Neapolitan Ritual Food

by Michelangelo Pascali

Everybody knows Italian cuisine, but few are aware that several traditional dishes hold a symbolic meaning. Guestblogger Michelangelo Pascali uncovers the metaphorical value of some Neapolitan recipes.

Neapolitan culture shows a dense symbology that accompanies the preparation and consumption of certain dishes, mostly for propitiatory purposes, during heartfelt ritual holidays. These very ancient holidays, some of which were later converted to Christian holidays, are linked to the passage of time and to the seasons of life.
The symbolic meaning of ritual food can sometimes refer to the cyclic nature of life, or to some exceptional social circumstances.

One of the most well-known “devotional courses” is certainly the white and crunchy torrone, which is eaten during the festivities for the Dead, between the end of October and the beginning of November. The almonds on the inside represent the bones of the departed which are to be absorbed in an vaguely cannibal perspective (as with Mexican sugar skeletons). The so-called torrone dei morti (“torrone of the Dead”) can also traditionally be squared-shaped, its white paste covered with dark chocolate to mimick the outline of a tavùto (“casket”).

The rhombus-shaped decorations on the pastiera, an Easter cake, together with the wheat forming its base, are meant to evoke the plowed fields and the coming of the mild season, more favorable for life.


The rebirth of springtime, after the “death” of winter, finds another representation in the casatiello, the traditional Easter Monday savory pie, that has to be left to rise for an entire night from dusk till dawn. Its ring-like shape is a reminder of the circular nature of time, as seen by the ancient agricultural, earthbound society (and therefore quite distant, in many ways, from the linear message of Christian religion); the inside cheese and sausages once again represent the dead, buried in the ground. But the real peculiarity, here, is the emerging of some eggs from the pie, protected by a “cross” made of crust: a bizarre element, which would have no reason to be there were it not an allegory of birth — in fact, the eggs are placed that way to suggest a movement that goes “from the underground to the surface“, or “from the Earth to the Sky“.

In the Neapolitan Christmas Eve menu, “mandatory courses are still called ‘devotions’, just like in ancient Greek sacred banquets”, and “the obligation of lean days is turned into its very opposite” (M. Niola, Il sacrificio del capitone, in Repubblica, 15/12/2013).
The traditional Christmas dinner is carried out along the lines of ancient funerary dinners (with the unavoidable presence of dried fruit and seafood), and it also has the function of consuming the leftovers before the arrival of a new year, as for example in the menestra maretata (‘married soup’).

But the main protagonist is the capitone, the huge female eel. This fish has a peculiar reproduction cycle (on the account of its migratory habits) and is symbolically linked to the Ouroboros. The capitone‘s affinity with the snake, an animal associated with the concept of time in many cultures, is coupled with its being a water animal, therefore providing a link to the most vital element.
The capitone is first bred and raised within the family, only to be killed by the family members themselves (in a ritual that even allows for the animal to “escape”, if it manages to do so): an explicit ritual sacrifice carried out inside the community.

While still alive, the capitone is cut into pieces and thrown in boiling oil to be fried, as each segment still frantically writhes and squirms: in this preparation, it is as if the infinite moving cycle was broken apart and then absorbed. The snake as a metaphor of Evil seems to be a more recent symbology, juxtaposed to the ancient one.

Then there are the struffoli, spherical pastries covered in honey — a precious ingredient, so much so that the body of Baby Jesus is said to be a “honey-dripping rock” — candied fruit and diavulilli (multi-colored confetti); we suppose that in their aspect they might symbolize a connection with the stars. These pastries are indeed offered to the guests during Christmas season, an important cosmological moment: Macrobius called the winter solstice “the door of the Gods“, as under the Capricorn it becomes possible for men to communicate with divinities. It is the moment in which many Solar deities were born, like the Persian god Mitra, the Irish demigod Cú Chulainn, or the Greek Apollo — a pre-Christian protector of Naples, whose temple was found where the Cathedral now is. And the Saint patron Januarius, whose blood is collected right inside the Cathedral, is symbolically close to Apollo himself.
Of course the Church established the commemoration of Christ’s birth in the proximity of the solstice, whereas it was first set on January 6:  the Earth reaches its maximum distance from the Sunon the 21st of December, and begins to get closer to it after three days.

The sfogliatella riccia, on the other hand, is an allusion to the shape of the female reproductive organ, the ‘valley of fire’ (this is the translation of its Neapolitan common nickname, which has a Greek etymology). It is said to date back to the time when orgiastic rites were performed in Naples, where they were widespread for over a millennium and a half after the coming of the Christian Era, carried out in several peculiar places such as the caves of the Chiatamone. This pastry was perhaps invented to provide high energetic intake to the orgy participants.

Lastly, an exquistely mundane motivation is behind the pairing of chiacchiere and sanguinaccio.
Chiacchiere look like tongues, or like those strings of paper where, in paintings and bas-relief, the words of the speaking characters were inscribed; and their name literally means “chit-chat”. The sanguinaccio is a sort of chocolate black pudding which was originally prepared with pig’s blood (but not any more).
During the Carnival, the only real profane holiday that is left, the association between these two desserts sounds like a code of silence: it warns and cautions not to contaminate with ordinary logic the subversive charge of this secular rite, which is completely egalitarian (Carnival masks hide our individual identity, making us both unrecognizable and also indistinguishable from each other).
What happens during Carnival must stay confined within the realm of Carnival — on penalty of “tongues being drowned in blood“.

Grief and sacrifice: abscence carved into flesh

Some of you probably know about sati (or suttee), the hindu self-immolation ritual according to which a widow was expected to climb on her husband’s funeral pire to be burned alive, along his body. Officially forbidden by the English in 1829, the practice declined over time – not without some opposition on behalf of traditionalists – until it almost entirely disappeared: if in the XIX Century around 600 sati took place every year, from 1943 to 1987 the registered cases were around 30, and only 4 in the new millennium.

The sacrifice of widows was not limited to India, in fact it appeared in several cultures. In his Histories, Herodotus wrote about a people living “above the Krestons”, in Thracia: within this community, the favorite among the widows of a great man was killed over his grave and buried with him, while the other wives considered it a disgrace to keep on living.

Among the Heruli in III Century a.D., it was common for widows to hang themselves over their husband’s burial ground; in the XVIII Century, on the other side of the ocean, when a Natchez chief died his wives (often accompanied by other volunteers) followed him by committing ritual suicide. At times, some mothers from the tribe would even sacrify their own newborn children, in an act of love so strong that women who performed it were treated with great honor and entered a higher social level. Similar funeral practices existed in other native peoples along the southern part of Mississippi River.

Also in the Pacific area, for instance in Fiji, there were traditions involving the strangling of the village chief’s widows. Usually the suffocation was carried out or supervised by the widow’s brother (see Fison’s Notes on Fijian Burial Customs, 1881).

The idea underlying these practices was that it was deemed unconcievable (or improper) for a woman to remain alive after her husband’s death. In more general terms, a leader’s death opened an unbridgeable void, so much so that the survivors’ social existence was erased.
If female self-immolation (and, less commonly, male self-immolation) can be found in various time periods and latitudes, the Dani tribe developed a one-of-a-kind funeral sacrifice.

The Dani people live mainly in Baliem Valley, the indonesian side of New Guinea‘s central highlands. They are now a well-known tribe, on the account of increased tourism in the area; the warriors dress with symbolic accessories – a feather headgear, fur bands, a sort of tie made of seashells specifying the rank of the man wearing it, a pig’s fangs fixed to the nostrils and the koteka, a penis sheath made from a dried-out gourd.
The women’s clothing is simpler, consisting in a skirt made from bark and grass, and a headgear made from multicolored bird feathers.

Among this people, according to tradition when a man died the women who were close or related to him (wife, mother, sister, etc.) used to amputate one or more parts of their fingers. Today this custom no longer exists, but the elder women in the tribe still carry the marks of the ritual.

Allow me now a brief digression.

In Dino Buzzati‘s wonderful tale The Humps in the Garden (published in 1968 in La boutique del mistero), the protagonist loves to take long, late-night walks in the park surrounding his home. One evening, while he’s promenading, he stumbles on a sort of hump in the ground, and the following day he asks his gardener about it:

«What did you do in the garden, on the lawn there is some kind of hump, yesterday evening I stumbled on it and this morning as soon as the sun came up I saw it. It is a narrow and oblong hump, it looks like a burial mound. Will you tell me what’s happening?». «It doesn’t look like it, sir» said Giacomo the gardener «it really is a burial mound. Because yesterday, sir, a friend of yours has died».
It was true. My dearest friend Sandro Bartoli, who was twenty-one-years-old, had died in the mountains with his skull smashed.
«Are you trying to tell me» I said to Giacomo «that my friend was buried here?»
«No» he replied «your friend, Mr. Bartoli […] was buried at the foot of that mountain, as you know. But here in the garden the lawn bulged all by itself, because this is your garden, sir, and everything that happens in your life, sir, will have its consequences right here.»

Years go by, and the narrator’s park slowly fills with new humps, as his loved ones die one by one. Some bulges are small, other enormous; the garden, once flat and regular, at this point is completely packed with mounds appearing with every new loss.

Because this problem of humps in the garden happens to everybody, and every one of us […] owns a garden where these painful phenomenons take place. It is an ancient story repeating itself since the beginning of centuries, it will repeat for you too. And this isn’t a literary joke, this is how things really are.

In the tale’s final part, we discover that the protagonist is not a fictional character at all, and that the sorrowful metaphore refers to the author himself:

Naturally I also wonder if in someone else’s garden will one day appear a hump that has to do with me, maybe a second or third-rate little hump, just a slight pleating in the lawn, not even noticeable in broad daylight, when the sun shines from up high. However, one person in the world, at least one, will stumble on it. Perhaps, on the account of my bad temper, I will die alone like a dog at the end of an old and deserted hallway. And yet one person that evening will stub his toe on the little hump in the garden, and will stumble on it the following night too, and each time that person will think with a shred of regret, forgive my hopefulness, of a certain fellow whose name was Dino Buzzati.

Now, if I may risk the analogy, the humps in Buzzati’s garden seem to be poetically akin to the Dani women’s missing fingers. The latter represent a touching and powerful image: each time a loved one leaves us, “we lose a bit of ourselves”, as is often said – but here the loss is not just emotional, the absence becomes concrete. On the account of this physical expression of grief, fingerless women undoubtedly have a hard time carrying out daily tasks; and further bereavements lead to the impossibility of using their hands. The oldest women, who have seen many loved ones die, need help and assistance from the community. Death becomes a wound which makes them disabled for life.

Of course, at least from a contemporary perspective, there is still a huge stumbling block: the metaphore would be perfect if such a tradition concerned also men, who instead were never expected to carry out such extreme sacrifices. It’s the female body which, more or less voluntarily, bears this visible evidence of pain.
But from a more universal perspective, it seems to me that these symbols hold the certainty that we all will leave a mark, a hump in someone else’s garden. The pride with which Dani women show their mutilated hands suggests that one person’s passage inevitably changes the reality around him, conditioning the community, even “sculpting” the flesh of his kindreds. The creation of meaning in displays of grief also lies in reciprocity – the very tradition that makes me weep for the dead today, will ensure that tomorrow others will lament my own departure.

Regardless of the historical variety of ways in which this concept was put forth, in this awareness of reciprocity human beings seem to have always found some comfort, because it eventually means that we can never be alone.

Su Battileddu

Il Carnevale, si sa, è la versione cattolica dei saturnalia romani e delle più antiche festività greche in onore di Dioniso. Si trattava di un momento in cui le leggi normali del pudore, delle gerarchie e dell’ordine sociale venivano completamente rovesciate, sbeffeggiate e messe a soqquadro. Questo era possibile proprio perché accadeva all’interno di un preciso periodo, ben delimitato e codificato: e, nonostante i millenni trascorsi e la secolarizzazione di questa festa, il Carnevale mantiene ancora in parte questo senso di liberatoria follia.

Ma a Lula, in Sardegna, ogni anno si celebra un Carnevale del tutto particolare, molto distante dalle colorate (e commerciali) mascherate cittadine. Si tratta di un rituale allegorico antichissimo, giunto inalterato fino ai giorni nostri grazie alla tenacia degli abitanti di questo paesino nel salvaguardare le proprie tradizioni. È un Carnevale che non rinnega i lati più oscuri ed apertamente pagani che stanno all’origine di questa festa, incentrato com’è sul sacrificio e sulla crudeltà.

battileddu3
Il protagonista del Carnevale lulese è chiamato su Battileddu (o Batiledhu), la “vittima”, che incarna forse proprio Dioniso stesso – dio della natura selvaggia, forza vitale primordiale e incontrollabile. L’uomo che lo interpreta è acconciato in maniera terribile: vestito di pelli di montone, ha il volto coperto di nera fuliggine e il muso sporco di sangue. Sulla sua testa, coperta da un fazzoletto nero da donna, è fissato un mostruoso copricapo cornuto, ulteriormente adornato da uno stomaco di capra.

007

su_battileddu_2011_20110302_1137676125

def07268-fb02-495d-9ec8-83f9636e2b92_590_590_0
Le pelli, le corna e il viso imbrattato di cenere e sangue sarebbero già abbastanza spaventosi: come non bastasse, su Battileddu porta al collo dei rumorosi campanacci (marrazzos) mentre sotto di essi, sulla pancia, penzola un grosso stomaco di bue che è stato riempito di sangue ed acqua.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

6775177204_f6fb9a5fd9_z

url

battileddu2

Per quanto possa incutere timore, su Battileddu è una vittima sacrificale, e la rappresentazione “teatrale” che segue lo mostra molto chiaramente. Il dio folle della natura è stato catturato, e viene trascinato per le strade del villaggio. Il rovesciamento carnascialesco è evidente nei cosiddetti Battileddos Gattias, uomini travestiti da vedove che però indossano dei gambali da maschio: si aggirano intonando lamenti funebri per la vittima, porgendo bambole di pezza alle donne tra la folla affinché le allattino. Ad un certo punto della sfilata, le finte vedove si siedono in cerchio e cominciano a passarsi un pizzicotto l’una con l’altra (spesso dopo aver costretto qualcuno fra il pubblico ad unirsi a loro); la prima a cui sfuggirà una risata sarà costretta a pagare pegno, che normalmente consiste nel versare da bere.

8459873022_377977706a_o

6915217689_59ecb0b44d

09-su-battileddu-viene-percosso
In questo chiassoso e sregolato corteo funebre, intanto, su Battileddu continua ad essere pungolato, battuto e strattonato dalle funi di cuoio con cui l’hanno legato i Battileddos Massajos, i custodi del bestiame, uomini vestiti da contadini. È uno spettacolo cruento, al quale nemmeno il pubblico si sottrae: tutti cercano di colpire e di bucare lo stomaco di bue che il dio porta sulla pancia, in modo che il sangue ne sgorghi, fecondando la terra. Quando questo accade, gli spettatori se ne imbrattano il volto.

carnevale_lula_100213_2053

reportage_267_15
Alla fine, lo stomaco di su Battileddu viene squarciato del tutto, e il dio si accascia nel sangue, sventrato. Si alza un grido: l’an mortu, Deus meu, l’an irgangatu! (“l’hanno ucciso, Dio mio, lo hanno sgozzato!”). Ecco che le vedove intonano nuovi lamenti e mettono in scena un corteo funebre, ma le parole e i gesti delle “pie donne” sono in realtà osceni e scurrili.

battileddu4

8467947728_da57f3fbf2_o

su-batiledhu1
Nel frattempo un altro capovolgimento ha avuto luogo: due dei “custodi” sono diventati bestie da soma e, aggiogati ad un carro come buoi, l’hanno tirato per le strade durante la rappresentazione. È su questo carro che viene issato il corpo esanime della vittima, per essere esibito alla piazza in alcuni giri trionfali. Ma la finzione viene presto svelata: un bicchiere di vino riporta in vita su Battileddu, e la festa vera e propria può finalmente avere inizio.

carnevale_lula_100213_033

carnevale_lula_100213_016

Su-Battileddu-Issocatore
Questa messa in scena della passione e del cruento sacrificio di su Battileddu si ricollega certamente agli antichi riti agricoli di fecondazione della terra; la cosa davvero curiosa è che la tradizione sarebbe potuta scomparire quando, nella prima metà del ‘900, venne abbandonata. È ricomparsa soltanto nel 2001, a causa dell’interesse antropologico cresciuto attorno a questa caratteristica figura, nell’ambito dello studio e valorizzazione delle maschere sarde. Ora, il dio impazzito che diviene montone sacrificale è di nuovo tra di noi.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iNGkd056N9Q]

(Grazie, freya76!)

Le esequie dei Toraja

Sulawesi è un’isola della Repubblica Indonesiana, situata ad est del Borneo e a sud delle Filippine. Nella provincia meridionale dell’isola, sulle montagne, vivono i Toraja, etnia indigena di circa 650.000 persone. I Toraja sono famosi per le loro abitazioni tradizionali a forma di palafitta e dal tetto allungato, chiamate tongkonan, e per le colorate fantasie geometriche con cui intagliano e decorano il legno.

Ma i Toraja sono noti anche per i loro complessi ed elaborati rituali funebri. Essi risalgono ad un’epoca remota, quando i Toraja seguivano ancora la loro religione politeistica tradizionale, chiamata aluk (“la Via”, un sistema di legge, fede e consuetudine); quest’ultima, con il tempo e a causa della lunga guerra contro i musulmani, è oggi divenuta un miscuglio di cristianesimo ed animismo.
Sebbene molti dei rituali “della vita”, cioè quelli propiziatori e purificatori, siano man mano stati abbandonati, le cerimonie “della morte” sono rimaste pressoché invariate.

Per i Toraja, la morte di un membro della famiglia è un evento di fondamentale importanza, e le celebrazioni funebri sono lunghe, complesse ed estremamente dispendiose, tanto da essere probabilmente il principale momento di aggregazione sociale per l’intera popolazione. Più il morto era potente o ricco, più le cerimonie sono fastose: se si tratta di un nobile, il funerale può contare migliaia di partecipanti. A spese della famiglia, in un campo prescelto per i rituali vengono costruite delle tettoie e dei gazebo per ospitare il pubblico, dei depositi per il riso, e altre strutture apposite; per diversi giorni ai pianti e alle lamentazioni si alternano la musica dei flauti e la recitazione di poemi e canzoni in onore del defunto.

Il momento culminante è il sacrificio degli animali – maiali, bufali, polli: ancora una volta, il numero varia a seconda dell’influenza sociale del morto. La lama del machete può abbattersi anche su un centinaio di animali. Particolarmente importanti sono però i bufali d’acqua: oltre ad essere le bestie più costose, sono quelle che assicureranno al morto l’arrivo più celere al Puya, la terra delle anime. Le loro carcasse vengono lasciate in fila sul prato, in attesa che il loro “proprietario” sia partito per il suo viaggio, alla conclusione dei funerali. In seguito, la loro carne verrà spartita fra gli ospiti, mangiata o venduta al mercato.

Viste le enormi spese da sostenere, la famiglia impiega spesso anche anni a cercare i fondi necessari per la cerimonia. Di conseguenza, i funerali si svolgono molto tempo dopo il decesso; in questo periodo di attesa, l’anima del morto è considerata ancora presente a tutti gli effetti e si aggira per il villaggio. Quando finalmente i funerali si sono compiuti, il suo corpo viene seppellito in un cimitero scavato all’interno di una parete di roccia, e un’effigie con le sue fattezze (chiamata tau tau) viene posta a guardia della tomba.

Se invece il morto era meno abbiente, la bara viene fissata proprio sul ciglio della parete, o in alcuni casi sospesa tramite delle funi. I sarcofagi rimarranno appesi fino a quando i sostegni non marciranno, facendoli crollare.

Anche i bambini vengono tumulati in questo modo, ma talvolta è riservato loro un posto in particolari loculi scavati all’interno di grandi tronchi d’albero.

Con questa prima sepoltura, però, il rapporto dei Toraja con i loro morti non è affatto finito. Ogni anno, in agosto, si svolge la cerimonia chiamata Ma’Nene, durante la quale i cadaveri dei defunti vengono riesumati.

I corpi mummificati vengono lavati, pettinati e vestiti in abiti nuovi dai familiari; nel caso fossero rimaste soltanto le ossa, invece, queste vengono comunque lavate e avvolte in stoffe pregiate.

Una volta che i rituali di cosmesi sul cadavere sono completati, i morti vengono fatti “camminare”, tenendoli ritti, e portati in giro per il villaggio. Questa parata, al di là delle valenze religiose, si colora del vero e proprio orgoglio di esibire i propri antenati: la gente li ammira, li tocca, e si scatta delle fotografie assieme a loro. Il Ma’Nene è il segno dell’amore dei parenti per il morto che, in effetti, non potrebbe essere più “vivo” di così.

Alla fine di questa processione d’onore, la salma viene seppellita per la seconda volta, nel suo luogo di ultimo riposo. Completato finalmente il passaggio del morto nell’aldilà, viene così sancita la sua appartenenza agli antenati, ogni sua ira è scongiurata, ed egli diviene una figura esclusivamente positiva, alla quale i discendenti potranno permettersi di chiedere protezione e consiglio.

Il rito del Ma’Nene può sembrare inusuale ed esotico ai nostri occhi odierni, abituati all’occultamento della morte e della salma, ma non è esattamente così: anche in Italia la riesumazione e l’affettuosa pulitura del cadavere fa parte della cultura tradizionale, come abbiamo spiegato in questo articolo.

Molte delle foto che trovate in questo post sono state scattate dall’amico Paul Koudounaris, il cui spettacolare libro fotografico Memento Mori dà conto dei suoi viaggi nei cinque continenti alla ricerca dei costumi funerari più particolari.

(Grazie, Gianluca!)

Mummie di palude

Tollundmannen

Siamo abituati a pensare alle mummie come a degli scheletri con ancora un po’ di pelle addosso. Eppure esiste un tipo di mummia esattamente opposta – in cui, cioè, lo scheletro è quasi del tutto deteriorato ma tutti i tessuti molli sono perfettamente preservati. Si tratta delle cosiddette mummie di palude.

Se un cadavere finisce infatti nelle fredde acque di un acquitrino, in certe particolari condizioni di acidità e di bassa temperatura, la decomposizione dei tessuti viene completamente inibita, mentre lo stesso acido presente nella torba scioglie il carbonato di calcio delle ossa. Il risultato è una mummificazione della pelle e degli organi interni stupefacente per dettagli e perfezione (se si esclude il colorito nero-bruno che assume l’epidermide), e una ridotta presenza di struttura ossea.

Grauballemanden_stor
Nell’Europa settentrionale questo tipo di paludi, chimate torbiere, sono comuni, e vi sono stati rinvenuti eccezionali resti umani (ma anche manufatti e carcasse animali) incredibilmente preservati. Nel caso dei corpi umani, i volti e la pelle di questi cadaveri mostrano ancora preziosi dettagli come ad esempio dei tatuaggi, e addirittura in alcuni casi le impronte digitali. E stiamo parlando di mummie risalenti a 5000 anni fa.

Tollundmanden_i_Silkeborgmuseet

L’importanza di questi ritrovamenti è ovviamente fondamentale per gli archeologi, anche se a dire il vero rimangono diversi enigmi al riguardo. La maggior parte di queste mummie, infatti, sono senza dubbio relative alla civiltà dei Celti, diffusa un po’ ovunque nel Nord Europa, dalle isole Britanniche al Danubio. Ma perché i Celti avrebbero voluto lasciare soltanto alcuni dei loro morti nelle paludi, spesso aiutandosi con dei pali per far sprofondare il cadavere? Qual è il motivo di queste sepolture fuori dalla norma? L’unico elemento che abbiamo a disposizione sono i corpi stessi, che mostrano inquietanti segni di violenza: ci sono mummie che sono state evidentemente pugnalate, bastonate, impiccate o strangolate. La mummia di Tollund (forse la più bella, risalente al IV secolo a.C) porta ancora al collo la corda usata per strozzarla; il vecchio di Croghan (vissuto fra il 362 e il 175 a.C.) è stato pugnalato, decapitato, i suoi capezzoli amputati e il suo corpo tagliato a metà. Spesso i cadaveri hanno i capelli rasati di fresco, talvolta soltanto da un lato del capo (come la ragazza di Yde).

tumblr_lf00x594YK1qc6n7jo1_500

TOOL

TollundMan2

crogman3

06
Questi segni di tortura e di morte violenta lasciano tre possibili spiegazioni: o si trattava di esecuzioni di criminali messi a morte, oppure i corpi ci parlano di sacrifici rituali che servivano a propiziare il favore di una qualche divinità (del raccolto di grano o latte, della guerra e via dicendo). Una terza alternativa, meno plausibile, riguarda l’utilizzo divinatorio delle viscere umane: un po’ come facevano gli aruspici etruschi e romani con le interiora di volatili, i Celti avrebbero (secondo Strabone) utilizzato le budella umane a fini oracolari. Quest’ultima teoria è la meno accreditata, e sembra che queste mummie siano con tutta probabilità appartenute a condannati a morte, oppure a vittime sacrificali.

2556084438_637c4c28e9

Yde_Girl
Un’altra interessante applicazione derivante dal perfetto stato di conservazione delle mummie è la possibilità odierna di ricostruire i volti di questi uomini e donne morti migliaia di anni fa. Sembra che si trattasse principalmente di esponenti della nobiltà, dal viso curato e dalle unghie non rovinate da lavori manuali, e le analisi chimiche dei loro capelli ci svelano che non si trattava certo di individui malnutriti.

Yde-girl
Chi erano questi uomini di alta estrazione, destinati a morire e sprofondare nelle nere acque di una palude? Quale scopo aveva la loro cruenta esecuzione? Nessuna risposta ancora è certa. Per adesso i loro resti riposano nei musei, dalle teche pressurizzate sembrano ancora interrogarci… e noi, uomini del futuro, rimarremo forse per sempre ignari del loro segreto.

Grauballemanden2

Grauballemanden3

Aghori

Il mondo non è altro che illusione. È facile dirlo, ma se dovessimo davvero crederci, come imposteremmo la nostra vita? Avrebbero ancora senso le leggi degli uomini, le regole di comportamento? E se perfino l’etica fosse un ulteriore tranello mentale, e in realtà Dio se la ridesse di tutti i nostri dubbi e scrupoli morali?

Simili questioni stanno al centro di molte tradizioni religiose, ma nessuna ha portato il ragionamento alle estreme conseguenze quanto la setta degli Aghori.


Asceti shivaisti, lo scopo degli Aghori è liberarsi una volta per tutte dalla ruota delle reincarnazioni; per fare questo puntano, attraverso la meditazione e un ascetismo estremo, a fondere il proprio Sé (Atman) con il tutto (Brahman), superando il pensiero bloccato in illusori dualismi. Gli opposti non esistono, per loro, e così non esiste nulla di bello o di brutto, di buono o di cattivo; tutto è emanazione di Shiva, dunque tutto è perfetto.


Così, gli Aghori hanno sviluppato un percorso spirituale davvero incredibile: abbracciare tutti quei comportamenti che la società normalmente condanna ed aborre, tutte le pratiche più disgustose e oscene, tutte le azioni moralmente condannabili secondo le tradizionali regole del karma.


Per raggiungere l’estasi che permetterà loro di trascendere le categorie del pensiero umano, gli Aghori fanno uso di cannabis, bevono alcool, mangiano cibi conditi con oppiacei e allucinogeni. Si abbandonano anche a rituali sessuali di matrice tantrica, se non a vere e proprie orge. Mica male come asceti, direte.


Ma gli Aghori non si fermano certo qui. Per dimostrare che hanno abbandonato ogni preconcetto, inclusi i dualismi gusto/disgusto e puro/impuro, si dedicano senza battere ciglio a urofagia e coprofagia. Si aggirano anche spesso negli ossari a cielo aperto dove le salme vengono lasciate a decomporsi, e sono stati più volte avvistati mentre si spalmavano su tutto il corpo le ceneri di una cremazione. Uno dei loro rituali (il shava samskara) utilizza un cadavere come “altare” su cui si celebra la cerimonia.


Terrificanti già nell’aspetto, adorni di monili ricavati da ossa umane e teschi utilizzati come coppe da cui bevono, non arretrano nemmeno di fronte all’ultimo dei tabù: il cannibalismo. Quest’ultimo viene praticato su cadaveri trafugati o dissepolti, e secondo alcune fonti la fine preferita dai maestri Aghori è quella di venire divorati dal proprio successore, in modo da trasferirgli tutti i “poteri” acquisiti durante la vita.


Potrebbe sembrare che nulla sia troppo sacro per un Aghori; in realtà è esattamente l’opposto. L’asceta cerca infatti di vedere Dio in qualsiasi fenomeno dell’universo, in tutte le manifestazioni della catena di causa ed effetto. Quindi, se ogni cosa è sacra e illuminata, la tenebra e la paura sono soltanto nella nostra mente. Mangiare carne di mucca (proibitissimo per qualsiasi tradizione induista) o mangiare un corpo umano sono azioni che non possono dispiacere a Shiva, in quanto egli permette che esistano. Anzi, Shiva è in quelle azioni così come in tutte le altre, sempre, contemporaneamente, ovunque.
La ricerca spirituale è dunque un precipitarsi nella turpitudine, nell’osceno e nel rivoltante, salvo accorgersi poi che quella che sembrava oscurità era in verità luce – è un tentativo di disimparare tutto ciò che ci hanno insegnato sul bene e sul male, per guardare il mondo con uno sguardo primordiale, con gli occhi di un bambino ancora privo di categorie di pensiero.


Ora, quanto avete letto finora è la teoria, fin troppo nobilitante.
Nella realtà molte frange della setta sono più interessate agli aspetti magico-sciamanici che a quelli filosofici: così i rituali divengono veri e propri atti magici, violenti e rivoltanti, finalizzati all’acquisizione di poteri soprannaturali, e che comportano il sacrificio di animali e perfino di esseri umani. La comunione con Shiva passa in secondo piano rispetto alle fatture contro i nemici, e al potenziamento delle virtù magiche degli “stregoni” attraverso il rito. Secondo alcune fonti, gli Aghori sarebbero addirittura convinti che Shiva perdona fino a sette omicidi (esclusi i sacrifici umani, che sono sempre a fin di bene e che quindi non entrano nel conto).

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d10x8LI1NOE]

La setta degli Aghori, sparsa principalmente su India e Nepal, è avvolta nel segreto e nel mistero, in quanto i suoi adepti non hanno alcuna voglia di fare troppa pubblicità alle proprie azioni. Nelle campagne, gli asceti sono temuti e venerati come uomini dagli enormi poteri magici, proprio in virtù della forza che dimostrano nel dedicarsi agli aspetti più terribili dell’esistenza.

(Grazie, Skiv95!)

Dolore sacro

Come è noto, nella maggior parte delle tradizioni religiose il sacrificio corporale è parte integrante di specifici rituali o pratiche di ascesi o espiazione. Nelle culture più marcatamente sciamaniche o tribali il dolore sacro va spesso di pari passo con l’estasi e la trance mistica, come accade durante alcune festività in cui le ferite vengono praticate o autoinflitte dai devoti come segno di una raggiunta “immunità” alle sofferenze, garantita dalla comunione con la divinità.

tv7

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWpNPP6Lvi4]

In Oriente, l’intera esistenza era vista come una serie ininterrotta di sofferenze. Questo tipo di visione pessimistica era comune nell’area indocinese, e le due soluzioni a cui si era pensato prima dell’avvento del Buddha erano le più logiche. Per sconfiggere il dolore si doveva: 1) massimizzare il piacere – da cui la tradizione tantrista, che peraltro ha diversi elementi di derivazione sciamanica ed è radicalmente differente dalla versione edulcorata che ne hanno dato in Occidente le varie trasposizioni New-Age; oppure 2) abituare l’anima alla sofferenza, in modo talmente estremo da non poterla più percepire – da cui tutte le tecniche di meditazione ascetiche induiste. La rivoluzione operata dal Buddha fu proprio quella di proporre una via di mezzo, che non indulgesse nell’attaccamento alle cose ma che non mortificasse il corpo.

Eppure, anche la visione buddhista deve fare i conti con la sofferenza: quando il Buddha Siddhārtha Gautama annunciò le Quattro Nobili Verità, che ruotano tutte attorno al concetto di dolore (Dukkha), la prima di queste recitava: “[…] la nascita è dolore, la vecchiaia è dolore, la malattia è dolore, la morte è dolore; il dispiacere, le lamentazioni, la sofferenza, il tormento e la disperazione sono dolore; l’unirsi con ciò che è spiacevole è dolore; il separarsi da ciò che è piacevole è dolore”.

Chiaro quindi come, all’interno di una concezione simile dell’esistenza, il sottoporsi a stress fisici notevoli assuma un significato di accettazione e di “allenamento” alla vita, fino all’auspicato distacco da questa realtà fatta di illusione e dolore.

yogi_himalaya3

Per quanto riguarda il cattolicesimo, il sacrificio più comune è quello di derivazione ebraica, vale a dire la vera e propria rinuncia a un beneficio o a una ricchezza come forma di contraccambio per una grazia o un favore richiesto alla divinità.

Nella tradizione cattolica, però, il corpo umano ha storicamente avuto un posto subordinato rispetto al concetto di anima. Nonostante la nuova catechesi abbia cercato di rettificare l’attitudine religiosa verso il corpo, ancora oggi per molti fedeli esiste una marcata dicotomia fra fisicità e spirito, come se la purezza dell’anima fosse minacciata costantemente dalle pulsioni animali e peccaminose del suo involucro materiale.

In questo senso nel mondo cattolico il sacrificio (da sacer+facere, rendere sacro) tenta spesso di ridare dignità al corpo disonorato; l’accanimento per il controllo degli istinti, considerati impuri, fa in questi casi sfumare i contorni dell’atto sacrificale, rendendo difficile capire se si tratti effettivamente di un atto di rinunzia al benessere fisico in nome del sacro, oppure di una vera e propria punizione.

A San Pedro Cutud, nelle Filippine, durante le celebrazioni della Settimana Santa, i credenti inscenano la Passione del Cristo in maniera fedele e realistica: il devoto che “interpreta” Gesù, in questa sorta di rappresentazione sacra, viene flagellato, coronato di spine e infine crocifisso realmente (anche se con accorgimenti che rendono il martirio non letale). Pare che Ruben Enaje, un fedele locale, sia stato crocifisso ben 21 volte fino al 2007. Rolando Del Campo, un altro devoto, ha fatto voto di essere crocifisso per 15 volte se Dio avesse voluto far superare a sua moglie una gravidanza difficoltosa.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VI19pLL9VKM]

Chiaramente, come in tutto ciò che riguarda l’ambìto religioso, ognuno è libero di credere ciò che vuole; e di leggere, in queste manifestazioni di fede assoluta, una miopia intellettuale oppure uno strapotere della casta sacerdotale, una ricerca della spettacolarità che sconfina nel divismo, oppure al contrario una commovente espressione di modestia e di umanità. Quello che resta come dato di fatto è che il dolore trova sempre posto nella contemplazione del sacro, in quanto è, assieme alla morte, uno dei misteri essenziali a cui l’uomo ha da sempre cercato una risposta.