Crucifixion workshop

I see before me crosses not all alike,
but differently made by different peoples:
some hang a man head downwards
,
some force a stick upwards through his groin,
some stretch out his arms on a forked gibbet.
I see cords, scourges,
and instruments of torture for each limb and each joint:
but I see Death also.
(Seneca, Consolatio ad Marciam, translated by Aubrey Stewart)

Vittore_Carpaccio_066

Easter is coming and, like every year, on Good Friday the believers will commemorate the Passion of Jesus, nailed to the wood on the Golgotha. Are we really sure that the traditional representation of Christ on the cross is realistic? After all, also in the endless variations of the punishment’s scene that art history has been producing for many centuries, there always seem to be some discrepancies: sometimes the nails are driven through the Redeemer’s hands and feet, sometimes through his wrists. This confusion goes back a long time ago, to the early, rough translations of the Gospel of John in which the Greek word for “limb” was misinterpreted as “hand“.

How exactly did the crucifixion take place? And what caused the death of the condemned person?
Both historian and scientists have tried to answer these questions.

Giotto,_Lower_Church_Assisi,_Crucifixion_01

Coeval sources lead to the assumption that the word “crucifixion” in Latin and Greek referred to different methods of execution, such as the impalement and the tying on a simple tree, and most likely these methods varied according to time and place.
The only thing we know for sure is that it was the most humiliating, long and painful punishment provided for by the judicial system at that time (at least in the Mediterranean Basin). Cicero himself defined it as “
the most cruel and sombre of all punishments“: the sufferings of the condemned person, hanged naked and exposed to public ridicule, were prolonged as much as possible by means of drugged drinks (myrrh and wine) or mixtures of water and vinegar which served to quench one’s thirst, stanch bleeding, revive and so on.
In rare cases death was accelerated. This happened to keep law and order, because some friend or relative of the condemned person had intervened, or according to specific local customs: the two methods most frequently used to put an end to the pain of the crucified were the spear thrust to the heart, that Jesus himself is traditionally believed to have received, and the so-called
crucifragium, namely the fracture of the legs by means of hammers or sticks, in order to take every support away from the condemned person, who choked because of the hyperextension of the ribcage.

Listener

Three kinds of crosses were used by Romans for judicial punishments at the time of Jesus: the crux decussata, or St Andrew’s cross, consisted of two stakes fastened to form a X; the crux commissa, with stakes forming a T-shape; the crux immissa, the most famous cross, in which the horizontal beam (patibulum) was placed at two-thirds of the length of the vertical one (stipes). This arrangement allowed to put up the so-called titulus, a notice including the personal details of the condemned person, the charge and the sentence.

Alcuni-aspetti-storici-della-crocifissione-romana

Another rather ascertained detail was the presence of a support half-way of the stipes, that was called sedile in Latin. It offered a support to the body of the condemned person, so that he/she could carry its weight without collapsing, thus preventing her/him from dying too fast. From sedile is apparently derived the phrase “to sit on the cross”. More complicated was the use of the suppedaneum, the support which the feet were nailed to and maybe rested on, often represented in paintings of the crucifixion but never mentioned in ancient manuscripts.

Listener-1

Although we now know many details about the cross itself, the methods of fastening were debated for a long time. The only skeleton ever found of a person condemned to crucifixion (discovered in 1968 around Jerusalem) had fractured legs and a nail into the outside of the ankle, which suggests that the feet were tied to the sides of the cross. But this doesn’t resolve the doubts that for many centuries have been tormenting theologians and believers. Where were the nails exactly driven? Through the hands or the wrists? Were the feet nailed to the front or to the sides of the stipes? Were the legs upright or bent at the knee?

6000567_orig

5543308_orig

It may seem strange but this matter was long debated also in the field of science, especially towards the end of the nineteenth century. Medical researchers could rely on a continuous supplying of corpses, and amputated arms and legs, to sieve different hypothesis.

The theory that the nails were driven through the wrists, precisely between carpus and radius, had the advantage that this method probably allowed to slice the thumb’s median nerve and long flexor tendon, but without affecting arteries nor fracturing bones. On the other side, the idea that the Redeemer had been nailed through the wrists was considered – if not exactly heretic – at least risky by a part of Christian scientists: it certainly meant to disprove most of the traditional representations, but there was much more at stake. The actual theological issue concerned the stigmata. If Jesus had been nailed through the wrists, how could we explain the wounds that invariably appeared on the palms of people in the odour of sanctity? Maybe Our Lord Himself (that used to inflict stigmata as a punishment, but also as a sign of blissfulness) didn’t know where the nails had been driven? To accept the wrists theory meant to admit that the stigmatized person had been more or less unconsciously influenced by a wrong iconography, and that the origin of the sores was anything but ultramundane…

In order to repress these ignominious assumptions, around 1900, Marie Louis Adolphe Donnadieu, professor at the Catholic Faculty of Sciences in Lyon, decided to try once and for all a true crucifixion. He nailed a corpse to a wooden board, and even by a single hand.

.

donnadieu

According to professor Donnadieu, the cruel photograph of the dead hanging by an arm, published in his Le Saint Suaire de Turin devant la Science (1904), undoubtedly proved that Jesus’ hands could support his body on the cross. The other scientists should recant their theories once and for all; Donnadieu’s only regret was not a moral one, but concerned the fact that “the light in the photograph didn’t offer the best aesthetic conditions“.

Unfortunately his dramatic demonstration didn’t silence opponents, not even in the ranks of the Catholic. Thirty years later doctor Pierre Barbet, first surgeon at the Paris Saint Joseph Hospital, criticized Donnadieu’s experiment in his text La passion de Jésus Christ selon le chirurgien (1936): “The picture shows a pathetic body, small, bony and emaciated. […] The corpse that I had crucified, instead […] was absolutely fresh and fleshy“. In fact, also Barbet had started to nail corpses, but in a more serious and programmatic way than Donnadieu.

 

image017-695x602

The meticulous research of Pierre Barbet undoubtedly includes him among the pioneers (they were few, to be pedantic) of medical studies about the Crucifixion, concerning in particular the wounds that marked the Shroud of Turin. Barbet came to the conclusion that the man represented on the Shroud had been nailed through the wrists and not the palms; that in the Shroud’s mark the thumb was missing because the median nerve had been cut off by the nail; that the man of the Shroud died of suffocation, when legs and arms were no more capable of supporting him.

8240982_orig

The last hypothesis, that was considered as the most reliable for many decades, was disproven by the last great expert in crucifixion, the famous American forensic pathologist and anthropologist Frederick Zugibe. He mainly studied between the end of the 1990s and the beginning of the 2000s. He didn’t have corpses to nail in his garage (as you can imagine, the vogue for crucifying corpses in order to investigate this kind of questions had definitely died out) and he carried out his researches thanks to a team of volunteers. Incidentally, to find these volunteers was easier than expected, because the members of a Christian congregation near his home queued up to play the role of the Saviour.
Zugibe built a handmade cross on which he tied his test subjects, constantly measuring their body functions – pressure, heartbeat, respiration, etcetera. He concluded that Jesus didn’t die of asphyxia, but of traumatic shock and hypovolemia.

zugibe

SV8-1

To complete the picture, other scholars assumed different causes of death for a crucified person: heart attack, acidosis, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, but also infections, dehydration, wounds caused by animals, or a combination of these factors. Whatever the ultimate cause, there was clearly only one way to get down off the cross.

Regarding the notorious nails and their entry wound, Zugibe believed that the upper part of the palm was perfectly capable to support the weight of the body, without causing bone fractures. He proved his theorem many times in the course of some dissections in the laboratory.

 

zugibe6

zugibe7

Then, after dozens of years, “an unbelievable and unexpected event, extremely meaningful, took place in the coroner’s office, confirming the existence of this passage [inside the hand]. A young woman had been brutally stabbed on her entire body. I found a defence wound on her hand, because she had raised it in the attempt to protect her face from the ferocious aggression. The examination of this wound on the hand proved that […] the blade had crossed the “Z” area and the point had gone out on the back of the wrist exactly as can be seen on the Shroud. A radiography of the area proved that there were no fractures at all!“.

zugibe8

The fact that a pathologist gets excited to the point of using an exclamation mark, during a murder victim autopsy, while thinking about the correlations between a stab, the Shroud of Turin and the crucifixion of Jesus Christ… well, this is not surprising in the slightest. After all, at stake here are a thousand years of religious imagery.

Croce1

The English new edition of the text by Pierre Barbet is A Doctor at Calvary. The conclusions of Zugibe are summed up in his essay Pierre Barbet Revisited, that can be consulted online.

Il boia maldestro

Londra, durante i circa trent’anni della Restaurazione (1660-1688), era una città in preda alla violenza, immersa in un clima di paranoia e terrore. Oltre ai “classici” crimini come furti, rapine, omicidi e via dicendo, si rischiava anche di venire denunciati come cattolici, o peggio ancora nemici della corona: i processi, religiosi e politici, colpivano chi non era devotamente aderente all’ortodossia anglicana, così come chi aveva avversato il ritorno di Re Carlo II. E la pena capitale era inflitta con inquietante leggerezza, soprattutto durante le famigerate “assise sanguinose” nel 1685, presiedute dal temibile giudice Jeffreys che mandò al patibolo quasi 300 uomini senza battere ciglio.

Dal 1666 al 1678, il più celebre fra i boia era certamente Jack Ketch. Forse di origini irlandesi, la sua data di nascita non si conosce, né si sa quale mestiere svolgesse prima di diventare carnefice della corona. Molto spesso gli aguzzini avevano una carriera di macellaio alle spalle, e in effetti Ketch mostrava una certa dimestichezza nello squartare i cadaveri dei condannati.


All’epoca, infatti, la pena più severa fra tutte era riservata agli accusati di alto tradimento, e veniva denominata hanged, drawn and quartered: il condannato veniva legato a un’asse e trascinato da un cavallo fino alla pubblica piazza; qui, veniva completamente denudato e legato ad una scala in legno. (Per legge, le donne accusate del medesimo crimine andavano a questo punto arse vive – perché denudarle pubblicamente avrebbe offeso il comune pudore…).
Il collo veniva assicurato ad uno dei pioli della scala con una corda stretta a nodo corto, in modo da soffocare il suppliziato ma senza ucciderlo. Gli venivano tagliati pene e testicoli, e gettati in un braciere; ancora vivo, il condannato veniva poi sbudellato, e le sue viscere erano estratte dal boia che le bruciava di fronte ai suoi occhi. Infine si procedeva a decapitare il condannato, e a squartarne il corpo in quattro parti.


Ma non era finita qui: i resti del giustiziato dovevano essere esposti in vari punti strategici di Londra, come ad esempio lungo il London Bridge o a Temple Bar, affinché servissero da monito. Ecco che Ketch procedeva quindi, nelle segrete della prigione di Newgate, chiamate appropriatamente Jack Ketch’s Kitchen, a bollire i “quarti” dei condannati. Nel 1661 un visitatore di nome Ellwood descrisse quanto vide, come in una scena di un moderno film horror: “teste venivano portate per essere bollite, dentro a sporchi cesti di vimini, e i boia compiaciuti e beffardi le canzonavano”. Le teste venivano gettate nelle pentole e bollite nella canfora per prevenire la putrefazione, prima di essere esposte nei luoghi di maggior passaggio.


Ketch dovette occuparsi di diversi condannati a questo tipo di supplizio, perché quando Carlo II cominciò la restaurazione vennero mandati a morte tutti i regicidi (responsabili di aver firmato la condanna di Carlo I) che erano ancora in vita. Ma la maggior parte dei suoi servigi riguardavano le “semplici” impiccagioni, nelle quali eccelleva.

Purtroppo per lui, un punto debole Ketch ce l’aveva. Per quanto fosse a suo agio con cappi e coltelli, non sapeva proprio maneggiare l’ascia. A sua discolpa, c’è da dire che le decapitazioni erano relativamente rare e riservate ai nobili; fino a pochi anni prima, si faceva addirittura arrivare un boia dal Continente, esperto nell’utilizzo dell’ascia. Fatto sta che Ketch (a causa di tagli nel budget giudiziario?) si prese carico anche di quest’arte in cui non aveva alcuna esperienza, e che avrebbe macchiato per sempre il suo buon nome.

Il primo grosso scandalo che riguardò il boia fu l’esecuzione di Lord Russell nel 1683. Secondo la legge, il nobiluomo andava decapitato con un solo fendente, e una volta sul patibolo Lord Russell pagò, com’era d’uso a quel tempo, una bella somma a Ketch affinché svolgesse il suo lavoro in maniera decisa e pulita.
Mai soldi furono spesi peggio.

Secondo alcuni, il boia esagerava spesso con l’alcol – abitudine che, come si sa, non aiuta la mira. Fatto sta che Ketch sollevò la mannaia, ma il colpo che si abbattè sul condannato ferì il collo senza staccare la testa; la seconda stoccata ancora una volta non bastò. Lord Russell era ancora vivo, fra spruzzi di sangue e urla disumane. Un altro paio di colpi, e finalmente la lama fece rotolare via la testa di Lord Russell. Quell’infinita agonia fu talmente straziante da impressionare perfino le folle abituate al sangue, che seguivano avidamente e con regolarità le esecuzioni. Ketch fu costretto a pubblicare un opuscolo intitolato Apologie, in cui si scusava per la barbarie dello spettacolo, adducendo come attenuante il fatto che Lord Russell aveva sbagliato a “posizionarsi nel modo corretto” sui ceppi.

Due anni dopo, venne il turno di James Scott, primo Duca di Monmouth, anch’egli condannato alla decapitazione. Il Duca rifiutò il cappuccio o qualsiasi altro trattamento di favore, e una volta sul patibolo allungò la solita, profumata mancia a Ketch. Le sue ultime parole furono: “Non servitemi come avete fatto con Lord Russell. Ho sentito che l’avete colpito tre o quattro volte…”


Questa volta, se possibile, andò ancora peggio. Il primo fendente colpì addirittura la spalla del povero Duca; il secondo e il terzo non fecero che aprire nuove ferite non fatali. Fra i fischi della folla, Ketch depose l’ascia, deciso a lasciar perdere: lo fecero risalire sul patibolo a completare il lavoro. Ci vollero dai cinque agli otto colpi prima che il condannato finisse di soffrire. La gente era talmente inferocita che, se non ci fossero state le guardie a proteggerlo mentre si allontanava, Ketch sarebbe stato linciato sul posto.


Un anno dopo, nel 1686, Ketch fu incarcerato per resistenza ad un ufficiale; il suo assistente, Paskah Rose, prese il suo posto ma venne arrestato dopo appena quattro mesi, per rapina. Una volta uscito di prigione, Ketch riprese la sua carica, e ricominciò proprio dall’impiccagione del suo assistente a Tyburn. Verso la fine dello stesso anno, Jack Ketch morì.


A quanto si dice, Ketch fu un personaggio davvero spiacevole, costantemente ubriaco, ossessivamente avido di denaro, sempre pronto a lamentarsi del proprio compenso e a rivendere i vestiti dei condannati più nobili. Eppure, a causa delle sue ultime, maldestre performance, la figura di Ketch si guadagnò inaspettatamente un posto di rilievo nell’immaginario popolare: protagonista di ballate, poemi, pamphlet, citato da scrittori del calibro di Dickens, divenne il classico spauracchio per minacciare i bambini indisciplinati. E, grazie al tipico black humor inglese, entrò a far parte dei teatri di burattini della tradizione di Punch & Judy: in questi spettacoli, spesso il “boia pasticcione” viene ingannato e finisce immancabilmente per impiccarsi da solo.

Arte criminologica

Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Pee Gee Daniel

Accade spesso che per il raggiungimento di mete stupefacenti la via che vi ci conduce si presenti impervia.

Anche in questo caso, al termine di un percorso accidentato, tra gli inestricabili paesini del cuore della Lomellina, sfrecciando lungo sottili assi viari a prova di ammortizzatore, si giunge finalmente a un prodigioso sancta sanctorum per gli amanti del macabro, dell’insolito e del curioso, nascosto – come sempre si conviene a un vero tesoro – nell’ampio soppalco di una grande cascina bianca, dispersa tra le campagne.

1

Là sopra vi attendono, beffardamente occhieggianti dalle loro teche collocate in un ordine rapsodico ma di indubbio impatto, teste sotto formalina galleggianti in barattoli di vetro, mani mozze, corpi mummificati, arti pietrificati, crani di gemelli dicefali, barattoli di larve di sarcophaga carnaria, cadaveri adagiati dentro bare in noce, un austero mezzobusto della Cianciulli (la celeberrima “Saponificatrice di Correggio”), pezzi rari come alcuni documenti olografi di Cesare Lombroso, parti anatomiche provenienti da vecchi gabinetti medici, armi del delitto, strumenti di tortura o per elettroshock in uso in un recente passato, memento di pellagrosi e briganti, tsantsa umane e di scimmia prodotte dalla tribù ecuadoriana dei Jivaros, bambolotti voodoo, cimeli risalenti a efferati fatti di cronaca nostrana.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Creatore e gestore di questa casa-museo del crimine è il facondo Roberto Paparella. Sarà lui a introdurvi e accompagnarvi per le varie installazioni con la giusta dose di erudizione e intrattenimento: un po’ chaperon, un po’ cicerone e un po’ Virgilio dantesco.

Diplomato in arte e restauro (la parte inferiore dell’edificio è infatti occupata da mobilio in attesa di recupero) e criminologo, il Paparella ha saputo combinare questi due aspetti dando vita a una disciplina ibrida che ha voluto battezzare “arte criminologica”, cui è improntata l’intera mostra permanente che ho avuto il piacere di visitare in quel di Olevano. Poiché c’è innanzitutto da dire che non di mero collezionismo si tratta: molti dei pezzi che vi troviamo sono cioè manufatti e ricostruzioni iperrealistiche composti ad hoc dalla sapienza tecnica del nostro, cosicché i reperti storici e i “falsi d’autore” si mescolano e si confondono in maniera pressoché indistinguibile, giocando sul significato più ampio del termine “originale”.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2718

DSCN2709

My beautiful picture

È forse utile spiegare che il museo è ospitato all’interno di una comunità terapeutica. Roberto Paparella infatti, oltre a essere un artista del lugubre, un restauratore, un ricercatore scrupoloso nel campo criminologico e un tabagista imbattibile, è anche stato il più giovane direttore di una comunità per tossicodipendenti in Italia (autore insieme al giurista Guido Pisapia, fratello dell’attuale sindaco di Milano, di un testo per operatori del settore), mentre oggi si occupa di ragazzi usciti dall’istituto penale minorile. Proprio questo, mi ha rivelato, è stato uno dei principali sproni alla sua vera passione: ripercorrere quotidianamente i vari iter giudiziari e la teoria giuridica di delitti e pene in compagnia dei suoi ragazzi ha fatto rinascere in lui questo interesse per delinquenti, vittime, atti omicidiari e “souvenir” a essi connessi.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Una vocazione riaffiorata dal passato, visto che il primo a instillare in lui questo gusto grandguignolesco fu in effetti il padre che, dopo aver visitato il museo delle cere di Milano, aveva deciso di farsene uno in proprio, nello scantinato di casa sua, che aveva poi chiamato La taverna rossa e nel quale amava condurre famigliari e amici nel tentativo di impressionarli con le ricostruzioni di famosi assassini, seppure di produzione casalinga e un po’ naif.
La tradizione familiare peraltro prosegue, visto che i due figli di Paparella, cresciuti tra cadaveri dissezionati più o meno posticci, tengono a fornire spontaneamente i propri pareri in merito alla attendibilità di questa o quella riproduzione artigianale di cui il padre è autore.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2725

Per quanto riguarda la “falsificazione” anatomica di salme o parti di esse, è una cura certosina quella che viene impiegata, avvalendosi di uno studio filologico, di un’attenta scelta dei materiali, di una efficace disposizione scenografica dei corpi stessi e delle luci che ne esalteranno le forme. Come nel caso di Elisa Claps, i cui resti Paparella ha rielaborato ricoprendo uno scheletro in resina con uno speciale ritrovato indiano noto come cartapelle, capace di ricreare l’effetto di un tegumento incartapecorito dalla lunga esposizione agli elementi atmosferici, e infine decorato con altri componenti di provenienza umana (l’apparato dentario è fornito da alcuni studi odontoiatrici, mentre i capelli vengono recuperati da vecchie parrucche di capelli veri, scovate nei mercatini).
Paparella afferma che nel suo operato si cela anche una motivazione morale: la volontà di ridare una consistenza tridimensionale alle vittime come ai carnefici, nella speranza di muovere dentro allo spettatore quelli che potremmo individuare come i due momenti aristotelici della pietà e del terrore.

Continuando la visita, incontriamo il corpo del cosiddetto Vampiro della Bergamasca, già esaminato a suo tempo dal Lombroso, alle cui misurazioni antropometriche lo scultore si è attenuto fedelmente: per la cronaca, Vincenzo Verzeni era un serial killer o, secondo la terminologia clinica del tempo, un «monomaniaco omicida necrofilomane, antropofago, affetto da vampirismo», che provava una frenesia erotica nello strappare coi denti larghi brani di carne alle proprie vittime.

Accanto, ecco lo scheletro di un morto di mafia, con sasso in bocca e mani amputate, che emerge faticosamente dalla terra mentre, sull’altro lato, in una posizione rattrappita, una mummia azteca lancia al visitatore una versione parodistica dell’Urlo di Munch. Alle sue spalle, addossata all’estesa parete, un’intera schiera di calchi delle teste di alienati e criminali ci osserva in maniera inquietante, a breve distanza dai calchi dei genitali di stupratori e di pazienti affette dal terribile tribadismo.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Si prosegue lungo una parete tappezzata di scatti ANSA di celebri processi del secondo dopoguerra, finché – in un accostamento emblematico dello stile di questo stravagante museo – poggiato su una lapide di candido marmo, ci si imbatte in un set anti-vampiri completo, con tanto di teschio, altarino portatile, barattolo contenente terra consacrata, chiodone in ferro in luogo dell’abusato paletto di frassino, argilla, paramenti ecclesiastici vari, pipistrelli essiccati, breviario e crocefisso a portar via, il tutto serbato in uno scrigno ligneo di pregevole fattura.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Ritornati all’entrata, al momento del commiato, troverete a salutarvi il manichino animato di Antonio Boggia, pluriomicida della Milano ottocentesca. A qualche passo dall’automa, l’occhio cade su una pesante mannaia in ferro, usata dallo stesso Boggia per le sue esecuzioni. Vera o falsa? Non sta a noi rivelarvelo. Se vi va, andando alla mostra (che vi si offrirà ben più particolareggiata di questo mio stringato resoconto) portatevi in tasca il giusto quantitativo di carbonio 14, oppure, più semplicemente, godetevi lo spettacolo senza porvi troppe domande.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture
Museo di Arte Criminologica
, via Cascina Bianca 1, 27020 Olevano di Lomellina (PV)
È necessario prenotare: tel. 3333639136 tel./fax 038451311 email: [email protected]

Bloody Murders

johnson20-cvr-0001-0

Quando state entrando ad un concerto, o a uno spettacolo teatrale, vi viene consegnato il programma della serata. Una cosa simile accadeva, in Inghilterra, anche per un tipo particolare di spettacolo pubblico: le esecuzioni capitali.

tumblr_mcryzmX2HS1rn6z3jo1_500
Nel XVIII e XIX Secolo, infatti, alcune stamperie e case editrici inglesi si erano specializzate in un particolare prodotto letterario. Venivano generalmente chiamati Last Dying Speeches (“ultime parole in punto di morte”) o Bloody Murders (“sanguinosi omicidi”), ed erano dei fogli stampati su un verso solo, di circa 50×36 cm di grandezza. Venivano venduti per strada, per un penny o anche meno, nei giorni precedenti un’esecuzione annunciata; quando arrivava il gran giorno, veniva preparata spesso un’edizione speciale per le folle che si assiepavano attorno al patibolo.

execution-of-wm-corder

008090564_439_height

dying-speeches
Sull’unica facciata stampata si potevano trovare tutti i dettagli più scabrosi del crimine commesso, magari un resoconto del processo, e anche delle accattivanti illustrazioni (un ritratto del condannato, o del suo misfatto, ecc.). Usualmente il testo si concludeva con un piccolo brano in versi, spacciato per “le ultime parole” del condannato, che ammoniva i lettori a non seguire questo funesto esempio se volevano evitare una fine simile.

4787793

4787751

4788099

4787939
La vita di questi foglietti non si esauriva nemmeno con la morte del condannato, perché nei giorni successivi all’esecuzione ne veniva stampata spesso anche una versione aggiornata con le ultime parole pronunciate dal condannato – vere, stavolta -, il racconto del suo dying behaviour (“comportamento durante la morte”) o altre succulente novità del genere.

broadside-detail

2180084755_b2f4e78eb8

4788820
I Bloody Murders erano un ottimo business, appannaggio di poche stamperie di Londra e delle maggiori città inglesi: costavano poco, erano semplici e veloci da preparare, e alcune incisioni (ad esempio la figura di un impiccato in controluce) potevano essere riutilizzate di volta in volta. Il successo però dipendeva dalla tempestività con cui questi volantini venivano fatti circolare.

4787919

4787749

4787747

4787893
Questi foglietti erano pensati per un target preciso, le classi medie e basse, e facevano leva sulla curiosità morbosa e sui toni iperbolici per attirare i loro lettori. Era un tipo di letteratura che anche le famiglie più povere potevano permettersi; e possiamo immaginarle, raccolte attorno al tavolo dopo cena, mentre chi tra loro sapeva leggere raccontava ad alta voce, per il brivido e il diletto di tutti, quelle violente e torbide vicende.

4787678
La Harvard Law School Library è riuscita a collezionare più di 500 di questi rarissimi manifesti, li ha digitalizzati e messi online. Consultabili gratuitamente, possono essere ricercati secondo diversi parametri (per crimine, anno, città, parole chiave, ecc.) sul sito del Crime Broadsides Project.

Il Museo Criminologico di Roma

2013-01-03 11.01.00

Nella seconda metà dell’800, in Europa e in Italia, divenne sempre più evidente la necessità di una riforma carceraria; allo stesso tempo, e grazie agli intensi dibattiti sulla questione, crebbe l’interesse per lo studi delle cause della delinquenza, e dei possibili metodi per curarla. Mentre quindi la Polizia Scientifica muoveva i primi passi, il grande criminologo Cesare Lombroso studiava le possibili correlazioni fra la morfologia fisica e l’attitudine al delitto, e grazie a lui prendeva vita il primo, grande museo di antropologia criminale a Torino.

A Roma, invece, si dovette aspettare fino al 1931 perché potesse aprire al pubblico il “Museo Criminale”, che ospitava la collezione di reperti utilizzati precedentemente per gli studi della scuola di Polizia scientifica. Il Museo ebbe poi fasi e fortune alterne, tanto da venire chiuso nel 1968, e riaperto solo nel 1975 con la nuova denominazione “MUCRI – Museo criminologico”. La nuova sede, all’interno delle carceri del palazzo del Gonfalone, è quella in cui il Museo si trova ancora oggi. Dalla fine degli anni ’70 il museo è stato nuovamente chiuso per quasi vent’anni, per riaprire al pubblico nel 1994.

Il Museo oggi conta centinaia di reperti, divisi in tre grandi sezioni: la Giustizia dal Medioevo al XIX secolo, l’Ottocento e l’evoluzione del sistema penitenziario, il Novecento e i protagonisti del crimine.

2013-01-03 10.41.38

2013-01-03 10.49.54

2013-01-03 10.51.53
La prima sezione, che ripercorre i metodi di punizione e di tortura in uso dal Medioevo fino al XIX secolo, è ovviamente la più impressionante. Dalle asce per decapitazione cinquecentesche, alle gogne, ai banchi di fustigazione, alle mordacchie, agli strumenti di tortura dell’Inquisizione, tutto ci parla di un’epoca in cui la crudeltà delle pene eguagliava, se non addirittura superava, quella del crimine stesso. Fra gli oggetti esposti segnaliamo la tonaca del celebre boia pontificio Mastro Titta, la spada che decapitò Beatrice Cenci, una forca e tre ghigliottine (fra cui quella in uso a Piazza del Popolo fino al 1869).

517507417_db6b739f85_z

2013-01-03 10.52.41

2013-01-03 10.52.26

2013-01-03 10.47.10
Nella seconda sezione, dedicata all’Ottocento, troviamo traccia della nascita dell’antropologia criminale, e dell’evoluzione del sistema carcerario. Possiamo vedere il calco del cranio del brigante Giuseppe Villella (su cui Lombroso scoprì nel 1872 la “prova” della delinquenza atavica: la “fossetta occipitale mediana”); lo spazio dedicato agli attentati politici espone, tra l’altro, il cranio, il cervello e gli scritti dell’anarchico lucano Giovanni Passannante, che attentò alla vita del re Umberto I a Napoli, nel 1878. Ugualmente impressionanti il letto di contenzione e le camicie di forza che testimoniano la nascita dei manicomi criminali.

giovannipassannante_cervello

7165628283_224f9178e4_c

2013-01-03 11.03.08

2013-01-03 11.02.55

2013-01-03 10.57.08

2013-01-03 10.56.39

2013-01-03 11.00.33

2013-01-03 11.02.23
Ma forse la parte più sorprendente è quella delle cosiddette “malizie carcerarie”, ovvero i sotterfugi con cui i detenuti comunicavano tra di loro, occultavano armi o inventavano sistemi per evadere o compiere atti di autolesionismo. Un’estrema inventiva che si tinge di toni tristi e spesso macabri.

7165624283_d429147e2e_c
L’ultima sezione, quella dedicata ai grandi episodi di cronaca nera del Novecento, è una vera e propria wunderkammer del crimine, dove decine e decine di oggetti e reperti sono esposti in un percorso eterogeneo che spazia dagli anni ’30 agli anni ’90. Una stanza ospita armi e indizi trovati sulla scena dei delitti italiani fra i più celebri, come ad esempio quelli perpetrati da Leonarda Cianciulli, la “saponificatrice di Correggio”; tra gli altri, sono esibiti gli oggetti personali di Antonietta Longo, la “decapitata di Castelgandolfo”, le armi della banda Casaroli, la pistola con cui la contessa Bellentani uccise il suo amante durante una sfarzosa serata di gala. Vi si trovano anche materiali pornografici sequestrati (quando erano ancora illegali), ed esempi di merce di contrabbando, inclusi numerosi quadri ed opere d’arte.

7350834806_d8df25bcfb_c

2013-01-03 11.07.17

2013-01-03 11.10.56

2013-01-03 11.04.53
Altre vetrine interessanti ripercorrono le testimonianze relative alla criminalità organizzata, al banditismo (con oggetti appartenuti a Salvatore Giuliano), al terrorismo, e a tutte le declinazioni possibili del crimine (furti, falsi, giochi d’azzardo, ecc.). Nella sezione dedicata allo spionaggio si può ammirare uno splendido e curioso baule dentro il quale fu rinvenuto, dopo un rocambolesco inseguimento, un piccolo ometto seduto su un seggiolino, legato con le cinghie e avvolto da coperte e cuscini. Si trattava di una spia che cercava di imbarcarsi clandestinamente all’aeroporto di Fiumicino.

2013-01-03 11.15.06

2013-01-03 11.15.18
Il Museo Criminologico si trova in Via del Gonfalone 29 (una laterale di Via Giulia), ed è aperto dal martedì al sabato dalle ore 9 alle 13; martedì e giovedì dalle 14.30 alle 18.30. Ecco il sito ufficiale del MUCRI.

AGGIORNAMENTO: dal 01 giugno 2016 il MUCRI è chiuso, e non è stata comunicata una data di riapertura.

Il Tempio delle Torture

Wat Phai Rong Wua.

Se visitate la Thailandia, ricordatevi questo nome. Si tratta di un luogo sacro, unico e assolutamente weird, almeno agli occhi di un occidentale. Tempio buddista, mèta annuale di migliaia di famiglie, è celebre per ospitare la più grande scultura metallica del Buddha. Ma non è questo che ci interessa. È famoso anche per il suo Palazzo delle Cento Spire, ma nemmeno questo ci interessa. Quello che segnaliamo qui sono le dozzine di figure e complessi statuari che descrivono torture e sevizie riservate dai demoni dell’inferno alle anime in pena.

Infilzate in faccia, o intrappolate nelle fauci di orrendi mostri, con le interiora esposte, trafitte da spade e lance, queste sculture lasciano ben poco all’immaginazione: se non diciamo le preghierine alla sera, non ce la passeremo tanto bene nell’aldilà. Questo macabro e violentissimo “parco di attrazioni” ha per i fedeli un valore educativo. È una visualizzazione grafica e figurativa della sofferenza e dell’inferno.

Certo, c’è da dire che il rapporto dei thailandesi con la morte è meno travagliato del nostro; eppure, per quanto a prima vista il giardino delle torture di Wat Phai Rong Wua possa sembrare una soluzione estrema per colpire la fantasia dell’uomo illetterato, ricordiamoci che anche le nostre chiese abbondano di dipinti e allegorie non meno violente o macabre. Ormai abituati all’arte del Novecento, che si è man mano astratta dal bisogno di veicolare o avere un significato, ci dimentichiamo facilmente del ruolo avuto anche nella nostra storia dell’arte figurativa: quella di educare le masse, di proporsi come libro illustrato, e di servire quindi alla formazione di un immaginario anche per quanto riguarda i mondi a venire.

Scoperto via Oddity Central.