peccatrici e dei tormenti che i demoni infliggevano loro. Mani artigliate, piedi, volti contorti dall’agonia sporgevano dalle pareti proprio sopra i tavolini dove il pubblico si fermava a bere. Anche qui venivano messe in scena delle rappresentazioni grottesche: un dannato veniva cotto da alcuni diavoli in un grande calderone, e altre attrazioni prevedevano differenti e crudeli supplizi.


Seguendo la stessa falsariga, verso la fine della serata si veniva invitati ad entrare nella seconda sala, l'”Antro di Satana”, in cui si assisteva ad un ultimo spettacolo in cui Mephisto torturava alcuni peccatori, sempre in maniera esagerata e goliardica.


Il Cabaret du Néant (“Cabaret del Nulla”) stava poco distante dagli altri due, e oltre ad essere il locale più antico fu anche quello che godette di maggior fama, tanto da inaugurare per breve tempo una succursale anche a New York.


Dopo aver pagato l’ingresso e ricevuto il gettone, l’avventore veniva introdotto nella buia sala “dell’intossicazione” da camerieri incipriati di bianco e vestiti come becchini. Qui tutto l’arredamento rimandava alla morte: bare al posto dei tavoli, pareti tappezzate di aforismi sul Tristo Mietitore, un lampadario costruito con vere ossa umane e teschi appesi ai muri. Una volta accomodatisi ad una bara, il cameriere accendeva il cero funebre e prendeva le ordinazioni: i drink offerti dal menu portavano i nomi dei più celebri bacilli, germi mortiferi e morbi incurabili. L’ospite, così, sceglieva “di che morte morire” e ordinava la dipartita a lui più congeniale.


Dopo aver bevuto il pubblico veniva fatto spostare nella cameretta sul retro, la Grotta dei Trapassati. Mentre un monaco suonava un organo, un volontario veniva fatto entrare in una bara, avvolto in un sudario e infine “trasformato” di fronte agli occhi degli avventori in uno scheletro (mediante l’effetto Pepper’s Ghost di cui abbiamo già parlato in questo articolo).


Il Cabaret de l’Enfer e quello du Ciel rimasero in piedi fino agli anni ’50, prima di essere smantellati; il Cabaret du Néant venne chiuso un po’ più tardi, all’inizio degli anni ’60.

Per questo articolo dobbiamo ringraziare uno dei nostri blog preferiti di sempre: La Rocaille, colto e curatissimo spazio dedicato alla decadenza, al kitsch e all’arte in generale (moda, architettura, design, iconografia, ecc.). Tutte le fotografie e gran parte delle info provengono da lì. Grazie, Annalisa!