50 Shades of Green: Sex With Plants

This article originally appeared on
#ILLUSTRATI n.53 – L’uomo che piantava gli alberi

When I was still attending the film school, I wrote a brief script for a short film about a man who bought a flower, a big orchid. He went home, put the orchid on his bed, caressed it, kissed it and, finally, made love with it.
The subject appeared quite comical but my intention was to make a sort of test or, even better, an exercise in style: would I be able to shoot such an absurd sex scene without making it ridiculous? Would I be able to make it even romantic? Was it possible to produce the well-known “suspension of disbelief” in the audience in such an extreme situation?
At that time, I didn’t know that I wasn’t being particularly original.

There is, in fact, a real rare paraphilia, or better a form of fetishism, consisting in deriving sexual arousal from trees and plants. The term defining it is ‘dendrophilia’ and may have been coined by Lawrence Buell when referring to the famous writer Henry David Thoreau’s love of trees – a totally innocent feeling in that case.
Like other paraphilias, dendrophilia is one of those topics that can be the delight of tabloids: when the editorial staff runs out of news, they can simply send a photographer in the courtyard, to take some shots of a lady kissing a tree, and the article is done: “I want to marry a poplar!”.
But does dendrophilia really exist?

© Closer Magazine

A seminal 2007 study from Bologna University estimated that only 5% of all fetishisms refers to inanimate objects that have no relationship with the human body. Within such a low rate, it is no wonder that the more exclusive niche of people with a thing for plants can be almost invisible; this is compounded by the shame of talking about it and by the fact that this sexual preference does not cause any problem; so, you will understand why there is no record of case studies dedicated to dendrophilia in medical literature.

Assuming this sort of paraphilia exists, we can reasonably infer from what we know about the other forms of fetishism, that its manifestations could be much less weird than we expect. Most of the appeal of the fetish relies on the smell, the texture, and the appearance of the object, which becomes important on an evocative level in order to stimulate arousal. In this respect, it is likely that the potential dendrophile simply finds the texture of a bark, the smoothness or the colour of the leaves, the shape of a root extremely pleasant; contact, sometimes associated with a sexually relevant distant memory, becomes effective in stimulating arousal.

Not really different from those people who derive arousal from velvet: we tend to define fetishism on a pathological level only when it becomes a sine qua non in order to get sexual gratification and, actually, many practitioners working in the field tend to make distinctions between optional, preferred and exclusive paraphilias. Only the last ones are considered sexual disorders; this distinction, which can be found in the DSM-5 as well (the most used diagnostic manual in psychiatry), is in fact the distinction between real fetishism and fetishistic behaviour.

Last June, a little scandal broke in Palermo: among the plants of the amazing Botanical Gardens popped up a video installation by the Chinese artist Zheng Bo named Pteridophilia (literally, “love of ferns”). The video shows seven young boys having sex with plants in a Taiwan forest.

Having considered the ruckus raised by this artistic video, maybe it’s a good thing that I never realized my short film. Which, with a little plot twist, ended up playing with the subtle distinction between pathological fetishism and a simple fetishistic act “by proxy”: after making love with the orchid, the main character went to gently put it on the grave of the only woman he had ever loved.

Tulpamancy

This article originally appeared on #ILLUSTRATI n. 48, “Budo”

A man alone is always in good company.
(G. Gaber, “I soli”, in Il Teatro Canzone, 1992)

For those who had an imaginary friend as children: don’t you ever miss that buddy you used to spend your days with?
You used to have fun together, give each other advice, tell each other your hopes and fears. Such imaginary friendship – as you probably already knew back then – was nothing but a mental game; yet it helped you to find your way into the complex world of grown-ups; and maybe it was also useful to unload some frustration, or to ease some loneliness.
Of course, now that you are adults, you learnt that there must be just one voice inside your head. If grown-ups keeps talking with an imaginary friend, well, it means they are crazy.
Yet, let’s admit it: sometimes we wish we could evoke someone to get some advice, someone we could confess a secret to and know it will never be revealed…

Some people don’t give up.
Since 2010 there is a small online community, made by people practicing the so-called “tulpamancy”. Tulpamancy is the creation of secondary identities or, in a manner of speaking, imaginary friends. Such entities are called “tulpa”, and they are generated by using some techniques on the edge between Eastern meditation and psychology: a tulpamancer, i.e. anyone trying to develop a tulpa, makes it consciously and is fully aware of the fictitious nature of the character he has created. At the same time, though, they can give this character a unique and independent identity, and they can hear its voice and perceive it also in the real world – through visual, hearing, tactile, and olfactory deliberate hallucinations.

Tulpas can be very different from their creators, thus allowing different perspectives; they sometimes speak different languages or have an exotic accent; they can be vague figures or extremely detailed characters with their own clothing and accessories; they have their own personality, tastes and skills.
They can help their tulpamancer in the most various ways: it could be a simple chat, or sometimes something more.

For example, one of the most detailed research on this subject (S. Veissière, Varieties of Tulpa Experiences: Sentient Imaginary Friends, Embodied Joint Attention, and Hypnotic Sociality in a Wired World, 2015), reports the experience of a girl who one day was particularly cold: her tulpa put an imaginary blanket on her shoulders, and almost magically she felt really warm. There are even some techniques that allow tulpas to temporarily take control of the “host” body, which therefore finds itself performing tasks it wouldn’t be able to accomplish alone.

At first glance, it can look crazy to create a multiple personality on purpose: the dissociative identity disorder is a serious pathology (some years ago I interviewed for this blog a woman hosting in her mind 27 alter egos, and her life wasn’t easy at all).
The crucial difference resides in the intention of this act, which allows to manage it: since it was created intentionally, a tulpa is a projection of the mind whose purpose is only positive, productive, supportive. Thus, tulpamancy can’t be considered as a pathology, as long as it doesn’t interfere with the functionality of the person. On the contrary, people devoted to this practice report it generated significant improvements in the quality of their lives, and even in social interactions. Many of them report they found an effective method to escape from loneliness and fight anxiety. Some of them even have sentimental or sexual relationships with their tulpas (although the community frowns upon this point, which is still controversial).

Despite being a very limited underground phenomenon, tulpamancy immediately caught the attention of anthropologists and psychologists. The method for the creation of new personalities could be indeed extremely interesting for cognitive sciences, ethnology, ethnobiology, linguistic anthropology, neurosciences, and hypnosis social studies.

“There must be just one voice inside your head”, we were saying. Our culture pushes us to believe that our identity is unique, indivisible. Nevertheless, in the last twenty years of psychological research, the hypothesis of a multiple, liquid identity has become more and more plausible. According to some scholars, people could be divided into two main groups: those who keep a diachronic vision of their life, as if it was the autobiography of a well-defined first-person narrator, and those who perceive their existence like a series of episodes, and that see their past as made of different moments and evolution steps when their personality was totally different from the current one.

In other words: our interior narrations, the way we “narrate ourselves” to ourselves, are complex, and the famous theory of “One, No One and One Hundred Thousand” by Pirandello is maybe closer to the truth than we think.
So, as tulpamancers say, why don’t transform all this material into a true resource, by nurturing imaginary friendships?
We would all be a little crazier, but also happier.

The Carney Landis Experiment

Suppose you’re making your way through a jungle, and in pulling aside a bush you find yourself before a huge snake, ready to attack you. All of a sudden adrenaline rushes through your body, your eyes open wide, and you instantly begin to sweat as your heartbeat skyrockets: in a word, you feel afraid.
But is your fear triggering all these physical reactions, or is it the other way around?
To make a less disquieting example, let’s say you fall in love at first sight with someone. Are the endorphines to be accounted for your excitation, or is your excitation causing their discharge through your body?
What comes first, physiological change or emotion? Which is the cause and which is the effect?

This dilemma was a main concern in the first studies on emotion (and it still is, in the field of affective neurosciences). Among the first and most influential hypothesis was the James-Lange theory, which maintained the primacy of physiological changes over feelings: the brain detects a modification in the stimuli coming from the nervous system, and it “interprets” them by giving birth to an emotion.

One of the problems with this theory was the impossibility of obtaining clear evidence. The skeptics argued that if every emotion arises mechanically within the body, then there should be a gland or an organ which, when conveniently stimulated, will invariably trigger the same emotion in every person. Today we know a little bit more of how emotions work, in regard to the amygdala and the different areas of cerebral cortex, but at the beginning of the Twentieth Century the objection against the James-Lange theory was basically this — “come on, find me the muscle of sadness!

In 1924, Carney Landis, a Minnesota University graduate student, set out to understand experimentally whether these physiological changes are the same for everybody. He focused on those modifications that are the most evident and easy to study: the movement of facial muscles when emotion arises. His study was meant to find repetitive patterns in facial expressions.

To understand if all subjects reacted in the same way to emotions, Landis recruited a good number of his fellow graduate students, and began by painting their faces with standard marks, in order to highlight their grimaces and the related movement of facial muscles.
The experiment consisted in subjecting them to different stimuli, while taking pictures of their faces.

At first volunteers were asked to complete some rather harmless tasks: they had to listen to jazz music, smell ammonia, read a passage from the Bible, tell a lie. But the results were quite discouraging, so Landis decided it was time to raise the stakes.

He began to show his subjects pornographic images. Then some medical photos of people with horrendous skin conditions. Then he tried firing a gunshot to capture on film the exact moment of their fright. Still, Landis was having a hard time getting the expressions he wanted, and in all probability he began to feel frustrated. And here his experiment took a dark turn.

He invited his subjects to stick their hand in a bucket, without looking. The bucket was full of live frogs. Click, went his camera.
Landis encouraged them to search around the bottom of the mysterious bucket. Overcoming their revulsion, the unfortunate volunteers had to rummage through the slimy frogs until they found the real surprise: electrical wires, ready to deliver a good shock. Click. Click.
But the worst was yet to come.

The experiment reached its climax when Landis put a live mouse in the subject’s left hand, and a knife in the other. He flatly ordered to decapitate the mouse.
Most of his incredulous and stunned subjects asked Landis if he was joking. He wasn’t, they actually had to cut off the little animal’s head, or he himself would do it in front of their eyes.
At this point, as Landis had hoped, the reactions really became obvious — but unfortunately they also turned out to be more complex than he expected. Confronted with this high-stress situation, some persons started crying, others hysterically laughed; some completely froze, others burst out into swearing.

Two thirds of the paricipants ended up complying with the researcher’s order, and carried out the macabre execution. In any case, the remaining third had to witness the beheading, performed by Landis himself.
As we said, the subjects were mainly other students, but one notable exception was a 13 years-old boy who happened to be at the department as a patient, on the account of psychological issues and high blood pressure. His reaction was documented by Landis’ ruthless snapshots.

Perhaps the most embarassing aspect of the whole story was that the final results for this cruel test — which no ethical board would today authorize — were not even particularly noteworthy.
Landis, in his Studies of Emotional Reactions, II., General Behavior and Facial Expression (published on the Journal of Comparative Psychology, 4 [5], 447-509) came to these conclusions:

1) there is no typical facial expression accompanying any emotion aroused in the experiment;
2) emotions are not characterized by a typical expression or recurring pattern of muscular behavior;
3) smiling was the most common reaction, even during unpleasant experiences;
4) asymmetrical bodily reactions almost never occurred;
5) men were more expressive than women.

Hardly anything that could justify a mouse massacre, and the trauma inflicted upon the paritcipants.

After obtaining his degree, Carney Landis devoted himself to sexual psychopatology. He went on to have a brillant carreer at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. And he never harmed a rodent again, despite the fact that he is now mostly remembered for this ill-considered juvenile experiment rather than for his subsequent fourty years of honorable research.

There is, however, one last detail worth mentioning.
Alex Boese in his Elephants On Acid, underlines how the most interesting figure of all this bizarre experiment went unnoticed: the fact that two thirds of the subjects, although protesting and suffering, obeyed the terrible order.
And this percentage is in fact similar to the one recorded during the infamous Milgram experiment, in which a scientist commanded the subjects to inflict an electric shock to a third individual (in reality, an actor who pretended to receive the painful discharge). In that case as well, despite the ethical conflict, the simple fact that the order came from an authority figure was enough to push the subjects into carrying out an action they perceived as aberrant.

The Milgram experiment took place in 1961, almost forty years after the Landis experiment. “It is often this way with experiments — says Boese — A scientis sets out to prove one thing, but stumbles upon something completely different, something far more intriguing. For this reason, good researchers know they should always pay close attention to strange events that occur during their experiments. A great discovery might be lurking right beneath their eyes – or beneath te blade of their knife.

On facial expressions related to emotions, see also my former post on Guillaume Duchenne (sorry, Italian language only).

Subversive farts & musical anuses

Those who have been reading me for some time know my love for unconventional stories, and my stubborn belief that if you dig deep enough into any topic, no matter how apparently inappropriate, it is possible to find some small enlightenments.
In this post we will attempt yet another tightrope walking exercise. Starting from a question that might sound ridiculous at first: can flatulence give us some insight about human nature?

An article appeared on the Petit Journal on May 1st 1894 described “a more or less lyrical artist whose melodies, songs without words, do not come exactly from the heart. To do him justice it must be said that he has pioneered something entirely his own, warbling from the depth of his pants those trills which others, their eyes towards heaven, beam at the ceiling“.
The sensational performer the Parisian newspaper was referring to was Joseph Pujol, famous by his stage name Le Pétomane.

Born in Marseille, and not yet thirty-seven at the time, Pujol had initially brought his act throughout the South of France, in Cette, Béziers, Nîmes, Toulouse and Bordeaux, before eventually landing in Paris, where he performed for several years at the Moulin Rouge.
His very popular show was entirely based on his extraordinary abilities in passing wind: he was able to mimic the sound of different musical instruments, cannon shots, thunders; he could modulate several popular melodies, such as La Marseillese, Au clair de la lune, O sole mio; he could blow out candles with an air blast from 30 centimeters away; he could play flutes and ocarinas through a tube connected with his derriere, with which he was also able to smoke a cigarette.
Enjoying an ever-increasing success between XIX and XX Century, he even performed before the Prince of Whales, and Freud himself attended one of his shows (although he seemed more interested in the audience reactions rather than the act itself).

Pujol had discovered his peculiar talent by chance at the age of thirteen, when he was swimming in the sea of his French Riviera. After sensing a piercing cold in his intestine, he hurried back to the shore and, inside a bathing-hut, he discovered that his anus had, for some reason, taken in a good amount of sea water. Experimenting throughout the following years, Pujol trained himself to suck air into his bottom; he could not hold it for very long, but this bizarre gift guaranteed him a certain notoriety among his peers at first, and later among his fellow soldiers when he joined the army.
Once he had reached stage fame, and was already a celebrated artist, Pujol was examined by several doctors who were interested in studying his anatomy and physiology. Medicine papers are a kind of literature I very much enjoy reading, but few are as delectable as the article penned by Dr. Marcel Badouin and published in 1892 on the Semaine médicale with the title Un cas extraordinaire d’aspiration rectale et d’anus musical (“An extraordinary case of rectal aspiration and musical anus”). If you get by in French, you can read it here.
Among other curiosities, in the article we discover that one of Pujol’s abilities (never included in his acts on grounds of decency) was to sit in a washbowl, sucking in the water and spraying it in a strong gush up to a five-meter distance.

The end of Joseph Pujol’s carreer coincided with the beginning of the First World War. Aware of the unprecedented inhumanity of the conflict, Pujol decided that his ridiculous and slightly shameful art was no longer suitable in front of such a cruel moment, and he retired for good to be a baker, his father’s job, until his death in 1945.
For a long time his figure was removed, as if he was an embarassement for the bougeoisie and those French intellectuals who just a few years earlier were laughing at this strange ham actor’s number. He came back to the spotlight only in the second half of XX Century, namely because of a biography published by Pauvert and of the movie Il Petomane (1983) directed by Pasquale Festa Campanile, in which the title character is played by Italian comedian Ugo Tognazzi with his trademark bittersweet acting style (the film on the other hand was never released in France).

Actually Pujol was not the first nor the last “pétomane”. Among his forerunners there was Roland the Farter, who lived in XII-Century England and who earned 30 acres of land and a huge manorfor his services as a buffoon under King Henry II. By contract he went on to perform before the sovereign, at Christmas, “unum saltum et siffletum et unum bumbulum” (one jump, one whistle and one fart).
But the earliest professional farter we know about must be a medieval jester called Braigetóir, active in Ireland and depicted in the most famous plate of John Derricke’s The Image of Irelande, with a Discoverie of Woodkarne (1581).

The only one attempting to repeat Pujol’s exploits in modern times is British performer Paul Oldfield, known as Mr. Methane, who besides appearing on Britain’s Got Talent also recorded an album and launched his own Android app. If you look for some of his videos on YouTube, you will notice how times have unfortunately changed since the distinguished elegance shown by Pujol in the only remaining silent film of his act.


Let’s get back now to our initial question. What does the story of Joseph Pujol, and professional farters in general, tell us? What is the reason of their success? Why does a fart make us laugh?

Flatulence, as all others bodily expressions associated with disgust, is a cultural taboo. This means that the associated prohibition is variable in time and latitude, it is acquired and not “natural”: it is not innate, but rather something we are taught since a very early age (and we all know what kind of filthy behavior kids are capable of).
Anthropologists link this horror for bodily fluids and emissions to the fear of our animal, pre-civilized heritage; the fear that we might become primitive again, the fear of seeing our middle-class ideal of dignity and cleanliness crumble under the pressure of a remainder of bestiality. It is the same reason for which societies progressively ban cruelty, believed to be an “inhuman” trait.

The interesting fact is that the birth of this family of taboos can be historically, albeit conventionally, traced: the process of civilization (and thus the erection of this social barrier or fronteer) is usually dated back to the XVI and XVII Centuries — which not by chance saw the growing popularity of Della Casa’s etiquette treatise Il Galateo.
In this period, right at the end of the Middle Ages, Western culture begins to establish behavioral rules to limit and codify what is considered respectable.

But in time (as Freud asserted) the taboo is perceived as a burden and a constriction. Therefore a society can look for, or create, certain environments that make it acceptable for a brief period to bend the rules, and escape the discipline. This very mechanism was behind the balsphemous inversions taking place in Carnival times, which were accepted only because strictly limited to a specific time of the year.

In much the same way, Pujol’s fart shows were liberating experiences, only possible on a theatrical stage, in the satyrical context of cabaret. By fracturing the idealistic facade of the gentleman for an hour or so, and counterposing the image of the physiological man, the obscenity of the flesh and its embarassements, Pujol on a first level seemed to mock bourgeois conventions (as later did Buñuel in the infamous dinner scene from his 1974 film The Phantom of Liberty).
Had this been the case, had Pujol’s act been simply subversive, it would had been perceived as offensive and labeled as despicable; his success, on the other hand, seems to point in another direction.

It’s much more plausible that Pujol, with his contrived and refined manners conflicting with the grotesque intestinal noises, was posing as a sort of stock comic character, a marionette, a harmless jester: thanks to this distance, he could arguably enact a true cathartic ritual. The audience laughed at his lewd feats, but were also secretely able to laugh at themselves, at the indecent nature of their bodies. And maybe to accept a bit more their own repressed flaws.

Perhaps that’s the intuition this brief, improper excursus can give us: each time a fart in a movie or a gross toilet humor joke makes us chuckle, we are actually enacting both a defense and an exorcism against the reality we most struggle to accept: the fact that we still, and anyway, belong to the animal kingdom.

The Monster Study

Vi sono molti disturbi ai quali la scienza non ha ancora saputo trovare un’origine e una causa certa.

Sotto il comune termine di “balbuzie” si è soliti raggruppare diversi tipi di impedimenti del linguaggio, più o meno gravi; al di là delle classificazioni specialistiche, ciò che risulta chiaro anche ai profani è che chi soffre di questo genere di disfluenze verbali finisce per essere sottoposto a forte stress, tanto da farsi problemi ad iniziare una conversazione, avere attacchi di ansia, e addirittura nei casi più estremi isolarsi dalla vita sociale. Si tratta di un circolo vizioso, perché se la balbuzie provoca ansia, l’ansia a sua volta ne aggrava i sintomi: la persona balbuziente, quindi, deve saper superare un continuo sentimento di inadeguatezza, lottando costantemente contro la perdita di controllo.

Le cause esatte della balbuzie non sono state scoperte, così come non è ancora stata trovata una vera e propria cura definitiva per il problema; è indubbio che il fattore ansiogeno sia comunque fondamentale, come dimostrano quelle situazioni in cui, a fronte di uno stress più ridotto (ad esempio, parlando al telefono), i sintomi tendono ad affievolirsi notevolmente se non a scomparire del tutto.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UB3N_nmeB9k]

Fra i primi a sottolineare l’importanza dell’aspetto psicologico della balbuzie (pensieri, attitudini ed emozioni dei pazienti) fu il Dr. Wendell Johnson. Riconosciuto oggi come uno dei più influenti patologi del linguaggio, egli focalizzò il suo lavoro su queste problematiche in un’epoca, gli anni ’30, in cui gli studi sul campo erano agli albori: eppure i dati raccolti nelle sue ricerche sui bambini balbuzienti sono ancora oggi i più numerosi ed esaustivi a disposizione degli psicologi.

wjoldcap
Nonostante le molte terapie efficaci da lui iniziate, e una vita intera dedicata alla comprensione e alla cura di questo disturbo (di cui egli stesso soffriva), Johnson viene spesso ricordato soltanto per un esperimento sfortunato e discutibile sotto il profilo etico, che nel tempo è divenuto tristemente famoso.

Wendell Johnson era convinto che la balbuzie non fosse genetica, ma che venisse invece fortemente influenzata da fattori esterni quali l’educazione, l’autostima e in generale l’ambiente di sviluppo del bambino. Per provare questa sua teoria, nel 1939 Johnson elaborò un complesso esperimento che affidò a una studentessa universitaria, Mary Tudor, sotto la sua supervisione. Lo scopo del progetto consisteva nel verificare quanto influissero i complimenti e i rimproveri sullo sviluppo del linguaggio: la Tudor avrebbe cercato di “curare” la balbuzie di alcuni bambini, lodando il loro modo di esprimersi, e allo stesso tempo – ecco che arriva la parte spinosa – di indurla in altri bambini perfettamente in grado di parlare, tramite continui attacchi alla loro autostima. Venne deciso che le piccole cavie umane sarebbero state dei bambini orfani, in quanto facili da reperire e privi di figure genitoriali che potessero interferire con il progetto.

In un orfanotrofio di veterani nello Iowa, Johnson e Tudor selezionarono ventidue bambini dai 5 ai 15 anni, che avevano tutti perso i genitori in guerra; fra questi, soltanto dieci erano balbuzienti. I bambini con problemi di balbuzie vennero divisi in due gruppi: a quelli del gruppo IA, sperimentale, la Tudor doveva ripetere che il loro linguaggio era ottimo, e che non avevano da preoccuparsi. Il gruppo IB, di controllo, non riceveva particolari suggestioni o complimenti.

Poi c’erano i dodici bambini che parlavano fluentemente: anche loro vennero divisi in due gruppi, IIA e IIB. I più fortunati erano quelli del secondo gruppo di controllo (IIB), che venivano educati in maniera normale e corretta. Il gruppo IIA, invece, è il vero e proprio pomo della discordia: ai bambini, tutti in grado di parlare bene, venne fatto credere che il loro linguaggio mostrasse un inizio preoccupante di balbuzie. La Tudor li incalzava, durante le sue visite, facendo notare ogni loro minimo inciampo, e recitando dei copioni precedentemente concordati con il suo docente: “Siamo arrivati alla conclusione che hai dei grossi problemi di linguaggio… hai molti dei sintomi di un bambino che comincia a balbettare. Devi cercare immediatamente di fermarti. Usa la forza di volontà… Fa’ qualunque cosa pur di non balbettare… Non parlare nemmeno finché non sai di poterlo fare bene. Vedi come balbetta quel bambino, vero? Beh, certamente ha iniziato proprio in questo modo”.

L’esperimento durò da gennaio a maggio, con Mary Tudor che parlava ad ogni bambino per 45 minuti ogni due o tre settimane. I bambini del gruppo IIA, bersagliati per i loro fantomatici difetti di pronuncia, accusarono immediatamente il trattamento: i loro voti peggiorarono, e la loro sicurezza si disintegrò totalmente. Una bambina di nove anni cominciò a rifiutarsi di parlare e a tenere gli occhi coperti da un braccio tutto il tempo, un’altra di cinque divenne molto silenziosa. Una ragazzina quindicenne, per evitare di balbettare, ripeteva “Ah” sempre più frequentemente fra una parola e l’altra; rimproverata anche per questo, cadde in una sorta di loop e iniziò a schioccare le dita per impedirsi di dire “Ah”.

I bambini della sezione IIA, nel corso dei cinque mesi dell’esperimento, divennero introversi e insicuri. La stessa Mary Tudor riteneva che la ricerca si fosse spinta troppo oltre: presa dai sensi di colpa, per ben tre volte dopo aver concluso l’esperimento Mary ritornò all’orfanotrofio per rimediare ai danni che era convinta di aver provocato. Così, di sua spontanea iniziativa, cercò di far capire ai bambini del gruppo IIA che, in realtà, non avevano mai veramente balbettato. Se questo tardivo moto di pietà sia servito a ridare sicurezza ai piccoli orfani, oppure abbia disorientato ancora di più le loro già confuse menti, non lo sapremo mai.

WJ 3

I risultati dell’esperimento dimostravano, secondo Johnson, che la balbuzie vera e propria poteva nascere da un errato riconoscimento del problema in famiglia: anche con le migliori intenzioni, i genitori potevano infatti scambiare per balbuzie dei piccoli difetti di linguaggio, perfettamente normali durante la crescita, e ingigantirli fino a portarli a livello di una vera e propria patologia. Lo psicologo si rese comunque conto che il suo esperimento poggiava su un confine etico piuttosto delicato, e decise di non pubblicarlo, ma di renderlo liberamente disponibile nella biblioteca dell’Università dello Iowa.

Passarono più di sessant’anni, quando nel 2001 un giornalista investigativo del San Jose Mercury News scoprì l’intera vicenda, e intuì subito di poterci costruire uno scoop clamoroso. Johnson, morto nel frattempo nel 1965, era ritenuto uno degli studiosi del linguaggio di più alto profilo, rispettato ed ammirato; il sensazionale furore mediatico che scaturì dalla rivelazione dell’esperimento alimentò un intenso dibattito sull’eticità del suo lavoro. L’Università si scusò pubblicamente per aver finanziato il “Monster Study” (com’era stato immediatamente ribattezzato dai giornali), e il 17 agosto 2007 sei degli orfani ancora in vita ottennero dallo Stato un risarcimento di 950.000 dollari, per le ferite psicologiche ed emotive sofferte a causa dall’esperimento.

Era davvero così “mostruoso” questo studio? I bambini del gruppo IIA rimasero balbuzienti per tutta la vita?

In realtà, non lo divennero mai, nonostante Johnson sostenesse di aver provato la sua tesi anti-genetica. Mary Tudor aveva parlato di “conseguenze inequivocabili” sulle abilità linguistiche degli orfani, eppure a nessuno dei bambini del gruppo IIA venne in seguito diagnosticata una balbuzie. Alcuni di loro riferirono in tribunale di essere diventati introversi, ma di vera e propria balbuzie indotta, neanche l’ombra.

Le valutazioni degli odierni patologi del linguaggio variano considerevolmente sugli effetti negativi che la ricerca di Johnson potrebbe aver provocato. Quanto all’eticità del progetto in sé, non va dimenticato che negli anni ’30 la sensibilità era differente, e non esisteva ancora alcuna direttiva scientifica internazionale riguardo gli esperimenti sugli esseri umani. A sorpresa, in tutto questo, l’aspetto più discutibile rimane quello scientifico: i professori Nicoline G. Ambrose e Ehud Yairi, in un’analisi dell’esperimento condotta dopo il 2001, si mostrano estremamente critici nei confronti dei risultati, viziati secondo loro dalla frettolosa e confusa progettazione e dai “ripensamenti” della Tudor. Anche l’idea che la balbuzie sia un comportamento che il bambino sviluppa a causa della pressione psicologica dei genitori – concetto di cui Johnson era strenuamente convinto e che ripeté come un mantra fino alla fine dei suoi giorni – non viene assolutamente corroborata dai dati dell’esperimento, visto che alcuni dei bambini in cui sarebbe dovuta insorgere la balbuzie avevano invece conosciuto addirittura dei miglioramenti.

La vera macchia nella brillante carriera di Johnson, quindi, non sarebbe tanto la sua mancanza di scrupoli, ma di scrupolo: la ricerca, una volta spogliata da tutti gli elementi sensazionalistici ed analizzata oggettivamente, si è rivelata meno grave del previsto nelle conseguenze, ma più pasticciata e tendenziosa nei risultati che proponeva.

Il Monster Study è ancora oggi un esperimento pressoché universalmente ritenuto infame e riprovevole, e di sicuro lo è secondo gli standard morali odierni, visto che ha causato un indubbio stress emotivo a un gruppo di minori già provati a sufficienza dalla morte dei genitori. Ma, come si è detto, erano altri tempi; di lì a poco si sarebbero conosciuti esperimenti umani ben più terrificanti, questa volta dalla nostra parte dell’Oceano.

Ad oggi, nonostante l’eziologia precisa del disturbo rimanga sconosciuta, si ritiene che la balbuzie abbia cause di tipo genetico e neurologico.

Animali liofilizzati

Ecco una domanda difficile per tutti i possessori di animali: quando il vostro cane o gatto morirà, cosa farete delle sue spoglie?

C’è chi decide di seppellire il proprio animale, chi opta per la cremazione – ma c’è anche chi non riesce mai ad uscire veramente dalla fase della negazione, e vorrebbe continuare ad avere il proprio cucciolo con sé, per sempre.

Fino a poco tempo fa l’unica altra soluzione possibile era la tassidermia: eppure gli imbalsamatori spesso non sono disposti a preparare gli animali da compagnia, e per un motivo evidente. Finché si tratta di preservare la testa di un cervo, il cliente non fa mai problemi, ma quando l’animale da impagliare è un gattino amato e conosciuto per anni, qualsiasi imperfezione nel risultato tassidermico salta subito all’occhio del padrone. Così questo tipo di clienti risulta essere difficile, se non quasi impossibile, da soddisfare.

Oggi però esiste una nuova tecnica di conservazione degli animali da compagnia che promette miracoli. Guardate l’immagine qui sotto: questo cane è morto, ed è stato liofilizzato.

Quando pensiamo alla liofilizzazione, ci vengono in mente subito alcuni alimenti ridotti in polvere, come ad esempio il caffè solubile. Il procedimento in realtà può essere applicato anche a qualsiasi sostanza organica, e consiste nell’essiccamento dei tessuti a temperature estremamente basse, alle quali vengono alternate fasi di riscaldamento in situazioni di pressione controllata, di modo che l’acqua contenuta nei tessuti passi direttamente dallo stato ghiacciato al vapore (sublimazione). In questo modo la struttura della sostanza viene intaccata il meno possibile e mantiene le proprie caratteristiche specifiche: ecco perché la liofilizzazione di un animale da compagnia dà questi risultati eccezionali.

article-2287653-186ACF89000005DC-569_634x415

freezedriedpets

freeze-dried-pets.jpeg4-1280x960

460x

2775_1freeze_dried_pets

Chiaramente i costi di un simile procedimento non sono indifferenti, e in America oscillano tra 850 e 2.500 dollari; inoltre la liofilizzazione di un animale, magari di grossa taglia, non è affatto un processo veloce, e tra liste d’attesa e tempi tecnici si può aspettare anche più di un anno prima che l’esemplare ritorni al suo padrone.

12JPSTUFFERS4-articleLarge

120302-PetPhoto1-hmed-0930a.grid-6x2

Cant bear bury dear departed Tiddles Eternally the freeze dried pets loving pet owners bear bury cremated 2

freeze-dried-gray-dog-120301

I responsabili delle ditte che offrono questo servizio descrivono una clientela meno eccentrica di quello che si potrebbe immaginare: chi si rivolge a loro è gente normale, che non sopporta l’idea della separazione definitiva, e che cerca nella preservazione dell’animale un aiuto per superare il dolore. Per alcuni di essi, l’animale era l’unica compagnia di una vita solitaria. Desiderano avere ancora una presenza fisica concreta, con cui relazionarsi e illudersi di interagire.

a31_02284006

tumblr_lkbm2mrkVR1qz8ill

p_014

Abbiamo parlato spesso dell’occultamento della morte operato nel tempo dalle società occidentali; il progressivo allontanarsi dell’esperienza del cadavere dalle nostre vite ha reso sempre più complicata l’elaborazione del lutto, e questo si riflette anche sulla morte degli animali da compagnia, dato che l’amore che portiamo verso di loro talvolta rende la separazione altrettanto traumatica che se si trattasse di una persona cara.

Così, se l’immagine di qualcuno che coccola un animale morto ci dovesse apparire patetica o peggio ancora ridicola, gli psicologi ricordano che gli esseri umani proiettano abitualmente attributi umani ad oggetti inanimati; e per quanto riguarda la morte, ovviamente, tutti noi abbiamo reso visita ad una tomba, e magari rivolto parole intime al defunto, come se potesse sentirci… come se fosse ancora vivo. E viene da domandarsi se questo “come se”, il desiderio e la capacità umana di rifiutare la realtà così com’è per costruirne una simbolica, non sia forse alla base di tutte le nostre grandezze, e di tutte le nostre miserie.

1_7_08_IMG_4925

Intervista sul sesso estremo

illustrati

Come sapete, da settembre dello scorso anno Bizzarro Bazar ha l’onore di compilare ogni mese una rubrica fissa sulla splendida rivista Illustrati di Logos Edizioni.

Confessiamo che il tema del numero di febbraio, “l’arte della gioia e l’amore”, ci aveva posto qualche problema, visto che questo è un blog che si occupa principalmente del macabro e del meraviglioso. Alcune strane storie d’amore le abbiamo già affrontate (ad esempio qui), e non era il caso di ripetersi.

ritratto

Dunque, per celebrare San Valentino con il giusto gusto per il bizzarro, abbiamo pensato di intervistare Ayzad, una delle massime autorità italiane in campo di sesso estremo, BDSM e sessualità alternative, autore di BDSM – Guida per esploratori dell’erotismo estremo (2004-2009, Castelvecchi) e di XXX – Il dizionario del sesso insolito (2009 – Castelvecchi), entrambi testi consigliati dall’Associazione Italiana di Sessuologia e Psicologia Applicata e dall’Istituto di Evoluzione Sessuale.

L’intervista esclusiva affronta temi succulenti come la dipendenza da sesso, i rapporti di dominazione/sottomissione, passando per l’orgasmo dei ravanelli, i matrimoni gay e i danni provocati da Cinquanta sfumature di grigio. Il tutto condito con l’ironia e l’arguzia a cui Ayzad ha abituato i suoi lettori.

Illustrati è scaricabile in PDF e consultabile online sul sito ufficiale, e sarà disponibile gratuitamente nelle librerie dai primi di febbraio. Il sito ufficiale di Ayzad è invece un must per approfondire alcuni degli argomenti di cui abbiamo chiacchierato assieme.

La sindrome di Cotard

Non c’è volto che non sia sul punto di cancellarsi come il volto d’un sogno.
(Jorge Louis Borges, L’Aleph, 1949)

Immaginate per un momento un contesto spaventoso: venite coinvolti in un terribile incidente automobilistico, battete la testa e tutto si fa nero. Vi risvegliate in ospedale, e dopo qualche giorno riuscite ad alzarvi e recarvi in bagno da soli. Per la prima volta dopo il vostro blackout potete guardarvi nello specchio. E lì, di fronte a voi, sta una faccia che non riconoscete. Certo, assomiglia a voi, ma non siete voi.
Cosa pensereste? E qualora, rivedendo vostra moglie o vostro marito, i vostri figli e parenti, voi non sentiste assolutamente alcuna emozione, come reagireste? Forse arrivereste alla conclusione che tutto quello che state vivendo è un’illusione: in realtà voi siete morti in quell’incidente, e ora vi trovate in un deprimente aldilà, fatto ad immagine del buon vecchio mondo, ma che non vi può convincere appieno. Dopo un po’ cominciate a sentire il vostro corpo putrefarsi, vi sembra di non avere più gli organi interni, e allora a cosa serve mangiare? A cosa serve fare una qualsiasi delle cose che facevate prima, se sapete intimamente di essere dei morti che camminano?

Non è un romanzo di Philip K. Dick. Lo scenario da incubo appena descritto è quello che potrebbe vivere chi soffre della sindrome di Cotard, e non è nemmeno necessario un trauma cranico perché si manifesti. Nonostante abbia preso il nome dal neurologo francese Jules Cotard, egli non è stato il primo a descrivere la sindrome. Già nel 1788 Charles Bonnet riportò il caso di una donna anziana che rimase paralizzata quando una violenta corrente d’aria le colpì il collo mentre cucinava, ed ella collassò come se avesse avuto un infarto. Una volta ripresasi, la donna chiese alle figlie di essere vestita con il corredo funebre e di essere chiusa in una bara perché, di fatto, era “morta”.


Cotard nel 1880 venne invece a contatto con una donna di mezza età che si lamentava di non avere “né cervello, né nervi, né un petto, né uno stomaco, né gli intestini”. Ai suoi occhi, il suo corpo era in avanzato stadio di decomposizione; per lei non esistevano più né Dio né Satana, e siccome lei stessa non aveva più un’anima, non aveva nemmeno bisogno di mangiare. Questa donna morì di inedia e di fame.

La sindrome di Cotard è un rara affezione mentale che insorge in alcuni casi all’interno di quadri schizofrenici o psicotici, o anche associata all’uso di farmaci antivirali come l’aciclovir (il farmaco di scelta per la cura di herpes e varicella). I neurologi hanno scoperto un’interessante correlazione con la sindrome di Capgras, nella quale il soggetto si convince che i suoi parenti o amici siano in realtà degli impostori “travestiti” come i loro vecchi compagni. La sindrome di Capgras è rivolta verso l’esterno, verso altre persone, mentre la sindrome di Cotard riguarda il modo in cui un individuo vede se stesso; ma l’incapacità di riconoscimento è la stessa.

Studiando i casi di Capgras, alcuni neurologi sono arrivati alla conclusione che questa impossibilità di riconoscere gli astanti sia essenzialmente visiva: un soggetto affetto dalla sindrome riconosce facilmente sua moglie, ad esempio, solo se le parla al telefono – ma appena la vede di persona, si convince immediatamente che quella non è veramente lei. Così la teoria più accreditata è che sia avvenuta una disconnessione fra l’area della corteccia temporale che si occupa del riconoscimento visivo delle facce e le aree che associano le emozioni a quegli stimoli visivi (l’amigdala e altre strutture limbiche). Questo fa sì che, guardando la moglie, il soggetto non provi nessuna di quelle emozioni che ricorda di aver provato in passato, e di conseguenza il cervello raggiunge la conclusione che “poiché guardandola non provo nulla per lei, quella non può essere mia moglie, la donna che amo”.

Nei casi di Cotard, questo tipo di dinamica si ritorce contro l’immagine di sé (che sia in uno specchio, o nella propriocezione mentale interna); il soggetto non si riconosce più, e arriva a pensare di vivere un’illusione, di essere un cadavere ambulante o ancora peggio: alcuni pazienti credono  di aggirarsi in un mondo in cui tutto è morto, alberi compresi; altri sono convinti di essere all’inferno.


La cura farmacologica per la sindrome di Cotard include normalmente antidepressivi e antipsicotici; anche se, vista la scarsa conoscenza che abbiamo di questi rari fenomeni, si tratta sempre di cure sintomatiche.

Le psicosi di derealizzazione e le sindromi come quella di Cotard sono inquietanti non soltanto perché mostrano quanto poco sappiamo della nostra mente: ci ricordano soprattutto che la realtà è quello che crediamo che sia, perfino contro ogni logica o indizio razionale.

Il pianto

Si dice che l’uomo sia l’unico animale capace di piangere. Questo non è del tutto vero, perché anche altri vertebrati come scimpanzé, elefanti, orsi, cani, hanno un sistema lacrimale simile al nostro che serve a mantenere umida la superficie degli occhi. Si potrebbe dire allora che soltanto l’uomo ha sviluppato un pianto di tipo emotivo, ma sappiamo che anche i cuccioli di molti animali, se separati dalle madri, producono dei versi caratteristici e inconfondibili che in alcuni casi assomigliano proprio al pianto dei nostri bambini. Eppure una differenza notevole e curiosa fra noi e gli animali esiste, ed è la correlazione fra pianto e lacrime. Soltanto noi abbiamo sviluppato la peculiarità di lacrimare quando soffriamo emotivamente.

A cosa serve questa strana strategia evolutiva? Perché quando siamo sottoposti a un trauma o un motivo di stress, le lacrime compaiono ai nostri occhi?


Ogni vita comincia con un pianto: è il segnale che siamo arrivati al mondo, siamo qui, e abbiamo bisogno di aiuto. Vulnerabili in tutto, non abbiamo altro sistema per attirare l’attenzione sulle nostre necessità. Il pianto dei bambini è quindi soprattutto vocale, potente, ogni grido dura circa un secondo e segue il ritmo del ciclo respiratorio, con brevi pause per “tirare il fiato”; non sempre è accompagnato da lacrime.

Mano a mano che cresciamo, piangiamo sempre meno e anche il modo in cui lo facciamo cambia lentamente: si passa dalle grida rumorose ad un pianto più silenzioso, di cui l’elemento più notevole è la copiosa lacrimazione. Non ha perso la sua funzione di richiesta di aiuto, ma con la maturazione questo segnale diviene più visivo che sonoro; diventiamo, per così dire, più selettivi e possiamo “scegliere” da chi vogliamo farci vedere mentre piangiamo. Così, al di là della (relativa) capacità di inibire le lacrime o di decidere quando e dove piangeremo, il pianto adulto avviene nella maggior parte dei casi entro le mura domestiche, dove il segnale visivo raggiunge le persone con cui siamo più intimi. L’idea che la società impedisca agli adulti di piangere non è forse corretta: piuttosto le regole sociali restringono il campo d’azione, in modo che il pianto diventi un evento più “mirato”, ritualizzato e codificato – e quindi più efficace.

Ma il pianto è davvero soltanto un segnale sociale? Perché piangiamo anche da soli? E perché, dopo aver pianto, ci sentiamo meglio?

Gli studi condotti fino ad oggi evidenziano una forte possibilità che le lacrime abbiano una funzione curativa: infatti la concentrazione di NGF (nerve growth factor, la proteina scoperta da Rita Levi-Montalcini e che le ha valso il premio Nobel) presente nelle lacrime aumenta dopo una ferita alla cornea, suggerendo l’idea che l’NGF giochi un ruolo importante nella guarigione dell’occhio.

Alcuni scienziati hanno ipotizzato che le lacrime ad alta concentrazione di NGF possano quindi avere anche un effetto antidepressivo: piangere non servirebbe soltanto a segnalare agli altri  il proprio stato d’animo, dunque, ma addirittura a modularlo.

La strategia evolutiva alla base del pianto emotivo è, ovviamente, oggetto di pura speculazione: possiamo immaginare che le lacrime un tempo servissero soltanto all’auto-guarigione di ferite o malattie degli occhi. Con il tempo, però, la connessione fra le lacrime e un trauma agli occhi venne compreso e quando un membro di una tribù lacrimava ci si prendeva cura di lui, o comunque venivano inibiti comportamenti aggressivi nei suoi confronti; questo segnale primitivo può in seguito essere stato ritualizzato per divenire un segno di sofferenza fisica ed emotiva.

Questa lacrimazione emotiva è un’innovazione relativamente recente, e gli scienziati sono convinti di poter scoprire le tracce biologiche della sua genesi. L’NGF presente nelle lacrime potrebbe infatti avere una doppia funzione: da una parte, come già detto, essere un agente curativo e dall’altra, in quanto neurotrofina, giocare un ruolo centrale nella formazione dello stesso circuito neurologico necessario al pianto. Questo studio “a ritroso” delle tracce evolutive ha portato spesso a scoperte inattese, vaste e profonde. Le nostre lacrime racchiudono forse un nuovo segreto che ci aiuterà a comprendere meglio la straordinaria macchina che è il nostro corpo.

I fratelli Collyer

Langley Collyer

Figli di un ginecologo di prestigio e di una cantante d’opera, i fratelli Collyer, Homer e Langley, sono divenuti nel tempo figure iconiche di New York a causa della loro vita eccentrica e della loro tragica fine: purtroppo la sindrome a cui hanno involontariamente dato il nome non è affatto rara, e pare anzi sia in lenta ma costante crescita soprattutto nelle grandi città.

Nati alla fine dell’ ‘800, fin da ragazzi i due fratelli dimostrano spiccate doti che lasciano prospettare una vita di successo: dall’intelligenza acuta e vispa, si iscrivono entrambi alla Columbia University e guadagnano il diploma – Langley in ingegneria e Homer in diritto nautico. Homer è anche un eccellente pianista e si esibisce al Carnegie Hall, ma abbandona la carriera di musicista abbastanza presto, in seguito alle prime critiche negative. Langley sfrutta le sue conoscenze ingegneristiche per brevettare alcuni marchingegni che però non hanno successo.


Fin dal 1909 i Collyer vivono con i genitori ad Harlem: all’epoca si trattava di un quartiere “in“, a prevalenza bianca, in cui risiedevano molti professionisti altolocati e grossi nomi della finanza e dello spettacolo. Ma nel 1919 il padre Herman abbandona la famiglia e si trasferisce in un’altra casa: morirà quattro anni più tardi. La madre dei due fratelli muore invece nel 1929.

Harlem in quel periodo sta cambiando volto, da zona residenziale sta divenendo un quartiere decisamente malfamato. I fratelli Collyer, rimasti orfani, reagiscono a questo cambiamento facendosi sempre più reclusi, e più eccentrici. Cominciano a collezionare oggetti trovati in giro per le strade, e non gettano più l’immondizia. La loro casa al 2078 della Quinta Avenue si riempie a poco a poco degli utensili più disparati che i Collyer accatastano ovunque: giocattoli, carrozzine deformate, pezzi di violini, corde e cavi elettrici attorcigliati a pile di giornali vecchi di anni, cataste di scatoloni pieni di bicchieri rotti, cassepanche ricolme di lenzuola di ogni genere, fasci di decine di ombrelli, candelabri, pezzi di manichini, 14 pianoforti, un’intera automobile disassemblata e un’infinità di altre cianfrusaglie senza alcun valore.


Come il poeta greco dell’antichità di cui porta il nome, negli anni ’30 Homer diventa cieco. Langley, allora, decide di prendersi cura del fratello, e la vita dei due si fa ancora più misteriosa e appartata. I ragazzini tirano i sassi alle loro finestre, li chiamano “i fratelli fantasma”. Homer resta sempre sepolto in casa, all’interno della fitta rete di cunicoli praticati all’interno della spazzatura che ormai riempie la casa fino al soffitto; Langley esce di rado, per procurarsi le cento arance alla settimana che dà da mangiare al fratello nell’assurda convinzione che serviranno a ridargli la vista. Diviene sempre più ossessionato dall’idea che qualche intruso possa fare irruzione nel loro distorto, sovraffollato universo per distruggere l’intimità che si sono ritagliati: così, da buon ingegnere, costruisce tutta una serie di trappole, più o meno mortali, che dissemina e nasconde nella confusione di oggetti stipati in ogni stanza. Chiunque abbia l’ardire di entrare nel loro mondo la pagherà cara.


Eppure è proprio una di queste trappole, forse troppo bene mimetizzata, che condannerà i due fratelli Collyer. Nel Marzo del 1947, mentre sta portando la cena a Homer, strisciando attraverso un tunnel scavato nella parete di pacchi di giornale, Langley attiva per errore uno dei suoi micidiali trabocchetti: la parete di valigie e vecchie riviste gli crolla addosso, uccidendolo sul colpo. Qualche metro più in là sta seduto Homer, cieco e ormai paralizzato, impotente nell’aiutare il fratello. Morirà di fame e di arresto cardiaco qualche giorno più tardi.


La polizia, allertata da un vicino, fa irruzione nell’appartamento il 21 marzo, 10 ore dopo la morte di Homer. Ma il corpo di Langley, sepolto sotto uno strato di immondizia, non viene trovato subito e gli investigatori attribuiscono l’insopportabile odore all’immensa quantità di immondizia. Viene scatenata una caccia all’uomo nel tentativo di localizzare il fratello mancante, mentre le forze dell’ordine procedono, con estrema cautela per evitare le trappole, a svuotare a poco a poco l’appartamento.

Gli agenti, dopo quasi due settimane di ricerche fra le ben 180 tonnellate di rifiuti accumulati dai Collyer negli anni, trovano Langley l’8 aprile, mentre il cadavere è già preda dei topi.

I fratelli Collyer sono divenuti famosi perché incarnano una realtà tipicamente newyorkese: gli appartamenti sono spesso talmente piccoli, e la gente sedentaria, che il problema dei cosiddetti hoarders, cioè i collezionisti compulsivi di spazzatura, finisce spesso fuori controllo. Ma il fenomeno è tutt’altro che circoscritto alla sola Grande Mela.

Gli hoarders purtroppo esistono ovunque, anche in Italia, come vi racconterà qualsiasi vigile del fuoco. Normalmente si tratta di individui, con un’alta percentuale di anziani, costretti a una vita estremamente solitaria; la sindrome comincia con la difficoltà di liberarsi di ricordi e oggetti cari, ed è spesso acutizzata da timori di tipo finanziario. L’abitudine di “non buttar via nulla” diventa presto, per questi individui, una vera e propria fobia di essere separati dalle loro cose, anche le più inutili. Chi è affetto da questa mania spesso riempie le stanze fino ad impedire le normali funzioni per cui erano originariamente progettate: non si può più cucinare in cucina, dormire in camera da letto, e così via. L’accumulo incontrollato di cianfrusaglie rappresenta ovviamente un pericolo per sé e per gli altri, e rende difficoltose le operazioni di soccorso in caso di incendio o di altro infortunio.

La disposofobia è nota anche come sindrome di Collyer, in ricordo dei due eccentrici fratelli. Sempre in memoria di questa triste e strana storia, nel luogo dove sorgeva la loro casa c’è ora un minuscolo “pocket park”, chiamato Collyer Park.


Ecco la pagina di Wikipedia sulla disposofobia. E in questa pagina trovate una serie di fotografie di appartamenti di persone disposofobiche.