The Carney Landis Experiment

Suppose you’re making your way through a jungle, and in pulling aside a bush you find yourself before a huge snake, ready to attack you. All of a sudden adrenaline rushes through your body, your eyes open wide, and you instantly begin to sweat as your heartbeat skyrockets: in a word, you feel afraid.
But is your fear triggering all these physical reactions, or is it the other way around?
To make a less disquieting example, let’s say you fall in love at first sight with someone. Are the endorphines to be accounted for your excitation, or is your excitation causing their discharge through your body?
What comes first, physiological change or emotion? Which is the cause and which is the effect?

This dilemma was a main concern in the first studies on emotion (and it still is, in the field of affective neurosciences). Among the first and most influential hypothesis was the James-Lange theory, which maintained the primacy of physiological changes over feelings: the brain detects a modification in the stimuli coming from the nervous system, and it “interprets” them by giving birth to an emotion.

One of the problems with this theory was the impossibility of obtaining clear evidence. The skeptics argued that if every emotion arises mechanically within the body, then there should be a gland or an organ which, when conveniently stimulated, will invariably trigger the same emotion in every person. Today we know a little bit more of how emotions work, in regard to the amygdala and the different areas of cerebral cortex, but at the beginning of the Twentieth Century the objection against the James-Lange theory was basically this — “come on, find me the muscle of sadness!

In 1924, Carney Landis, a Minnesota University graduate student, set out to understand experimentally whether these physiological changes are the same for everybody. He focused on those modifications that are the most evident and easy to study: the movement of facial muscles when emotion arises. His study was meant to find repetitive patterns in facial expressions.

To understand if all subjects reacted in the same way to emotions, Landis recruited a good number of his fellow graduate students, and began by painting their faces with standard marks, in order to highlight their grimaces and the related movement of facial muscles.
The experiment consisted in subjecting them to different stimuli, while taking pictures of their faces.

At first volunteers were asked to complete some rather harmless tasks: they had to listen to jazz music, smell ammonia, read a passage from the Bible, tell a lie. But the results were quite discouraging, so Landis decided it was time to raise the stakes.

He began to show his subjects pornographic images. Then some medical photos of people with horrendous skin conditions. Then he tried firing a gunshot to capture on film the exact moment of their fright. Still, Landis was having a hard time getting the expressions he wanted, and in all probability he began to feel frustrated. And here his experiment took a dark turn.

He invited his subjects to stick their hand in a bucket, without looking. The bucket was full of live frogs. Click, went his camera.
Landis encouraged them to search around the bottom of the mysterious bucket. Overcoming their revulsion, the unfortunate volunteers had to rummage through the slimy frogs until they found the real surprise: electrical wires, ready to deliver a good shock. Click. Click.
But the worst was yet to come.

The experiment reached its climax when Landis put a live mouse in the subject’s left hand, and a knife in the other. He flatly ordered to decapitate the mouse.
Most of his incredulous and stunned subjects asked Landis if he was joking. He wasn’t, they actually had to cut off the little animal’s head, or he himself would do it in front of their eyes.
At this point, as Landis had hoped, the reactions really became obvious — but unfortunately they also turned out to be more complex than he expected. Confronted with this high-stress situation, some persons started crying, others hysterically laughed; some completely froze, others burst out into swearing.

Two thirds of the paricipants ended up complying with the researcher’s order, and carried out the macabre execution. In any case, the remaining third had to witness the beheading, performed by Landis himself.
As we said, the subjects were mainly other students, but one notable exception was a 13 years-old boy who happened to be at the department as a patient, on the account of psychological issues and high blood pressure. His reaction was documented by Landis’ ruthless snapshots.

Perhaps the most embarassing aspect of the whole story was that the final results for this cruel test — which no ethical board would today authorize — were not even particularly noteworthy.
Landis, in his Studies of Emotional Reactions, II., General Behavior and Facial Expression (published on the Journal of Comparative Psychology, 4 [5], 447-509) came to these conclusions:

1) there is no typical facial expression accompanying any emotion aroused in the experiment;
2) emotions are not characterized by a typical expression or recurring pattern of muscular behavior;
3) smiling was the most common reaction, even during unpleasant experiences;
4) asymmetrical bodily reactions almost never occurred;
5) men were more expressive than women.

Hardly anything that could justify a mouse massacre, and the trauma inflicted upon the paritcipants.

After obtaining his degree, Carney Landis devoted himself to sexual psychopatology. He went on to have a brillant carreer at the New York State Psychiatric Institute. And he never harmed a rodent again, despite the fact that he is now mostly remembered for this ill-considered juvenile experiment rather than for his subsequent fourty years of honorable research.

There is, however, one last detail worth mentioning.
Alex Boese in his Elephants On Acid, underlines how the most interesting figure of all this bizarre experiment went unnoticed: the fact that two thirds of the subjects, although protesting and suffering, obeyed the terrible order.
And this percentage is in fact similar to the one recorded during the infamous Milgram experiment, in which a scientist commanded the subjects to inflict an electric shock to a third individual (in reality, an actor who pretended to receive the painful discharge). In that case as well, despite the ethical conflict, the simple fact that the order came from an authority figure was enough to push the subjects into carrying out an action they perceived as aberrant.

The Milgram experiment took place in 1961, almost forty years after the Landis experiment. “It is often this way with experiments — says Boese — A scientis sets out to prove one thing, but stumbles upon something completely different, something far more intriguing. For this reason, good researchers know they should always pay close attention to strange events that occur during their experiments. A great discovery might be lurking right beneath their eyes – or beneath te blade of their knife.

On facial expressions related to emotions, see also my former post on Guillaume Duchenne (sorry, Italian language only).

The Abominable Vice

Among the bibliographic curiosities I have been collecting for years, there is also a little book entitled L’amico discreto. It’s the 1862 Italian translation of The silent friend (1847) by R. e L. Perry; aside from 100 beautiful anatomical plates, the book also shows a priceless subtitle: Observations on Onanism and Its Baneful Results, Including Mental and Sexual Incapacity and Impotence.

Just by skimming through the table of contents, it’s clear how masturbation was indicated as the main cause for a wide array of conditions: from indigestion to “hypoconriac melancholy”, from deafness to “bending of the penis”, from emaciated complexion to the inability to walk, in a climax of ever more terrible symptoms preparing the way for the ultimate, inevitable outcome — death.
One page after the other, the reader learns why onanism is to be blamed for such illnesses, specifically because it provokes an

excitement of the nervous system [which] by stimulating the organs to transient vigour, brings, ere middle life succeeds the summer of manhood, all the sensible infirmities and foibles of age; producing in its impetuous current, such an assemblage of morbid irritation, that even on trivial occasions its excitement is of a high and inflammable character, and its endurance beyond the power of reason to sustain.

But this is just the beginning: the worst damage is on the mind and soul, because this state of constant nervous stimulation

places the individual in a state of anxiety and misery for the remainder of his existence, — a kind of contingency, which it is difficult for language adequately to describe; he vegetates, but lives not: […] leading the excited deviating mind into a fertile field of seductive error — into a gradual and fatal degradation of manhood — into a pernicious, disgraceful, and ultimately almost involuntary application of those inherent rights which nature wisely instituted for the preservation of her species […] in defiance of culture, moral feeling, moral obligation, and religious impressions: thus the man, who, at the advent of youth and genius was endowed with gaiety and sociality, becomes, ere twenty-five summers have shed their lustre on him, a misanthrope, and a nadir-point of discontent! What moral region does that man live in? […] Is it nothing to light the gloomy torch that guides, by slow and melancholy steps to the sepulchre of manhood, in the gay and fascinating spring-time of youth and ardent desire; when the brilliant fire of passion, genius, and sentiment, ought to electrify the whole frame?

This being a physiology and anatomy essay, today its embellishments, its evocative language (closer to second-rate poetry than to science) seem oddly out of place — and we can smile upon reading its absurd theories; yet The Silent Friend is just one of many Nineteeth Century texts demonizing masturbation, all pretty popular since 1712, when an anonymous priest published a volume called Onania, followed in 1760 by L’Onanisme by Swiss doctor Samuel-Auguste Tissot, which had rapidly become a best-seller of its time.
Now, if physicians reacted in such a harsh way against male masturbation, you can guess their stance on female auto-eroticism.

Here, the repulsion for an act which was already considered aberrant, was joined by all those ancestral fears regarding female sexuality. From the ancient vagina dentata (here is an old post about it) to Plato’s description of the uterus (hystera) as an aggressive animale roaming through the woman’s abdomen, going through theological precepts in Biblical-Christian tradition, medicine inherited a somber, essentially misogynistic vision: female sexuality, a true repressed collective unconscious, was perceived as dangerous and ungovernable.
Another text in my library is the female analogue of Tissot’s Onania: written by J.D.T. de Bienville, La Ninfomania ovvero il Furore Uterino (“Nymphomania, or The Uterine Fury”) was originally published in France in 1771.
I’m pasting here a couple of passages, which show a very similar style in respect to the previous quotes:

We see some perverted young girls, who have conducted a voluptuous life over a long period of time, suddenly fall prey to this disease; and this happens when forced retirement is keeping them from those occasions which facilitated their guilty and fatal inclination. […] All of them, after they are conquered by such malady, occupy themselves with the same force and energy with those objects which light in their passion the infernal flame of lewd pleasure […], they indulge in reading lewd Novels, that begin by bending their heart to soft feelings, and end up inspiring the most depraved and gross incontinence. […] Those women who, after taking a few steps in this horrible labyrinth, miss the strength to come back, are drawn almost imperceptibly to excesses, which after corrupting and damaging their good name, deprive them of their own life.

The book goes on to describe the hallucinatory state in which the nymphomaniacs fall, frantically hurling at men (by nature all chaste and pure, it seems), and barely leaving them “the time to escape their hands“.
Of course, this an Eighteenth Century text. But things did not improve in the following century: during the Nineteenth Century, actually, the ill-concealed desire to repress female sexuality found one of its cruelest incarnations, the so-called “extirpation”.

This euphemism was used to indicate the practice of clitoridectomy, the surgical removal of the clitoris.
Everybody kows that female genital mutilations continue to be a reality in many countries, and they have been the focus of several international campaigns to abandon the practice.
It seems hard to believe that, far from being solely a tribal tradition, it became widespread in Europe and in the United States within the frame of modern Western medicine.
Clitoridectomy, a simple yet brutal operation, was based on the idea that female masturbation led to hysteria, lesbianism and nymphomania. The perfect circular reasoning behind this theory was the following: in mental institutions, insane female patients were often caught masturbating, therefore masturbation had to be the cause of their lunacy.

One of the most fervent promoters of extirpation was Dr. Isaac Baker Brown, English gynaecologist and obstetrical surgeon.
In 1858 he opened a clinic on Notting Hill, ad his therapies became so successful that Baker Brown resigned from Guy’s Hospital to work privately full time. By means of clitoridectomy, he was able to cure (if we are to trust his own words) several kinds of madness, epilepsy, catalepsy and hysteria in his patients: in 1866 he published a nice little book on the subject, which was praised by the Times because Brown “brought insanity within the scope of surgical treatment“. In his book, Brown reported 48 cases of female masturbation, the heinous effects on the patients’ health, and the miraculous result of clitoridectomy in curing the symptoms.

We don’t know for sure how many women ended up under the enthusiastic doctor’s knife.
Brown would have probably carried on with his mutilation work, if he hadn’t made the mistake of setting up a publicity campaign to advertise his clinic. Even then, self-promotion was considered ethically wrong for a physician, so on April 29, 1866, the British Medical Journal published a heavy j’accuse against the doctor. The Lancet followed shortly after, then even the Times proved to have changed position and asked if the surgical treatment of illness was legal at all. Brown ended up being investigated by the Lunacy Commission, which dealt with the patients’ welfare in asylums, and in panic he denied he ever carried out clitoridectomies on his mentally ill patients.

But it was too late.
Even the Royal College of Surgeons turned away from him, and a meeting decided (with 194 approving votes against 38 opposite votes) his removal from the Obstetric Society of London.
R. Youngson and I. Schott, in A Brief History of Bad Medicine (Robinson, 2012), highlight the paradox of this story:

The extraordinary thing was that Baker Brown was disgraced, not because he practised clitoridectomy for ridiculuous indications, but because, out of greed, he had offended against professional ethics. No one ever suggested that there was anything wrong with clitoridectomy, as such. Many years were to pass before this operation was condemned by the medical profession.

And many more, until eventually masturbation could be freed from medical criminalization and moral prejudice: at the beginning of the Twentieth Century doctors still recommended the use of constrictive laces and gears, straight-jackets, up to shock treatments like cauterization or electroconvulsive therapy.

1903 patent to prevent erections and nocturnal pollutions through the use of spikes, electric shocks and an alarm bell.

Within this dreadful galaxy of old anti-masturbation devices, there’s one looking quite harmless and even healthy: corn flakes, which were invented by famous Dr. Kellogg as an adjuvant diet against the temptations of onanism. And yet, whenever cereals didn’t do the trick, Kellogg advised that young boys’ foreskins should be sewn with wire; as for young girls, he recommended burning the clitoris with phenol, which he considered

an excellent means of allaying the abnormal excitement, and preventing the recurrence of the practice in those whose will-power has become so weakened that the patient is unable to exercise entire self-control.
The worse cases among young women are those in which the disease has advanced so far that erotic thoughts are attended by the same voluptuous sensations that accompany the practice. The author has met many cases of this sort in young women, who acknowledged that the sexual orgasm was thus produced, often several times daily. The application of carbolic acid in the manner described is also useful in these cases in allaying the abnormal excitement, which is a frequent provocation of the practice of this form of mental masturbation.

(J. H. Kellogg, Plain Facts for Old And Young, 1888)

It was not until the Kinsey Reports (1948-1953) that masturbation was eventually legitimized as a natural and healthy part of sexuality.
All in all, as Woody Allen put it, it’s just “sex with someone you love“.

On the “fantastic physiology” of the uterus, there is a splendid article (in Italian language) here. Wikipedia has also a page on the history of masturbation. I also recommend Orgasm and the West. A History of Pleasure from the Sixteenth Century to the Present, by R. Muchembled.

Toshio Saeki

1026710

Among all the artists adressing the liminal zones of obscenity and taboo, few have explored the Unheimliche in all its variations with Toshio Saeki’s precision.

Born in 1945 in Miyazaki prefecture, he moved to Osaka when he was 4 years old and then landed in Tokyo at 24, right when the sex industry was booming. After a few months in a publicity agency, Saeki decided to focus exclusively on adult illustration. His drawings were published on Heibon Punch and other magazines, and slowly gained international interest. Today, after 40 years of activity, Toshio Saeki is among the most praised japanese erotic artists, with solo exhibitions even outside Japan — in Paris, London, Tel Aviv, New York, San Francisco and Toronto.135

414

1111

1027372

For Saeki, art — like fantasy — cannot and should not know any limit.
In spite of the sulfurous nature of his drawings, he had surprisingly little trouble with censorship: apart from some “warning” notified by the police to the magazines featuring his plates, Saeki never experienced true pressions because of his work. And this is understandable if we take into account the cultural context, because his work, although modern, is deeply rooted in tradition.
As the critic Erick Gilbert put it, “if you look at Saeki’s art outside of its cultural sphere, you may be troubled by its violence. But once you go inside that cultural sphere, you know that this violence is well-understood, that ‘it’s only lines on paper,’ to quote cartoonist Robert Crumb. This extreme imagery of Japanese artists, and their characteristic need to go as far as possible, can be traced several centuries back to the so-called bloody ukiyo-e of the 19th century“.

To fully understand Toshio Saeki, it’s essential to look back to the muzan-e, a bloody subgenre of prints (ukiyo) which appeared around the half of ‘800, drawn by masters such as Tsukioka Yoshitoshi. This latter created the Twenty-eight famous murders with verse, in which he depicted all sorts of atrocities and violent deaths, taken from the news or from the stories of Kabuki theater. Here are some examples of Yoshitoshi’s extreme production.

Furuteya-Hachirōbei-murdering-a-woman-in-a-graveyard-9

Inada-Kyūzō-Shinsuke-woman-suspended-from-rope-12

Two-women-of-Nojiri-who-were-set-upon-while-travelling-robbed-tied-to-trees-and-eaten-by-wolves

YOSHITOSHI-Reizei-Takatoyo-committing-seppuku-from-the-series-Selections-from-One-Hundred-Warriors.

Other muzan-e, often particularly cruel, were drawn by Utagawa Yoshiiku, Kawanabe Kyōsai, and more marginally Hokusai; this current would then influence the more recent generation of artists and mangaka interested in developing the themes of ero guro – eroticism contaminated by surreal, bizarre, grotesque and crooked elements. Among the contemporary most prominent figures, Shintaro Kago and the great (and hyper-violent) Suehiro Maruo stand out.
So our Toshio Saeki is in good company, as he mixes the solid tradition of muzan-e with classical figures of japanese demons, bringing to the surface the erotic tension already hidden in ancient plates, making it both explicit and obsessive.

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-58-840x1380-820x1347

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-59

start_bild_Toshio

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-32-840x1357-820x1325

toshio01

His work is a visionary maelstrom in which sex and torture are inseparable, where erotic pulsion is intertwined with frenzy and psychopatology. The manic intensity of his illustrations, however, is coupled with a formal and stylish elegance, which cools down and crystallizes the nightmare: his prints are not created on the spot, because this precise refinement points to a deep study of the image.
Often they are connected with nightmares I had as a child, or extreme fantasies of my youth. These images made an impression on me, and I exaggerate them until they become those works that seem to have such a stong impact on the viewer“, declared the artist. These visions are carefully considered by Saeki, before he puts them on paper. For this reason his work looks like some sort of cartography of the further limits of erotic fantasy, those fringes where desire ultimately transforms into cupio dissolvi and cupio dissolvere (the desire to be annihilated, and to annihilate).

155

1027374

darlin_doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-22-840x1212-820x1183

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-45

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-9-840x1289-820x1258

But, for all their shocking power, Saeki’s paitings are always just dreams. “Leave other people to draw seemingly beautiful flowers that bloom within a nice, pleasant-looking scenery. I try instead to capture the vivid flowers that sometimes hide and sometimes grow within a shameless, immoral and horrifying dream. […] Let’s not forget that the images I draw are fictional“.

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-12

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-13

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-44

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-14

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-33-840x672-820x656

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-25

And, again: “The important thing, to me, is awakening the viewer’s sensitiviy. I don’t care if he is a bigot or not. I want to give him the sensation that in his life — basically a secure and ordinary existence — there might be “something wrong”. Then hopefully the observer could discover a part of himself he did not know was there”.

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-50-840x1350-820x1318

  doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-51-840x672-820x656

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-23

doorofperception.com-toshio_saeki-21

514

Quotes appearing in this post are taken from: here, here and here.
For a deeper treatise on muzan-e, here’s an article (in Italian) on the wonderful website Kainowska.

Emozioni vegetali

Pannocchia strappò i biglietti.
Zucchina e Broccolo entrarono nella sala e si sedettero sulle poltrone, emozionati.
Zucchina: – Ma fa davvero tanta paura, questo film?
Broccolo: – Dai, fifona, ci sono qua io!
E così dicendo, allungò ridendo un ciuffo di rametti sulla spalla di Zucchina.
Si spensero le luci, si udì una musica tenebrosa e il titolo apparve sullo schermo: LA NOTTE DEI VEGANI!

 

Di tanto in tanto i giornali pubblicano la notizia che nessun vegetariano vorrebbe mai sentire: alcuni scienziati avrebbero scoperto che anche le piante hanno un sistema nervoso, che pensano, soffrono ed hanno addirittura una memoria. Ma quanto c’è di vero in queste evidenti semplificazioni giornalistiche? Le piante sono realmente capaci di pensiero, di percezioni ed emozioni? Perfino di “ricordare” chi fa loro del bene e chi invece infligge del dolore?

Tutti abbiamo sentito dire che le piante crescono meglio se con loro si parla, se si lavano le loro foglie amorevolmente, se le si riempie di affetto. Alcuni esperti dal pollice verde giurano che facendo ascoltare la musica classica a una piantina da salotto crescerà più rigogliosa e i suoi colori si faranno più intensi. Quest’idea è in realtà nata a metà dell’Ottocento, ed è attribuita al pioniere della psicologia sperimentale Gustav Fechner, ma è stato lo scienziato indiano Chandra Bose che l’ha presa sul serio, tanto da sviluppare i primi test di laboratorio sull’argomento, agli inizi del Novecento.

Chandra Bose si convinse che le piante avessero un qualche tipo di sistema nervoso analizzando le modificazioni che avvenivano nella membrana delle cellule quando le sottoponeva a diverse condizioni: in particolare, secondo Bose, ogni pianta rispondeva a uno shock con uno “spasmo” simile a quello di un animale. Le cellule, osservò, avevano “vibrazioni” diverse a seconda che la pianta fosse coccolata o, viceversa, torturata. Pare che anche il celebre drammaturgo (vegetariano) George B. Shaw fosse rimasto sconvolto quando, in visita ai laboratori di Bose, vide un cavolo morire bollito fra atroci spasmi e convulsioni.

Ma Bose non si limitò a questo: scoprì che una musica rilassante aumentava la crescita delle piante, e una dissonante la rallentava; sperimentò con precisione l’effetto che veleni e droghe avevano sulle cellule. Infine, per dimostrare che tutto ha un’anima, o perlomeno una matrice comune, si mise ad avvelenare i metalli. Avete letto bene. Bose “somministrò” diverse quantità di veleno all’alluminio, allo zinco e al platino – ottenendo dei grafici straordinari che dimostravano che anche i metalli soffrivano di avvelenamento esattamente come ogni altro essere vivente.

Se vi sembra che Bose si sia spinto un po’ troppo in là con la fantasia, aspettate che entri in scena Cleve Backster.

Nel 1966, mentre faceva delle ricerche sulle modificazioni elettriche in una pianta che viene annaffiata, Backster collegò un poligrafo (macchina della verità) ad una delle foglie della piantina su cui stava lavorando. Con sua grande sorpresa, scoprì che il poligrafo registrava delle fluttuazioni nella resistenza elettrica del tutto simili a quelle di un uomo che viene sottoposto a un test della verità. Era possibile che la pianta stesse provando qualche tipo di stress? E se, per esempio, le avesse bruciato una foglia, cosa sarebbe successo? Proprio mentre pensava queste cose, l’ago del poligrafo impazzì, portandosi di colpo al massimo. Backster si convinse che la pianta doveva in qualche modo essersi accorta del suo progetto di bruciarle una foglia – gli aveva letto nella mente!

Da quel momento sia Backster che altri ricercatori (Horowitz, Lewis, Gasteiger) decisero di esplorare il mistero delle reazioni emotive delle piante. Attaccandole al poligrafo, registrarono i picchi e interpretarono le risposte che i vegetali davano a diverse situazioni. Gli strumenti regalavano continue sorprese: le piante “urlavano” orripilate quando i ricercatori bollivano davanti a loro dei gamberetti vivi, si calmavano quando gli scienziati mettevano sul giradischi i Notturni di Chopin, si “ubriacavano” addirittura se venivano annaffiate col vino. Non solo, mostravano di riconoscere ogni ricercatore, dando un segnale diverso e preciso ogni volta che uno di loro entrava nella stanza; “prevedevano” quello che lo scienziato stava per fare, tanto che per spaventarle gli bastava pensare di spezzare un rametto o staccare una foglia.

Il libro che dettagliava tutti i risultati di queste ricerche,  La vita segreta delle piante di Tompkins e Bird, fu pubblicato nel 1973 e divenne immediatamente un caso sensazionale. Venne addirittura adattato per il cinema, e il film omonimo (musicato da Stevie Wonder) suscitò infinite controversie.

Tutti questi scienziati interessati alle misteriose qualità paranormali delle piante avevano però una cosa in comune: mostravano un po’ troppa voglia di dimostrare le loro tesi. Successive ripetizioni di questi esperimenti, condotti da ricercatori un po’ più scettici in laboratori più “seri”, come potete immaginare, non diedero alcun risultato. Ma allora, dove sta la verità? Le piante possono o non possono pensare, ricordare, provare emozioni?

Cominciamo con lo sfatare uno dei miti più resistenti nel tempo: le piante non hanno un sistema nervoso. Come tutte le cellule viventi, anche le cellule vegetali funzionano grazie allo scambio di elettricità, ma questo passaggio di energia non si sviluppa lungo canali dedicati e preferenziali come accade con i nostri nervi. Talvolta le piante rispondono alla luce con una “cascata” di impulsi elettrici che durano anche quando la luce è terminata, e questo ha portato alcuni giornalisti a parlare di una “memoria” dell’evento; ma la metafora è sbagliata, sarebbe come dire che i cerchi sulla superficie dell’acqua continuano anche dopo che il sasso è andato a fondo perché l’acqua è capace di ricordare.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zq3UuHlPLQU]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXb6YKERKn4]

Se il ruolo dei segnali elettrici nelle piante è ancora in larga parte sconosciuto, questo non ci autorizza ad attribuire categorie umane ai loro comportamenti. Certo, alle volte è difficile ammirare le meraviglie del mondo vegetale senza immaginare che nascondano un qualche tipo di coscienza, o di “mente”. Pensate al geotropismo e al fototropismo: non importa come girate una pianta, le radici si dirigeranno sempre verso il basso e i rami verso l’alto, con puntuale precisione e a seconda della specie di pianta. Pensate all’edera che si arrampica per decine di metri, alle piante carnivore che scattano più veloci degli insetti, ai girasoli che seguono il nostro astro in cielo, alle piante che fioriscono soltanto quando i giorni cominciano ad allungarsi e quelle che invece fioriscono non appena le giornate si accorciano. Esiste perfino un certo tipo di “comunicazione” fra le piante: se un parassita attacca un pino in una foresta, la risposta immunitaria viene riscontrata contemporaneamente in tutto il bosco, e non soltanto nell’albero che è stato attaccato – la “notizia” dell’arrivo del nemico è stata in qualche modo segnalata al resto degli alberi. Prima di precipitarci a concludere che esiste un linguaggio delle piante, però, faremmo meglio a tenere i piedi a terra.

Le piante, come la maggior parte degli organismi, percepiscono il mondo attorno a loro, processano le informazioni che raccolgono e rispondono agli stimoli esterni alterando la propria crescita e il proprio sviluppo, e mettendo in atto tecniche e strategie di sopravvivenza a volte sorprendentemente sofisticate. Ancora oggi alcuni di questi processi rimangono effettivamente misteriosi. Ma Elizabeth Van Volkenburgh, botanica dell’Università di Washington, chiarisce una volta per tutte: “un grosso errore che fa la gente è parlare delle piante come se ‘sapessero’ cosa stanno facendo. Insegnanti di biologia, ricercatori, studenti e gente comune fanno tutti lo stesso sbaglio. Io preferirei dire che una pianta avverte e risponde, piuttosto che dire che ‘sa’. Usare parole come ‘intelligenza’ o ‘pensiero’ per le piante è un errore. Alle volte è divertente, un po’ provocatorio. Ma è scorretto.”

Quando parliamo di piante che riflettono, decidono, amano o soffrono, staremmo quindi commettendo l’errore di proiettare caratteristiche prettamente umane sui vegetali. Bisognerebbe forse pensare alle piante come a una specie aliena, con cui non è possibile adottare metri di misura umani: parlare di emozioni, ricordi, pensiero è illudersi che le nostre specifiche caratteristiche vadano bene per tutti gli esseri viventi, è voler vedere noi stessi in ciò che è diverso. Così, domandarsi se una pianta prova dolore è forse un quesito senza senso.

Per concludere, è buona norma prendere sempre con le pinze le divulgazioni spacciate per “clamorose scoperte”. Allo stesso tempo, se la prossima volta che affettate un pomodoro, cogliete una margherita o addentate una mela avrete un attimo di esitazione, o un leggero brivido… beh, qui a Bizzarro Bazar potremo ritenerci soddisfatti.

Ecco un articolo (in inglese) sul sito del Scientific American.

The Tiger Lillies

Band di culto formata a Londra nel 1989, i Tiger Lillies sono tra i più originali e sconcertanti gruppi musicali in circolazione. Il loro stile unico è un misto di cabaret gitano, di rimandi brechtiani e di black humor, il tutto condito dall’uso di strumenti talvolta inusuali e da arrangiamenti rétro.

I loro testi, spesso controversi, esplorano l’universo oscuro dei depravati e dei perdenti, raccontando sordide storie di violenza, morte, sesso e blasfemia. Il loro mondo è una sorta di bassofondo crepuscolare e post-apocalittico in cui prostitute, freaks, ubriachi e assassini incontrano sorti orribili. Ma l’incredibile espressività facciale del cantante Martyn Jacques, il suo look da clown “andato a male” e la sua voce in falsetto (sgradevole, inquietante, eppure magnetica) contribuiscono a stemperare i toni delle liriche, calandole in una dimensione teatrale e surreale.

Così quando i Tiger Lillies ci cantano le loro fiabe macabre piene di bambini che sanguinano a morte, prostitute ubriache dalla pelle di serpente, accoppiamenti con animali e altre simili atrocità, l’umorismo nerissimo riesce comunque a distanziarci e a lasciarci turbati, sì, ma anche ghignanti.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xCGz8rc-HY]

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhrGspR0yQo]

Sito ufficiale.

Lobotomia transorbitale

Una delle pratiche mediche più discusse della storia, ormai completamente abbandonata, è la lobotomia. Eppure questa tecnica chirurgica ha goduto di un grande successo e diffusione fino a tempi relativamente recenti.

La lobotomia è una procedura neurochirurgica che consiste nel tagliare le connessioni della corteccia prefrontale, la parte anteriore dei lobi frontali del cervello. Introdotta nel 1935, ebbe un’inaspettata fortuna per più di vent’anni. Veniva utilizzata per ridare la pace agli animi tormentati, agli schizofrenici incurabili, e agli psicotici all’ultimo stadio.

Le prime tecniche prevedevano l’apertura del cranio per effettuare la lobotomia, ma questo rendeva la terapia economicamente irraggiungibile per molte fasce di popolazione; fu così che il dottor Freeman, nel 1945, mise a punto con l’aiuto del suo collega Watts una tecnica che prevedeva l’uso di lunghi strumenti ispirati ai punteruoli rompighiaccio (ice pick lobotomy). Questa nuova tecnica poteva essere svolta come una terapia da ambulatorio, senza bisogno di sale operatorie e grandi dispendi. L’idea del dottore era che la lobotomia avrebbe risolto praticamente tutti i mali psicologici moderni.

Nella lobotomia transorbitale così come la praticava Freeman, al soggetto veniva sollevata la palpebra superiore dell’occhio; il punteruolo (chiamato orbitoclast) veniva martellato fino a rompere il sottile strato osseo sopra l’occhio, e inserito dunque nel cervello. E qui cominciava il vero show di Freeman: con movimenti sicuri e decisi, muoveva i punteruoli avanti e indietro, e lateralmente, al fine di distaccare i lobi frontali dal talamo. Nel 1948 Freeman impreziosì la procedura, aggiungendo il “taglio profondo frontale”, un movimento del punteruolo direttamente dentro al lobo, un taglio che metteva talmente sotto pressione lo strumento chirurgico che talvolta si spezzava, rimanendo all’interno. Freeman era conscio dell’aspetto spettacolare delle sue operazioni, che spesso praticava in pubblico. Era arrivato a esibire una tale maestria da riuscire a operare i suoi punteruoli con una mano sola. Nel 1947 Watts, il collega assieme al quale aveva sviluppato la tecnica, si distaccò da Freeman, disgustato dalla piega che aveva preso una pratica chirurgica che auspicava più seria.

Già tra il 1940 e il 1944 erano state operate 684 lobotomie solo negli Stati Uniti; grazie alla promozione evangelica che Freeman fece della cura, i numeri impennarono verso la fine del decennio. Ovviamente, i danni collaterali della lobotomia erano evidenti: i pazienti molte volte rimanevano in stato semi-vegetativo, o mostravano evidenti problemi di linguaggio – praticamente, rimanevano disabili per tutta la vita. Certamente la lobotomia era efficace per facilitare la cura dei pazienti più violenti: all’epoca, inoltre, i farmaci per malattie di tipo psichiatrico erano ancora agli albori. Per mettere maggiormente questa pratica nel contesto di quegli anni, bisogna ricordare che non si trattava dell’unica terapia radicale e invasiva in voga nella prima metà del XX secolo: elettroshock, shock da insulina, terapia malarica, coma indotto da barbiturici, shock cardiaci… i medici, all’epoca, non ci andavano certo per il sottile.

Si stima che negli Stati Uniti siano state lobotomizzate più di 40.000 persone, 17.000 in Gran Bretagna, 9.300 nei paesi Scandinavi. Nel 1950 l’URSS vietò la pratica, bollandola come contraria ai diritti umanitari, perché “trasforma un malato di mente in un idiota”. Negli anni ’70 la lobotomia lentamente cessò di essere utilizzata, anche se alcuni casi si segnalano fino agli anni ’80. Fra i più famosi lobotomizzati, ricordiamo Rosemary Kennedy (sorella di John), che si sottopose all’intervento a 23 anni e rimase per sempre ritardata, e la sorella di Tennessee Williams, Rose, la cui sorte sembra abbia ispirato diversi motivi ricorrenti nell’opera del drammaturgo americano.

Joel-Peter Witkin

Joel-Peter Witkin, nato a Brooklyn nel 1939, è uno dei massimi fotografi viventi. La sua opera, spesso controversa, si ispira alle atmosfere dei primi dagherrotipi ed è chiaramente influenzata da numerosi referenti pittorici, tanto che spesso le fotografie di Witkin sono delle “rivisitazioni” di opere celebri della storia dell’arte.

Dopo essere stato fotografo di guerra in Vietnam, studia scultura e fotografia alla Cooper Union, alla Columbia University, e infine all’Università del New Mexico ad Albuquerque. Stabilitosi lì, Witkin trova nel Messico la patria ideale in cui poter sviluppare le sue idee: le leggi restrittive degli Stati Uniti non gli avrebbero permesso infatti di perseguire l’ideale artistico che egli desiderava raggiungere.

Sì, perché le fotografie che Witkin voleva scattare erano qualcosa di davvero unico: ciò che l’artista si propone è mostrare il bello e il sacro, nascosti fra le pieghe del deforme, del macabro, dell’osceno e del grottesco. Nei suoi scatti Witkin immortala freaks di ogni tipo, nani, transessuali, donne e uomini amputati, deformi, corpi estremi; non rifugge nemmeno dall’ultimo tabù, quello del cadavere. Infatti nelle sue fotografie vengono composti corpi e resti umani reali, utilizzati come parti di macabre nature morte, o sezionati ad arte per ottenere il risultato simbolico ricercato. Gli obitori messicani pare siano molto generosi, quanto a cadaveri non reclamati. Questo ha dato a Witkin l’opportunità di creare (assieme alla sua fedele compagna di vita e assistente) alcune fra le più allucinate e toccanti allegorie della caducità umana, dove arti umani, feti e bambini morti interagiscono con modelli viventi in un barocco e infernale affresco.

Nel celebre The Kiss, per esempio, Witkin seziona una testa mozzata longitudinalmente e la fotografa come se il cadavere baciasse se stesso, in una sorta di definitivo e tragico narcisismo (o forse gli uomini sono tutti illusione, ed esiste solo Dio, e ci illudiamo di amare qualcosa di diverso da Lui?).

Quello che l’artista ha sempre sottolineato (e che è anche confermato dalla sua biografia) è la forte componente mistica delle sue opere: ciò che Witkin cerca di fare non è sollecitare i nostri bassi istinti voyeuristici, ma al contrario purificare le nostre paure più radicate attraverso il mito, nobilitando il diverso, e cercando il sublime nell’orrore. Si intuisce un vero e sincero amore per i soggetti/oggetti delle sue fotografie, come se attraverso i corpi impazziti dei suoi freaks, e i pezzi di cadavere anonimi che adornano i suoi affreschi, si potesse percepire un elemento trascendente; come se, invece di invocare una salvezza o una lontana luce divina, Witkin si sforzasse di trovarla qui ed ora, anche in ciò che più ci disgusta, e che a una prima occhiata sembrerebbe negarla.

Ad impreziosire i suoi ritratti si aggiunge il certosino e lunghissimo lavoro di graffiatura dei negativi e di sperimentazione continua con le emulsioni, la candeggina e gli altri prodotti chimici con cui Witkin tratta e “rovina” le sue fotografie. Tanto che, visti i tempi di lavorazione, in un anno l’artista non può permettersi di produrre più di due o tre scatti.

Artista controverso ed estremo, Witkin ha creato un universo iconico unico e inedito, che tocca corde profonde grazie a quella complessa commistione di bellezza e oscenità che lascia lo spettatore spiazzato, turbato e meravigliato.