The Terrible Tucandeira

The initiation ritual of tucandeira is typical of the Sateré-Mawé people stationed along the Amazon River on the border between the states of Amazonas and Pará of Brazil.
The ritual is named after a giant ant (the Paraponera clavata, also known as “bullet ant”) whose painful sting, 30 times more poisonous than that of a bee, causes swelling, redness, fever and violent chills.

This test of courage and endurance sanctions a tennager’s entry into adulthood: every young man who wants to become a true warrior must submit to it.

The tucandeira takes place during the Amazonian summer months (October to December).
First the ants must be captured and taken from their anthills, usually located at the base of hollow trees, and they are enclosed in an empty bamboo called tum-tum. A mixture of water and cajú leaves is then prepared, and the ants are immersed and left in this anesthetic “soup”.

Once they are asleep, the ants are inserted one by one within the knitting of a straw glove, their fearsome stingers stuck on the inside of the mitten. They are then left to awaken from their numbness: realizing that they are trapped, the ants begin to get more and more angry.

When the time for the actual ritual finally arrives, the whole village meets to observe and encourage the adolescents who undergo initiation. It is the much feared moment of the test. Will they resist pain?

He who leads the dance intones a song, adapting the words to the circumstance. The women sit in front of the group of men and accompany the melody. Some candidates paint their hands black with Genipa berries and then drink a very strong liquor called taruhà, based on fermented cassava, useful for reducing pain and giving the necessary strength to face the ritual. Those who undergo the tucandeira for the first five times must apply to certain diets. When the ants awaken, the actual ritual begins. The dance director slips the gloves on the candidates’ hands and blows tobacco smoke into the gloves to further irritate the ants. Then the musicians begin to play rudimentary wooden tubes while the boys dance.

(A. Moscè , I Sateré Mawé e il rito della tucandeira, in “Etnie”, 23/01/2014)

The angry ants begin to prick the hands of the young, who are made to dance to distract themselves from the pain. In a short time their hands and arms get paralyzed; in order to pass the test, the candidate must wear the gloves for at least ten minutes.


After this time, the gloves are removed and the pain begins to manifest itself again. It will take twenty-four hours for the effect of inoculated neurotoxins to subside; the young man will be the victim of excruciating pain and sometimes prey to uncontrollable tremors even in the following days.
And this is just the beginning for him: to be fully completed, the ritual will have to be repeated 19 more times.

Through this ritual, a Sateré Mawé recognizes his origins, laws and customs; and from adolescence on, he will have to repeat it at least twenty times to be able to draw its beneficial effects. The whole population participates in the ritual and observes how the candidates face it. It is an important time to get to know each other, gather, and contract future marriages.
The tucandeira is also a propitiatory rite, through which a boy can become a good fisherman and hunter, have luck in life and work, turn into a strong and courageous man. People come together very willingly for this ritual, which in addition to its festive and playful aspect is also an opportunity to recall the cosmogonic myths of the origin of the stars, the sun, the moon, water, air and all living things.

(A. Moscè, Ibid.)

In this National Geographic video on tucandeira, the chief summarizes in an admirable way the ultimate meaning of these practices:

“If you live your life without suffering anything, or without any kind of effort, it won’t be worth anything to you.”

(Thanks, Giulio!)

 

Simone Unverdorben, The False Martyr

Article by guestblogger La cara Pasifae

A little boy went out to play.
When he opened his door he saw the world.
As he passed through the doorway he caused a riflection.
Evil was born!
Evil was born and followed the boy.

(D. Lynch, Inland Empire, 2006)

It was a nice late-summer afternoon, in 2013. I remember well.
A friend had invited me to the opening of his latest exhibition. He had picked an unusual place for the event: an ancient and isolated parish church that stood high up on a hill, the church of Nanto. The building had been recently renovated, and it was open to the public only on specific occasions.
Once there, one immediately feels the urge to look around. The view is beautiful, but it pays the price of the impact the construction industry (I was almost about to say “architecture”) has had on the surroundings, with many industrial buildings covering the lanscapes of Veneto region like a tattoo. Better go inside and look at the paintings.

I was early for the opening, so I had the artist, his works and the entire exhibition area all for myself. I could walk and look around without any hurry, and yet I felt something disturbing my peace, something I couldn’t quite pin down at first:  it kind of wormed its way into my visual field, calling for attention. On a wall, as I was passing from one painted canvas to the next, I eventually spotted a sudden, indefinite blur of colors. A fresco. An image had been resting there well before the exhibition paintings were placed in front of it!

Despite the restoration, as it happens with many medieval and Renaissance frescoes, some elements were still confused and showed vanishing, vaporous outlines. But once in focus, an unsettling vision emerged: the fresco depicted a quite singular torture scene, the likes of which I had never encountered in any other artwork (but I wouldn’t want to pass as an expert on the subject).
Two female figures, standing on either side, were holding the arms of a blonde child (a young Christ, a child-saint, or a puer sacer, a sacred and mystical infant, I really couldn’t say). The kid was being tortured by two young men: each holding a stiletto, they were slicing the boy’s skin all over, and even his face seemed to have been especially brutalized.


Blood ran down the child’s bound feet into a receiving bowl, which had been specifically placed under the victim’s tormented limbs.

The child’s swollen face (the only one still clearly visible) had an ecstatic expression that barely managed to balance the horror of the hemorrhage and of the entire scene: in the background, a sixth male figure sporting a remarkable beard, was twisting a cloth band around the prisoner throat. The baby was being choked to death!

What is the story of this fresco? What tale does it really tell?
The five actors do not look like peasants; the instruments are not randomly chosen: these are thin, sharp, professional blades. The incisions on the victim’s body are too regular. Who perpetrated this hideous murder, who was the object of the resentment the author intended to elicit in the onlookers? Maybe the fresco was a representation — albeit dramatic and exaggerated — of a true crime. Should the choking, flaying and bleeding be seen as a metaphor for some parasitic exploitation, or do they hint at some rich and eccentric nobleman’s quirkiness? Is this a political allegory or a Sadeian chronicle?
The halo surrounding the child’s head makes him an innocent or a saved soul. Was this a homage, a flattering detail to exhalt the commissioner of this work of art? What character was meant to be celebrated here, the subjects on the sides who are carrying out a dreadful, but unavoidable task, or the boy at the center who looks so obscenely resigned to suffer their painful deeds? Are we looking at five emissaries of some brutal but rational justice as they perform their duties, or the misadventure of a helpless soul that fell in the hands of a ferocious gang of thugs?

At the bottom of the fresco, a date: «ADI ⋅ 3 ⋅ APRILE 1479».
This historical detail brought me back to the present. The church was already crowded with people.
I felt somehow crushed by the overload of arcane symbols, and the frustation of not having the adequate knowledge to interpret what I had seen. I furtively took a snapshot. I gave my host a warm farewell, and then got out, hoping the key to unlock the meaning of the fresco was not irretrievably lost in time.

As I discovered at the beginning of my research on this controversial product of popular iconography, the fresco depicts the martyrdom of Saint Simonino of Trent. Simone Unverdorben, a two-year-old toddler from Trent, disappeared on March 23, 1475. His body was found on Easter Day. It was said to have been mauled and strangled. In Northern Italy, in those years, antisemitic abuses and persecutions stemmed from the widely influential sermons of the clergy. The guilt for the heinous crime immediately fell upon the Trent Jewish community. All of its members had to endure one of the biggest trials of the time, being subjected to tortures that led to confessions and reciprocal accusations.

During the preliminary investigations of the Trent trial, a converted Jew was asked if the practice of ritual homicide of Christian toddlers existed within the Hebrew cult. […] The converted Jew, at the end of the questioning, confirmed with abundant details the practice of ritual sacrifice in the Jewish Easter liturgy.
Another testimony emerged from the interrogation of another of the alleged killers of the little Simone, the Jewish physician Tobia. He declared on the rack there was a commerce in Christian blood among Jews. A Jewish merchant called Abraam was said to have left Trent shortly before Simone’s death with the intention of selling Christian blood, headed to Feltre or Bassano, and to have asked around which of the two cities was closer to Trent. Tobia’s confession took place under the terrifying threat of being tortured and in the desperate attempt to avoid it: he therefore had to be cooperative to the point of fabrication; but it was understood that his testimony, whenever made up, should be consistent and plausible.
[…] Among the others, another converted man named Israele (Wolfgang, after converting) was  also interrogated under torture. He declared he had heard about other cases of ritual murders […]. These instances of ritual homicides were inventions whose protagonists had names that came from the interrogee’s memory, borrowed to crowd these fictional stories in a credible way.

(M. Melchiorre, Gli ebrei a Feltre nel Quattrocento. Una storia rimossa,
in Ebrei nella Terraferma veneta del Quattrocento,
a cura di G.M. Varanini e R.C. Mueller, Firenze University Press 2005)

Many were burned at the stake. The survivors were exiled from the city, after their possessions had been confiscated.
According to the jury, the child’s collected blood had been used in the ritual celebration of the “Jewish Easter”.

The facts we accurately extracted from the offenders, as recorded in the original trials, are the following. The wicked Jews living in Trent, having maliciously planned to make their Easter solemn through the killing of a Christian child, whose blood they could mix in their unleavened bread, commisioned it to Tobia, who was deemed perfect for the infamous deed as he was familiar with the town on the account of being a professional doctor. He went out at 10 pm on Holy Thursday, March 23, as all believers were at the Mass, walked the streets and alleys of the city and having spotted the innocent Simone all alone on his father’s front door, he showed him a big silver piece, and with sweet words and smiles he took him from via del Fossato, where his parents lived, to the house of the rich Jew Samuele, who was eagerly waiting for him. There he was kept, with charms and apples, until the hour of the sacrifice arrived. At 1 am, little twenty-nine-months-old Simone was taken to the chamber adjoining the women’s synagogue; he was stripped naked and a band or belt was made from his clothes, and he was muzzled with a handkerchief, so that he wouldn’t immediately choke to death nor be heard; Moses the Elder, sitting on a stall and holding the baby in his lap, tore a piece of flesh off his cheek with a pair of iron pliers. Samuele did the same while Tobia, assisted by Moar, Bonaventura, Israele, Vitale and another Bonaventura (Samuele’s cook) collected in a basin the blood pouring from the wound. After that, Samuele and the aforementioned seven Jews vied with each other to pierce the flesh of the holy martyr, declaring in Hebrew that they were doing so to mock the crucified God of the Christians; and they added: thus shall be the fate of all our enemies. After this feral ordeal, the old Moses took a knife and pierced with it the tip of the penis, and with the pliers tore a chunk of meat from the little right leg and Samuel, who replaced him, tore a piece out of the other leg. The copious blood oozing from the puerile penis was harvested in a different vase, while the blood pouring from the legs was collected in the basin. All the while, the cloth plugging his mouth was sometimes tightened and sometimes loosened; not satisfied with the outrageous massacre, they insisted in the same torture a second time, with greater cruelty, piercing him everywhere with pins and needles; until the young boy’s blessed soul departed his body, among the rejoicing of this insane riffraff.

(Annali del principato ecclesiastico di Trento dal 1022 al 1540, pp. 352-353)

Very soon Simonino (“little Simone”) was acclaimed as a “blessed martyr”, and his cult spread thoughout Northern Italy. As devotion grew wider, so did the production of paintings, ex voto, sculptures, bas reliefs, altar decorations.

Polichrome woodcut, Daniel Mauch’s workshop, Museo Diocesano Tridentino.

Questionable elements, taken from folktales and popular belief, began to merge with an already established, sterotyped antisemitism.

 

From Alto Adige, April 1, 2017.

Despite the fact that the Pope had forbidden the cult, pilgrims kept flocking. The fame of the “saint” ‘s miracles grew, together with a wave of antisemitism. The fight against usury led to the accusation of loan-sharking, extended to all Jews. The following century, Pope Sistus V granted a formal beatification. The cult of Saint Simonino of Trent further solidified. The child’s embalmed body was exhibited in Trent until 1955, together with the alleged relics of the instruments of torture.

In reality, Simone Unverdorben (or Unferdorben) was found dead in a water canal belonging to a town merchant, near a Jewish man’s home, probably a moneylender. If he wasn’t victim of a killer, who misdirected the suspects on the easy scapegoat of the Jewish community, the child might have fallen in the canal and drowned. Rats could have been responsible for the mutilations. In the Nineteenth Century, accurate investigations proved the ritual homicide theory wrong. In 1965, five centuries after the murder, the Church abolished  the worship of Saint “Martyr” Simonino for good.

A violent fury against the very portraits of the “torturers” lasted for a long time. Even the San Simonino fresco in Nanto was defaced by this rage. This is the reason why, during that art exhibition, I needed some time to recognize a painting in that indistinct blur of light and colors.

My attempt at gathering the information I needed in order to make sense of the simulacrum in the Nanto parish church, led me to discover an often overlooked incident, known only to the artists who represented it, their commissioners, their audience; but the deep discomfort I felt when I first looked at the fresco still has not vanished.

La cara Pasifae


Suggested bibliography:
– R. Po – Chia Hsia, Trent 1475. Stories of a Ritual Murder Trial, Yale 1992
– A. Esposito, D. Quaglioni, Processi contro gli Ebrei di Trento (1475-1478), CEDAM 1990
– A. Toaff, Pasque di sangue: ebrei d’Europa e omicidi rituali, Il Mulino 2008

Neapolitan Ritual Food

by Michelangelo Pascali

Everybody knows Italian cuisine, but few are aware that several traditional dishes hold a symbolic meaning. Guestblogger Michelangelo Pascali uncovers the metaphorical value of some Neapolitan recipes.

Neapolitan culture shows a dense symbology that accompanies the preparation and consumption of certain dishes, mostly for propitiatory purposes, during heartfelt ritual holidays. These very ancient holidays, some of which were later converted to Christian holidays, are linked to the passage of time and to the seasons of life.
The symbolic meaning of ritual food can sometimes refer to the cyclic nature of life, or to some exceptional social circumstances.

One of the most well-known “devotional courses” is certainly the white and crunchy torrone, which is eaten during the festivities for the Dead, between the end of October and the beginning of November. The almonds on the inside represent the bones of the departed which are to be absorbed in an vaguely cannibal perspective (as with Mexican sugar skeletons). The so-called torrone dei morti (“torrone of the Dead”) can also traditionally be squared-shaped, its white paste covered with dark chocolate to mimick the outline of a tavùto (“casket”).

The rhombus-shaped decorations on the pastiera, an Easter cake, together with the wheat forming its base, are meant to evoke the plowed fields and the coming of the mild season, more favorable for life.


The rebirth of springtime, after the “death” of winter, finds another representation in the casatiello, the traditional Easter Monday savory pie, that has to be left to rise for an entire night from dusk till dawn. Its ring-like shape is a reminder of the circular nature of time, as seen by the ancient agricultural, earthbound society (and therefore quite distant, in many ways, from the linear message of Christian religion); the inside cheese and sausages once again represent the dead, buried in the ground. But the real peculiarity, here, is the emerging of some eggs from the pie, protected by a “cross” made of crust: a bizarre element, which would have no reason to be there were it not an allegory of birth — in fact, the eggs are placed that way to suggest a movement that goes “from the underground to the surface“, or “from the Earth to the Sky“.

In the Neapolitan Christmas Eve menu, “mandatory courses are still called ‘devotions’, just like in ancient Greek sacred banquets”, and “the obligation of lean days is turned into its very opposite” (M. Niola, Il sacrificio del capitone, in Repubblica, 15/12/2013).
The traditional Christmas dinner is carried out along the lines of ancient funerary dinners (with the unavoidable presence of dried fruit and seafood), and it also has the function of consuming the leftovers before the arrival of a new year, as for example in the menestra maretata (‘married soup’).

But the main protagonist is the capitone, the huge female eel. This fish has a peculiar reproduction cycle (on the account of its migratory habits) and is symbolically linked to the Ouroboros. The capitone‘s affinity with the snake, an animal associated with the concept of time in many cultures, is coupled with its being a water animal, therefore providing a link to the most vital element.
The capitone is first bred and raised within the family, only to be killed by the family members themselves (in a ritual that even allows for the animal to “escape”, if it manages to do so): an explicit ritual sacrifice carried out inside the community.

While still alive, the capitone is cut into pieces and thrown in boiling oil to be fried, as each segment still frantically writhes and squirms: in this preparation, it is as if the infinite moving cycle was broken apart and then absorbed. The snake as a metaphor of Evil seems to be a more recent symbology, juxtaposed to the ancient one.

Then there are the struffoli, spherical pastries covered in honey — a precious ingredient, so much so that the body of Baby Jesus is said to be a “honey-dripping rock” — candied fruit and diavulilli (multi-colored confetti); we suppose that in their aspect they might symbolize a connection with the stars. These pastries are indeed offered to the guests during Christmas season, an important cosmological moment: Macrobius called the winter solstice “the door of the Gods“, as under the Capricorn it becomes possible for men to communicate with divinities. It is the moment in which many Solar deities were born, like the Persian god Mitra, the Irish demigod Cú Chulainn, or the Greek Apollo — a pre-Christian protector of Naples, whose temple was found where the Cathedral now is. And the Saint patron Januarius, whose blood is collected right inside the Cathedral, is symbolically close to Apollo himself.
Of course the Church established the commemoration of Christ’s birth in the proximity of the solstice, whereas it was first set on January 6:  the Earth reaches its maximum distance from the Sunon the 21st of December, and begins to get closer to it after three days.

The sfogliatella riccia, on the other hand, is an allusion to the shape of the female reproductive organ, the ‘valley of fire’ (this is the translation of its Neapolitan common nickname, which has a Greek etymology). It is said to date back to the time when orgiastic rites were performed in Naples, where they were widespread for over a millennium and a half after the coming of the Christian Era, carried out in several peculiar places such as the caves of the Chiatamone. This pastry was perhaps invented to provide high energetic intake to the orgy participants.

Lastly, an exquistely mundane motivation is behind the pairing of chiacchiere and sanguinaccio.
Chiacchiere look like tongues, or like those strings of paper where, in paintings and bas-relief, the words of the speaking characters were inscribed; and their name literally means “chit-chat”. The sanguinaccio is a sort of chocolate black pudding which was originally prepared with pig’s blood (but not any more).
During the Carnival, the only real profane holiday that is left, the association between these two desserts sounds like a code of silence: it warns and cautions not to contaminate with ordinary logic the subversive charge of this secular rite, which is completely egalitarian (Carnival masks hide our individual identity, making us both unrecognizable and also indistinguishable from each other).
What happens during Carnival must stay confined within the realm of Carnival — on penalty of “tongues being drowned in blood“.

Grief and sacrifice: abscence carved into flesh

Some of you probably know about sati (or suttee), the hindu self-immolation ritual according to which a widow was expected to climb on her husband’s funeral pire to be burned alive, along his body. Officially forbidden by the English in 1829, the practice declined over time – not without some opposition on behalf of traditionalists – until it almost entirely disappeared: if in the XIX Century around 600 sati took place every year, from 1943 to 1987 the registered cases were around 30, and only 4 in the new millennium.

The sacrifice of widows was not limited to India, in fact it appeared in several cultures. In his Histories, Herodotus wrote about a people living “above the Krestons”, in Thracia: within this community, the favorite among the widows of a great man was killed over his grave and buried with him, while the other wives considered it a disgrace to keep on living.

Among the Heruli in III Century a.D., it was common for widows to hang themselves over their husband’s burial ground; in the XVIII Century, on the other side of the ocean, when a Natchez chief died his wives (often accompanied by other volunteers) followed him by committing ritual suicide. At times, some mothers from the tribe would even sacrify their own newborn children, in an act of love so strong that women who performed it were treated with great honor and entered a higher social level. Similar funeral practices existed in other native peoples along the southern part of Mississippi River.

Also in the Pacific area, for instance in Fiji, there were traditions involving the strangling of the village chief’s widows. Usually the suffocation was carried out or supervised by the widow’s brother (see Fison’s Notes on Fijian Burial Customs, 1881).

The idea underlying these practices was that it was deemed unconcievable (or improper) for a woman to remain alive after her husband’s death. In more general terms, a leader’s death opened an unbridgeable void, so much so that the survivors’ social existence was erased.
If female self-immolation (and, less commonly, male self-immolation) can be found in various time periods and latitudes, the Dani tribe developed a one-of-a-kind funeral sacrifice.

The Dani people live mainly in Baliem Valley, the indonesian side of New Guinea‘s central highlands. They are now a well-known tribe, on the account of increased tourism in the area; the warriors dress with symbolic accessories – a feather headgear, fur bands, a sort of tie made of seashells specifying the rank of the man wearing it, a pig’s fangs fixed to the nostrils and the koteka, a penis sheath made from a dried-out gourd.
The women’s clothing is simpler, consisting in a skirt made from bark and grass, and a headgear made from multicolored bird feathers.

Among this people, according to tradition when a man died the women who were close or related to him (wife, mother, sister, etc.) used to amputate one or more parts of their fingers. Today this custom no longer exists, but the elder women in the tribe still carry the marks of the ritual.

Allow me now a brief digression.

In Dino Buzzati‘s wonderful tale The Humps in the Garden (published in 1968 in La boutique del mistero), the protagonist loves to take long, late-night walks in the park surrounding his home. One evening, while he’s promenading, he stumbles on a sort of hump in the ground, and the following day he asks his gardener about it:

«What did you do in the garden, on the lawn there is some kind of hump, yesterday evening I stumbled on it and this morning as soon as the sun came up I saw it. It is a narrow and oblong hump, it looks like a burial mound. Will you tell me what’s happening?». «It doesn’t look like it, sir» said Giacomo the gardener «it really is a burial mound. Because yesterday, sir, a friend of yours has died».
It was true. My dearest friend Sandro Bartoli, who was twenty-one-years-old, had died in the mountains with his skull smashed.
«Are you trying to tell me» I said to Giacomo «that my friend was buried here?»
«No» he replied «your friend, Mr. Bartoli […] was buried at the foot of that mountain, as you know. But here in the garden the lawn bulged all by itself, because this is your garden, sir, and everything that happens in your life, sir, will have its consequences right here.»

Years go by, and the narrator’s park slowly fills with new humps, as his loved ones die one by one. Some bulges are small, other enormous; the garden, once flat and regular, at this point is completely packed with mounds appearing with every new loss.

Because this problem of humps in the garden happens to everybody, and every one of us […] owns a garden where these painful phenomenons take place. It is an ancient story repeating itself since the beginning of centuries, it will repeat for you too. And this isn’t a literary joke, this is how things really are.

In the tale’s final part, we discover that the protagonist is not a fictional character at all, and that the sorrowful metaphore refers to the author himself:

Naturally I also wonder if in someone else’s garden will one day appear a hump that has to do with me, maybe a second or third-rate little hump, just a slight pleating in the lawn, not even noticeable in broad daylight, when the sun shines from up high. However, one person in the world, at least one, will stumble on it. Perhaps, on the account of my bad temper, I will die alone like a dog at the end of an old and deserted hallway. And yet one person that evening will stub his toe on the little hump in the garden, and will stumble on it the following night too, and each time that person will think with a shred of regret, forgive my hopefulness, of a certain fellow whose name was Dino Buzzati.

Now, if I may risk the analogy, the humps in Buzzati’s garden seem to be poetically akin to the Dani women’s missing fingers. The latter represent a touching and powerful image: each time a loved one leaves us, “we lose a bit of ourselves”, as is often said – but here the loss is not just emotional, the absence becomes concrete. On the account of this physical expression of grief, fingerless women undoubtedly have a hard time carrying out daily tasks; and further bereavements lead to the impossibility of using their hands. The oldest women, who have seen many loved ones die, need help and assistance from the community. Death becomes a wound which makes them disabled for life.

Of course, at least from a contemporary perspective, there is still a huge stumbling block: the metaphore would be perfect if such a tradition concerned also men, who instead were never expected to carry out such extreme sacrifices. It’s the female body which, more or less voluntarily, bears this visible evidence of pain.
But from a more universal perspective, it seems to me that these symbols hold the certainty that we all will leave a mark, a hump in someone else’s garden. The pride with which Dani women show their mutilated hands suggests that one person’s passage inevitably changes the reality around him, conditioning the community, even “sculpting” the flesh of his kindreds. The creation of meaning in displays of grief also lies in reciprocity – the very tradition that makes me weep for the dead today, will ensure that tomorrow others will lament my own departure.

Regardless of the historical variety of ways in which this concept was put forth, in this awareness of reciprocity human beings seem to have always found some comfort, because it eventually means that we can never be alone.

The elephants’ graveyard

Run_Cubbies

In The Lion King (1994), the famous Disney animated film, young lion Simba is tricked by the villain, Scar, and finds himself with his friend Nala in the unsettling elephants’ graveyard: hundreds of immense pachyderm skeletons reach the horizon. In this evocative location, the little cub will endure the ambush of three ravenous hyenas.

The setting of this action-packed scene, in fact, does not come from the screenwriters’ imagination. An elephants’ graveyard had already been shown in Trader Horn (1931), and in some Tarzan flicks, featuring the iconic Johnny Weissmuller.
And the most curious fact is that the existence of a mysterious and gigantic collective cemetery, where for thousands of years the elephants have been retiring to die, had been debated since the middle of XIX Century.

viajes-cementerio-elph-tarzan

This legendary place, described as some sort of secret sanctuary, hidden in the deepest recesses of Black Africa, is one of the most enduring myths of the golden age of explorations and big-game hunting. It was a true African Eldorado, where the courageous adventurer could find an unspeakable treasure: besides the elephants’ skeletons, the cave (or the inaccessible valley) would hold such an immense quantity of ivory that anyone finding it would have become insanely rich.

But finding a similar place, as every respectable legend demands, was no easy task. Those who saw it, either never came back from it… or were not able to locate the entrance anymore. Tales were told about searchers who found the tracks of an old and sick elephant, who had departed from the herd, and followed them for days in hope that the animal would bring them to the hidden graveyard; but they then realized they had been led in a huge circle by the deceptive elephant, and found themselves right where they started.

According to other versions, the elusive ossuary was regarded as a sacred place by indigenous people. Anyone who approached it, even accidentally, would have been attacked by the dreadful guardians of the cemetery, a pack of warriors lead by a shaman who protected the entrance to the sanctuary.

The elephants’ graveyard legend, which was mentioned even by Livingstone and circulated in Europe until the first decades of the XX Century, is indeed a legend. But where does it come from? Is it possible that this myth is somewhat grounded in reality?

First of all, there really are some places where high concentrations of elephant bones can be found, as if several animals had traveled there, to a single, precise spot to let themselves die.

The most plausible explanation can be found, surprisingly enough, in dentition. Elephants actually have only two sets of teeth: molars and incisors. Tusks are nothing more than modified incisors, slowly and incessantly growing, whose length is regulated by constant wear. On the contrary, molars are cyclically replaced: during the animal’s lifespan, reaching fifty or sixty years of age in a natural environment, new teeth grow on the back of the mandible and push forward the older ones.

jaw_of_a_deceased_loxodonta_africana_juvenile_individual_found_within_the_voyager_ziwani_safari_camp_on_the_edge_of_the_tsavo_west_national_park_near_ziwani_kenya_3_edited

An elephant can have up to a maximum of six molar cycles during its whole existence.
But if the animal lives long enough, which is to say several years after the last cycle occurred, there is no replacement and its wore-down dentition ceases to be functional. These old elephants then find it difficult to feed on shrubs and harder plants, and therefore move to areas where the presence of a water spring guarantees softer and more nutrient herbs. The weariness of old age brings them to prefer regions featuring higher vegetation density, where they need less to struggle to find food. According to some researchers, the muddy waters of a spring could bring relief to the suffering and dental decay of these aging pachyderms; the malnourished animals would then begin to drink more and more water, and this could actually lead to a worsening of their health by diluting the glucose in their blood.
Anyways, the search for water and a more suitable vegetation could draw several sick elephants towards the same spring. This hypothesis could explain the findings of bone stacks in relatively circumscribed areas.

elephant-skeleton

A second explanation for the legend, if a sadder one, could be connected to ivory commerce and smuggling. It’s not rare, still nowadays, for some “elephants’ graveyards” to be found — except they turn out to be massacre sites, where the animals were hunted and mutilated of their precious tusks by poachers. Similar findings, back in the days, could have suggested the idea that the herd had collected there on purpose, to wait for the end to come.

But the stories about a hidden cemetery could also have risen from the observation of elephants’ behavior when facing the death of a counterpart.
These animals are in fact thought to be among the most “intelligent” mammals, in that they show quite complex social relations within the group, elaborate behavioral characteristics, and often display surprising altruistic conduct even towards other species. An emblematic example is that of one domestic indian elephant, employed in following a truck which was carrying logs; at the master’s sign, the animal lifted one of the logs from the trailer and placed it in the appropriate hole, excavated earlier on. When the elephant came to a specific hole, it refused to follow the order; the master came down to investigate, and he found a dog sleeping at the bottom of the hole. Only when the dog was taken out of the hole did the elephant drive the log into it (reported by C. Holdrege in Elephantine Intelligence).

When an elephant dies — especially if it’s the matriarch — the other members of the herd remain around the carcass, standing in silence for days. They gently touch it with their trunks, as if staging an actual mourning ritual; they take turns to leave the body to find water and food, then get back to the place, always keeping guard of the body. They sometimes carry out a sort of rudimentary burial practice, hiding and covering the carcass with dry twigs and torn branches. Even when encountering the bones of an unknown deceased elephant, they can spend hours touching and scattering the remains.

Ethologists obviously debate over these behaviors: the animals could be attracted and confused by the ivory in the remains, as ivory is used as a socially fundamental communication device; according to some researches, they show sometimes the same “stupor” for birds’ remains or even simple pieces of wood. But they seem to be undoubtedly fascinated by their counterparts, wounded or dead.

Being the only animals, other than men and some primate species, who show this kind of participation in death and dying, elephants have always been associated with human emotions — particularly by those indigenous people who live in strict contact with them. There has always been an important symbolic bond between man and elephant: thus unfolds the last, and deepest level of the story.

The hidden graveyard legend, besides its undeniable charm, is also a powerful allegory of voluntary death, the path the elder takes in order to die in solitude and dignity. Releasing his community from the weight of old age, and leaving behind a courageous and strong image, he proceeds towards the sacred place where he will be in contact with his ancestors’ spirits, who are now ready to honorably welcome him as one of their own.70

Post inspired by this article.

I soldi dei morti

Per i cinesi, ogni uomo è composto da diversi spiriti: fra tutti, i due più importanti sono quello materiale, chiamato po, con sede nel fegato e nutrito dal cibo, che al momento della morte rimane nella tomba; e l’anima spirituale, chiamata hun, con sede nei polmoni e nutrita dal respiro, che al trapasso si stacca invece dal corpo e va incontro al suo destino.
Un destino che è ovviamente conseguenza delle azioni terrene, della virtù e delle qualità del morto. Così, nell’oltretomba, esiste una gamma di possibili mutamenti che attendono lo hun del defunto: il più difficile e prestigioso è ovviamente divenire uno xiandao, un Immortale taoista – oppure raggiungere Jing-tu, la Terra Pura, se si è buddhisti. Ma, qualora in vita le azioni del morto non siano state per nulla virtuose, l’anima può finire per incrementare le fila degli egui, “spiriti affamati” che arrecano danni e problemi ai viventi a causa della fame e della sete insaziabili che li divorano.
Tutti coloro che stanno nel mezzo – né spiriti eccelsi, né peccatori senza speranza – vengono destinati alla “Via dell’Uomo” (rendao), vale a dire a reincarnarsi fino a che non saranno finalmente degni di lasciare questo mondo. Queste anime, però, prima di potersi reincarnare dovranno passare per una sorta di regno di mezzo chiamato diyu, assimilabile al nostro purgatorio.

Il diyu non è altro che una terribile “prigione sotterranea” che in qualche modo riflette specularmente la burocrazia del nostro mondo. Qui le anime vengono imputate in un vero e proprio processo in dieci differenti stadi, i Dieci Tribunali dell’Inferno: alla fine del lungo dibattimento giudiziario, il defunto viene assegnato ad un supplizio specifico a seconda delle sue colpe e mancanze. Si tratta di pene e torture dantesche sia nella crudeltà che nel contrappasso, che l’anima patisce provando dolori atroci, proprio come se avesse ancora un corpo. Fra lame che mozzano la lingua ai bugiardi, seghe che tagliano in due gli uomini d’affari scorretti, stupratori e ladri gettati in calderoni d’olio bollente o cotti al vapore, gente macinata e ridotta in polvere con mole di pietra, il diyu è una fiera degli orrori senza fine. Le anime, una volta subìto il supplizio, vengono ricomposte e la pena ricomincia.

Una volta scontato il periodo di “carcere duro” previsto dai giudici, all’anima è somministrata una pozione che le fa dimenticare quanto ha visto, e infine viene rispedita sulla terra… spesso con un bel calcio nel sedere (il che spiega le voglie violacee all’altezza delle natiche che a volte mostrano i neonati).

Dicevamo però che il diyu è una sorta di versione ribaltata del nostro mondo. Non crediate quindi che le delibere del Tribunale dell’Inferno siano infallibili: proprio come accade nei Palazzi di Giustizia terreni, nell’oltretomba cinese possono verificarsi degli errori giudiziari; c’è una mole impressionante di pratiche burocratiche da sbrigare, e anche fra i demoni esistono corruzione e nepotismo.
Ecco perché i cinesi hanno sviluppato uno dei rituali sacrificali più particolari e bizzarri: quello delle qian zhi, le “banconote di carta”.

Si tratta di imitazioni di banconote su cui è impresso il volto del sovrano dell’Aldilà, simili ai soldi finti dei giochi in scatola, stampate su carta di riso ed emesse dalla Banca degli Inferi, Yantong Yinhang. I tagli variano (anche a seconda dell’inflazione!) da diecimila a centinaia di miliardi di yuan – anche se ovviamente il prezzo d’acquisto è infinitamente inferiore a quello nominale. Si possono comprare in svariati empori e negozi.

400685506_fe1e803396_z

Le banconote vengono bruciate in falò rituali accesi vicino alle tombe, così che il fuoco le “trasporti” oltre il confine fra vivi e morti, recapitandole al caro estinto. L’anima del defunto potrà quindi usare i soldi inviatigli dalla famiglia per acquistare beni di consumo, per “comprare” i favori delle guardie, oppure per guadagnarsi rispetto e status sociale, o magari addirittura per corrompere un giudice e ottenere così uno sconto di pena.

Vi sono regole strette e tabù collegati al modo in cui le banconote vanno bruciate, così come ad esempio regalarne una ad una persona ancora in vita è altamente offensivo: insomma, i soldi dei morti sono un affare serio per molti cinesi.
Il defunto è in definitiva considerato come un parente vivo e vegeto, che si trova in un luogo lontano e sta attraversando un periodo di difficoltà. Quale famiglia amorevole non gli manderebbe un po’ di soldi?

Se questo approccio, tipico della pratica e concreta mentalità cinese, ci sembra strano ad un primo sguardo, si tratta in realtà di una pratica non molto distante dal nostro atteggiamento verso i cari estinti: compriamo una bella lapide, raccomandiamo a Dio la loro anima, in modo da ottenere la loro benevolenza; in cambio, li preghiamo per avere intercessioni, protezione e favori.
Il culto degli antenati è pressoché universale, e la versione cinese delle qian zhi non fa che rendere evidente il meccanismo che lo sottende.
L’appartenenza alla società è di norma sancita dallo scambio (economico, di lavoro, di sostegno e di aiuto) fra i membri della società stessa: la barriera della morte, che in teoria dovrebbe interrompere questo commercio, non è affatto insormontabile, perché in tutte le culture lo scambio fra vivi e morti non viene mai meno, diventa semplicemente simbolico.

La peculiarità non sta quindi nel tentativo di regalare qualcosa ai morti, poiché è proprio questo il nocciolo del culto dei defunti, in ogni epoca e latitudine: vogliamo continuare a proteggere i nostri cari, e a dimostrare attraverso il dono sacrificale quanto forte sia ancora l’affetto che ci lega a loro. Il vero aspetto singolare di questa tradizione sta nella somiglianza quasi comica dell’Aldilà cinese con il nostro mondo.


Con il passare del tempo e con l’evolversi della tecnologia, ormai anche all’Inferno le semplici mazzette non bastano più. Forse i diavoli sono diventati più esigenti, o forse nell’Aldilà – dove comunque è indispensabile darsi un tono – le stesse anime dei defunti si fanno influenzare dalle mode consumistiche; fatto sta che nei negozi, accanto alle banconote, sono oggi esposte delle raffigurazioni cartacee di bottiglie di champagne (conquistare la simpatia del carceriere con un goccetto funziona sempre), prodotti di bellezza, completi in gessato, ciabatte contraffatte di Louis Vuitton con cui pavoneggiarsi, carte di credito, addirittura ville in miniatura, macchine di lusso, televisori al plasma, laptop, cellulari, iPhone e iPad taroccati con tanto di custodia. Tutto in carta, pronto da bruciare, in vendita per pochi euro.

Un oltretomba fin troppo familiare, che rispecchia vizi e problemi per i quali nemmeno la morte sembra essere un rimedio sicuro: non c’è da stupirsi quindi che, fra i vari gadget che si possono inviare nell’oltretomba, vi siano anche le repliche delle scatole di Viagra.

La maggior parte delle informazioni sono tratte dall’illuminante e consigliatissimo Tre uomini fanno una tigre. Viaggio nella cultura e nella lingua cinese (2014) di Nazzarena Fazzari.

Battesimi pericolosi

74852771

Castrillo de Murcia è un piccolo borgo di 500 anime nella provincia di Burgos, nella Spagna del Nord. Il paesino è sonnacchioso, e non vi succede nulla di eclatante; ma per un giorno all’anno, Castrillo si guadagna l’attenzione dei media e di un manipolo di turisti incuriositi dalla strana tradizione che vi si svolge da quasi 400 anni.

Nata nel 1620, la festa di El Colacho si svolge nel giorno del Corpus Domini (in Maggio o in Giugno), ed è curata dalla Confraternita del Santísimo Sacramento de Minerva. Un prescelto si veste con un abito tradizionale dai colori sgargianti che ricordano le fiamme dell’Inferno: si tratta infatti di una vera e propria personificazione del Diavolo, che indossa una minacciosa maschera di sapore carnevalesco. El Colacho si aggira per le vie paesane, accompagnato in processione dai membri della Confraternita, e rincorre di tanto in tanto i passanti e i bambini, frustandoli giocosamente con una sorta di gatto a nove code.

A man dressed in a red and yellow costume representing the devil runs through the streets chasing a boy during traditional Corpus Christi celebrations, in Castrillo de Murcia

large_dsc03223

large_dsc03228

large_dsc03251

large_dsc03331

Ma è la seconda parte della processione che è la più impressionante. Giunto nella piazza cittadina, El Colacho si appresta al rituale tradizionale che ha reso celebre la festività. Vengono preparati dei materassi, su cui sono adagiati dei bambini, tutti rigorosamente nati nei dodici mesi precedenti: alcuni degli infanti piangono, altri ridono, altri ancora dormono di gusto.

large_dsc03367

large_dsc03361-1

large_dsc03334

Ed ecco che, una volta pronti questi affollati lettini, El Colacho prende la rincorsa e comincia a saltarli, uno dopo l’altro, atterrando a pochi centimetri di distanza dalle testoline dei piccoli. Un passo falso potrebbe essere davvero pericoloso: ma, a quanto si dice, fino ad ora non si è mai verificato alcun incidente.

El-Colacho-baby-jumping-Spain-2-450x250

El Colacho Baby Jumping Fiesta

El-Colacho-baby-jumping-Spain-3

Perché una madre dovrebbe voler posizionare il proprio figlioletto di pochi mesi sul materassino, affinché un uomo vestito da diavolo vi salti sopra, di fronte a una folla plaudente? Il rito, secondo la credenza popolare, è salvifico e benefico: il passaggio di El Colacho rimuove il Peccato Originale, e porta con sé ogni male, proteggendo i neonati dalle malattie.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zheUrV2Bn-Y]

Ovviamente, la Chiesa non si limita a storcere il naso di fronte a questo tipo di tradizioni, ma le condanna apertamente, poiché secondo la dottrina ufficiale soltanto il sacramento del battesimo può sollevare il peso del Peccato Originale. Ma gli abitanti di Castrillo de Murcia, per quanto devoti, non rinuncerebbero per niente al mondo alla loro tradizione: si è sempre fatto così, e tutti coloro che battezzano i propri figli in questo strano modo sono stati a loro tempo sottoposti al salto del Colacho.

large_dsc03344

large_dsc03337

070615_spain_0

Se il salto del Colacho può sembrare estremo e pericoloso, non è nulla in confronto al battesimo che si celebra in alcune parti dell’India, in particolare negli stati di Karnataka e Maharashtra; si tratta di un rito praticato indistintamente da musulmani ed induisti.

Un uomo scala con una corda le mura del tempio, mentre sulla sua schiena penzola un secchio. Una volta arrivato in cima, il devoto mostra a tutti il contenuto del secchio – un bambino (di massimo due anni): dal tetto, alto una decina di metri, esibisce il neonato alla folla sottostante, tenendolo per le braccia e i piedini. Dopo aver invocato la protezione divina, di colpo lo lancia nel vuoto.

Nella piazza, una quindicina di uomini stanno aspettando l’atterraggio del bambino, tendendo una coperta per salvarlo. Il piccolo rimbalza sul telone, viene acchiappato al volo, rapidamente fatto passare di mano in mano e riconsegnato alla madre o al padre. Il tutto dura pochi secondi, anche se ci vogliono svariati minuti perché il bambino si riprenda dallo shock.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WbOsEmHzq1c]

Il salto, ancora una volta, ha lo scopo di portare fortuna e salute al neonato; per la sua pericolosità, si tratta comunque di un rituale controverso, e diverse associazioni per i diritti umani hanno cercato di proibirlo. Nel 2011 queste proteste sono state ufficialmente ascoltate, ma la legge che mette al bando tale pratica è regolarmente ignorata dai fedeli, e perfino la polizia preferisce non interferire con i riti.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tuqRYS0K3UU]

Visto anche il carattere sensibile della questione, è facile immaginare lo scandalo e la rabbia di chi è estraneo a questo tipo di tradizioni, e certamente si può (e si deve) discutere sull’opportunità che certi rituali rischiosi continuino ad essere riproposti al giorno d’oggi. Ma, per quanto il rito in questione sia stato tacciato di essere barbarico, “assurdo”, “senza logica né ragione”, per chi ha un minimo di dimestichezza con l’antropologia il suo senso è cristallino – in verità, esso mostra molte caratteristiche classiche di qualsiasi rito di passaggio.

Il bambino viene innanzitutto separato dai genitori; la guida lo conduce fino al confine, fino alla prova – eminentemente fisica – che egli dovrà affrontare da solo (il salto); infine, una volta completata l’essenziale fase di “transizione”, cioè il superamento della difficoltà, avviene la reintegrazione del bambino con il nucleo familiare e, più genericamente, con la società. Il bambino, com’è ovvio, è ora un individuo nuovo, e gode dei benefici del nuovo status (immunità dalle malattie).

Il salto del Colacho, così come il lancio dei bambini dalla moschea, sono “battesimi del fuoco” portatori di un senso profondo: i riti di passaggio sono talmente fondamentali per l’uomo da sopravvivere anche nelle nostre società industrializzate, cibernetiche e all’avanguardia. Non è tanto il valore di queste tradizioni che andrebbe messo in discussione, quindi, quanto piuttosto la modalità d’esecuzione. Forse, piuttosto che bandire e proibire, sarebbe più produttivo incentivare l’elaborazione di varianti ritualistiche meno cruente, come si è provveduto a fare in molti altri casi nel mondo.

Le esequie dei Toraja

Sulawesi è un’isola della Repubblica Indonesiana, situata ad est del Borneo e a sud delle Filippine. Nella provincia meridionale dell’isola, sulle montagne, vivono i Toraja, etnia indigena di circa 650.000 persone. I Toraja sono famosi per le loro abitazioni tradizionali a forma di palafitta e dal tetto allungato, chiamate tongkonan, e per le colorate fantasie geometriche con cui intagliano e decorano il legno.

Ma i Toraja sono noti anche per i loro complessi ed elaborati rituali funebri. Essi risalgono ad un’epoca remota, quando i Toraja seguivano ancora la loro religione politeistica tradizionale, chiamata aluk (“la Via”, un sistema di legge, fede e consuetudine); quest’ultima, con il tempo e a causa della lunga guerra contro i musulmani, è oggi divenuta un miscuglio di cristianesimo ed animismo.
Sebbene molti dei rituali “della vita”, cioè quelli propiziatori e purificatori, siano man mano stati abbandonati, le cerimonie “della morte” sono rimaste pressoché invariate.

Per i Toraja, la morte di un membro della famiglia è un evento di fondamentale importanza, e le celebrazioni funebri sono lunghe, complesse ed estremamente dispendiose, tanto da essere probabilmente il principale momento di aggregazione sociale per l’intera popolazione. Più il morto era potente o ricco, più le cerimonie sono fastose: se si tratta di un nobile, il funerale può contare migliaia di partecipanti. A spese della famiglia, in un campo prescelto per i rituali vengono costruite delle tettoie e dei gazebo per ospitare il pubblico, dei depositi per il riso, e altre strutture apposite; per diversi giorni ai pianti e alle lamentazioni si alternano la musica dei flauti e la recitazione di poemi e canzoni in onore del defunto.

Il momento culminante è il sacrificio degli animali – maiali, bufali, polli: ancora una volta, il numero varia a seconda dell’influenza sociale del morto. La lama del machete può abbattersi anche su un centinaio di animali. Particolarmente importanti sono però i bufali d’acqua: oltre ad essere le bestie più costose, sono quelle che assicureranno al morto l’arrivo più celere al Puya, la terra delle anime. Le loro carcasse vengono lasciate in fila sul prato, in attesa che il loro “proprietario” sia partito per il suo viaggio, alla conclusione dei funerali. In seguito, la loro carne verrà spartita fra gli ospiti, mangiata o venduta al mercato.

Viste le enormi spese da sostenere, la famiglia impiega spesso anche anni a cercare i fondi necessari per la cerimonia. Di conseguenza, i funerali si svolgono molto tempo dopo il decesso; in questo periodo di attesa, l’anima del morto è considerata ancora presente a tutti gli effetti e si aggira per il villaggio. Quando finalmente i funerali si sono compiuti, il suo corpo viene seppellito in un cimitero scavato all’interno di una parete di roccia, e un’effigie con le sue fattezze (chiamata tau tau) viene posta a guardia della tomba.

Se invece il morto era meno abbiente, la bara viene fissata proprio sul ciglio della parete, o in alcuni casi sospesa tramite delle funi. I sarcofagi rimarranno appesi fino a quando i sostegni non marciranno, facendoli crollare.

Anche i bambini vengono tumulati in questo modo, ma talvolta è riservato loro un posto in particolari loculi scavati all’interno di grandi tronchi d’albero.

Con questa prima sepoltura, però, il rapporto dei Toraja con i loro morti non è affatto finito. Ogni anno, in agosto, si svolge la cerimonia chiamata Ma’Nene, durante la quale i cadaveri dei defunti vengono riesumati.

I corpi mummificati vengono lavati, pettinati e vestiti in abiti nuovi dai familiari; nel caso fossero rimaste soltanto le ossa, invece, queste vengono comunque lavate e avvolte in stoffe pregiate.

Una volta che i rituali di cosmesi sul cadavere sono completati, i morti vengono fatti “camminare”, tenendoli ritti, e portati in giro per il villaggio. Questa parata, al di là delle valenze religiose, si colora del vero e proprio orgoglio di esibire i propri antenati: la gente li ammira, li tocca, e si scatta delle fotografie assieme a loro. Il Ma’Nene è il segno dell’amore dei parenti per il morto che, in effetti, non potrebbe essere più “vivo” di così.

Alla fine di questa processione d’onore, la salma viene seppellita per la seconda volta, nel suo luogo di ultimo riposo. Completato finalmente il passaggio del morto nell’aldilà, viene così sancita la sua appartenenza agli antenati, ogni sua ira è scongiurata, ed egli diviene una figura esclusivamente positiva, alla quale i discendenti potranno permettersi di chiedere protezione e consiglio.

Il rito del Ma’Nene può sembrare inusuale ed esotico ai nostri occhi odierni, abituati all’occultamento della morte e della salma, ma non è esattamente così: anche in Italia la riesumazione e l’affettuosa pulitura del cadavere fa parte della cultura tradizionale, come abbiamo spiegato in questo articolo.

Molte delle foto che trovate in questo post sono state scattate dall’amico Paul Koudounaris, il cui spettacolare libro fotografico Memento Mori dà conto dei suoi viaggi nei cinque continenti alla ricerca dei costumi funerari più particolari.

(Grazie, Gianluca!)

Holt Cemetery

6309487319_88b5621b9b_z

A New Orleans, se scavate due o tre metri nella terra, potreste trovare l’acqua. Questo è il motivo per cui, in tutto il Delta del Mississippi (e in gran parte della Louisiana, che per metà è occupata da una pianura alluvionale), di regola i cimiteri si sviluppano above ground, vale a dire in mausolei e loculi costruiti al di sopra del livello del suolo. Ma ci sono eccezioni, e una di queste è lo Holt Cemetery.

Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_Louisiana

Si tratta del “cimitero dei poveri”, ossia del luogo che ospita i cari estinti di coloro che non possono permettersi di far costruire una tomba sopraelevata. I costi funerari, negli Stati Uniti, sono esorbitanti e perfino famiglie in condizioni più o meno agiate devono talvolta aspettare mesi o anni prima di poter permettersi il lusso di una lapide. Lo Holt Cemetery è una delle “ultime spiagge”, riservate ai meno abbienti.

Sunken_Madonna,_Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_LA

Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_LA_Tilted_Angel

Non è raro trovarvi delle lapidi in legno o altri materiali, insegne di tipo artigianale, su cui sono stati iscritti con vernice e pennello le date di nascita e di morte del defunto.

Holt_Cemetery,_New_Orleans,_LA_Benjamin

holt1

2371028839_a52323026f_z

01

01l

In altri casi le tombe ospitano gli effetti personali del morto, perché la famiglia non aveva spazio o possibilità di metterli da parte – ma questa non è forse l’unica motivazione. New Orleans infatti è stata storicamente il crocevia di diverse etnie (neri, europei, isleños, creoli, cajun, filippini, ecc.), e ha raccolto un patrimonio culturale estremamente variegato e complesso. Questo si rispecchia anche nei rituali religiosi e funebri: alcuni di questi oggetti sono stati lasciati lì intenzionalmente, per accompagnare il parente nel suo viaggio nell’aldilà.

holt cemetery_38-L

nola-story-about-murder-capitol-holt-cemetery

Troy_Guitar_Holt_Cemetery

Ma il problema dello Holt Cemetery è che lo spazio non è mai abbastanza: quando una tomba è in stato di abbandono, i guardiani possono decidere di riutilizzarla. Non esiste un piano regolatore, non esistono posti assegnati, né un vero e proprio registro. I nuovi morti sono sepolti sopra a quelli vecchi, dei quali non rimane traccia alcuna. Così, per evitare che si salti a conclusioni affrettate, alcune famiglie continuano a lasciare nuovi oggetti, o a sistemare corone di fiori, a erigere recinti o semplicemente a modificare l’aspetto della lapide per segnalare che quel loculo è ancora “in uso”. Si racconta ad esempio di una tomba accanto alla quale qualche anno fa era stata posizionata una sedia di latta, e sulla sedia stava aperto un libro che cambiava ogni settimana.

4024479695_1ac45f9645

4470282845_fdb34381f5_o

6309459225_a2ce5f2522_z

6309982634_f703006dda_z

6309980896_3389a9b634_z

bright blue grave

29cemetary2

many materials used to surround this grave

interesting grave

p0138bk1

p0138bmp

I sepolcri più appariscenti, nel cimitero di Holt, sono quelli della famiglia Smith. Arthur Smith, infatti, è un artista locale che ha partecipato a diverse mostre di outsider art: ancora oggi lo si può vedere spingere il suo carrello per le discariche della città, alla ricerca di quei tesori con cui fabbricherà la sua arte povera. È proprio lui che mantiene in continua evoluzione le istallazioni che ha costruito attorno alle tombe di sua madre e di sua zia. (Potete trovare altre foto della sua produzione artistica qui).

3254043243_c6815fc375_o

3254043883_f74201d261_o

3440905589_00a15bd53f_o

3571256562_cb0564743a_o

Nonostante i recinti e le cure dei familiari, come dicevamo all’inizio, il grande problema di New Orleans è sempre stata l’acqua, e non solo quella violenta e brutale degli uragani: basta una piena del Mississippi per causare gravi fenomeni alluvionali. Un po’ di pioggia, perché cada anche l’ultimo tabù. Ecco allora che nel piccolo cimitero di Holt i morti tornano a galla. Dalla terra umida affiorano parti di teschi, ossa che sventolano ancora brandelli di vestiti, piccoli rimasugli sbiancati dal tempo e dalla natura.

holtcemeterygraves

07l

url

tumblr_m1oy338No81r8r4lto1_500

potters field 015

potters field 005

3068523301_498ccf225d

C’è chi, venendo a conoscenza della situazione allo Holt Cemetery, grida allo scandalo, al sacrilegio e allo svilimento della dignità umana; ed è ironico, e in un certo senso poetico, il fatto che un simile cimitero sorga proprio a ridosso di un quartiere particolarmente benestante della città.

Questo strano luogo in cui i morti non hanno lapide, né una sepoltura sicura, sembra simboleggiare lo scorrere delle cose del mondo più che un cimitero opulento, circondato da alte pareti di marmo, in cui si entra come in un austero santuario in cui il tempo si sia fermato. Holt è il cimitero dei poveri, è tenuto vivo dai poveri. Qui non ci si può permettere nemmeno l’illusione dell’eterno, e la memoria esiste solo finché vi è ancora qualcuno che ricordi.

7393363262_76f5bab25b_z

(Grazie, Marco!)

Dakhma

tumblr_mb03366zO61r86b9lo8_r1_1280

Anche le religioni muoiono. Un tempo il mazdeismo o zoroastrismo, fondato sugli insegnamenti di Zarathustra, il profeta che nacque ridendo, era la religione più diffusa al mondo, la principale nell’area mediorientale prima che vi si affermasse l’Islam. Oggi invece i seguaci sono meno di 200.000, e il numero continua a diminuire anche a causa della chiusura dell’ortodossia verso i non-credenti, tanto che nei prossimi decenni questa fede potrebbe addirittura scomparire. Attualmente sono i Parsi, emigrati secoli fa dall’Iran  verso l’India, a mantenerne vivi i precetti.

Religione eminentemente monoteistica, il mazdeismo fa del dualismo fra bene e male la sua principale caratteristica: all’uomo è chiesto di scegliere fra la via della Verità e quella della Menzogna, tra la giustizia e l’ingiustizia, tra la luce e le tenebre, tra l’ordine e il disordine. Il puro, dunque, dovrà essere attento a non essere contaminato in nulla da azioni, oggetti o pensieri malvagi. Proprio per questo gli zoroastriani hanno elaborato un particolare rito funebre, volto a limitare e tenere distanti gli effetti nefasti della morte sui viventi.

rito_parsi
Il cadavere è, infatti, impuro, perché appena dopo la morte viene invaso da demoni e spiriti che rischiano di contaminare non soltanto gli uomini retti, ma anche gli elementi. Non è possibile dunque cremare il corpo di un defunto, perché il fuoco – che è elemento sacro – ne sarebbe infettato; sotterrarlo, d’altra parte, porterebbe a un inquinamento della terra.

BombayTempleOfSilenceEngraving

bourne1880s

tumblr_lzgj77xKjl1qi8q6uo1_r1_500
Così gli zoroastriani costruiscono da secoli un tipo speciale di struttura, chiamata dakhma, o “torre del silenzio”. Si tratta di una impalcatura di legno e argilla, talvolta simile a una vera e propria torretta, alta fino a 10 metri circa. La piattaforma superiore, dalla circonferenza rialzata e inclinata verso l’interno, è suddivisa in tre cerchi concentrici, talvolta suddivisi in celle, e ha al suo centro un’apertura o un pozzo.

tour_silence2

Tower_of_Silence_(Yazd)_006
Qui i cadaveri vengono disposti da speciali addetti, i Nâsâsâlar (letteralmente, “coloro che si prendono cura di ciò che è impuro”), gli unici che hanno la facoltà di toccare i morti: gli uomini vengono sistemati nel cerchio esterno, le donne in quello mediano e i bambini in quello più interno.

tower

tumblr_mdf30g7RdQ1qhxm2vo1_1280

Lì vengono lasciati in pasto agli avvoltoi e ai corvi (che normalmente li divorano nel giro di tre o quattro ore) e rimangono sulla dakhma anche per un anno, finché le loro ossa non siano state completamente ripulite e sbiancate dagli uccelli, dal sole e dalla pioggia. Le ossa vengono infine gettate nel pozzo centrale, dove la pioggia e il fango le disintegreranno a poco a poco, facendo filtrare attraverso strati di carbone e sabbia quello che resta del corpo, prima di restituirlo alla terra e, ove possibile, al mare, tramite un acquedotto sotterraneo.

PAR100418

PAR254219

tumblr_m9wqmczkWc1r1kbga

tumblr_m9wqm4hGiM1r1kbga
Il rituale delle torri del silenzio è oggi sempre più a rischio a causa di due enormi problemi: la sovrappopolazione e la scarsità di avvoltoi. Il numero sempre maggiore di cadaveri costringe a gettare nel pozzo centrale anche i corpi non ancora interamente decomposti, causando un intasamento che comporta evidenti problemi igienici, soprattutto se si pensa che a Mumbai il parco funebre sta sulla collina residenziale di Malabar Hill, a meno di trecento metri dai primi caseggiati. Nonostante la comunità Parsi abbia stanziato 200.000 euro l’anno per l’acquisto e l’allevamento di avvoltoi specificamente addestrati, sono sempre più numerosi i fedeli che optano per il cimitero o la cremazione.

torri_malabar

tumblr_lz17cmdIxN1qjzpg0o1_1280

Towers-of-Silence2
Attualmente esistono all’incirca sessanta dakhma attive, a Mumbai, Pune, Calcutta, Bangalore e nello stato del Gujarat. Ma questa antica tradizione potrebbe presto scomparire: troppo lunga e troppo poco pratica.

(Grazie, Francesco!)