Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 10

In the 10th episode of Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: the psychedelic story of crainal trepanation advocates; the african fetish hiding a dark secret; the Club that has the most macabre initiation ritual in the whole world.
[Be sure to turn on English captions]

And so we came to the conclusion … at least for this first season.
Will there be another one? Who knows?

For the moment, enjoy this last episode and consider subscribing to the channel if you haven’t yet. Cheers!

Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

Napoleon’s Penis

The surgical tool kit that was used to perform the autopsy on Napoleon’s body at Saint Helena is on display at the Museum of History of Medicine in Paris.
But few people know that those scalpels probably also emasculated the Emperor.

In his last few months on Saint Helena, Napoleon suffered from excruciating stomach pains. Sir Hudson Lowe, the governor of the island under whose control Bonaparte had been confined, dismissed the whole thing as a slight anemia. Yet on May 5, 1821 Bonaparte died.
The autopsy conducted the following day by Napoleon’s personal physician, Francesco Carlo Antommarchi, revealed that he had been killed by a stomach tumor, aggravated by large ulcers (although the actual causes of death have been debated).
But during the autoptic examination Antommarchi apparently took some liberties.

Francesco Carlo Antommarchi

The heart was extracted and put in in a vase filled with spirit; it was meant to be delivered to the Emperor’s second wife, Maria Luisa, in Parma. In reality, she must have been hardly impressed by such a token of love, since a few months after Napoleon’s death she already married her lover. The stomach, that cancerous organ responsible for Napoleon’s death, was also removed and preserved in liquid. Antommarchi then made a cast of Bonaparte’s face, from which he later produced the famous death mask displayed at the Musée de l’Armée.

But at this point the doctor from Marseilles decided he’d grab a further, macabre trophy: he severed Napoleon’s penis. Antommarchi’s motives for this extra cut are unclear. Some speculate it might have been some sort of revenge for the way the irascible Napoleon mistreated him in the last few months; according to other sources, the doctor (sometimes described as an ignorant and disrespectful man) simply thought he could make a profit out of it.

But perhaps it was not even Antommarchi who took the controversial specimen. Thirty years later, in 1852, Mamluk Ali (Louis-Etienne Saint-Denis, Napoleon’s most faithful valet) published a memorial in the Revue des Mondes. In the article, Ali attributed the responsibility of this mutilation to himself and to Abbot Angelo Paolo Vignali, the chaplain who administered extreme unction to Bonaparte. He stated that he and Vignali had removed some unspecified “portions” of Napoleon’s corpse during the autopsy.

All these stories are quite dubious; it seems unlikely that such a disfigurement could go unnoticed. Five English doctors, plus three English and three French officers, were present at Napoleon’s autopsy. After the embalming, his faithful waiter Marchand dressed his body in uniform. How come no one noticed the absence of manhood on the body of the “little corporal”?

In any case,  what may or may not have been Napoleon’s true penis, but a penis nonetheless, began to circulate in Europe.
And even if it’s unclear who was responsible for severing it, in the end it was chaplain Vignali who smuggled it back to Corsica, along with more conventional mementos (documents and letters, a few pieces of silverware, a lock of hair, a pair of breeches, etc.), and the organ passed to his heirs upon Vignali’s death in a bloody vendetta in 1828. It remained in the family for almost a century, and was finally purchased by an anonymous buyer at an auction in 1916, together with the entire collection. In the auction catalog, the penis was described with a euphemism: “mummified tendon“.

After being bought by the famous antiquarian bookstore Maggs of London, the lot was resold in 1924 to Philadelphia collector Abraham Simon Wolf Rosenbach, who exhibited it three years later at the Museum of French Art in New York. Here the penis of Napoleon was on public display for the first and only time, and a jouranlist described it as a “maltreated strip of buck-skin shoelace or a shriveled eel“.

In 1944 Rosenbach sold the collection once again, and it continued to be passed from hand to hand. But despite the historical value of these memorabilia the market proved to be less and less interested, and the Vignali collection remained unsold at various auctions. In 1977 a major part of the collection was acquired by the French government, and destined to join the remains of Napoleon at Les Invalides. Not the penis, however, which the French refused to even acknowledge. It was John K. Lattimer, an American urologist, who bought it for $ 4,000. His intention, it seems, was to permanently remove it from circulation so that it would not be ridiculed.

The urologist had amassed an impressive collection of macabre historical curiosities – from the blood-stained collar that President Lincoln wore on the night of his murder at Ford’s theater, to one of the poison capsules Göring used to commit suicide. Lattimer kept the infamous “mummified tendon” locked away in a suitcase under his bed for years, protecting it from the public’s morbid curiosity, and he always refused any purchase proposal. He X-rayed the specimen, and it turned out to actually be a human penis.

After Lattimer’s death in 2007, his daughter took on the laborious task of archiving this incredible collection.
The penis is still part of the collection: Tony Perrottet, author of the book Napoleon’s Privates, is among the very few who have had the opportunity to see it in person. “It was kind of an amazing thing to behold. There it was: Napoleon’s penis sitting on cotton wool, very beautifully laid out, and it was very small, very shriveled, about an inch and a half long. It was like a little baby’s finger.
Here is the video showing the moment when the writer finally found himself face to face with the illustrious genitals:

Perrottet was not given permission to film the actual penis at the time, but in a 2015 reading he exhibited an alleged replica, which you can see below.

One can understand Perrottet’s obvious excitation in the video: the author declared that, to him, Napoleon’s penis is the symbol “of everything that’s interesting about history. It sort of combines love and death and sex and tragedy and farce all in this one story“. And certainly all these elements do contribute to the fascination we feel for such a relic, which is at once comic, macabre, obscene and titillating. But there’s more.

The body of a man who – for better or for worse – so profoundly changed the history of the world, possesses an almost magical aura. Why then does the thought of it being disrespected and desecrated provoke an unmentionable, subtle satisfaction? Why did Lattimer fear that showing that small, withered and mummified penis would result in public derision?

Perhaps it’s because that little piece of meat looks like a masterpiece of irony, a perfect retaliation.
As comedian George Carlin put it,

men are terrified that their pricks are inadequate and so they have to compete with one another to feel better about themselves and since war is the ultimate competition, basically, men are killing each other in order to improve their self-esteem. You don’t have to be a historian or a political scientist to see the Bigger Dick foreign policy theory at work.

George Carlin, Jammin’ In New York (1992)

The controversial POTUS tweet (01/03/2018) on who might have the “bigger button”.

On the other hand, this relic also reminds us that Napoleon was mortal, after all, and brings his figure back to the concreteness of a corpse on the autopsy table. The mummified penis takes the place of that hominem te memento (“Remember that you are only a man”) that was repeated in the ear of Roman generals returning from a victory so they wouldn’t get a big head, or the sic transit that the protodeacon pronounced at the passage in San Pietro of the newly elected Pope (“thus passes the glory of the world”).

That flap of shrunken and withered skin is at once a symbol of vanitas, and a mockery of the typical machismo so often exhibited by leaders and rulers. It reminds us that “the Emperor has no clothes”.
Worse: he has no clothes, no life, and no manhood.

Part of the informations in this article come from Bess Lovejoy’s wonderful book Rest In Pieces: The Curious Fates of Famous Corpses (2014).
One chapter of my book
Paris Mirabilia is devoted to the Museum of History of Medicine.
Tony Perrottet’s Napoleon’s Privates: 2,500 Years of History Unzipped is essentially a collection of spicy anecdotes about famous historical figures. Among these, one in particular is relevant. During the WWII, Stalin asked Winston Churchill to help out with the Russian army’s “serious condom shortage”. The British Prime Minister had a special batch of extra-large condoms prepared, then sent them to Russia with the label “Made in Britain – Medium“. This glaring example of foreign policy would have delighted George Carlin.

Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 3

In the 3rd episode of the Bizzarro Bazar Web Series we talk about some scientists who tried to hybridize monkeys with humans, about an incredible raincoat made of intestines, and about the Holy Foreskin of Jesus Christ.
[Be sure to turn on English subtitles.]

If you like this episode be sure to subscribe to the channel, and most of all spread the word. Enjoy!

Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

Links, Curiosities & Mixed Wonders – 15

  • Cogito, ergo… memento mori“: this Descartes plaster bust incorporates a skull and detachable skull cap. It’s part of the collection of anatomical plasters of the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, and it was sculpted in 1913 by Paul Richer, professor of artistic anatomy born in Chartres. The real skull of Descartes has a rather peculiar story, which I wrote about years ago in this post (Italian only).
  • A jarring account of a condition which you probably haven’t heard of: aphantasia is the inability of imagining and visualizing objects, situations, persons or feelings with the “mind’s eye”. The article is in Italian, but there’s also an English Wiki page.
  • 15th Century: reliquaries containing the Holy Virgin’s milk are quite common. But Saint Bernardino is not buying it, and goes into a enjoyable tirade:
    Was the Virgin Mary a dairy cow, that she left behind her milk just like beasts let themselves get milked? I myself hold this opinion, that she had no more and no less milk than what fitted inside that blessed Jesus Christ’s little mouth.

  • In 1973 three women and five men feigned hallucinations to find out if psychiatrists would realize that they were actually mentally healthy. The result: they were admitted in 12 different hospitals. This is how the pioneering Rosenhan experiment shook the foundations of psychiatric practice.
  • Can’t find a present for your grandma? Ronit Baranga‘s tea sets may well be the perfect gift.

  • David Nebreda, born in 1952, was diagnosed with schizophrenia at the age of 19. Instead of going on medication, he retired as a hermit in a two-room apartment, without much contact with the outside world, practicing sexual abstinence and fasting for long periods of time. His only weapon to fight his demons is a camera: his self-portraits undoubtedly represent some kind of mental hell — but also a slash of light at the end of this abyss; they almost look like they capture an unfolding catharsis, and despite their extreme and disturbing nature, they seem to celebrate a true victory over the flesh. Nebreda takes his own pain back, and trascends it through art. You can see some of his photographs here and here.
  • The femme fatale, dressed in glamourous clothes and diabolically lethal, is a literary and cinematographic myth: in reality, female killers succeed in becoming invisible exactly by playing on cultural assumptions and keeping a low and sober profile.
  • Speaking of the female figure in the collective unconscious, there is a sci-fi cliché which is rarely addressed: women in test tubes. Does the obsessive recurrence of this image point to the objectification of the feminine, to a certain fetishism, to an unconscious male desire to constrict, seclude and dominate women? That’s a reasonable suspicion when you browse the hundred-something examples harvested on Sci-Fi Women in Tubes. (Thanks, Mauro!)

  • I have always maintained that fungi and molds are superior beings. For instance the slimy organisms in the pictures above, called Stemonitis fusca, almost seem to defy gravity. My first article for the magazine Illustrati, years ago, was  dedicated to the incredible Cordyceps unilateralis, a parasite which is able to control the mind and body of its host. And I have recently stumbled upon a photograph that shows what happens when a Cordyceps implants itself within the body of a tarantula. Never mind Cthulhu! Mushrooms, folks! Mushrooms are the real Lords of the Universe! Plus, they taste good on a pizza!

  • The latest entry in the list of candidates for my Museum of Failure is Adelir Antônio de Carli from Brazil, also known as Padre Baloeiro (“balloon priest”). Carli wished to raise funds to build a chapel for truckers in Paranaguá; so, as a publicity stunt, on April 20, 2008, he tied a chair to 1000 helium-filled balloons and took off before journalists and a curious crowd. After reaching an altitude of 6,000 metres (19,700 ft), he disappeared in the clouds.
    A month and a half passed before the lower part of his body was found some 100 km off the coast.

  • La passionata is a French song covered by Guy Marchand which enjoyed great success in 1966. And it proves two surprising truths: 1- Latin summer hits were already a thing; 2- they caused personality disorders, as they still do today. (Thanks, Gigio!)

  • Two neuroscientists build some sort of helmet which excites the temporal lobes of the person wearing it, with the intent of studying the effects of a light magnetic stimulation on creativity.  And test subjects start seeing angels, dead relatives, and talking to God. Is this a discovery that will explain mystical exstasy, paranormal experiences, the very meaning of the sacred? Will this allow communication with an invisible reality? Neither of the two, because the truth is a bit disappointing: in all attempts to replicate the experiment, no peculiar effects were detected. But it’s still a good idea for a novel. Here’s the God helmet Wiki page.
  • California Institute of Abnormalarts is a North Hollywood sideshow-themed nightclub featuring burlesque shows, underground musical groups, freak shows and film screenings. But if you’re afraid of clowns, you might want to steer clear of the place: one if its most famous attractions is the embalmed body of Achile Chatouilleu, a clown who asked to be buried in his stage costume and makeup.
    Sure enough, he seems a bit too well-preserved for a man who allegedly died in 1912 (wouldn’t it happen to be a sideshow gaff?). Anyways, the effect is quite unsettling and grotesque…

  • I shall leave you with a picture entitled The Crossing, taken by nature photographer Ryan Peruniak. All of his works are amazing, as you can see if you head out to his official website, but I find this photograph strikingly poetic.
    Here is his recollection of that moment:
    Early April in the Rocky Mountains, the majestic peaks are still snow-covered while the lower elevations, including the lakes and rivers have melted out. I was walking along the riverbank when I saw a dark form lying on the bottom of the river. My first thought was a deer had fallen through the ice so I wandered over to investigate…and that’s when I saw the long tail. It took me a few moments to comprehend what I was looking at…a full grown cougar lying peacefully on the riverbed, the victim of thin ice.

Il cranio di Cartesio

Descartes3

Réné Descartes è riconosciuto come uno dei massimi filosofi mai esistiti, il cui pensiero si propose come spartiacque, gettando le basi per il razionalismo occidentale e facendo tabula rasa della logica tradizionale precedente; secondo Hegel, tutta la filosofia moderna nasce con lui: “qui possiamo dire d’essere a casa e, come il marinaio dopo un lungo errare, possiamo infine gridare “Terra!”. Cartesius segna un nuovo inizio in tutti i campi. Il pensare, il filosofare, il pensiero e la cultura moderna della ragione cominciano con lui.

Il filosofo francese pose il dubbio come base di qualsiasi ricerca onesta della verità. Epistemologo scettico nei confronti dei sensi ingannevoli, perfino della matematica, della materialità del corpo o di quelle realtà che ci sembrano più assodate, Cartesio si chiese: di cosa possiamo veramente essere sicuri, in questo mondo? Ecco allora che arrivò al primo, essenziale risultato, il vero e proprio “mattone” per porre le fondamenta del pensiero: se dubito della realtà, l’unica cosa certa è che io esisto, vale a dire che c’è almeno qualcosa che dubita. Il mio corpo potrà anche essere un’illusione, ma l’intuito mi dice che quella “cosa che pensa” (res cogitans) c’è davvero, altrimenti non esisterebbe nemmeno il pensiero. Questo concetto, espresso nella celebre formula cogito ergo sum, dà l’avvio alla sua ricognizione della realtà del mondo.

Frans_Hals_-_Portret_van_René_Descartes

I ritratti di Cartesio giunti fino a noi mostrano tutti lo stesso volto, fra il solenne e il beffardo, dallo sguardo penetrante e sicuro: dietro quegli occhi, si potrebbe dire, riposa il fondamento stesso del pensiero, della scienza, della cultura moderna. Ma la sorte beffarda volle che il cranio di Cartesio, lo scrigno che aveva contenuto le idee di quest’uomo straordinario, l’involucro di quel cogito che dà certezza all’esistenza, conoscesse un lungo periodo di vicissitudini.

Nel 1649 Cartesio, già celebre, accettò l’invito di Cristina di Svezia e si trasferì a Stoccolma per farle da precettore: la regina, infatti, desiderava studiare la filosofia cartesiana direttamente alla fonte, dall’autore stesso. Ma gli orari delle lezioni, fissate in prima mattinata, costrinsero Cartesio ad esporsi al rigido clima svedese e, a meno di un anno dal suo arrivo a Stoccolma, Cartesio si ammalò di polmonite e morì.

Il suo corpo venne inumato in un cimitero protestante alla periferia della capitale. Nel 1666, la salma fu riesumata per essere riconsegnata alla cattolica Francia, che ne rivendicava il possesso. Le spoglie, arrivate a Parigi, vennero sepolte nella chiesa di Sainte-Geneviève per poi essere ulteriormente traslate nel Museo dei monumenti funebri francesi. Lì rimasero per tutto il tumultuoso periodo della Rivoluzione. Allo smantellamento della collezione, nel 1819, i resti di Cartesio vennero portati nella loro sede definitiva, nella chiesa di Saint-Germain-des-Prés, dove riposano tuttora. Ma c’era un problema.

Cartesio

Durante la terza riesumazione, di fronte ai luminari dell’Accademia delle Scienze, si aprì la bara e le ossa dello scheletro tornarono alla luce: ci si accorse subito, però, che qualcosa non andava. Il teschio di Cartesio mancava all’appello. Da chi e quando era stato sottratto?

Una volta annunciato lo scandalo del furto, cominciarono a spuntare in tutta Europa teschi o frammenti di cranio attribuiti al grande filosofo.

La quantità di reperti scatenò feroci controversie: come potevano esistere più teschi, e così tanti frammenti, di una stessa persona? Ironia del destino: il dubbio, che era stato alla base del Discorso su metodo di Descartes, veniva a intaccare i suoi stessi resti mortali.

(A. Zanchetta, Frenologia della vanitas, 2011)

Si venne a scoprire che già all’epoca della prima esumazione, nel 1666, il teschio era stato probabilmente sostituito con un altro; ma nel 1819 si era volatilizzato perfino il cranio posticcio. Oltre ai due teschi, fu possibile verificare che anche altre ossa erano state sottratte, per essere tramandate per oltre tre secoli in chissà quali ambiti privati.

E il teschio originale? Sarebbe rimasto per sempre ad adornare la sconosciuta scrivania di qualche facoltoso dilettante filosofo?
Dopo essere passato per decenni fra le mani di professori, mercanti, militari, vescovi e funzionari governativi, il cranio di Cartesio riemerse infine in un’asta pubblica in Svezia, dove venne acquistato e rispedito in dono alla Francia.

descartes-crane

Era piccolo, liscio, sorprendentemente leggero. Il colore non era uniforme: in alcuni punti era stato sfregato fino a uno splendore perlaceo mentre in altri punti c’era una spessa patina di sporco, ma perlopiù aveva l’aspetto di una vecchia pergamena. E in effetti si trattava di un oggetto che aveva molte storie da raccontare, in senso non solo figurato ma anche letterale. Più di due secoli fa qualcuno gli aveva scritto sulla calotta una pomposa poesia in latino, le cui lettere sbiadite erano ora di un marrone annerito. Un’altra iscrizione, proprio sulla fronte, accennava oscuramente – e in svedese – a un furto. Sui lati si vedevano vagamente i fitti scarabocchi delle firme di tre degli uomini che l’avevano posseduto.

(R. Shorto, Le ossa di Cartesio, 2009)

3438106_3_e07e_le-crane-de-descartes-1596-1650_08dcdcbb4b545979cf36e193f0924190

19286788

Il teschio venne dato in consegna al Musée de l’Homme a Parigi, dove è conservato tutt’oggi.
Sulla sua fronte si può leggere l’iscrizione apposta dal responsabile della sottrazione originaria: “Il teschio di Descartes, preso da J. Fr. Planström, nell’anno 1666, all’epoca in cui il corpo stava per essere restituito alla Francia“.

Ancora oggi, paradossalmente, il cranio dell’iniziatore del pensiero razionale conserva tutto l’irrazionale fascino di una sacra reliquia.

descran

La biblioteca delle meraviglie – VIII

Angela Carter
LA CAMERA DI SANGUE
(1984-95, Feltrinelli, f.c.)

Femminista innamorata del simbolo, del mito e del fiabesco barocco, Angela Carter è stata una delle voci più distinte e originali della letteratura britannica del Novecento. I suoi romanzi e racconti vengono talvolta inseriti nella vaga definizione di “realismo magico”, in ragione dell’irruzione del fantastico nel contesto realistico, ma la scrittura della Carter unisce alla piacevolezza dell’affabulazione una complessa stratificazione di rimandi culturali che la avvicinano per certi versi al postmoderno. Non fanno eccezione queste fiabe classiche, rilette dalla Carter alla luce di una sensibilità moderna che ha metabolizzato stimoli distanti ed eclettici (la tradizione orale, i maudits francesi, Sade, la psicanalisi, ecc.).

Le favole reinventate ne La camera di sangue (fra le altre, Cappuccetto Rosso, Il gatto con gli stivali, la Bella e la Bestia, ecc.) sono di volta in volta crudeli, comiche, inquietanti o suggestive, ma sempre costruite alla luce di una particolare ironia che ne esalta i sottotesti sessuali o sessisti.

Il femminismo di Angela Carter, per quanto radicale, non è certamente manicheo ma pare anzi ambiguamente affascinato dalle figure maschili oppressive e dominanti (davvero esclusivamente per “denunciarle”?). In questo senso la vera e propria perla di questa antologia rimane il racconto d’apertura che dà il titolo alla raccolta, una rilettura libera della favola di Barbablù. La raffinatezza della descrizione dei sentimenti della sposa-bambina “acquistata” e segregata dal marito-orco è tra i punti più alti del libro: l’attrazione e la repulsione si confondono in modo quasi impercettibile nell’insicurezza virginale della protagonista. La prima notte di nozze avviene in una imponente camera del castello in cui il marito ha fatto istallare una dozzina di specchi – indicando la folla di ragazzine riflesse, esclama soddisfatto: “Guarda, me ne sono procurato un intero harem!”. Poi la deflorazione, ed ecco che con l’arrivo del sangue si disvela la maschera della sessualità come aggressione; sarà sempre il sangue a guidare come un filo rosso la protagonista alla scoperta del vero volto dell’assassino collezionista di mogli; e il sogno idilliaco si trasformerà in incubo proprio con l’apertura della porta proibita, la segreta del nero desiderio maschile, fatto di crudeltà e dominazione.

Per un’analisi del testo, rimandiamo a questa pagina.

Jacques Chessex
L’ULTIMO CRANIO DEL MARCHESE DI SADE
(2012, Fazi Editore)

Il libro postumo di Chessex esce in Italia a quasi tre anni dalla morte dell’autore svizzero, avvenuta per attacco cardiaco nel corso di una conferenza. E L’ultimo cranio ha certamente qualcosa di profetico, perché parla di uno scrittore che sta per morire: si tratta del famigerato Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, quel “divino marchese” che con il passare del tempo diviene una figura sempre più centrale nella cultura occidentale. La prima parte del romanzo racconta gli ultimi mesi di vita di Sade rinchiuso nel manicomio di Charenton, ormai minato nella salute a causa dei continui eccessi. La sua agonia è lenta e dolorosa: proprio lui, che ha passato gran parte della sua vita in cella, è ora costretto a fare i conti con un’altra prigione, quella della carne che va disfacendosi. Emorragie, coliche, tosse asmatica, obesità e sincopi lo rendono ancora più blasfemo e intrattabile del solito. In preda a uno sconfinato cupio dissolvi, Sade è ormai maniacalmente ossessionato dalle sue dissolutezze. La seconda parte del romanzo traccia invece la storia del suo cranio, che attraversa l’Europa e i secoli ritornando in superficie di tanto in tanto, e portando con sé un’aura magica di malvagità e sciagure. Come una vera e propria reliquia al contrario, il cranio diviene il simbolo beffardo di un ateismo che ha bisogno di martiri e di santi tanto quanto le religioni che disprezza. Questa duplicità rimanda evidentemente al celebre saggio di Klossowski Sade prossimo mio, in cui l’autore sottolinea più volte che l’ateismo del Marchese aveva necessità di una religione da vilipendere, e in definitiva anche il Sade di Chessex brucia di furia sovrumana, quasi divina. L’ultimo cranio, nonostante le accuse di pornografia e immoralità (oltre al sesso, il libro contiene anche qualche blasfemia esplicita), sorprende per la sostanziale pacatezza del linguaggio e i toni riflessivi che contrastano con la rabbia del protagonista: Chessex compone qui una misurata e matura vanitas, che ci parla della dissoluzione finale da cui non può scappare nemmeno un animo indomito.

Proprio perché l’uomo è solo, ha così terribilmente bisogno di simboli. Di un cranio, di amuleti, di oggetti di scongiuro. La consapevolezza vertiginosa della fine dell’individuo nella morte. A ogni istante, la rovina. Forse bisognerebbe considerare la passione per un cranio, e singolarmente per un cranio stregato, come una manifestazione disperata di amore di sè e del mondo già perduto“.

Il Santo Prepuzio

La circoncisione di Gesù avvenne, secondo i Vangeli (Luca, 2,21) 8 giorni dopo la sua nascita. Per secoli la Chiesa Cattolica Romana ha festeggiato questa ricorrenza (il primo giorno di Gennaio), e la Chiesa Ortodossa continua a farlo tutt’oggi.

In sé la cosa non avrebbe nulla di strano, se non fosse che il prepuzio tagliato del Salvatore ha, nel corso del tempo, scatenato acerrime lotte e controversie.

Il Medioevo, si sa, fu l’ “epoca d’oro” delle reliquie: oltre ai corpi (incorrotti e non) dei santi, o ai frammenti di legno della Santa Croce, comparivano di volta in volta le reliquie più varie e fantasiose. Il campionario comprendeva il latte della Vergine, le tre vertebre della coda dell’asino cavalcato da Cristo al suo ingresso a Gerusalemme, il pelo della barba di San Giovanni Battista, la cinta di Maria caduta a terra durante la sua ascensione al cielo e addirittura un piolo della scala vista (in sogno!) da Giacobbe.

Il Santo Prepuzio era una delle reliquie più gettonate: a seconda della fonte, in varie città europee c’erano otto, dodici, quattordici o addirittura diciotto diversi Santi Prepuzi. Contemporaneamente.

Secondo la versione “ufficiale” dell’epoca, Carlo Magno, mentre pregava presso il Santo Sepolcro, avrebbe ricevuto in dono il Prepuzio da un angelo. In seguito, l’avrebbe regalato a Leone III il 25 dicembre 800  in occasione della sua incoronazione. Secondo un’altra versione invece il prepuzio sarebbe un dono di Irene di Bisanzio, ricevuto da Carlo Magno in occasione delle nozze. Leone III collocò la reliquia nel Sancta sanctorum della Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano a Roma, assieme alle altre.

Ma Roma era soltanto un nome tra gli altri, sull’affollata mappa delle basiliche che rivendicavano il possesso del Santo Prepuzio: ce n’era uno a Santiago di Compostela, uno a Coulombs nella diocesi di Chartres (Francia), uno a Chartres stessa;  e anche le chiese di Besançon, Metz, Hildesheim, Charroux, Conques, Langres, Anversa, Fécamp, Puy-en-Velay, e Auvergne ritenenevano ciascuna di essere in possesso dell’unico vero Santo Prepuzio.

Uno dei più famosi prepuzi era quello conservato dal 1100 in poi ad Anversa, prepuzio che era stato venduto al re Baldovino I di Gerusalemme in quel di Palestina nel corso di una crociata. Durante una messa, il vescovo di Cambray ne vide uscire tre gocce di sangue che macchiarono i lini dell’altare. In onore di questo santissimo e sanguinante pezzetto di pelle, nonché della macchiata tovaglia, venne subito costruita una speciale cappella e vennero periodicamente tenute festose processioni; il miracoloso prepuzio divenne oggetto di culto e meta di pellegrinaggi.

Nel 1557 venne rinvenuto un Santo Prepuzio nella cittadina di Calcata (Viterbo). Il Prepuzio di Calcata è degno di nota perché è il più longevo di cui si abbia notizia: il reliquiario venne portato in processione anche recentemente (nel 1983) durante la Festa della Circoncisione. La tradizione ebbe fine quando dei ladri rubarono il contenitore ricoperto di gioielli e le reliquie in esso contenute.

Il Prepuzio di Calcata fu anche al centro di un acceso dibattito teologico. Infatti i  monaci di una abbazia rivale, quella di Charroux, sostenevano che il Santo Prepuzio conservato nella loro chiesa fosse stato donato direttamente, dall’immancabile Carlo Magno. Nei primi anni del XII secolo il Prepuzio venne portato in processione fino a Roma, perché Innocenzo III ne verificasse l’autenticità, ma il Papa rifiutò di farlo. La reliquia in seguito andò perduta, per ricomparire solo nel 1856, quando un operaio che lavorava nell’abbazia dichiarò di aver trovato il reliquiario nascosto nello spessore di un muro. La riscoperta portò ad uno scontro teologico con il Prepuzio ufficiale di Calcata, che era venerato ufficialmente dalla Chiesa da centinaia di anni. Nel 1900 la Chiesa risolse il dilemma vietando a chiunque di scrivere o parlare del Santo Prepuzio, pena la scomunica (Decreto no. 37 del 3 febbraio 1900). Nel 1954, dopo lungo dibattito, la punizione venne portata al vitandi (persona da evitare), il grado più grave della scomunica; successivamente il Concilio Vaticano Secondo rimosse dal calendario liturgico la festività della Circoncisione di Cristo.

Il Santo Prepuzio di Calcata rimase per lungo tempo l’ultimo sopravvissuto ai vari saccheggi. A seguito del furto in epoca moderna del reliquiario di Calcata, non si sa se qualcuno dei Prepuzi sia tuttora esistente. Il mistero riguardante una delle più bizzarre reliquie della storia cristiana resiste ancora.