Balthus’ adolescents

Art should comfort the disturbed,
and disturb the comfortable.

(Cesar A. Cruz)

Until January 31 2016 it is possible to visit the Balthus retrospective in Rome, which is divided in two parts, a most comprehensive exhibit being held at the Scuderie del Quirinale, and a second part in Villa Medici focusing on the artist’s creative process and giving access to the rooms the painter renovated and lived in during his 16 years as director of the Academy of France.

In many ways Balthus still remains an enigmatic figure, so unswervingly antimodernist to keep the viewer at distance: his gaze, always directed to the Renaissance (Piero della Francesca above all), is matched by a constant and meticulous research on materials, on painting itself before anything else. Closely examined, his canvas shows an immense plastic work on paint, applied in uneven and rugged strokes, but just taking a few steps back this proves to be functional to the creation of that peculiar fine dust always dancing within the light of his compositions, that kind of glow cloaking figures and objects and giving them a magical realist aura.

Even if the exhibit has the merit of retracing the whole spectrum of influences, experimentations and different themes explored by the painter in his long (but not too prolific) career, the paintings he created from the 30s to the 50s are unquestionably the ones that still remain in the collective unconscious. The fact that Balthus is not widely known and exhibited can be ascribed to the artist’s predilection for adolescent subjects, often half-undressed young girls depicted in provocative poses. In Villa Medici are presented some of the infamous polaroids which caused a German exhibit to close last year, with accusations of displaying pedophilic material.

The question of Balthus’ alleged pedophilia — latent or not — is one that could only arise in our days, when the taboo regarding children has grown to unprecedented proportions; and it closely resembles the shadows cast over Lewis Carroll, author of Alice in Wonderland, guilty of taking several photographs of little girls (pictures that Balthus, by the way, adored).

But if some of his paintings cause such an uproar even today, it may be because they bring up something subtly unsettling. Is this eroticism, pornography, or something else?

Trying to find a perfect definition separating eroticism from pornography is an outdated exercise. More interesting is perhaps the distinction made by Angela Carter (a great writer actively involved in the feminist cause) in her essay The Sadeian Woman, namely the contrast between reactionary pornography and “moral” (revolutionary) pornography.

Carter states that pornography, despite being obscene, is largely reactionary: it is devised to comfort and strenghten stereotypes, reducing sexuality to the level of those crude graffiti on the walls of public lavatories. This representation of intercourse inevitably ends up being just an encounter of penises and vaginas, or their analogues/substitutes. What is left out, is the complexity behind every sexual expression, which is actually influenced by economics, society and politics, even if we have a hard time acknowledging it. Being poor, for intance, can limit or deny your chance for a sophisticated eroticism: if you live in a cold climate and cannot afford heating, then you will have to give up on nudity; if you have many children, you will be denied intimacy, and so on. The way we make love is a product of circumstances, social class, culture and several other factors.

Thus, the “moral” pornographer is one who does not back up in the face of complexity, who does not try to reduce it but rather to stress it, even to the detriment of his work’s erotic appeal; in doing so, he distances himself from the pornographic cliché that would want sexual intercourse to be just an abstract encounter of genitals, a shallow and  meaningless icon; in giving back to sexuality its real depth, this pornographer creates true literature, true art. This attitude is clearly subversive, in that it calls into question biases and archetypes that our culture — according to Carter — secretely inoculates in our minds (for instance the idea of the Male with an erect sex ready to invade and conquer, the Female still bleeding every month on the account of the primordial castration that turned her genitals passive and “receptive”, etc.).

In this sense, Carter sees in Sade not a simple satyr but a satirist, the pioneer of this pornography aiming to expose the logic and stereoptypes used by power to mollify and dull people’s minds: in the Marquis’ universe, in fact, sex is always an act of abuse, and it is used as a narrative to depict a social horizon just as violent and immoral. Sade’s vision is certainly not tender towards the powerful, who are described as revolting monsters devoted by their own nature to crime, nor towards the weak, who are guilty of not rebelling to their own condition. When confronting his pornographic production with all that came before and after him, particularly erotic novels about young girls’ sexual education, it is clear how much Sade actually used it in a subversive and taunting way.

Pierre Klossowksi, Balthus’ brother, was one of Sade’s greatest commentators, yet we probably should not assign too much relevance to this connection; the painter’s frirendship with Antonin Artaud could be more enlightening.

Beyond their actual collaborations (in 1934 Artaud reviewed Balthus’ first personal exhibit, and the following year the painter designed costumes and sets for the staging of The Cenci), Artaudian theories can guide us in reading more deeply into Balthus’ most controversial works.

Cruelty was for Artaud a destructive and at the same time enlivening force, essential requisite for theater or for any other kind of art: cruelty against the spectator, who should be violently shaken from his certainties, and cruelty against the artist himself, in order to break every mask and to open the dizzying abyss hidden behind them.

Balthus’ Uncanny is not as striking, but it moves along the same lines. He sees in his adolscents, portrayed in bare bourgeois interiors and severe geometric perspectives, a subversive force — a cruel force, because it referes to raw instincts, to that primordial animalism society is always trying to deny.

Prepuberal and puberal age are the moments in which, once we leave the innocence of childhood behind, the conflict between Nature and Culture enters our everyday life. The child for the first time runs into prohibitions that should, in the mind of adults, create a cut from our wild past: his most undignified instincts must be suppressed by the rules of good behavior. And, almost as if they wanted to irritate the spectators, Balthus’ teenagers do anything but sit properly: they read in unbecoming positions, they precariously lean against the armchair with their thighs open, incorrigibly provocative despite their blank faces.

But is this a sexual provocation, or just ironic disobedience? Balthus never grew tired of repeating that malice lies only in the eyes of the beholder. Because adolescents are still pure, even if for a short time, and with their unaffectedness they reveal the adults inhibitions.

This is the subtle and elegant subversive vein of his paintings, the true reason for which they still cause such an uproar: Balthus’ cruelty lies in showing us a golden age, our own purest soul, the one that gets killed each time an adolescent becomes an adult. His aesthetic and poetic admiration is focused on this glimpse of freedom, on that instant in which the lost diamond of youth sparkles.

And if we want at all costs to find a trace of eroticism in his paintings, it will have to be some kind of “revolutionary” eroticism, like we said earlier, as it insinuates under our skin a complexity of emotions, and definitely not reassuring ones. Because with their cheeky ambiguity Balthus’ girls always leave us with the unpleasant feeling that we might be the real perverts.

The Mysteries of Saint Cristina

(English translation courtesy of Elizabeth Harper,
of the wonderful All the Saints You Should Know
)

MAK_1540

Two days ago, one of the most unusual solemnities in Italy was held as usual: the “Mysteries” of Saint Cristina of Bolsena, a martyr who lived in the early fourth century.

Every year on the night of July 23rd, the statue of St. Cristina is carried in a procession from the basilica to the church of St. Salvatore in the highest and oldest part of the village. The next morning, the statue follows the path in reverse. The procession stops in five town squares where wooden stages are set up. Here, the people of Bolsena perform ten tableaux vivants that retrace the life and martyrdom of the saint.

These sacred representations have intrigued anthropologists and scholars of theater history and religion for more than a century. Their origins lie in the fog of time.

immagine-banner

In our article Ecstatic Bodies, which is devoted to the relationship between the lives of the saints and eroticism, we mentioned the martyrdom of St. Cristina. In fact, her hagiography is (in our opinion) a masterful little narrative, full of plot twists and underlying symbolism.

According to tradition, Cristina was a 12-year old virgin who secretly converted to Christianity against the wishes of her father, Urbano. Urbano held the position of Prefect of Volsinii (the ancient name for Bolsena). Urbano tried every way of removing the girl from the Christian faith and bringing her back to worship pagan gods, but he was unsuccessful. His “rebellious” daughter, in her battle against her religious father, even destroyed the golden idols and distributed the pieces to the poor. After she stepped out of line again, Urban decided to bend her will through force.

It is at this point the legend of St. Cristina becomes unique. It becomes one of the most imaginative, brutal, and surprising martyrologies that has been handed down.

Initially, Cristina was slapped and beaten with rods by twelve men. They became exhausted little by little, but the strength of Cristina’s faith was unaffected. So Urbano commanded her to be brought to the wheel, and she was tied to it. When the wheel turned, it broke the body and disarticulated the bones, but that wasn’t enough. Urban lit an oil-fueled fire under the wheel to make his daughter burn faster.  But as soon as Cristina prayed to God and Jesus, the flames turned against her captors and devoured them (“instantly the fire turned away from her and killed fifteen hundred persecutors and idolaters, while St. Cristina lay on the wheel as if she were on a bed and the angels served her”).

cristina5

So Urbano locked her up in prison where Cristina was visited by her mother – but not even maternal tears could make it stop. Desperate, her father sent five slaves out at night. They picked up the girl, tied a huge millstone around her neck and threw her in the dark waters of the lake.

The next morning at dawn, Urbano left the palace and sadly went down to the shore of the lake. But suddenly he saw something floating on the water, a kind of mirage that was getting closer. It was his daughter, as a sort of Venus or nymph rising from the waves. She was standing on the stone that was supposed to drag her to the bottom; instead it floated like a small boat. Seeing this, Urban could not withstand such a miraculous defeat. He died on the spot and demons took possession of his soul.

Cristina Sul Lago_small

But Cristina’s torments were not finished: Urbano was succeeded by Dione, a new persecutor. He administered his cruelty by immersing the virgin in a cauldron of boiling oil and pitch, which the saint entered singing the praises of God as if it were a refreshing bath. Dione then ordered her hair to be cut and for her to be carried naked through the streets of the city to the temple of Apollo. There, the statue of the god shattered in front of Cristina and a splinter killed Dione.

The third perpetrator was a judge named Giuliano: he walled her in a furnace alive for five days. When he reopened the oven, Cristina was found in the company of a group of angels, who by flapping their wings held the fire back the whole time.

Giuliano then commanded a snake charmer to put two vipers and two snakes on her body. The snakes twisted at her feet, licking the sweat from her torments and the vipers attached to her breasts like infants. The snake charmer agitated the vipers, but they turned against him and killed him. Then the fury and frustration of Giuliano came to a head. He ripped the breasts off the girl, but they gushed milk instead of blood. Later he ordered her tongue cut out. The saint collected a piece of her own tongue and threw it in his face, blinding him in one eye. Finally, the imperial archers tied her to a pole and God graciously allowed the pains of the virgin to end: Cristina was killed with two arrows, one in the chest and one to the side and her soul flew away to contemplate the face of Christ.

Cristina

In the aforementioned article we addressed the undeniable sexual tension present in the character of Cristina. She is the untouchable female, a virgin whom it’s not possible to deflower by virtue of her mysterious and miraculous body. The torturers, all men, were eager to torture and punish her flesh, but their attacks inevitably backfired against them: in each episode, the men are tricked and impotent when they’re not metaphorically castrated (see the tongue that blinds Giuliano). Cristina is a contemptuous saint, beautiful, unearthly, and feminine while bitter and menacing. The symbols of her sacrifice (breasts cut off and spewing milk, snakes licking her sweat) could recall darker characters, like the female demons of Mesopotamian mythology, or even suggest the imagery linked to witches (the power to float on water), if they were not taken in the Christian context. Here, these supernatural characteristics are reinterpreted to strengthen the stoicism and the heroism of the martyr. The miracles are attributed to the angels and God; Cristina is favored because she accepts untold suffering to prove His omnipotence. She is therefore an example of unwavering faith, of divine excellence.

Without a doubt, the tortures of St. Cristina, with their relentless climax, lend themselves to the sacred representation. Because of this, the “mysteries”, as they are called, have always magnetically attracted crowds: citizens, tourists, the curious, and groups arrive for the event, crowding the narrow streets of the town and sharing this singular euphoria. The mysteries selected may vary. This year on the night of 23rd, the wheel, the furnace, the prisons, the lake, and the demons were staged, and the next morning the baptism, the snakes, the cutting of the tongue, the arrows and the glorification were staged.

MAK_1358

MAK_1377

MAK_1384

MAK_1386

MAK_1395

MAK_1400

The people are immobile, in the spirit of the tableaux vivant, and silent. The sets are in some cases bare, but this ostentatious poverty of materials is balanced by the baroque choreography. Dozens of players are arranged in Caravaggio-esque poses and the absolute stillness gives a particular sense of suspense.

MAK_1404

MAK_1422

In the prison, Cristina is shown chained, while behind her a few jailers cut the hair and amputate the hands of other unfortunate prisoners. You might be surprised by the presence of children in these cruel representations, but their eyes can barely hide the excitement of the moment. Of course, there is torture, but here the saint dominates the scene with a determined look, ready for the punishment. The players are so focused on their role, they seem almost enraptured and inevitably there is someone in the audience trying to make them laugh or move. It is the classic spirit of the Italians, capable of feeling the sacred and profane at the same time; without participation failing because of it. As soon as they close the curtain, everyone walks back behind the statue, chanting prayers.

MAK_1407

MAK_1406

MAK_1409

MAK_1414

MAK_1417

MAK_1418

MAK_1427

MAK_1426

MAK_1429

The scene with the demons that possess the soul of Urbano (one of the few scenes with movement) ends the nighttime procession and is undoubtedly one of the most impressive moments. The pit of hell is unleashed around the corpse of Urbano while the half-naked devils writhe and throw themselves on each other in a confusion of bodies; Satan, lit in bright colors, encourages the uproar with his pitchfork. When the saint finally appears on the ramparts of the castle, a pyrotechnic waterfall frames the evocative and glorious figure.

MAK_1445

MAK_1462

MAK_1471

MAK_1474

MAK_1477

MAK_1480

MAK_1481

MAK_1483

The next morning, on the feast of St. Cristina, the icon traces the same route back and returns to her basilica, this time accompanied by the band.

MAK_1509

MAK_1510a

MAK_1508

MAK_1511

MAK_1515

MAK_1512

MAK_1523

MAK_1526

MAK_1536

MAK_1539

Even the martyrdom of snakes is animated. The reptiles, which were once collected near the lake, are now rented from nurseries, carefully handled and protected from the heat. The torturer agitates the snakes in front of the impassive face of the saint before falling victim to the poison. The crowd erupts into enthusiastic applause.

MAK_1548

MAK_1544

MAK_1554

MAK_1556

MAK_1559

MAK_1560

MAK_1564

MAK_1571

MAK_1572

MAK_1574

MAK_1574a

The cutting of the tongue is another one of those moments that would not be out of place in a Grand Guignol performance. A child holds out a knife to the executioner, who brings the blade to the lips of the martyr. Once the tongue is severed, she tilts her head as blood gushes from her mouth. The crowd is, if anything, even more euphoric.

MAK_1579

MAK_1580

MAK_1581

MAK_1582

MAK_1587

MAK_1588

MAK_1589

MAK_1596

MAK_1597a

MAK_1597b

MAK_1597c

MAK_1600a

Here Cristina meets her death with two arrows planted in her chest. The last act of her passion happens in front of a multitude of hard-eyed and indifferent women, while the ranks of archers watch for her breathing to stop.

MAK_1603

MAK_1601

MAK_1604

MAK_1606

MAK_1608

MAK_1611

MAK_1613

MAK_1607

MAK_1618

The final scene is the glorification of the saint. A group of boys displays the lifeless body covered with a cloth, while chorus members and children rise to give Cristina offerings and praise.

MAK_1618a

MAK_1619

MAK_1620

MAK_1622

MAK_1624

MAK_1625

MAK_1628

MAK_1629

MAK_1627

MAK_1630

One striking aspect of the Mysteries of Bolsena is their undeniable sensuality. It’s not just that young, beautiful girls traditionally play the saint, even the half-naked male bodies are a constant presence. They wear quivers or angel wings; they’re surrounded by snakes or they raise up Cristina, sweetly abandoned to death, and their muscles sparkle under lights or in the sun, the perfect counterpoint to the physical nature of the passion of the saint. It should be emphasized that this sensuality does not detract from the veneration. As with many other folk expressions common in our peninsula, the spiritual relationship with the divine becomes intensely carnal as well.

MAK_1383

MAK_1566

MAK_1598

MAK_1567

MAK_1615

MAK_1626

The legend of St. Cristina effectively hides an underlying sexual tension and it is remarkable that such symbolism remains, even in these sacred representations (heavily veiled, of course). While we admire the reconstructions of torture and the resounding victories of the child martyr and patron saint of Bolsena, we realize that getting onstage is not only the sincere and spontaneous expression in the city. Along with the miracles they’re meant to remember, the tableaux seem to allude to another, larger “mystery”. These scenes appear fixed and immovable, but beneath the surface there is bubbling passion, metaphysical impulses and life.

MAK_1638

Verità e menzogne

Talvolta, la menzogna dice meglio della verità ciò che avviene nell’anima.
(Maksim Gorkij)

f-for-fake-DI-2

Nello straordinario film-saggio F for Fake (1974), ad un certo punto Orson Welles annuncia che tutto quello che si vedrà durante i seguenti sessanta minuti sarà assolutamente vero. Mentre il film prosegue, raccontando varie vicende di falsari di opere d’arte, lo spettatore si dimentica di questo proclama, finché un sornione Welles non ricompare ricordandoci di aver promesso di dire la verità soltanto per un’ora, e che quell’ora è scaduta da un pezzo. “Per gli ultimi 17 minuti, ho mentito spudoratamente“.

Realtà e finzione, vero e falso.
Il dualismo fra questi opposti, come tutti i dualismi, viene da lontano. Ed è soggetto al principio di non-contraddizione della logica aristotelica, che afferma che una cosa non possa essere contemporaneamente A e non-A. Vale a dire, è impossibile che qualcosa sia vera e falsa allo stesso tempo.
Riconoscere le menzogne dalla verità ci sembra una qualità fondamentale. Eppure talvolta può accadere che le acque si confondano, e la certezza dell’assioma “se non è vero, allora è falso” venga messa in discussione. Addentriamoci nei meandri di questi territori di confine, cominciando da una prima domanda: è sempre possibile tracciare una linea sicura e precisa che separi il falso dal vero?

10VANGOGHjp-articleLarge

Tramonto a Montmajour, uno dei più famosi falsi Van Gogh, è in realtà un vero Van Gogh. Il dipinto, acquistato dall’industriale norvegese Christian Mustad nel 1908, era stato esposto nella casa dell’imprenditore finché un ambasciatore francese non l’aveva “smascherato” come falso. Mustad, preso dalla vergogna d’essere stato ingannato, lo nascose in soffitta e così per quasi un secolo il dipinto passò di solaio in solaio. Sottoposto alla commissione del Van Gogh Museum negli anni ’90, il dipinto venne giudicato falso; ma dopo una seconda investigazione durata ben due anni, il 9 settembre 2013 gli esaminatori annunciarono che si trattava proprio di un autentico Van Gogh.

Questa non è certo l’unica opera di valore riconosciuta solo tardivamente; gli esempi sono innumerevoli, dai mobili del XVI secolo scambiati per falsi ottocenteschi alle imitazioni pittoriche che si scoprono essere invece originali. Nel mondo dell’arte la questione dell’attribuzione è complessa, spinosa e delicata, e ci interroga sulla difficoltà non soltanto di smascherare il falso, ma perfino di comprendere cosa sia autentico. Quanti veri capolavori sono ritenuti di scarso valore o bollati come plagi, e magari giacciono abbandonati in qualche cantina? E quanti dei dipinti nei musei d’arte di tutto il mondo – sì, proprio quelli che avete ammirato anche voi in qualsiasi mostra – sono in realtà dei falsi?
Secondo gli esperti, nel vasto mercato dell’arte almeno un’opera su due sarebbe falsa; nemmeno i musei si salvano, perché circa il 20% dei quadri delle maggiori collezioni museali nei prossimi 100 anni saranno probabilmente riattribuiti ad altri autori. In molti casi si determinerà con maggiore certezza ad esempio che il dipinto è stato eseguito da assistenti o allievi del Maestro in questione, oppure che si tratta di veri e propri quadri contraffatti a fini di truffa, ma in altri casi si scoprirà magari il contrario – come è accaduto alla National Gallery di Washington quando un quadro del valore di 200.000 sterline attribuito a Francesco Granacci è stato riconosciuto come possibile opera di Michelangelo: se fosse vero, la quotazione schizzerebbe di colpo ai 150 milioni di sterline.

Ed eccoci alla nostra seconda domanda. È evidente quanto, per le istituzioni che acquistano e gestiscono simili tesori, la distinzione fra autentico e falso sia di prioritaria importanza. Ma per il pubblico? Emozionarsi di fronte ad un finto Tiziano è un’esperienza meno valida che farlo di fronte a un’opera autentica?

Non lo pensano i curatori del Fälschermuseum di Vienna, che propone soltanto dipinti fasulli: vi si possono ammirare, fra gli altri, falsi Klimt, Van Gogh, Rembrandt, Matisse, Chagall e Monet. Questo Museo dei Falsi, unico nel suo genere, ospita la sua collezione “criminale” all’interno di un approfondito percorso  dedicato alla storia del plagio, e relative curiosità – dal falsario che riuscì a vendere un falso Vermeer a Hermann Göring durante la Seconda Guerra Mondiale, a quello che inserì nei suoi quadri delle “bombe a orologeria” e anacronismi, fino ai sorprendenti “finti falsi dipinti”.

museo_de_obras_falsas_de_viena_medium

In altri casi, il gioco è più scoperto ma non meno intrigante.
A Istanbul, nel quartiere di Cukurcuma, si trova una palazzina rossa. Alla fine degli anni ’70 qui si è consumata l’ossessiva storia d’amore fra il ricco trentenne Kemal e la bella ma povera Füsun. Per otto anni, dal 1976 al 1984, Kemal ha raccolto ogni genere di oggetti legati all’amata, dei memento che gli potessero ricordare il loro impossibile sentimento: fermacapelli, fazzoletti, ritagli di giornale, spille, fino a catalogare minuziosamente tutti i 4.213 mozziconi di sigaretta fumati dalla ragazza. Questa collezione costituisce oggi il Museo dell’Innocenza, ospitato nella medesima palazzina, un commovente e perenne tributo all’agonia di un amore.
Eppure Kemal e Füsun non sono mai esistiti.

Museum of Innocence 01 20130528 for91days.comPhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days
20121212e
20121212b
Dog-Collection-Museum-Of-InnocencePhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days
Füsun-Dress-Museum-Of-InnocencePhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days
Füsun-Sigthing-Museum-Of-InnocencePhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days

Essi sono i personaggi di fantasia creati da Orhan Pamuk, premio Nobel per la letteratura nel 2006, uno dei più noti scrittori turchi, per il suo romanzo Il Museo dell’Innocenza (2008). Aperto nel 2012, il Museo è la versione “materiale” del libro, un’imponente raccolta di tutti gli oggetti descritti sulla pagina: ciascuna delle 83 vetrine rimanda ad un capitolo del romanzo. Dice l’autore: “la storia è pura invenzione, così come il museo. E neppure le sigarette sono del tutto autentiche. Se lo fossero, il tabacco si deteriorerebbe in sei mesi. Con un sostanza chimica ho riempito le cartine con del tabacco turco e, una volta fumate elettronicamente, gli ho dato varie forme che potessero rendere la psicologia di una ventenne immersa nell’infelicità di una storia d’amore travolgente“. Il Museo, che in un dettagliato gioco di rimandi con il libro svela la sua natura finzionale, non è per questo meno coinvolgente e riesce – in maniera forse perfino più intuitiva e toccante di quanto potrebbe fare una mostra storica – a raccontare la vita di ogni giorno della Istanbul di quegli anni (per un approfondimento sui risvolti concettuali, consigliamo questo articolo di Mariano Tomatis).

20121212d

Raki Museum Of InnocencePhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days
Museum Of Innocence Collection IstanbulPhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days
Meltem-Soda-Museum-Of-InnocencePhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days
Playing-Bingo-Museum-Of-InnocencePhoto credit: Istanbul For 91 Days

Ancora più estremo è l’esempio del Museum Of Jurassic Technology di Los Angeles (di cui abbiamo già parlato in questo post): un museo scientifico in cui è impossibile distinguere la finzione dalla realtà, e in cui notizie assolutamente vere vengono presentate fianco a fianco con esposizioni fantasiose, ma comunque plausibili. Dei pannelli illustrano astruse e complicatissime teorie fisiche di cui nessuno ha mai sentito parlare; un macchinario impossibile ed esoterico è semplicemente etichettato come “Macchina della verità”, ma un secondo cartello avverte che è fuori servizio; alcune teche contengono delle microsculture eseguite su chicchi di riso: eppure quando avviciniamo gli occhi alla lente d’ingrandimento per ammirare, per esempio, il volto di Cristo scolpito nel chicco, l’immagine è stranamente confusa e non capiamo davvero cosa stiamo osservando, e così via… La vertigine è inevitabile, e il senso di spaesamento diviene poco a poco una vera e propria esperienza della meraviglia e del mistero.

museum-of-jurassic-technology-exhibits-of-microspcopes

Abbiamo aperto questa breve ricognizione del confine fra verità e menzogne con Orson Welles, e non a caso.
Il cinema infatti esiste grazie alla finzione, ed ha forse più punti in comune con l’illusionismo che con il teatro. E, anche in campo cinematografico, le cose si fanno davvero interessanti quando il pubblico non è a conoscenza del trucco.

cq5dam.web.1280.1280
Prendiamo ad esempio i film documentari di Werner Herzog: il grande regista, famoso per la temerarietà e per il talento visionario, è noto anche per i pochi scrupoli con cui inserisce delle sequenze di fiction all’interno di reportage peraltro scrupolosi. In Rintocchi dal profondo (1993), incentrato sulla spiritualità in Siberia, vediamo ad un certo punto degli uomini che strisciano sulla superficie ghiacciata di un lago, nella speranza di scorgere dei bagliori subacquei della mitica Città Perduta di Kitezh, che secondo la leggenda si è inabissata proprio in quel lago.

Ho sentito parlare di questo mito quando ero lì. Si tratta di una credenza popolare. […] Volevo riprendere i pellegrini che si trascinavano qua e là sul ghiaccio, cercando la visione della città perduta, ma siccome non c’erano pellegrini intorno, ho assunto due ubriachi della città vicino e li ho messi sul ghiaccio. Uno di loro ha la faccia dritta sulla superficie gelata e guarda come se fosse in uno stato di meditazione profonda. La pura verità è che era completamente ubriaco e si è addormentato, lo abbiamo dovuto svegliare a fine riprese“.

Bells-From-the-Deep-2

Ma, per quanto scandalosa possa sembrare questa pratica all’interno di un documentario (che, secondo le regole classiche, dovrebbe attenersi ai “fatti”, alla “verità”, al realismo), lo scopo di Herzog non è assolutamente quello di rendere più spettacolare il suo film, o di imbrogliare lo spettatore. Il suo intento è quello di raccontare l’essenza di un popolo proprio grazie ad una menzogna.

Potrebbe sembrare un inganno, ma non lo è. […] Questo popolo esprime la fede e la superstizione in modo estatico. Credo che per loro la linea di demarcazione tra fede e superstizione sia labile. La domanda è: come riuscire a cogliere lo spirito di una nazione in un film di un’ora e mezza? In un certo senso la scena dei pellegrini ubriachi è l’immagine più profonda che si può avere della Russia. L’affannosa ricerca della città perduta rappresenta l’anima di un’intera comunità. Credo che la scena colga il destino e lo spirito della Russia, e chi conosce questa nazione e i suoi abitanti sostiene che questa sia la scena più bella del film. Anche quando svelo che non si tratta di pellegrini ma di comparse, continuano ad amare quella scena perché racchiude una sorta di verità estatica“.

Una verità che, in questo caso, risplende ancora più luminosa attraverso la finzione.

Durante la proiezione di F for Fake in un cineclub di provincia, un nostro caro amico confessò a una ragazza che la sua decennale amicizia per lei non era sincera. In realtà, l’aveva sempre segretamente amata. La loro relazione sentimentale cominciò così, con una verità sussurrata nel bel mezzo di un film sulle menzogne.
È una storia vera o falsa? Che importa, se ha una sua bellezza?

(Grazie, finegarten!)

R.I.P. HR Giger

gigerfeat__span

Si è spento ieri il grande H. R. Giger, in seguito alle ferite riportate durante una caduta nella sua casa di Zurigo. Aveva 74 anni.

hr_giger_at_work

Giger aveva cominciato la sua carriera negli anni ’70, e verso la metà del decennio venne reclutato da Alejandro Jodorowsky come designer e scenografo per l’adattamento cinematografico di Dune: il progetto purtroppo non vide mai la luce, ma Giger, ormai fattosi notare ad Hollywood, fu scelto per disegnare i set e il look della creatura di Alien (1979). L’Oscar vinto grazie al film di Ridley Scott gli diede fama internazionale.

hr_giger_alien_IV

hr_giger_wreck_III

hr_giger_alienderelictcockpit

20294

Da quel momento, stabilitosi a Zurigo in pianta stabile, Giger continuò a dipingere, scolpire e progettare arredamenti d’interni e oggetti di design; i suoi quadri comparvero sulle copertine di diversi album musicali; nel 1998 aprì i battenti il Museum H. R. Giger, nel castello di St. Germain a Gruyères.

hr-giger-art

hr_giger_bar

1349619302_74350

Giger_Museum

I suoi inconfondibili e surreali dipinti, realizzati all’aerografo, aprono una finestra su un futuro oscuro e distopico: panorami plumbei, in cui l’organico e il meccanico si fondono e si confondono, dando vita ad enormi ed enigmatici amplessi di carne e metallo. Se l’idea dell’ibridazione fisica fra l’uomo e la macchina risulta oggi forse un po’  datata, l’elemento ancora disturbante dei dipinti di Giger è proprio questa sensualità morbosa e perversa, una sorta di sessualità post-umana e post-apocalittica.

hr_giger_elp_XII

hr-giger-erotomechanics-vii1

hr_giger_0221-620x432

hr_giger_020

hr-giger-dark-water

La sua opera, al tempo stesso viscerale ed elegante, è capace di mescolare desiderio e orrore, tragicità e mistero. La sfrenata fantasia di H. R. Giger, e le sue visioni infernali e aliene, hanno influenzato l’immaginario di un’intera generazione: dallo sviluppo dell’estetica cyberpunk ai design ultramoderni, dalla musica rock ai film horror e sci-fi, dal mondo dei tattoo all’alta moda.

hr-giger-1

123

548974759

Ecco il link all’ HR Giger Museum.

Paul Cadden

(Articolo a cura della nostra guestblogger Marialuisa)

La meraviglia che si prova di fronte ad alcune opere di Paul Cadden è difficile da spiegare, osservare ogni ruga dei suoi personaggi, le espressioni e gli sguardi, la tensione che sentiamo nell’immagine come se noi stessi ne facessimo parte.

Belle foto? No. Bei quadri in grafite, questo è l’elemento che sicuramente ci stupisce, una realtà perfetta rimasta impressa da una matita, composta da minuscoli tratti impercettibili. Difficile pensare che sono disegni, che non è un attimo impresso su una foto.

Il motivo che ha spinto Paul Cadden a creare quadri iperrealisti piuttosto che di altro genere è il fatto di essere profondamente affascinato dalla continua distorsione della realtà che ci circonda.

La facilità con cui i media, ma anche le stesse persone riescono a manipolare la percezione della realtà di masse intere, la propensione a distorcere un fatto per avere ragione in una semplice discussione, tutto questo lo spinge a creare quadri in cui la realtà sembra un fatto così immobile ma anche vero, tale da essere incontestabile e interpretabile da chiunque a modo suo senza filtri.

L’iperrealismo permette di aggiungere dettagli non reali nella foto iniziale per darci la possibilità di avere la sensazione di poter vedere molti più oggetti, molti più dettagli di quanti non riesca a cogliere il nostro occhio in una foto o nella realtà stessa.

Appiattire i soggetti, eliminando ogni tipo di colore attraverso la grafite, permette al nostro occhio di rilassarsi e guardare tutto senza disturbi: quello che l’artista cerca di fare è proiettarci in una realtà ripulita da oggetti estranei, sensazioni disturbanti – è tutto lì, alla nostra portata, tutto valutabile, tutto immobile eppure in tensione.

Paul Cadden attraverso le sue opere ci porta a osservare i suoi soggetti ma anche lo stesso mondo in cui viviamo, stralci di società, con occhio imperturbabile e finalmente oggettivo.

Dal suo stesso sito vorrei riportare una frase che ben rappresenta il suo pensiero riguardo alla realtà al di fuori delle sue opere.

Noam Chomsky: “In ogni luogo, dalla cultura popolare ai sistemi di propaganda, c’è una costante pressione per far sì che le persone si sentano deboli e confuse, che il loro unico ruolo sia quello di rettificare decisioni e consumare”.

Questo è il link al suo sito.

Placentofagia

Qualche tempo fa, Nicole Kidman dichiarò di aver mangiato la placenta dopo il suo ultimo parto. (Dichiarò anche di bere la propria urina per mantenersi giovane, ma quella è un’altra storia). Follie da VIP, direte. E invece pare che la moda stia prendendo piede.

La placenta, si sa, è quell’organo tipico dei mammiferi che serve a scambiare il nutrimento fra il corpo della madre e il feto, “avvicinando” le due circolazioni sanguigne tanto da far passare le sostanze nutritive e l’ossigeno attraverso una membrana chiamata barriera placentale, che divide la parte di placenta che appartiene alla mamma (placenta decidua) da quella del feto (corion). La placenta si distacca e viene espulsa durante il secondamento, la fase immediatamente successiva al parto; si tratta dell’unico organo umano che viene “perso” una volta terminata la sua funzione.

Quasi tutti i mammiferi mangiano la propria placenta dopo il parto: si tratta infatti di un organo ricco di sostanze nutritive e, sembrerebbe, contiene ossitocina e prostaglandine che aiutano l’utero a ritornare alle dimensioni normali ed alleviano lo stress del parto. Anche gli erbivori, come capre o cavalli, stranamente sembrano apprezzare questo strappo alla loro dieta vegetariana. Pochi mammiferi fanno eccezione e non praticano la placentofagia: il cammello, ad esempio, le balene e le foche. Anche i marsupiali non la mangiano, ma anche se volessero, non potrebbero – la loro placenta non viene espulsa ma riassorbita.

Se per quanto riguarda gli animali è intuitivo comprendere lo sfruttamento di una risorsa tanto nutritiva alla fine di un processo estenuante come il parto, diverso è il discorso per gli umani. Noi siamo normalmente ben nutriti, e non avremmo realmente bisogno di questo “tiramisù” naturale. Perché allora si sta diffondendo la moda della placentofagia?

La motivazione di questa pratica, almeno a sentire i sostenitori, sarebbe il tentativo di evitare o lenire la depressione post-partum. Più precisamente, la placenta avrebbe il potere di far sparire i sintomi del cosiddetto baby blues (quel senso di leggera depressione e irritabilità che il 70% delle neomamme dice di provare per qualche giorno dopo il parto), evitando quindi che degenerino in una depressione più seria. Sfortunatamente, nessuna ricerca scientifica ha mai suffragato queste teorie. Non c’è alcun motivo medico per mangiare la placenta. Ma le mode della medicina alternativa, si sa, di questo non si curano granché.

E così ecco spuntare decine di video su YouTube, e siti che propongono ricette culinarie a base di placenta: c’è chi la salta in padella con le cipolle e il pomodoro, chi preferisce farne un ragù per la lasagna o gli spaghetti, chi la disidrata e ne ricava una sorta di “dado in polvere” per insaporire le vivande quotidiane. Se siete persone più esclusive, potete sempre prepararvi un bel cocktail di placenta da sorseggiare a bordo piscina. Ecco un breve ricettario (in inglese) tratto dal sito per mamme Mothers 35 Plus.

Consci che l’idea di mangiare la propria placenta può non solleticare tutti i nostri lettori, vi suggeriamo un ultimo utilizzo, certamente più artistico, che sta pure prendendo piede. Si tratta delle cosiddette placenta prints, ovvero “stampe di placenta”. Il metodo è semplicissimo: piazzate la placenta fresca, ancora ricoperta di sangue, su un tavolo; premeteci sopra un foglio da disegno, in modo che il sangue imprima la figura sulla carta. Potete anche spargere un po’ di inchiostro sulla placenta prima di passarci sopra il foglio, così da ottenere risultati più duraturi. E voilà, ecco che avrete un bel quadretto a ricordo del vostro travaglio, da incorniciare e appendere nell’angolo più in vista del vostro salotto.

Valerio Carrubba

Valerio Carrubba è nato nel 1975 a Siracusa. Le sue opere sono davvero uniche, e per più di una ragione.

Si tratta di dipinti surreali che ritraggono i soggetti sezionati e “aperti” come nelle tavole anatomiche, “cadaveri viventi” che espongono la propria natura fisica e l’interno dei corpi con iperrealismo di dettagli.

Ma la peculiare tecnica pittorica di Carrubba consiste nel dipingere ogni quadro due volte. Dapprima crea quello che molti degli spettatori più comuni definirebbero “il quadro vero”, vale a dire il disegno più definito, più pittorico, più dettagliato. Dopodiché l’artista vi dipinge sopra una seconda stesura, più “automatica”, che va a nascondere la versione precedente. Così facendo, crea un fantasma invisibile ai nostri occhi, nega e nasconde l’anima prima della sua opera, che rimane evidente solamente nella stratificazione dei colori (esaltata dall’utilizzo dell’acciaio inox come supporto).

“Ed è proprio la morte del “quadro vero”, ovvero sommamente, irrimediabilmente, ritualmente falso che Carrubba celebra; dipingendolo e poi, nella quiete del suo studio, uccidendolo e mostrandocene l’ectoplasma.” (Luigi Spagnol)

A simboleggiare questa morte del linguaggio espressivo, e la duplicità delle sue opere, i suoi quadri hanno tutti titoli palindromi (leggibili sia da destra che da sinistra).

Il pittore cieco

Esref Armagan è uno straordinario e controverso pittore. I suoi dipinti potrebbero sembrare abbastanza “normali”, naif e semplici, nonostante l’uso sensibile del colore, se non fossimo a conoscenza di un piccolo dettaglio: Esref è cieco dalla nascita, e non ha mai avuto occhi per vedere o percepire la luce.

Esref è nato povero e non ha avuto alcuna educazione. Ha iniziato la sua carriera facendo ritratti: chiedeva a un parente o a un amico di sottolineare con una penna il volto su una fotografia, poi con i suoi polpastrelli “leggeva” le linee tracciate sulla foto e le replicava sul foglio da disegno. Ma la sua abilità, con il tempo, si è spinta molto oltre.


Ha sviluppato una tecnica inusuale per i suoi dipinti: dopo averli disegnati, li colora usando le dita con uno strato di pittura ad olio, poi è costretto ad aspettare da due a tre giorni perché il colore si secchi; infine può continuare il suo quadro. Questa è una tecnica non ortodossa, dovuta al fatto che Esref è cieco e opera senza il controllo esterno di altri collaboratori. La principale qualità dei suoi lavori, al di là della brillantezza dei colori o la composizione artistica, sta nell’incredibile fedeltà con cui Esref replica la tridimensionalità. Gli oggetti più lontani sono disegnati più piccoli, e con una incredibile precisione di prospettiva. In un uomo nato senza occhi, questo è un talento che nessuno penserebbe di trovare.

Alcuni neurofisiologi e psicologi americani si sono interessati al caso, e hanno portato l’artista turco a disegnare i contorni del battistero della Basilica di Brunelleschi a Firenze (ritenuto uno dei luoghi in cui l’idea di prospettiva è storicamente nata). Il filmato presentato qui di seguito è in bilico fra la plausibilità e l’agiografia mediatica; alcuni infatti hanno avanzato dubbi sulle effettive competenze di questo pittore, che potrebbe essere segretamente “guidato” da qualcuno nei suoi exploit artistici. Sembrerebbe però che le risonanze al cervello del pittore abbiano indicato un’attività della corteccia cerebrale nelle zone normalmente “morte” in altre persone cieche.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3AgO6H0H98]

Quindi, bufala o miracolo? Esref, ormai avvezzo alle mostre internazionali, continua ad affermare che gli piacerebbe essere ricordato per il suo lavoro, piuttosto che per il suo handicap. “Non capisco come qualcuno possa considerarmi cieco, perché le mie dita vedono più di quanto veda una persona che possiede gli occhi”.

Scoperto via Oddity Central.

Zdzisław Beksiński

Zdzisław Beksiński (1929-2005) è noto come uno dei maggiori artisti polacchi della seconda metà del ‘900. Nel 1975 una giuria di critici lo nominò miglior artista dei primi trent’anni della Repubblica Polacca.

Dopo un primo periodo di opere minori, nel 1971 Beksiński ha un terribile incidente stradale, quando rimane bloccato con la sua auto all’interno di un passaggio a livello incustodito, nel cuore della fredda campagna polacca. Se la cava con tre settimane di coma e molti mesi di convalescenza. Grazie alla famiglia, e alla sua grande forza d’animo, torna ad essere la persona affabile di una volta: eppure, da quel momento, la sua arte cambia radicalmente.

I suoi dipinti ad olio assumono una qualità gotica, surreale, macabra. Fra architetture impossibili e inquietanti comincia ad agitarsi una moltitudine di figure mostruose, dalla carnalità corrotta e putrida, esseri semifusi con la pietra, nature morte di mondi lontani.

Zdzisław è un uomo schivo e timido: nonostante la sua arte post-apocalittica sia piuttosto cupa e tenebrosa, l’artista è conosciuto per i suoi modi gentili, per la sua piacevole conversazione e per il suo senso dell’umorismo. Non ama la notorietà, e spesso non si presenta all’inaugurazione delle sue mostre. Quando qualche giornalista riesce a fargli una domanda sui suoi quadri, risponde semplicemente “non riesco a pensare a una frase appropriata da dire sulla pittura”.

Alla fine degli anni ’90 il suo nome è famoso in tutto il mondo, in particolare negli Stati Uniti e in Giappone, paese in cui conquista il primato di unico artista contemporaneo polacco inserito tra le prestigiose collezioni dell’Osaka Art Museum, e naturalmente nelle collezioni di musei polacchi e svedesi.

Ed è proprio allora che il destino si accanisce su di lui. Sua moglie, Zofia Stankiewicz, muore nel 1998. L’anno seguente, il giorno della vigilia di Natale del 1999, suo figlio Tomasz Beksinski, noto presentatore radiofonico e giornalista musicale, si toglie la vita.

Il vecchio pittore rimane solo, cade in depressione. Nemmeno la sua morte arriverà in modo sereno: Zdzisław Beksiński viene assassinato il 22 febbraio 2005, accoltellato con 17 pugnalate dal figlio del suo maggiordomo, a causa di un prestito di 100$ che l’artista aveva rifiutato di dare al ragazzo, allora diciannovenne.