Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: Episode 10

In the 10th episode of Bizzarro Bazar Web Series: the psychedelic story of crainal trepanation advocates; the african fetish hiding a dark secret; the Club that has the most macabre initiation ritual in the whole world.
[Be sure to turn on English captions]

And so we came to the conclusion … at least for this first season.
Will there be another one? Who knows?

For the moment, enjoy this last episode and consider subscribing to the channel if you haven’t yet. Cheers!

Written & Hosted by Ivan Cenzi
Directed by Francesco Erba
Produced by Ivan Cenzi, Francesco Erba, Theatrum Mundi & Onda Videoproduzioni

Tiny Tim, Outcast Troubadour

Remember, it’s better to be a has-been than a never-was.
(Tiny Tim)

That an outsider like Tiny Tim could reach success, albeit briefly, can be ascribed to the typical appetite for oddities of the Sixties, the decade of the freak-out ethic/aesthetic, when everybody was constantly looking for out-of-line pop music of liberating and subversive madness.
And yet, in regard to many other weird acts of the time, this bizarre character embodied an innocence and purity the Love Generation was eager to embrace.

Born Herbert Khaury in New York, 1932, Tiny Tim was a big and tall man, sporting long shabby hair. Even if in reality he was obsessed with cleansing and never skipped his daily shower during his entire life, he always gave the impression of a certain gresiness. He would come up onstage looking almost embarassed, his face sometimes covered with white makeup, and pull his trusty ukulele out of a paper bag; his eyes kept rolling in ambiguous winks, conveying a melodramatic and out-of-place emphasis. And when he started singing, there came the ultimate shock. From that vaguely creepy face came an incredible, trembling falsetto voice like that of a little girl. It was as if Shirley Temple was held prisoner inside the body of a giant.

If anything, the choice of songs played by Tiny Tim on his ukulele tended to increase the whole surreal effect by adding some ancient flavor: the setlist mainly consisted of obscure melodies from the 20s or the 30s, re-interpreted in his typical ironic, overblown style.

It was hard not to suspect that such a striking persona might have been carefully planned and engineered, with the purpose of unsettling the audience while making them laugh at the same time. And laughter certainly didn’t seem to bother Tiny Tim. But the real secret of this eccentric artist is that he wasn’t wearing any mask.
Tiny Tim had always remained a child.

Justin Martell, author of the artist’s most complete biography (Eternal Troubadour: The Improbable Life of Tiny Tim, with A. Wray Mcdonald), had the chance to decypher some of Tiny’s diaries, sometimes compiled boustrophedonically: and it turned out he actually came within an inch of being committed to a psychiatric hospital.
Whether his personality’s peculiar traits had to do with some autistic spectrum disorder or not, his childish behaviour was surely not a pose. Capable of remembering the name of every person he met, he showed an old-fashioned respect for any interlocutor – to the extent of always referring to his three wives as “Misses”: Miss Vicki, Miss Jan, Miss Sue. His first two marriages failed also because of his declared disgust for sex, a temptation he strenuously fought being a fervent Christian. In fact another sensational element for the time was the candor and openness with which he publicly spoke of his sexual life, or lack thereof. “I thank God for giving me the ability of looking at naked ladies and think pure thoughts“, he would say.
If we are to believe his words, it was Jesus himself who revealed upon him the possibilities of a high-pitched falsetto, as opposed to his natural baritone timbre (which he often used as an “alternate voice” to his higher range). “I was trying to find an original style that didn’t sound like Tony Bennett or anyone else. So I prayed about it, woke up with this high voice, and by 1954, I was going to amateur nights and winning.

Being on a stage meant everything for him, and it did not really matter whether the public just found him funny or actually appreciated his singing qualities: Tiny Tim was only interested in bringing joy to the audience. This was his naive idea of show business – it all came down to being loved, and giving some cheerfulness in return.

Tiny avidly scoured library archives for American music from the beginning of the century, of which he had an encyclopedic knwoledge. He idolized classic crooners like Rudy Vallee, Bing Crosby and Russ Columbo: and in a sense he was mocking his own heroes when he sang standards like Livin’ In The Sunlight, Lovin’ In The Moonlight or My Way. But his cartoonesque humor never ceased to be respectful and reverential.

Tiny Tim reached a big unexpected success in 1968 with his single Tiptoe Through The Tulips, which charted #17 that year; it was featured in his debut album, God Bless Tiny Tim, which enjoyed similar critic and public acclaim.
Projected all of a sudden towards an improbable stardom, he accepted the following year to marry his fiancée Victoria Budinger on live TV at Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show, before 40 million viewers.

In 1970 he performed at the Isle of Wight rock festival, after Joan Baez and before Miles Davis; according to the press, with his version of There’ll Always Be An England he managed to steal the scene “without a single electric instrument”.

But this triumph was short-lived: after a couple of years, Tiny Tim returned to a relative obscurity which would last for the rest of his career. He lived through alternate fortunes during the 80s and 90s, between broken marriages and financial difficulties, sporadically appearing on TV and radio shows, and recording albums where his beloved songs from the past mixed with modern pop hits cover versions (from AC/DC to Bee Gees, from Joan Jett to The Doors).

According to one rumor, any time he made a phone call he would ask: “do you have the tape recorder going?
And indeed, in every interview Tiny always seemed focused on building a personal mythology, on developing his romantic ideal of an artist who was a “master of confusion“, baffling and elusive, escaping all categorization. Some believe he remained a “lonely outcast intoxicated by fame“; even when fame had long departed. The man who once befriended the Beatles and Bob Dylan, who was a guest at every star’s birthday party, little by little was forgotten and ended up singing in small venues, even performing with the circus. “As long as my voice is here, and there is a Holiday Inn waiting for me, then everything’s just swell.

But he never stopped performing, in relentelss and exhausting tours throughout the States, which eventually took their toll: in spite of a heart condition, and against his physician’s advice, Tiny Tim decided to go on singing before his ever decreasing number of fans. The second, fatal heart stroke came on November 30, 1996, while he was onstage at a charity evening singing his most famous hit, Tiptoe Through The Tulips.

And just like that, on tiptoes, this eternally romantic and idealistic human being of rare kindness quietly left this world, and the stage.
The audience had already left, and the hall was half-empty.

The mysterious artist Pierre Brassau

In 1964 the Gallerie Christinae in Göteborg, Sweden, held an exhibition of young avantgarde painters.
Among the works of these promising artists from Italy, Austria, Denmark, England and Sweden, were also four abstract paintings by the french Pierre Brassau. His name was completely unknown to the art scene, but his talents looked undisputable: this young man, although still a beginner, really seemed qualified to become the next Jackson Pollock — so much so that since the opening, his paintings stole the attention from all other featured works.

Journalists and art critics were almost unanimous in considering Pierre Brassau the true revelation of Gallerie Christinae’s exhibit. Rolf Anderberg, a critic for the Posten, was particularly impressed and penned an article, published the next day, in which he affirmed: “Brassau paints with powerful strokes, but also with clear determination. His brush strokes twist with furious fastidiousness. Pierre is an artist who performs with the delicacy of a ballet dancer“.

As should be expected, in spite of the general enthusiasm, there was also the usual skeptic. One critic, making a stand, defiantly declared: “only an ape could have done this“.
There will  always be somebody who must go against the mainstream. And, even if it’s hard to admit, in doing so he sometimes can be right.
Pierre Brassau, in reality, was actually a monkey. More precisely a four-year-old African chimpanzee living in the Borås Zoo.

Showing primate’s works in a modern art exhibition was Åke “Dacke” Axelsso’s idea, as he was at the time a journalist for the daily paper Göteborgs-Tidningen. The concept was not actually new: some years before, Congo the chimp  had become a celebrity because of his paintings, which fascinated Picasso, Miro and Dali (in 2005 Congo’s works were auctioned for 14.400 punds, while in the same sale a Warhol painting and a Renoir sculpture were withdrawn).
Thus Åke decided to challenge critics in this provocative way: behind the humor of the prank was not (just) the will to ridicule the art establishment, but rather the intention of raising a question that would become more and more urgent in the following years: how can we judge an abstract art piece, if it does not contain any figurative element — or if it even denies that any specific competence is needed to produce art?

Åke had convinced the zoo keeper, who was then 17 years old, to provide a chimp named Peter with brushes and canvas. In the beginning Peter had smeared the paint everywhere, except on the canvas, and even ate it: he had a particularly sweet tooth, it is said, for cobalt blue — a color which will indeed be prominently featured in his later work. Encouraged by the journalist, the primate started to really paint, and to enjoy this creative activity. Åke then selected his four best paintings to be shown at the exhibit.

Even when the true identity of mysterious Pierre Brassau was revealed, many critics stuck by their assessment, claiming the monkey’s paintings were better than all the others at the gallery. What else could they say?
The happiest person, in this little scandal, was probably Bertil Eklöt, a private collector who had bought a painting by the chimpanzee for $90 (about $7-800 today). Perhaps he just wanted to own a curious piece: but now that painting could be worth a fortune, as Pierre Brassau’s story has become a classic anecdote in art history. And one that still raises the question on whether works of art are, as Rilke put it, “of an infinite solitude, and no means of approach is so useless as criticism“.


The first international press article on Brassau appeared on Time magazine. Other info taken from this post by Museum of Hoaxes.

(Thanks, Giacomo!)

The island that wasn’t there

island utopia

Umberto Eco writes in his Book of Legendary Lands (2013):

There have been lands that were dreamed, described, searched for, registered on maps, and which then disappeared from maps and now everybody knows they never existed. And yet these lands had for the development of civilization the same utopic function of the reign of Prester John, to find which Europeans explored both Asia and Africa, of course finding other things.

And then there are imaginary lands which crossed the threshold of fantasy and stepped right into our world, as improbable as it seems, bursting into shared reality – even if for a brief time.

153656152-da5429fb-15b5-44f0-8cfc-143331d27318

In 1968, Rose Island stood some 7 miles from the coast of Rimini, bordering international waters.
It wasn’t a proper island, but rather a man-made platform, which had taken ten years of work and sacrifices to build. Why did it took so long to erect it? Because Rose Island had something different from other marine platforms: it was constructed bypassing or ignoring laws and permits, in a constant fight against bureaucracy. It wasn’t just an extreme case of unauthorized development, it was a true libertarian project. Rose Island declared itself to be an independent Republic.

Scansione0023

This micronation‘s President was Giorgio Rosa, born in 1925, who had been an engineer since 1950. In 1958 he began to shape his dream, his life’s accomplishment. Among economic and technical difficulties, in the following ten years he succeded to plant nine pylons out in the sea, on which he then had the platform’s structure built: 4,300 squared feet of reinforced concrete, suspended at 26 feet above the water level. Rosa and his accomplices even found a freshwater aquifer under the sea bed, which proved useful for the island’s supplies and to create a protected space for docking (which they called “Green Harbor”).

Foto_dell'--Isola_delle_Rose--_tratta_da_un_quotidiano_del_--1968--._--PD-Italia--

RoseIslandPanorama11071968

The idea Giorgio Rosa had was somewhat anarchic and pacific at the same time: “my initial project was to build something that could be free from any constraint, and wouldn’t require a lot of money. On dry land, bureaucracy had become suffocating. […] We wanted to open a bar and a restaurant. Just eat, drink and watch the ships from Trieste passing close by, sometimes even too close. My fondest memory is that of the first night, on the island under construction. Along came a storm, and it looked like it would tear everything apart. But in the morning the sun was shining, everything seemed beautiful and possible. Then trouble began“, he recalls.

Yes, because bureaucracy started fighting back, in a war to chase the rebels who attempted to live over the waves, without paying the government its due.
As the second floor of the platform was finished, Rose Island gained notoriey, while ships and motorboats called there, driven by curiosity. Worried by the growing traffic, port authorities, Italian finance police and government were already on guard.

153654210-bb6f7c5c-e64d-47e9-a695-81c71bf606d4

Scansione0019

That’s how, in the (desperate) attempt to free himself from Italy and its prohibitions once and for all, Rosa unilaterally declared his Island independent on May 1, 1968. Even if he was quite distant from hippies and countercultures, his move was in tune with the fighting spirit of the times: a couple of days later, to the cries of “Banning is banned“, the rebellious civil unrest of May 1968 would begin to take place in Paris.
The newly-born “nation” adopted esperanto as the official language. It began printing its own stamps, and was about to coin its own currency.

Foglietto_di_francobolli_dell'Isola_delle_Rose

messaggero-26-6-1968x300SMALL

But suddenly things took a bad turn. Points of order were put forward in Parliament both by right and left wing, for once united against the transgressors; Secret Services were sure that the platform actually concealed a base for soviet submarines; others thought the whole thing was an obscure Albanian maneuver.
Once the media event broke out, authorities responded ruthlessly.

articolo-isolarose

On February 11, 1969, all the concrete parts were demolished, the steel poles and joints were cut, and 165 lb of explosive were detonated on each pylon. On the impact, Rose Island tilted, bended over… but refused to collapse.

153654209-eb7b60f5-d39b-46f2-b358-738ecbfcb076

153658370-49b5c893-a551-4b6e-ba86-455099d8d866

153654459-2c6a7bac-3510-41d6-aa68-f1c732838001

153658370-49b5c893-a551-4b6e-ba86-455099d8d866

Then, two days later, artificers applied 264 lb of charge to each pillar – a total of more than a ton of explosive. Yet once again, the Island resisted, tilting forward a bit more. Like a dream stubbornly refusing to surrender to the blows of a tangible reality.
It was not to the military that Rose Island eventually decided to give up, but to a violent storm, sinking into the Adriatic Sea on February 26, 1969.

collage_3

FOTO-1-LIsola-delle-Rose-fu-fatta-esplodere-il-13-febbraio-1969

Today, after 40 years of oblivion, the Insulo de la Rozoj – the esperanto name of this micronation – is the object of renewed attention, through documentaries, novels, theatre plays, shows and museum exhibits, Facebook pages and blogs devoted to it. There are those who doubt the idealistic nature of the project, suspecting that the entire operation was nothing more than an attempt to build a tax haven (Rosa never denied the commercial and turistic purpose of the Island); those who, like the curators of the Museum of Vancouver, find connections with Thomas More‘s writings; and even those who think that Rosa’s feat prefigured the collapse of faith in representative democracy through a mix of political activism, architecture and technology.

Giorgio Rosa is now 90-years-old, and seems amused by his adventure’s revival. After losing his war (“the only one Italy was ever able to win“, he sarcastically stresses out) and having paid for the cost of demolition, he went on with his engineering career. “Don’t even bother to ask me, I’ll tell you: no more islands!

giorgio-rosa

But if the interest for his experiment is well alive and kicking, it means that we still find that dream of freedom, escape and independence seducing. We could ascribe its modern appeal to our impatience towards the ever more suffocating bureaucracy, to the alluring idea of escaping the economic crisis, to our disillusionment towards institutions, to fear of authorities interfering with our privacy; but maybe the truth is that Rose Island was the realization of one of humanity’s most ancient dreams, Utopia. Which is both a “perfect place” (eu-topia), away from the misery and malfunctions of society, and “non-place” (ou-topia), unreal.

And it’s always pleasant to cherish an impossible, unattainable idea – even though, or provided that, it remains a fantasy.

Scansione0013

Giorgio Rosa’s quotes are taken from here and here. (Thanks Daniele!)

Progetto MKULTRA

Gli Americani saranno anche dei paranoici cospirazionisti, sempre pronti a vedere intrighi e misteriosi “progetti” dei servizi segreti ovunque; ma bisogna ammettere che questa loro paura non nasce dal nulla. Di cospirazioni e di strane operazioni occulte ne hanno viste e vissute parecchie.

Anni ’50, inizio della Guerra Fredda. Stati Uniti e Russia cominciano a cercare freneticamente nuove armi per essere sempre un passo più avanti del loro avversario. E, in aggiunta alle ricerche batteriologiche e al perfezionamento delle armi atomiche, la CIA decide che ci sono i presupposti per iniziare un’operazione un po’ differente, sperimentale, e soprattutto illegale.

Sotto il nome in codice MKULTRA, il nuovo programma di ricerca segreto si propone di studiare e scoprire dei metodi per controllare la mente delle persone. Vi ricordate il nostro articolo su José Delgado? Ecco, la CIA vuole fare un ulteriore passo innanzi. D’altronde, pochi anni prima, aveva utilizzato l’Operazione Paperclip per reclutare i “migliori” scienziati e criminali di guerra nazisti, comprando le conoscenze acquisite durante gli esperimenti umani nei campi di sterminio, in cambio dell’immunità dai processi. Alcuni di questi scienziati avevano studiato tecniche di lavaggio del cervello, interrogatorio e tortura.

L’intento della CIA è quello di capire se esiste la possibilità di indurre, ad esempio, una persona all’assassinio programmato; se c’è un metodo scientifico per attuare il lavaggio del cervello o estorcere informazioni durante un interrogatorio; se si può alterare la percezione degli eventi nei testimoni, e via dicendo. Va da sé che per raggiungere questi risultati occorrono cavie umane. Così, se molti dei soggetti studiati dal progetto MKULTRA sono consenzienti, i ricercatori comprendono subito che per ottenere delle analisi precise e delle prove inconfutabili serviranno anche soggetti ignari… cavie che non sappiano di star prendendo parte all’esperimento. Anche in questo risiede l’illegalità dell’operazione, coperta quindi dal massimo segreto. E, sempre in massimo segreto, vengono investiti milioni e milioni di dollari in un progetto che a posteriori si può tranquillamente definire aberrante e criminale.

La maggior parte degli esperimenti relativi a MKULTRA hanno a che fare con le droghe. Si ricercano sostanze che alterino la mente in tutti i modi possibili: dalle sostanze più innocue che favoriscano la concentrazione, o che si dimostrino efficaci come rimedio per il dopo-sbronza… fino ai metodi chimici per creare confusione, depressione, paranoia e shock prolungati in un soggetto, per inibire le menzogne, per creare uno stato di ipnosi, per indurre lo svenimento istantaneo o la paralisi degli arti. Insomma, droghe “positive” che possono potenziare le truppe americane; e droghe “negative”, destinate a controllare e alterare la forza mentale del prigioniero o del nemico.

Gli esperimenti di MKULTRA meglio conosciuti sono quelli legati alla sperimentazione dell’LSD. Sintetizzata per la prima volta nel 1938 da Albert Hoffman, la dietilamide-25 dell’acido lisergico (LSD) era ancora sconosciuta al grande pubblico.  Gli agenti di MKULTRA decisero di comprendere i suoi effetti su una serie di cavie ignare, e nella famigerata Operazione Midnight Climax misero a punto questo sistema: dopo aver installato dei finti specchi in alcuni bordelli di San Francisco, con la complicità delle prostitute facevano in modo che al cliente venisse servito un drink in cui era stata disciolta una potente dose di acido. La “sessione” veniva quindi filmata da dietro lo specchio.

A poco a poco gli effetti della droga si manifestavano, e i clienti cominciavano ad essere preda di violente e incontrollabili allucinazioni; come si sa, l’LSD è fra le sostanze psicoattive sintetiche più potenti, con effetti che ad alti dosaggi possono spingersi ben oltre le 12 ore. I poveri clienti, arrivati con la modesta speranza di una seratina piccante, si ritrovavano di colpo scaraventati nel baratro della follia, in quella che aveva tutta l’aria di essere una crisi psicotica. Non capivano, non potevano capire perché di colpo vedessero le dimensioni della stanza alterarsi, il tempo distorcersi e la carta da parati pulsare come fosse viva. Si convincevano di essere impazziti di colpo, e il terrore si impadroniva di loro. Una volta esauriti gli effetti della droga, gli agenti si palesavano e intimavano alla vittima, ancora sotto shock, di non rivelare nulla di quanto era successo. Se avessero raccontato la loro storia, si sarebbe anche saputo che frequentavano il bordello… Alcuni dei soggetti non si ripresero più, e finirono ospedalizzati, e molti ritengono che diversi suicidi siano imputabili a questi esperimenti senza scrupoli.

Oltre alla somministrazione di droghe, il progetto sondò anche le diverse possibilità offerte dalla deprivazione sensoriale, dall’ipnosi, dalla privazione del sonno e dagli abusi verbali e fisici. Che tipo di osservazioni scientifiche si potevano trarre da simili esperimenti? Che valore aveva questa ricerca? Quando la CIA ammise pubblicamente, fra il 1975 e il 1977, l’esistenza del progetto MKULTRA e offrì le sue scuse, confessò anche che tutte queste ricerche non avevano portato ad alcun risultato concreto.  Gli agenti a capo degli esperimenti, si scoprì, non avevano nemmeno le qualifiche necessarie per essere degli osservatori scientificamente attendibili. Quindi la massiccia operazione, dal costo stimato di più di 10 milioni di dollari, e che aveva coinvolto numerose multinazionali farmaceutiche e distrutto la vita a molti civili divenuti cavie, non era servita a nulla.

Nonostante la declassificazione di molti documenti, iniziata nel 1977, e le ammissioni della CIA, c’è chi è pronto a giurare che la “confessione” sia un ulteriore depistaggio, e che il progetto MKULTRA non sia mai stato chiuso: continuerebbe ancora, sotto diverso nome, per mettere a punto metodi sempre più perfezionati di controllo della mente.

Ma la cosa forse più curiosa è un effetto boomerang che la CIA non poteva prevedere, e che cambiò la storia. Come ricordato, non tutti i soggetti degli esperimenti di MKULTRA erano vittime ignare. Fra i volontari che si sottoposero ad alcuni test con l’LSD in California, c’era anche un giovane studente della Stanford University. Questo ragazzo, sconvolto dal potenziale della droga, decise che avrebbe cercato di promuovere l’LSD anche al di fuori di MKULTRA. Lo studente era Ken Kesey, autore di Qualcuno volò sul nido del cuculo, che di lì a poco avrebbe fondato i Merry Pranksters e girato gli Stati Uniti portando follia e buonumore su un furgoncino multicolore, dispensando dosi gratuite di LSD a chiunque volesse provare. Grazie a Kesey cominciò la rivoluzione degli anni ’60, la pacifica ribellione hippie, e la cosiddetta psichedelia che cambiò volto alla società, alla musica, alla politica e alla cultura.

Da un terribile progetto segreto militare per il controllo della mente, quindi, nacque paradossalmente un movimento che in pochi anni conquistò il mondo; milioni di ragazzi cominciarono a predicare la liberazione della mente, l’espansione e l’allargamento della coscienza, l’uguaglianza dei diritti, il sesso libero, la convivenza pacifica e l’affrancamento da qualsiasi organizzazione militare o politica. Non esattamente quello che i vertici della CIA, con tutte le loro sofisticate conoscenze, avevano sperato di ottenere.

Alex Prager

Nata a Los Angeles nel 1979, la fotografa Alex Prager si sta affermando come una delle voci più originali della scena artistica californiana. Le sue fotografie, estremamente ricercate, fanno di sicuro la felicità di semiotici e critici, ma riescono a provocare forti emozioni anche nel pubblico meno “dotto”. E questo perché contengono riferimenti a un certo tipo di cultura popolare, o meglio “pop”, che tutti conosciamo bene.

Nonostante la splendida fattura e la maniacale ossessione per i dettagli, l’arte di Alex Prager è infatti interessante proprio in virtù di ciò che non mostra, per i rimandi esterni che chiama in causa. I suoi scatti sembrano provenire direttamente dagli anni ’60, dalle patinate riviste di moda, piene di belle modelle vestite di colori sgargianti, con stravaganti acconciature e che spesso esibiscono la gioiosa e liberatoria indipendenza delle donne di quegli anni. La cura nel ricostruire il look e i piccoli particolari d’epoca è notevole, ma il tutto non si esaurisce in un vuoto esercizio di stile.

Talvolta la drammaticità di alcune fotografie le fa sembrare dei veri e propri fotogrammi tratti da film che non vedremo mai… e che, allo stesso tempo, abbiamo la sensazione di aver visto centinaia di volte. Così un volto dal trucco rétro, gli occhi arrossati colmi di lacrime, è talmente potente da risvegliare in noi una fantasia narrativa. Lo spettatore si ritrova, inconsciamente, a ricostruire un prima e un dopo, a inventare un personale e immaginario film, è cioè chiamato a usare tutti i referenti “cotestuali” che ha per completare il senso dell’immagine.

Le migliori opere della Prager sono quindi rivolte a un pubblico cinefilo, e non a caso l’artista californiana ha anche diretto un paio di cortometraggi utilizzando alcune amiche modelle come attrici. I toni mélo e la drammaticità dell’illuminazione riportano direttamente a un immaginario cinematografico, che scopriamo essere molto più che un bagaglio culturale: in questo caso si tratta di un vero e proprio filtro inconscio, attraverso il quale guardiamo e interpretiamo gli stimoli visivi che ci arrivano dalle fotografie. Le riconosciamo istantaneamente come probabili fotogrammi di film anche se, a rifletterci, faremmo fatica a spiegare il perché di questa immediata “interpretazione”.

E, infine, parliamo dell’aspetto più “politico” dell’opera di Alex Prager. Forse stiamo leggendo un po’ troppo fra le righe, ma donne, sempre donne sono le protagoniste di queste foto. Donne disperate, liberate, spregiudicate o misteriose. Talvolta, donne che sembrano in gabbia. Come se il vero senso di ribellione di quell’epoca d’oro, gli anni Sessanta, fosse racchiuso in un universo esclusivamente femminile – e, allo stesso tempo, al di là dell’emancipazione, la donna continuasse ad essere un personaggio, stereotipato nelle sue pose melodrammatiche e fissato per sempre in un mondo dai colori accesi e dalle mille passioni incontrollabili. Ma, al di là delle interpretazioni, quello che rimane inconfutabile è la stupefacente potenza di alcune di queste foto, che giocano in maniera postmoderna con l’immaginario di una controcultura ormai metabolizzata e addomesticata. E ci spingono a interagire, a integrare attivamente ciò che vediamo con ciò che abbiamo vissuto come spettatori.

Ecco il sito ufficiale di Alex Prager.

AGGIORNAMENTO: Ecco un interessante documentario su Alex Prager firmato da un lettore di Bizzarro Bazar, il giovane ma talentuoso scrittore e attore Francesco Massaccesi.

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/24849216]

Auto trapanazione

Fino a dove sareste disposti ad arrivare, pur di “ampliare la vostra coscienza”? Potreste scegliere la strada più lunga, la meditazione, lo yoga, lo zazen e via dicendo. Oppure potreste decidere di prendere la “scorciatoia” delle sostanze psicoattive, e cercare di “liberare la mente” attraverso lo yage o i funghetti mescalinici, o l’acido lisergico. Ma arrivereste mai al punto di prendere il vostro fido trapano Black&Decker a percussione, puntarvelo alla fronte e praticare un bel foro nel cranio, dal quale si possa vedere la dura mater che ricopre il cervello?

La trapanazione è stata praticata fin dal Neolitico. Era una pratica relativamente comune, con la quale si cercava di far “uscire” gli spiriti maligni dalla testa del malato. Secondo alcune interpretazioni dei dipinti rupestri, pare che i nostri antenati fossero convinti che praticare un foro nel cranio potesse curare da emicranie, epilessia o disordini mentali. L’intervento, popolare nelle aree germaniche durante il Medio Evo, sembra inoltre aver avuto un’alta percentuale di sopravvivenza – a giudicare dai bordi soffici dei fori sui teschi ritrovati, le ferite stavano cominciando a guarire:  sette persone su otto si riprendevano dall’operazione.

Flashforward al 1964. I tre protagonisti di questa storia si chiamano Bart, Amanda e Joseph.

Bart Huges, un giovane olandese che non aveva mai potuto finire gli studi di medicina per via del suo uso di stupefacenti, pubblica un incartamento underground intitolato Il meccanismo del Volume del Sangue al Cervello, conosciuto anche come Homo Sapiens Correctus. In questo piccolo, psichedelico saggio Huges parla di come il cervello del bambino sia così ricettivo perché le ossa del cranio sono elastiche e la fontanella alla cima della testa permette al cervello di “respirare”, ossia di sostenere la pressione del sangue proveniente dal cuore con una sua propria “pulsazione”. Crescendo, però, la fontanella si salda e le ossa si solidificano. Il nostro cervello rimane così rinchiuso in una vera e propria prigione. Praticando un foro nel cranio, si allenta la pressione del cervello e lo si libera, dandogli uno sfogo per “respirare” e rendendo possibile una sorta di sballo permanente, oltre che un ampliamento della coscienza senza precedenti. Bart Huges praticò su se stesso la trapanazione, l’anno successivo, nel 1965. L’operazione durò 45 minuti, ma per togliere il sangue dai muri occorsero 4 ore.

Con le sue bende che coprivano l’impressionante foro, praticato all’altezza del terzo occhio, Bart Huges divenne il guru della trapanazione, auspicando che tutti gli ospedali la praticassero gratuitamente, e arrivando a opinare che in un futuro non troppo lontano il buco in testa venisse praticato a tutti, a una certa età, per creare un’umanità evoluta e sensitiva.

Ora, penserete, in un mondo normale nessuno darebbe credito a un guru di questo tipo, e soprattutto alle sue fantasticherie pseudoscientifiche. Ma questo non è un mondo normale, e men che meno lo era quello dei favolosi Sixties, in cui la liberazione della mente era uno degli scopi principali dell’esistenza, assieme al libero amore e alla musica rock. Huges cominciò con il farsi un adepto, Joseph Mellen, un hippie piuttosto fatto che però ebbe il merito di fargli conoscere Amanda Feilding. Fra i due scoccò subito la scintilla della passione. Bart e Amanda convinsero il povero Joseph a trapanarsi – ma se Bart aveva usato un trapano elettrico, Joseph avrebbe dovuto usare un trapano a mano, “per convincere le autorità che anche le popolazioni del terzo mondo avrebbero potuto godere della tecnica”. Joseph, che aveva forse poca personalità ma di certo molta buona volontà, provò a bucarsi la testa con quel trapano, senza riuscirvi, forse anche a causa della quantità impressionante di LSD che si era calato per “calmare i nervi”.

Mellen ci riprovò per altre quattro volte, nell’arco dei quattro anni successivi, talvolta assistito da Amanda (che aveva nel frattempo lasciato Bart, e si era sposata con lui). Una volta, ancora strafatto di LSD, si era trapanato fino a svenire ed essere ricoverato d’urgenza. Un’altra volta aveva sentito “un sacco di bolle corrermi dentro la testa”, ma visto che l’estasi prevista non arrivava, aveva concluso che  il buco praticato doveva per forza essere troppo piccolo. Un’altra volta si ruppe il trapano, Joseph dovette interrompere l’operazione a metà, andare a chiedere a un vicino di riparargli l’utensile, e poi riprendere il “lavoro”. Infine, dopo tanti tentativi tragicomici, Mellen riuscì ad ottenere il suo bel buco, e il più grande e potente sballo della sua vita (a suo dire). Amanda, imparando dagli errori del marito, decise tre mesi dopo di tentare anche lei.

Filmata da Joseph, la sua fu un’operazione sopraffina, e divenne ben presto un filmato d’arte underground che ancora oggi pochi hanno avuto la fortuna (?) di vedere: Heartbeat In The Brain (1970). Il filmato, esplicito e duro, ebbe una certa eco negli ambienti artistici nei quali la Feilding era conosciuta.

Amanda Feilding è sempre stata più ambigua sul risultato della sua auto trapanazione; ha continuato a sostenerne gli effetti benefici con strenua convinzione, ma ha anche spesso sottolineato la “soggettività” delle sue posizioni. (A onor del vero, bisogna sottolineare che nessuno di questi ferventi fautori della trapanazione ha mai sostenuto l’auto trapanazione: vi sono arrivati dopo che nessun chirurgo si era prestato a soddisfare le loro richieste).

Dopo vent’otto anni assieme e due figli, Mellen e Fielding si separarono. Risposati, ognuno di loro convinse il rispettivo nuovo coniuge a farsi trapanare. In tutto, le persone trapanate al mondo dovrebbero essere circa una ventina. Fino a qualche anno fa era attiva anche una Church Of Trepanation, con sede in Messico, che proponeva per un modico prezzo una trapanazione operata da un chirurgo messicano compiacente. Oggi si è trasformata in un più sobrio Gruppo per la Trapanazione, con un sito ad appoggio delle teorie in favore di questa pratica.

Per saperne di più:

Trapanazione su Wikipedia (inglese) – Intervista-racconto ad Amanda Feilding – il documentario A Hole in The Head

Scopitone

Lo scopitone era l’antesignano, nei favolosi anni ’60, del videoclip. Come una sorta di juke-box dotato di schermo, permetteva di visualizzare un filmato assieme alla musica di una canzone.

Morto già alla fine del decennio del 1960, lo Scopitone rivive oggi nelle collezioni di vari appassionati, che raccolgono i video originali dell’epoca.

Eccovi una splendida ed inquietante versione di Can’t Take My Eyes Off You a cura dei dimenticati Freddy Bee 4. Sembra di assistere a un convegno di becchini, e particolarmente degni di nota sono: 1) il cantante, uscito direttamente da una tavola di Charles Addams; 2) le go-go girls che danzano un improbabile balletto sulle note della cover.

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FUed_kkaWc]