Criminal Heads

Two dissected heads. Color plate by Gautier D’Agoty (1746).

Starting from the end of the Middle Ages, the bodies of those condemned to death were commonly used for anatomical dissections. It was a sort of additional penalty, because autopsy was still perceived as a sort of desecration; perhaps because this “cruelty” aroused a certain sense of guilt, it was common for the dissected bodies to be granted a burial in consecrated ground, something that would normally have been precluded to criminals.

But during the nineteenth century dissecting the bodies of criminals began to have a more specific reason, namely to understand how the anatomy of a criminal differed from the norm. A practice that continued until almost mid-twentieth century.
The following picture shows the head of Peter Kürten (1883-1931), the infamous Vampire of Düsseldorf whose deeds inspired Fritz Lang’s masterpiece M (1931). Today it is exhibited at Ripley’s Believe It Or Not by Winsconsin Dells.

Cesare Lombroso, who in spite of his controversial theories was one of the pioneers and founders of modern criminology, was convinced that the criminal carried in his anatomy the anomalous signs of a genetic atavism.

The Museum dedicated to him, in Turin, retraces his reasoning, his convictions influenced by theories in vogue at the time, and gives an account of the impressive collection of heads he studied and preserved. Lombroso himself wanted to become part of his museum, where today the criminologist’s entire skeleton is on display; his preserved, boneless head is not visible to the public.

Head of Cesare Lombroso.

Similar autopsies on the skull and brain of the murderers almost invariably led to the same conclusion: no appreciable anatomical difference compared to the common man.

A deterministic criminology — the idea, that is, that criminal behavior derives from some anatomical, biological, genetic anomaly — has a comforting appeal for those who believe they are normal.
This is the classic process of creation/labeling of the different, what Foucault called “the machinery that makes qualifications and disqualifications“: if the criminal is different, if his nature is deviant (etymologically, he strays from the right path on which we place ourselves), then we will sleep soundly.

Numerous research suggests that in reality anyone is susceptible to adopt socially deplorable behavior, given certain premises, and even betray their ethical principles as soon as some specific psychological mechanisms are activated (see P. Bocchiaro, Psicologia del male, 2009). Yet the idea that the “abnormal” individual contains in himself some kind of predestination to deviance continues to be popular even today: in the best case this is a cognitive bias, in the worst case it’s plain deceit. A striking example of mala fides is provided by those scientific studies financed by tobacco or gambling multinationals, aimed at showing that addiction is the product of biological predisposition in some individuals (thus relieving the funders of such reasearch from all responsibility).

But let’s go back to the obsession of nineteenth-century scientists for the heads of criminals.
What is interesting in our eyes is that often, in these anatomical specimens, what was preserved was not even the internal structure, but rather the criminal’s features.

In the picture below you can see the skin of the face of Martin Dumollard (1810-1862), who killed more than 6 women. Today it is kept at the Musée Testut-Latarjet in Lyon.
It was tanned while his skull was being studied in search of anomalies. It was the skull, not the skin, the focus of the research. Why then take the trouble to prepare also his face, detached from the skull?

Dumollard is certainly not the only example. Also at the Testut-Latarjet lies the facial skin of Jules-Joseph Seringer, guilty of killing his mother, stepfather and step-sister. The museum also exhibits a plaster cast of the murderer, which offers a more realistic account of the killer’s features, compared to this hideous mask.

For the purposes of physiognomic and phrenological studies of the time, this plaster bust would have been a much better support than a skinned face. Why not then stick to the cast?

The impression is that preserving the face or the head of a criminal was, beyond any scientific interest, a way to ensure that the memory of guilt could never vanish. A condemnation to perpetual memory, the symbolic equivalent of those good old heads on spikes, placed at the gates of the city — as a deterrent, certainly, but also and above all as a spectacle of the pervasiveness of order, a proof of the inevitability of punishment.

Head of Diogo Alves, beheaded in 1841.

Head of Narcisse Porthault, guillotined in 1846. Ph. Jack Burman.

 

Head of Henri Landru, guillotined in 1922.

 

Head of Fritz Haarmann, beheaded in 1925.

This sort of upside-down damnatio memoriæ, meant to immortalize the offending individual instead of erasing him from collective memory, can be found in etchings, in the practice of the death masks and, in more recent times, in the photographs of guillotined criminals.

Death masks of hanged Victorian criminals (source).

Guillotined: Juan Vidal (1910), Auguste DeGroote (1893), Joseph Vacher (1898), Canute Vromant (1909), Lénard, Oillic, Thépaut and Carbucci (1866), Jean-Baptiste Picard (1862), Abel Pollet (1909), Charles Swartewagher (1905), Louis Lefevre (1915), Edmond Claeys (1893), Albert Fournier (1920), Théophile Deroo (1909), Jean Van de Bogaert (1905), Auguste Pollet (1909).

All these heads chopped off by the executioner, whilst referring to an ideal of justice, actually celebrate the triumph of power.

But there are four peculiar heads, which impose themselves as a subversive and ironic contrappasso. Four more heads of criminals, which were used to mock the prison regime.


These are the effigies that, placed on the cushions to deceive the guards, allowed Frank Morris, together with John and Clarence Anglin, to famously escape from Alcatraz (the fourth accomplice, Allen West, remained behind). Sculpted with soap, toothpaste, toilet paper and cement powder, and decorated with hair collected at the prison’s barbershop, these fake heads are the only remaining memory of the three inmates who managed to escape from the maximum security prison — along with their mug shots.

Although unwittingly, Morris and his associates had made a real détournement of a narrative which had been established for thousands of years: an iconography that aimed to turn the head and face of the condemned man into a mere simulacrum, in order to dehumanize him.

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 7

Back with Bizzarro Bazar’s mix of exotic and quirky trouvailles, quite handy when it comes to entertaining your friends and acting like the one who’s always telling funny stories. Please grin knowingly when they ask you where in the world you find all this stuff.

  • We already talked about killer rabbits in the margins of medieval books. Now a funny video unveils the mystery of another great classic of illustrated manuscripts: snail-fighting knights. SPOILER: it’s those vicious Lumbards again.
  • As an expert on alternative sexualities, Ayzad has developed a certain aplomb when discussing the most extreme and absurd erotic practices — in Hunter Thompson’s words, “when the going gets weird, the weird turn pro“. Yet even a shrewd guy like him was baffled by the most deranged story in recent times: the Nazi furry scandal.
  • In 1973, Playboy asked Salvador Dali to collaborate with photographer Pompeo Posar for an exclusive nude photoshoot. The painter was given complete freedom and control over the project, so much so that he was on set directing the shooting. Dali then manipulated the shots produced during that session through collage. The result is a strange and highly enjoyable example of surrealism, eggs, masks, snakes and nude bunnies. The Master, in a letter to the magazine, calimed to be satisfied with the experience: “The meaning of my work is the motivation that is of the purest – money. What I did for Playboy is very good, and your payment is equal to the task.” (Grazie, Silvia!)

  • Speaking of photography, Robert Shults dedicated his series The Washing Away of Wrongs to the biggest center for the study of decomposition in the world, the Forensic Anthropology Center at Texas State University. Shot in stark, high-contrast black and white as they were shot in the near-infrared spectrum, these pictures are really powerful and exhibit an almost dream-like quality. They document the hard but necessary work of students and researchers, who set out to understand the modifications in human remains under the most disparate conditions: the ever more precise data they gather will become invaluable in the forensic field. You can find some more photos in this article, and here’s Robert Shults website.

  • One last photographic entry. Swedish photographer Erik Simander produced a series of portraits of his grandfather, after he just became a widower. The loneliness of a man who just found himself without his life’s companion is described through little details (the empty sink, with a single toothbrush) that suddenly become definitive, devastating symbols of loss; small, poetic and lacerating touches, delicate and painful at the same time. After all, grief is a different feeling for evry person, and Simander shows a commendable discretion in observing the limit, the threshold beyond which emotions become too personal to be shared. A sublime piece of work, heart-breaking and humane, and which has the merit of tackling an issue (the loss of a partner among the elderly) still pretty much taboo. This theme had already been brought to the big screen in 2012 by the ruthless and emotionally demanding Amour, directed by Michael Haneke.
  • Speaking of widowers, here’s a great article on another aspect we hear very little about: the sudden sex-appeal of grieving men, and the emotional distress it can cause.
  • To return to lighter subjects, here’s a spectacular pincushion seen in an antique store (spotted and photographed by Emma).

  • Are you looking for a secluded little place for your vacations, Arabian nights style? You’re welcome.
  • Would you prefer to stay home with your box of popcorn for a B-movies binge-watching session? Here’s one of the best lists you can find on the web. You have my word.
  • The inimitable Lindsey Fitzharris published on her Chirurgeon’s Apprentice a cute little post about surgical removal of bladder stones before the invention of anesthesia. Perfect read to squirm deliciously in your seat.
  • Death Expo was recently held in Amsterdam, sporting all the latest novelties in the funerary industry. Among the best designs: an IKEA-style, build-it-yourself coffin, but above all the coffin to play games on. (via DeathSalon)
  • I ignore how or why things re-surface at a certain time on the Net. And yet, for the last few days (at least in my whacky internet bubble) the story of Portuguese serial killer Diogo Alves has been popping out again and again. Not all of Diogo Alves, actually — just his head, which is kept in a jar at the Faculty of Medicine in Lisbon. But what really made me chuckle was discovering one of the “related images” suggested by Google algorythms:

Diogo’s head…

…Radiohead.

  • Remember the Tsavo Man-Eaters? There’s a very good Italian article on the whole story — or you can read the English Wiki entry. (Thanks, Bruno!)
  • And finally we get to the most succulent news: my old native town, Vicenza, proved to still have some surprises in store for me.
    On the hills near the city, in the Arcugnano district, a pre-Roman amphitheatre has just been discovered. It layed buried for thousands of years… it could accomodate up to 4300 spectators and 300 actors, musicians, dancers… and the original stage is still there, underwater beneath the small lake… and there’s even a cave which acted as a megaphone for the actors’ voices, amplifying sounds from 8 Hz to 432 Hz… and there’s even a nearby temple devoted to Janus… and that temple was the real birthplace of Juliet, of Shakespearean fame… and there are even traces of ancient canine Gods… and of the passage of Julius Cesar and Cleopatra…. and… and…
    And, pardon my rudeness, wouldn’t all this happen to be a hoax?


No, it’s not a mere hoax, it is an extraordinary hoax. A stunt that would deserve a slow, admired clap, if it wasn’t a plain fraud.
The creative spirit behind the amphitheatre is the property owner, Franco Malosso von Rosenfranz (the name says it all). Instead of settling for the traditional Italian-style unauthorized development  — the classic two or three small houses secretely and illegally built — he had the idea of faking an archeological find just to scam tourists. Taking advantage of a license to build a passageway between two parts of his property, so that the constant flow of trucks and bulldozers wouldn’t raise suspicions, Malosso von Rosenfranz allegedly excavated his “ancient” theatre, with the intention of opening it to the public at the price of 40 € per visitor, and to put it up for hire for big events.
Together with the initial enthusiasm and popularity on social networks, unfortunately came legal trouble. The evidence against Malosso was so blatant from the start, that he immediately ended up on trial without any preliminary hearing. He is charged with unauthorized building, unauthorized manufacturing and forgery.
Therefore, this wonderful example of Italian ingenuity will be dismanteled and torn down; but the amphitheatre website is fortunately still online, a funny fanta-history jumble devised to back up the real site. A messy mixtre of references to local figures, famous characters from the Roman Era, supermarket mythology and (needless to say) the omnipresent Templars.


The ultimate irony is that there are people in Arcugnano still supporting him because, well, “at least now we have a theatre“. After all, as the Wiki page on unauthorized building explains, “the perception of this phenomenon as illegal […] is so thin that such a crime does not entail social reprimand for a large percentage of the population. In Italy, this malpractice has damaged and keeps damaging the economy, the landscape and the culture of law and respect for regulations“.
And here resides the brilliance of old fox Malosso von Rosenfranz’s plan: to cash in on these times of post-truth, creating an unauthorized building which does not really degrade the territory, but rather increase — albeit falsely — its heritage.
Well, you might have got it by now. I am amused, in a sense. My secret chimeric desire is that it all turns out to be an incredible, unprecedented art installations.  Andthat Malosso one day might confess that yes, it was all a huge experiment to show how little we care abot our environment and landscape, how we leave our authenticarcheological wonders fall apart, and yet we are ready to stand up for the fake ones. (Thanks, Silvietta!)

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 5

Here’s a gift pack of strange food for the mind and weird stuff that should keep you busy until Christmas.

  • You surely remember Caitlin Doughty, founder  of the Order of the Good Death as well as author of best-seller Smoke Gets in Your Eyes. In the past I interviewd her, I wrote a piece for the Order, and I even flew to Philadelphia to meet her for a three-day conference.
    Caitlin is also famous for her ironic videos on the culture of death. The latest episode is dedicated to a story that will surely sound familiar, if you follow this blog: the story of the ‘Punsihed Suicide’ of Padua, which was published for the first time in my book His Anatomical Majesty.
    With her trademark humor, Caitlin succeeds in asking what in my view is the fundamental question: is it worth judging a similar episode by our contemporary ethical standards, or is it better to focus on what this tale can tell us about our history and about the evolution of sensibility towards death?

  • In 1966 a mysterious box washed up on a British shore: it contained swords, chandeliers, red capes, and a whole array of arcane symbols related to occultism. What was the function of these objects, and why were they left to the waves?
  • While we’re at it, here is an autopsy photograph from the 1920s, probably taken in Belgium. Was pipe smoking a way of warding off the bad smell?
    (Seen here, thanks again Claudia!)

  • A new photographic book on evolution is coming out, and it looks sumptuous. Robert Clark’s wonderful pictures carry a disquieting message: “Some scientists who study evolution in real time believe we may be in the midst of the world’s sixth mass extinction, a slow-motion funnel of death that will leave the planet with a small fraction of its current biodiversity. One reason that no one can forecast how it will end—and who will be left standing—is that, in many ways, our understanding of evolution itself continues to evolve“.
  • But don’t get too alarmed: our world might eventually be just an illusion. Sure, this concept is far from new: all the great spiritual, mythological or artistic messages have basically been repeating us for millennia that we should not trust our senses, suggesting ther is more to this reality than meets the eye. Yet, up until now, no one had ever tried to prove this mathematically. Until now.
    A cognitive science professor at the University of California elaborated an intriguing model that is causing a bit of a fuss: his hypothesis is that our perception has really nothing to do with the world out there, as it is; our sensory filter might not have evolved to give us a realistic image of things, but rather a convenient one. Here is an article on the Atlantic, and here is a podcast in which our dear professor quietly tears down everything we think we know about the world.
  • Nonsense, you say? What if I told you that highly evolved aliens could already be among us — without the need for a croncrete body, but in the form of laws of physics?

Other brilliant ideas: Goodyear in 1961 developed these illuminated tires.

  • Mariano Tomatis’ Blog of Wonders is actually Bizzarro Bazar’s less morbid, but more magical twin. You could spend days sifting through the archives, and always come up with some pearl you missed the first time: for example this post on the hidden ‘racism’ of those who believe Maya people came from outer space (Italian only).
  • In Medieval manuscripts we often find some exceedingly unlucky figures, which had the function of illustrating all possible injuries. Here is an article on the history and evolution of the strange and slightly comic Wound Man.

  • Looking at colored paint spilled on milk? Not really a mesmerizing thought, until you take four minutes off and let yourself be hypnotized by Memories of Painting, by Thomas Blanchard.

  • Let’s go back to the fallacy of our senses, ith these images of the Aspidochelone (also called Zaratan), one of the fantastical beasts I adored as a child. The idea of a sea monster so huge that it could be mistaken for an island, and on whose back even vegetation can grow, had great fortune from Pliny to modern literature:

  • But the real surprise is to find that the Zaratan actually exists, albeit in miniature:

  • Saddam Hussein, shortly after his sixtieth birthday, had 27 liters of his own blood taken just to write a 600-page calligraphied version of the Quran.
    An uncomfortable manuscript, so much so that authorities don’t really know what to do with it.
  • Time for a couple of Christmas tips, in case you want to make your decorations slightly menacing: 1) a set of ornaments featuring the faces of infamous serial killers, namely Charles Manson, Ted Bundy, Jeffrey DahmerEd Gein and H. H. Holmes; 2) a murderous Santa Claus. Make your guests understand festivities stress you out, and that might trigger some uncontrolled impulse. If you wish to buy these refined, tasteful little objects, just click on pictures to go to the corresponding Etsy store. You’re welcome.

  • Finally, if you run out of gift ideas for Christmas and you find yourself falling back on the usual book, at least make sure it’s not the usual book. Here are four random, purely coincidental examples…
    Happy holidays!

(Click on image to open bookshop)

Links, curiosities & mixed wonders – 1

Almost every post appearing on these pages is the result of several days of specific study, finding sources, visiting the National Library, etc. It often happens that this continuous research makes me stumble upon little wonders which perhaps do not deserve a full in-depth analysis, but I nonetheless feel sorry to lose along the way.

I have therefore decided to occasionally allow myself a mini-post like this one, where I can point out the best bizarre news I’ve come across in recent times, passed on by followers, mentioned on Twitter (where I am more active than on other social media) or retrieved from my archive.

The idea — and I candidly admit it, since we’re all friends here — is also kind of useful since this is a time of great excitement for Bizzarro Bazar.
In addition to completing the draft for the new book in the BB Collection, of which I cannot reveal any details yet, I am working on a demanding but thrilling project, a sort of offline, real-world materialization of Bizzarro Bazar… in all probability, I will be able to give you more precise news about it next month.

There, enough said, here’s some interesting stuff. (Sorry, some of my own old posts linked here and there are in Italian only).

  • The vicissitudes of Haydn’s head: Wiki page, and 1954 Life Magazine issue with pictures of the skull’s burial ceremony. This story is reminiscent of Descartes’s skull, of which I’ve written here. (Thanks, Daniele!)
  • In case you missed it, here’s my article (in English) for Illustrati Magazine, about midget pornstar Bridget Powers.
  • Continuing my exploration of human failure, here is a curious film clip of a “triphibian” vehicle, which was supposed to take over land, water and the skies. Spoiler: it didn’t go very far.

  • In the Sixties, the western coast of Lake Victoria in Tanzania fell prey to a laughter epidemics.
  • More recent trends: plunging into a decomposing whale carcass to cure rheumatism. Caitlin Doughty (whom I interviewed here) teaches you all about it in a very funny video.

  • Found what could be the first autopsy ever recorded on film (warning, strong images). Our friend pathologist says: “This film clip is a real gem, really beautiful, and the famous Dr. Erdheim’s dissecting skills are remarkable: he does everything with a single knife, including cutting the breastbone (very elegant! I use some kind of poultry shears instead); he proceeds to a nice full evisceration, at least of thoracic organs (you can’t see the abdomen) from tongue to diaphragm, which is the best technique to maintain the connection between viscera, and… he doesn’t get splattered at all! He also has the table at the right height: I don’t know why but in our autopsy rooms they keep on using very high tables, and therefore you have to step on a platform at the risk of falling down in you lean back too much. It is also interesting to see all the activity behind and around the pathologist, they were evidently working on more than one table at the same time. I think the pathologist was getting his hands dirty for educational reasons only, otherwise there would have been qualified dissectors or students preparing the bodies for him. It’s quite a sight to see him push his nose almost right into the cadaver’s head, without wearing any PPE…”

  • A long, in-depth and thought-provoking article on cryonics: if you think it’s just another folly for rich people who can’t accept death, you will be surprised. The whole thing is far more intriguing.
  • For dessert, here is my interview for The Thinker’s Garden, a wonderful website on the arcane and sublime aspects of art, history and literature.

Arte criminologica

Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Pee Gee Daniel

Accade spesso che per il raggiungimento di mete stupefacenti la via che vi ci conduce si presenti impervia.

Anche in questo caso, al termine di un percorso accidentato, tra gli inestricabili paesini del cuore della Lomellina, sfrecciando lungo sottili assi viari a prova di ammortizzatore, si giunge finalmente a un prodigioso sancta sanctorum per gli amanti del macabro, dell’insolito e del curioso, nascosto – come sempre si conviene a un vero tesoro – nell’ampio soppalco di una grande cascina bianca, dispersa tra le campagne.

1

Là sopra vi attendono, beffardamente occhieggianti dalle loro teche collocate in un ordine rapsodico ma di indubbio impatto, teste sotto formalina galleggianti in barattoli di vetro, mani mozze, corpi mummificati, arti pietrificati, crani di gemelli dicefali, barattoli di larve di sarcophaga carnaria, cadaveri adagiati dentro bare in noce, un austero mezzobusto della Cianciulli (la celeberrima “Saponificatrice di Correggio”), pezzi rari come alcuni documenti olografi di Cesare Lombroso, parti anatomiche provenienti da vecchi gabinetti medici, armi del delitto, strumenti di tortura o per elettroshock in uso in un recente passato, memento di pellagrosi e briganti, tsantsa umane e di scimmia prodotte dalla tribù ecuadoriana dei Jivaros, bambolotti voodoo, cimeli risalenti a efferati fatti di cronaca nostrana.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Creatore e gestore di questa casa-museo del crimine è il facondo Roberto Paparella. Sarà lui a introdurvi e accompagnarvi per le varie installazioni con la giusta dose di erudizione e intrattenimento: un po’ chaperon, un po’ cicerone e un po’ Virgilio dantesco.

Diplomato in arte e restauro (la parte inferiore dell’edificio è infatti occupata da mobilio in attesa di recupero) e criminologo, il Paparella ha saputo combinare questi due aspetti dando vita a una disciplina ibrida che ha voluto battezzare “arte criminologica”, cui è improntata l’intera mostra permanente che ho avuto il piacere di visitare in quel di Olevano. Poiché c’è innanzitutto da dire che non di mero collezionismo si tratta: molti dei pezzi che vi troviamo sono cioè manufatti e ricostruzioni iperrealistiche composti ad hoc dalla sapienza tecnica del nostro, cosicché i reperti storici e i “falsi d’autore” si mescolano e si confondono in maniera pressoché indistinguibile, giocando sul significato più ampio del termine “originale”.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2718

DSCN2709

My beautiful picture

È forse utile spiegare che il museo è ospitato all’interno di una comunità terapeutica. Roberto Paparella infatti, oltre a essere un artista del lugubre, un restauratore, un ricercatore scrupoloso nel campo criminologico e un tabagista imbattibile, è anche stato il più giovane direttore di una comunità per tossicodipendenti in Italia (autore insieme al giurista Guido Pisapia, fratello dell’attuale sindaco di Milano, di un testo per operatori del settore), mentre oggi si occupa di ragazzi usciti dall’istituto penale minorile. Proprio questo, mi ha rivelato, è stato uno dei principali sproni alla sua vera passione: ripercorrere quotidianamente i vari iter giudiziari e la teoria giuridica di delitti e pene in compagnia dei suoi ragazzi ha fatto rinascere in lui questo interesse per delinquenti, vittime, atti omicidiari e “souvenir” a essi connessi.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Una vocazione riaffiorata dal passato, visto che il primo a instillare in lui questo gusto grandguignolesco fu in effetti il padre che, dopo aver visitato il museo delle cere di Milano, aveva deciso di farsene uno in proprio, nello scantinato di casa sua, che aveva poi chiamato La taverna rossa e nel quale amava condurre famigliari e amici nel tentativo di impressionarli con le ricostruzioni di famosi assassini, seppure di produzione casalinga e un po’ naif.
La tradizione familiare peraltro prosegue, visto che i due figli di Paparella, cresciuti tra cadaveri dissezionati più o meno posticci, tengono a fornire spontaneamente i propri pareri in merito alla attendibilità di questa o quella riproduzione artigianale di cui il padre è autore.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

DSCN2725

Per quanto riguarda la “falsificazione” anatomica di salme o parti di esse, è una cura certosina quella che viene impiegata, avvalendosi di uno studio filologico, di un’attenta scelta dei materiali, di una efficace disposizione scenografica dei corpi stessi e delle luci che ne esalteranno le forme. Come nel caso di Elisa Claps, i cui resti Paparella ha rielaborato ricoprendo uno scheletro in resina con uno speciale ritrovato indiano noto come cartapelle, capace di ricreare l’effetto di un tegumento incartapecorito dalla lunga esposizione agli elementi atmosferici, e infine decorato con altri componenti di provenienza umana (l’apparato dentario è fornito da alcuni studi odontoiatrici, mentre i capelli vengono recuperati da vecchie parrucche di capelli veri, scovate nei mercatini).
Paparella afferma che nel suo operato si cela anche una motivazione morale: la volontà di ridare una consistenza tridimensionale alle vittime come ai carnefici, nella speranza di muovere dentro allo spettatore quelli che potremmo individuare come i due momenti aristotelici della pietà e del terrore.

Continuando la visita, incontriamo il corpo del cosiddetto Vampiro della Bergamasca, già esaminato a suo tempo dal Lombroso, alle cui misurazioni antropometriche lo scultore si è attenuto fedelmente: per la cronaca, Vincenzo Verzeni era un serial killer o, secondo la terminologia clinica del tempo, un «monomaniaco omicida necrofilomane, antropofago, affetto da vampirismo», che provava una frenesia erotica nello strappare coi denti larghi brani di carne alle proprie vittime.

Accanto, ecco lo scheletro di un morto di mafia, con sasso in bocca e mani amputate, che emerge faticosamente dalla terra mentre, sull’altro lato, in una posizione rattrappita, una mummia azteca lancia al visitatore una versione parodistica dell’Urlo di Munch. Alle sue spalle, addossata all’estesa parete, un’intera schiera di calchi delle teste di alienati e criminali ci osserva in maniera inquietante, a breve distanza dai calchi dei genitali di stupratori e di pazienti affette dal terribile tribadismo.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Si prosegue lungo una parete tappezzata di scatti ANSA di celebri processi del secondo dopoguerra, finché – in un accostamento emblematico dello stile di questo stravagante museo – poggiato su una lapide di candido marmo, ci si imbatte in un set anti-vampiri completo, con tanto di teschio, altarino portatile, barattolo contenente terra consacrata, chiodone in ferro in luogo dell’abusato paletto di frassino, argilla, paramenti ecclesiastici vari, pipistrelli essiccati, breviario e crocefisso a portar via, il tutto serbato in uno scrigno ligneo di pregevole fattura.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture

Ritornati all’entrata, al momento del commiato, troverete a salutarvi il manichino animato di Antonio Boggia, pluriomicida della Milano ottocentesca. A qualche passo dall’automa, l’occhio cade su una pesante mannaia in ferro, usata dallo stesso Boggia per le sue esecuzioni. Vera o falsa? Non sta a noi rivelarvelo. Se vi va, andando alla mostra (che vi si offrirà ben più particolareggiata di questo mio stringato resoconto) portatevi in tasca il giusto quantitativo di carbonio 14, oppure, più semplicemente, godetevi lo spettacolo senza porvi troppe domande.

My beautiful picture

My beautiful picture
Museo di Arte Criminologica
, via Cascina Bianca 1, 27020 Olevano di Lomellina (PV)
È necessario prenotare: tel. 3333639136 tel./fax 038451311 email: [email protected]

Il fornaio di Hannibal Lecter

375544_329577543730290_115059677_n

(Articolo a cura del nostro guestblogger Andrea Ferreri)

Il suo negozio si chiama Body Bakery, cioè la “panetteria dei corpi”. Se volete visitarla, dovete fare un po’ di strada, perché è a Ratchabury, a 100 km da Bangkok, in Thailandia. Il fornaio si chiama Kittiwat Unarrom, ha 35 anni, e, quando andate a trovarlo nel suo negozio, vi arriva subito la sensazione di essere capitati nel rifugio di un serial killer: nelle vetrine sono in esposizione teste, braccia, mani, intestini, attaccati a ganci come se fossero pezzi di carne in esposizione in una macelleria.

bread1

564085_441635482524495_2009685131_n

tumblr_lv9zf5FrcD1qk38c7o6_1280

Kittiwat li rende simili al vero grazie alla sua abilità nel manipolare acqua e farina, cui aggiunge però cioccolato, resine e coloranti tutti naturali, uvetta, anacardi e gli altri seducenti sapori cui siamo abituati nelle nostre città. Insomma, quei rimasugli di corpi li potete anche mangiare: basta solo superare l’idea che siete diventati cannibali.

395186_581838651837510_335498200_n

339178_459844790703564_782600727_o-550x418

slide_231118_1067018_free

L’idea di produrre un pane così raccapricciante nasce da una massima buddista secondo la quale “ciò che vedi potrebbe non essere vero quanto ciò che pensi”. E, infatti, quelli che sembrano i resti di un massacro nascondono la fragranza e la freschezza del pane, alimento della vita. «Quando i miei clienti vedono i miei lavori – racconta Kittiwat – scappano via, non vogliono nemmeno provare a mangiarli. Però, se li assaggiano, scoprono che sono solo pane e ne traggono una lezione: mai giudicare dalle apparenze!».

333137_459841297370580_2087467982_o-550x399

21646_491071540914222_370791018_n

545946_459855684035808_211822509_n-550x734

La food art fa parte della cultura artistica asiatica: in Thailandia c’è una vera e propria scuola di scultori di frutta che producono capolavori, per esempio, lavorando su un cocomero. Ma c’è anche una vicinanza profonda, antropologica, dello spirito thai alla morte (ne trovate un esempio in questo articolo). Così, il “fornaio di Hannibal Lecter” realizza le sue opere in perfetta sintonia con il suo ambiente culturale. Ma intorno a lui fioccano le leggende: si dice che suo padre lavorasse all’obitorio di Bangkok e che Kittiwat abbia passato la vita dividendosi tra il forno di famiglia e i cadaveri dimenticati sui tavoli di marmo della morgue.

Maja-ar-liku-10

È quasi tutto vero. Kittiwat viene da una famiglia di fornai e ha imparato a fare il pane a 10 anni, ma dal 2006, quando cioè si è laureato in Belle Arti e ha cominciato a realizzare le sue sculture “alimentari”, il suo mestiere si è trasformato in qualcosa di più raffinato, in uno strano, irrituale tentativo di raccontare il proprio mondo religioso. Si è documentato studiando libri di medicina, visitando musei anatomici e ha conquistato una straordinaria conoscenza dei suoi materiali base: l’acqua e la farina. Le sue opere sono incredibilmente somiglianti al vero, perturbanti e violente, ma non sono pensate soltanto con l’intenzione di creare disagio. Incartando i suoi lavori come se fossero alimenti (e di fatto lo sono), Kittiwat mette i clienti di fronte al loro lato oscuro, alla capacità di vedere la morte non più come un evento dal quale fuggire, ma come qualcosa da mangiare. Peccato però che questo aspetto sia passato in secondo piano: negli ultimi anni, anche grazie alla celebrità regalata da internet, lo spettacolo horror del suo obitorio commestibile è diventato un’attrazione turistica che potete trovare perfino nelle guide.

INDICAZIONI PER IL NEGOZIO 555729_441636715857705_188180002_n

Human-Bakery-11

La Contessa sanguinaria

tumblr_m6whgu2a4S1qd3ucoo1_1280

Articolo a cura della nostra guestblogger Veronica Pagnani

Erzsébet Báthory nacque nel 1560 a Nyírbátor, nell’odierna Ungheria, ma trascorse i primi anni della sua infanzia nella proprietà di famiglia in Transilvania. Meglio nota come Contessa Dracula o Contessa Sanguinaria, è considerata la più feroce e famosa assassina seriale in Ungheria ed in Slovacchia, con un numero di vittime che oscillerebbe da 100 a 300, tra accertate e sospette. I testimoni vociferavano anche di un certo diario, appartenuto alla contessa, in cui sarebbero trascritti minuziosamente i nomi di ben 650 vittime, il che la renderebbe la più prolifica serial killer di sempre, anche se gli storici sono soliti sostenere la prima stima di circa 300 vittime. I crimini sarebbero tutti avvenuti fra il 1585 e il 1610.

Erzsébet proveniva dalla nobile famiglia dei Báthory-Ecsed, che poteva vantare nel suo albero genealogico vari eroi di guerra ed addirittura un re di Polonia; ma, anche a causa di vari matrimoni tra consanguinei, molti membri della casata portavano i segni evidenti di disturbi mentali e schizofrenia. La stessa Erzsébet, fin dall’età di sei anni, era solita passare da uno stato di quiete ad uno di folle collera, disordine alimentato anche dai numerosi episodi cruenti a cui era costretta, nonostante la sua giovane età, ad assistere. Vide un giorno dei soldati torturare uno zingaro colpevole di aver venduto i propri figli ai turchi; la condanna consisteva nel tagliare il ventre di un cavallo tenuto fermo tramite delle corde, inserire il condannato nel ventre del cavallo per poi ricucirlo. All’età di 13 anni, poi, incontrò un suo cugino, il principe di Transilvania, il quale davanti ai suoi occhi ordinò di tagliare naso e orecchie a 54 persone colpevoli di aver sostenuto una rivolta di contadini.

Ferenc_Nadasdy_I

Appena quindicenne sposò Ferenc Nádasdy, anch’egli nobile di nascita e d’indole violenta: il suo passatempo preferito consisteva nel torturare i servi senza però ucciderli, o cospargere di miele una ragazza nuda che veniva poi legata vicino alle arnie di sua proprietà. I due sposi si scambiarono alcune dritte sui metodi di tortura, e a quanto pare Erzsébet, che era ben acculturata sulle tecniche più efficaci, istigò il marito ad alcune feroci pratiche.

Essendo Nádasdy il più delle volte impegnato a combattere contro i turchi, Erzsébet cominciò a frequentare sua zia, la contessa Karla, e a partecipare alle orge da lei stessa organizzate. Nello stesso periodo conobbe Dorkò , una donna che assieme al suo servo Thorko incoraggiò le tendenze sadiche della contessa insegnandole la stregoneria.

Crescendo, sia Erzsébet che suo marito (di circa sei anni più grande di lei) cominciarono a sfogare tutta la loro collera e follia sui servi, i quali, dal canto loro, potevano fare ben poco per difendersi. Molti erano quelli che cercavano di fuggire, ma che spesso venivano recuperati per poi essere torturati selvaggiamente. Nessuna forma di umanità veniva mossa dai due nei confronti dei servi. Si racconta di una donna la quale si rifiutò un giorno di lavorare perché ammalata e i due sposi, sospettosi riguardo a questa presunta malattia, decisero di infilarle tra le dita dei pezzi di carta impregnati d’olio a cui fu poi dato fuoco. Da quel momento furono in pochi quelli che osarono ribellarsi alla loro follia.

In un giorno come tanti, dopo aver schiaffeggiato una serva, Erzsébet notò che, in un punto della sua mano, dove poco prima era caduta una goccia di sangue della poveretta, la sua pelle era come ringiovanita. Corse così immediatamente dagli alchimisti di corte per chiedere delucidazioni riguardo a questo episodio e questi, pur di compiacerla, le diedero ragione spiegandole che già da tempo era stato provato che il sangue delle vergini possedeva queste eccezionali qualità. La contessa si convinse, dunque, che fare abluzioni nel sangue delle vergini (o addirittura berlo) le avrebbe garantito un’eterna giovinezza.

vlcsnap109180

Per trovare le sue vittime, le quali avrebbero dovuto essere non solo giovani e belle, ma anche del suo stesso status sociale, Erzsèbet istituì nel suo castello un’accademia che, ufficialmente, aveva la funzione di educare le giovani provenienti da famiglie agiate. Col passare del tempo, e con l’aumentare del numero di denunce di scomparsa pervenute alla Chiesa Cattolica, l’imperatore Mattia II intervenne ordinando delle indagini sulla nobildonna. Gli inviati dell’imperatore, che entrarono di nascosto nel castello, colsero Erzsèbet sul fatto; nelle stanze e nelle prigioni vennero ritrovate decine di cadaveri in putrefazione recanti i segni della tortura, e altre ragazze ancora vive con gli arti amputati. A seguito di un rapido processo, Erzsèbet e i suoi fedeli, i quali si resero complici dei crimini efferati, vennero murati vivi nelle loro stanze, con un unico foro per ricevere il cibo, mentre Dorko fu bruciata sul rogo, dopo essere stata incriminata di stregoneria.

Csok_Istvan-Erzsebet_Bathory_sketch

Dopo quasi 500 anni, la storia di Erzsèbet è viva più che mai nei racconti e nelle leggende dell’est europeo, mentre, nel resto del mondo, la sua figura è associata il più delle volte a Vlad III Dracula, proveniente dalla Valacchia, anche se, dopo attenti studi sull’albero genealogico della contessa, di etnia magiara, non è mai stato scoperto alcun antenato romeno.

[Nota: Le penultime due immagini sono tratte da uno degli episodi del film Racconti Immorali (1974) di Walerian Borowczyk, che narra le gesta della contessa sanguinaria.]

Snuff Movies

Di tanto in tanto, nelle notizie di cronaca più sensazionalistiche, fanno capolino i fantomatici snuff movies. Se ne parla da decenni e, nonostante le centinaia di pagine di inchiostro scritte al proposito, l’alone di mistero che li circonfonde resiste. Cosa sono esattamente?

Molti di voi sapranno già la risposta: si tratta di film prodotti a basso budget in cui vengono mostrate sevizie e torture reali, che culminano con l’uccisione del “protagonista” davanti al freddo occhio della videocamera, senza effetti speciali e senza trucchi. La morte violenta e reale della vittima di uno snuff movie garantisce un mercato esclusivo per la pellicola in questione, che viene venduta  a peso d’oro ai collezionisti più morbosi e depravati. Questo, almeno, è quanto si racconta. Sì, perché in verità nessuno ha mai visto uno snuff movie.

Essendo la morte, nella nostra cultura, un tabù progressivamente sostituito dalla sua immagine, sempre più onnipresente, la curiosità di vedere la morte, nell’esatto momento in cui avviene, cresce di continuo. Così, di filmati che mostrano la morte in diretta se ne trovano a centinaia su internet: dai classici intramontabili quali il suicidio di Budd Dwyer (prima grande star del voyeurismo mediatico, suo malgrado), fino alle decapitazioni ad opera dei terroristi islamici, alle atrocità di guerra negli stati sovietici o agli incidenti fatali più agghiaccianti, la morte su internet è presente in abbondanza. Trovare addirittura fotografie e filmati realizzati da alcuni serial killer, che mostrano violenze e smembramenti davvero agghiaccianti, è in definitiva un gioco da ragazzi.

Ma gli snuff sarebbero qualcosa di differente. Lo snuff movie dovrebbe avere alle spalle una vera e propria produzione, ed essere girato con l’unico scopo di mostrare un omicidio reale, senza alcuna altra motivazione che il profitto derivante dalla vendita del film. I filmati in cui vediamo un serial killer uccidere le sue vittime non sono snuff, perché originariamente intesi per uso personale. Lo snuff vero e proprio prevede una organizzazione che intrappola vittime innocenti e le sacrifica in nome di un mercato sotterraneo alla ricerca di emozioni sempre più forti.

Insomma, avete capito l’antifona: qualche miliardario senza scrupoli (solitamente americano) ordina un filmato di morte, e un gruppo di persone organizza un apposito set (solitamente in Sudamerica, dove la vita è più a buon mercato), per realizzarlo con il “contributo” di una ignara attrice assassinata davanti alla macchina da presa. Non so se in questo momento a voi sta suonando un campanello di allarme. Farebbe bene a suonare, con una scritta lampeggiante che dice “LEGGENDA METROPOLITANA”.

Analizziamo i concetti base della storia. Il ricco miliardario è in realtà un morboso e sadico voyeurista. Già questo personaggio (basato sull’idea che i soldi rendono “sporchi” e “diabolici”, e spingono alla ricerca dell’estremo onanismo sadico, visto che i piaceri comuni non bastano più) puzza di cliché. Se esaminiamo il resto della leggenda – la prostituta spesso proveniente dal Terzo Mondo, a sottolineare come la gente povera sia disposta a tutto – ci ritroviamo all’interno dei più triti preconcetti da bar. Unite a questo una spruzzata di superstizione nei riguardi della macchina da presa che “ruba l’anima”, un etto di chiacchiere sull’assenza di scrupolo da parte dei media, ed ecco che la leggenda diventa plausibile agli occhi dei più.

Nessuno snuff è mai stato ritrovato in nessun angolo del mondo, fino ad ora. Né l’FBI, né alcuna altra organizzazione investigativa ne ha mai rilevato traccia. E, nell’era di internet, nessuno snuff è mai affiorato sulla rete. La storia di questa persistente leggenda urbana è particolarmente interessante perché, a differenza di altri miti moderni, ha un inizio ben preciso.

Nel 1971 Michael e Roberta Findlay girano in Cile e Argentina un film intitolato Slaughter. La pellicola cercava di far leva sulla strage di Bel Air, avvenuta due anni prima, nella quale perse la vita anche la moglie di Roman Polanski, Sharon Tate, ad opera degli adepti di Charles Manson. Slaughter si rivela un filmaccio a basso budget della peggior specie, ma viene acquistato per una miseria dal distributore Allan Shackleton nel ’72. Per distribuire una tale porcheria, Shackleton (che era della vecchia scuola di distributori di sexploitation, abituato a inventarsi le trovate più mirabolanti pur di vendere una pellicola) decide che ci vuole una mossa di marketing costruita a regola d’arte.

Mette così in piedi una campagna pubblicitaria ad effetto, lasciando intendere che il film sia stato originariamente sequestrato dalla polizia mentre veniva contrabbandato dal Sudamerica agli Stati Uniti, e che presenti nel finale una sequenza di omicidio non simulata. Cambia il titolo della pellicola in Snuff.  Distribuisce addirittura ritagli di giornale a firma di un giornalista, “Vincent Sheehan”, che nei suoi articoli astiosi polemizza contro l’uscita del film nelle sale. Sheehan è ovviamente un altro parto della fervida fantasia di Shackleton.

“L’isteria della stampa fa il resto: i critici di tutto il paese si lanciano in fumiganti filippiche contro il film, prendendo per buone le panzane di Shackleton e dando così credibilità alle voci giudiziosamente sparse dal distributore. Prima ancora di uscire nelle sale, Snuff è già oggetto di scandalo e riprovazione. Il bello è che Shackleton deve ancora preparare il finale vero e proprio del film, che rimpiazzerà quello originario di Slaughter: i cinque minuti finali vengono girati […] in un solo giorno in un appartamento di Manhattan, al costo di 10.000 dollari” (da Sex and Violence, di R. Curti e T. La Selva, 2003, Lindau).

Nonostante Shackleton sia in seguito costretto ad ammettere che si trattava di una bufala, il clamore suscitato dalla pellicola fonda il mito degli snuff movie. Da lì in poi, sarà tutto un susseguirsi di operazioni di bassa exploitation che cercheranno di sfruttare quest’idea geniale. Nei cosiddetti mondo movies italiani molte scene “documentaristiche” sono in realtà ricreate ad arte e spacciate per vere, e così farà anche Ruggero Deodato nel suo famigerato Cannibal Holocaust (1978): il regista chiederà addirittura agli attori (tra i quali figura un giovane Luca Barbareschi, protagonista di una controversa scena in cui spara a un maialino) di scomparire dalla circolazione nei mesi successivi all’uscita del film, per alimentare la leggenda che le loro “morti” non fossero simulate.

Con regolarità, nei decenni successivi, di tanto in tanto spunta qualche sequenza di sevizie che fa il giro del mondo perché ritenuta uno snuff, salvo poi rendersi conto che è stata estrapolata da qualche film horror di bassa lega. Anche l’attore Charlie Sheen viene gabbato nel 1997, quando viene in possesso di uno snuff incredibile: una donna giapponese, legata ad un letto, viene seviziata e fatta lentamente a pezzi da un uomo vestito da samurai. Sheen, sconvolto, consegna il filmato all’FBI, convinto che si tratti di torture vere. Si scoprirà quasi subito che le riprese provengono dalla serie TV giapponese Guinea Pig, girata negli anni ’80 e famosa per i suoi effetti speciali iperrealistici.

Per quanto possa sembrare sorprendente, ancora oggi la leggenda resiste, viva e vegeta, nonostante l’assenza di prove e le continue bufale smascherate di volta in volta. Ancora più strano è che questo mito perduri in un’epoca in cui basta un po’ di esperienza per scovare sulla rete diversi siti che propongono efferatezze e crudeltà (purtroppo) tutt’altro che inventate. Ma gli snuff movies evidentemente hanno un fattore in più, che fa presa sull’immaginario collettivo: come in una favola moderna, ci parlano simbolicamente dell’avidità umana, della mancanza di scrupoli e del pericoloso potere occulto delle immagini.

Domanda & Risposta: Charles Manson

Ecco Charles Manson che pone una domanda, forse retorica ma piuttosto pregnante: “Do you feel blame? Are you mad? Uh, do you feel like wolf kabob roth vantage? Gefrannis booj pooch boo jujube; bear-ramage. Jigiji geeji geeja geeble goog. Begep flagaggle vaggle veditch-waggle bagga?”

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XREnvJRkif0&feature=related]

Alla domanda dell’intervistatore su chi sia veramente, Manson risponde così:

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2oZWpqtNi4]

Nel Regno dell’Irreale

Henry Darger era la classica persona che passa inosservata. Abiti sciatti ma puliti, un umile lavoro come custode dell’ospedale locale, la messa ogni giorno, un lavoro di volontariato a favore dei bambini che avevano subito abusi o erano stati trascurati, una fissazione per la storia della Guerra Civile Americana. Aveva avuto un’infanzia piuttosto difficile, subendo anche un internamento in manicomio (e all’inizio del ‘900, non era uno scherzo: significava lavori forzati e severe punizioni); eppure di tutte quelle sofferenze Henry sembrava non portare alcun segno, anzi spesso ricordava di aver avuto anche momenti felici. Un solitario, ma di buon cuore. Un uomo qualsiasi, nella grande città ventosa di Chicago. Anche la sua morte avvenne senza clamore, una mattina d’aprile del 1973.

Eppure Henry nascondeva un segreto.

Qualche giorno dopo la sua morte, frugando nella sua stanza per liberarla, i padroni di casa trovarono il progetto nascosto di Henry Darger, l’opera di una vita.

Il romanzo fantasy The story of the Vivian Girls, reintitolato recentemente The Realms of Unreal, scritto da Darger durante un periodo di oltre 60 anni, è un’opera straordinaria per dimensioni: più di 15.145 pagine di racconto, fittissime, e alcuni volumi rilegati contenenti diverse centinaia di illustrazioni, papiri colorati ad acquerello, ritagli di giornale e di libri da colorare. Oltre a questo, Darger scrisse anche un’autobiografia di 5.084 pagine, e un secondo lavoro di fiction, Crazy House, di più di 10.000 pagine.

Durante tutti quegli anni di vita da recluso, Darger aveva accumulato un archivio immenso di ritagli di giornale, pubblicità, pagine di libri per bambini. Su quella base, ricopiando i suoi ritagli, aveva illustrato le avventure delle Vivian Girls, le protagoniste del suo romanzo. In The Realms of Unreal, le ragazze Vivian sono sette principesse (cattoliche) di un mondo immaginario in cui i Glandeliniani (atei convinti) sfruttano i bambini e ne abusano costantemente. Dopo che viene messo in atto il più scioccante omicidio infantile mai causato dal Governo Glandeliniano, i bambini si sollevano e si scatena una guerra senza confine, il vero fulcro del romanzo, che si sviluppa fra fughe rocambolesche, epiche battaglie e crudeli scene di tortura.

Si è molto discusso su quello “scioccante omicidio infantile“. Darger, infatti, era rimasto particolarmente colpito dall’assassinio di una bambina, Elsie Paroubek, strangolata da uno sconosciuto nel 1911: aveva ritagliato la foto della piccola vittima da un giornale e l’aveva conservata come una reliquia. Quando un giorno l’immagine andò perduta, egli si convinse che la foto fosse stata rubata da qualche malintenzionato introdottosi in casa sua. Dopo aver elaborato preghiere e novene rivolte a Dio affinché gli fosse concesso di recuperare la fotografia, Darger decise che quell’affronto andava risolto in altro modo: nel suo romanzo in corso d’opera, che diventava ogni giorno di più una sorta di universo parallelo nel quale Henry risolveva i suoi conflitti interiori, fece scoppiare la guerra fra le Vivian girls e i Glandeliniani proprio a causa dell’omicidio di una piccola schiava ribelle. In virtù di questa ossessione di Darger per la piccola Elsie Paroubek, trasfigurata in eroina nel suo romanzo, il biografo MacGregor avanza l’ipotesi che l’assassino della bambina (mai identificato) fosse proprio lo stesso Darger.

Le prove che Henry Darger potesse realmente essere un pedofilo o un assassino non sono mai affiorate. Certo è che gran parte delle illustrazioni di Realms of Unreal mostrano ragazzine nude, spesso torturate e uccise dai Glandeliniani con un’attenzione e una cura dei particolari che ricordano i disegni realizzati dai più famosi serial killer. A intorbidire ancora più le acque, nella maggioranza dei dipinti le piccole bambine nude sfoggiano genitali maschili. È molto probabile che, come notano i maggiori esegeti dell’opera di Darger, il vecchio recluso non avesse un’idea chiara dell’anatomia femminile, essendo rimasto molto probabilmente illibato fino alla fine dei suoi giorni.

È innegabile che i suoi dipinti abbiano una forza strana e inquietante: sia che le sorelle Vivian siano in pericolo, sia che giochino innocentemente su un prato, una sottile vena di voyeurismo naif e infantile pervade ogni dettaglio, e nonostante i colori sgargianti e appariscenti il mondo di Darger è sempre impregnato di una tensione erotico-sadica piuttosto morbosa.

In una catarsi psicanalitica durata sessant’anni, Darger disegnò centinaia e centinaia di fogli, anche di grandi dimensioni, illustrando le varie fasi dell’avventura bellica delle sue eroine. Il romanzo ha addirittura due finali, uno in cui le sorelle Vivian escono vittoriose dalla guerra, e uno in cui soccombono alle forze degli atei adulti Glandeliniani.

Queste sue fantasie private, che nelle intenzioni originali non avevano forse alcuna pretesa d’arte, ma semplicemente di riscatto ed evasione da una vita troppo solitaria, sono oggi riconosciute come uno dei maggiori esempi di outsider art (arte degli emarginati). Le sue illustrazioni vengono esposte nelle maggiori gallerie, e vendute all’asta a prezzi elevatissimi. Documentari e saggi vengono prodotti sulla sua arte. L’American Folk Art Museum sta cercando di trasformare in museo il piccolo, povero appartamento nel quale Henry Darger, chino sui suoi fogli, privo di amici e lontano da tutti, fuggiva nello sconfinato e sublime mondo partorito dalla sua fantasia.

il più scioccante omicidio infantile mai causato dal governo Glandelinian